diabetestalk.net

How Much Sugar Will Kick You Out Of Ketosis

Whey Protein On Keto: Does Whey Protein Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Whey Protein On Keto: Does Whey Protein Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

“What’s the best whey protein on keto diets? Will it knock me out of ketosis?” If you’re currently on a ketogenic diet or looking to start it because of its fast fat-burning qualities, you might be wondering whether you can pour yourself a delicious protein shake to drink. Keto diets are very strict. And since only some foods are allowed, and some are thrown right out the window, this is a common question. Most people joining keto diets come from the bodybuilding community. And a big part of their diet is whey protein shakes. But there’s one problem… Is it okay to drink whey protein on a keto diet? Do they stop you from reaching ketosis? By the time you finish reading this post, you’ll find out the exact answer to whether you should or shouldn’t use whey protein on keto diets. (Hint: you can only use some) Plus, the best protein powders you should use if you’re on a keto diet. But to answer this question, you need to know how ketogenic diets work. How Ketogenic Diets Work (I assume most of you already know how it works, so I’m going to keep it short. And get straight to your question after) A keto diet is a low-carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet. Its main goal is to simply get your body into an optimal state of ketosis. Ketosis is when your body is so low on blood sugar (glucose), your liver is forced to burn stored body fat to produce ketones. These ketones are then used as energy, instead of stored glucose from eating carbohydrates. Once at this stage, your body is constantly burning fat to fuel itself. Insulin Another big part of keto is simply avoiding foods that spike your insulin levels. Insulin is released by the pancreas when blood sugar levels rise from eating lots of carbohydrates. Insulin allows your cells to use and store the gluco Continue reading >>

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

How Do I Get Back Into Ketosis Faster After Cheating?

Did you let go of your low carb diet for the holidays? Have a free meal? Maybe a carb up? Or go out to dinner? Restaurants are well known for hiding sugar in their salad dressings and putting other carby ingredients into their food that you might not know about. What you expect to be low carb isn't always as low as you think. All it takes is a single teaspoon of sugar in the salad dressing or a light dusting of flour on that chicken breast and you'll experience the consequences without even know why! However, all is not lost! You can recover from your setback and get back into ketosis almost as fast as water fasting by following the diet plan outlined below. If you went to a Christmas party, you might not have been able to tell if your food was really free of carbs, or not. You might have not wanted to upset the host, or you didn't want to feel left out, so you ate something that wasn't on plan. Tempting Christmas treats are the downfall of many. Perhaps, you deliberately caved in to those delicious looking cupcakes or a soft, fluffy donut that your boss or co-worker brought into the office. The holidays are not the only time that your self discipline and love for low carb eating will be put to the test. Maybe you went on vacation and decided to not bother with all of that carb counting stuff. If so, you might have gained a few pounds. You also might have decided to chuck the low-carb dieting game, kick back, eat what you consider a normal diet, and just enjoy your vacation. All of that delicious food looked too good to pass up! If you work out regularly and did a carb up to improve hormonal balance by bumping up your Leptin level, you might also be wondering if there's a way to get back into ketosis more quickly than water fasting. If so, this article will help you, to Continue reading >>

Do Bcaas Break Intermittent Fasting And Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Do Bcaas Break Intermittent Fasting And Kick You Out Of Ketosis?

Do BCAAs break intermittent fasting and kick you out of ketosis? I was recently sent a link to a video addressing the topic of if you should use branched chain amino acids during a fast and if doing so, will kick you out of ketosis. Now I talk alot about BCAAs and ketosis and fasting on my nutrition website but I feel the need to address all three. I’m happy I was sent that video as it’s a topic I’ve been meaning to address. In summary of the video, the author states, and I’m paraphrasing, About The Author Jimmy Smith is a gentlemen, entrepreneur and founder of The Physique Formula line of all natural supplements. You can visit his site at or email him any questions at [email protected] Want To Listen While You Read? “Leucine causes a HUGE spike in insulin”. Later in the video he says…. “A subject who was fasting for 50 days was given an injection of glucose and the subject was almost instantly kicked out of ketosis”. If you're worried about BCAAS knocking you out of ketosis or during a fast, you're barking up the wrong tree. — @jimmysmithtrain These two BIG swings and misses bring the author of the video to his final point that “BCAAs kick you out of ketosis and fasting and you don’t need to have BCAAs during a fast”. Where to begin, where to begin….. You Can See Me Talk About It On Video Right Here Branched Chain Amino Acids & Fasting I appreciate anyone trying to build a business or brand but doing it was incorrect information and perpetuating lies to fulfill some personal agenda is terrible, there I said it. Let’s move on. Starting with the loosely thrown around summary of studies. You can’t just say that BCAAS or any supplement or food causes a HUGE this or a LARGE that. What are we comparing the objective to? Chocolate mi Continue reading >>

Will This Kick Me Out Of Ketosis?

Will This Kick Me Out Of Ketosis?

A common question people have when starting keto is “will this kick me out of ketosis?” I’m going to address as many items as I can think of and explain why it will or will not kick you out of keto. This is going to be as comprehensive as possible so either use ctrl + f to find what you’re looking for or buckle up and read on. How do humans enter ketosis in the first place? Things will become much more clear if we explain how humans enter ketosis. Mainly, liver glycogen is what determines if ketones will be produced. Specifically, glycogen in the liver signals malonyl-coa to be formed by carboxylating acetyl-coa. Acetyl-coa is used in many processes and it’s the main substrate used to be turned into ketones. The wiki on regulation of ketogenesis which applies to this scenario says “When the body has no free carbohydrates available, fat must be broken down into acetyl-CoA in order to get energy. Acetyl-CoA is not being recycled through the citric acid cycle because the citric acid cycle intermediates (mainly oxaloacetate) have been depleted to feed the gluconeogenesis pathway, and the resulting accumulation of acetyl-CoA activates ketogenesis.” Basically, when there is more acetyl-CoA than oxaloacetate, the acetyl-CoA becomes acetoacetate, a ketone body. In plain English, carbs provide oxaloacetate, so if it doesn’t have carbs, it likely isn’t going to kick you out of ketosis. I’ll state the exceptions later. Why do humans enter ketosis so readily? Humans enter ketosis faster than any animal on the planet. It usually takes 24-36 hours before we enter ketosis.This is because we have huge brains and tiny bodies. Our brains need ~400 calories/day, which for most people that equates to 20% of our total energy demands. To put this in perspective, most anim Continue reading >>

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

A ketogenic diet requires that a person eat a high fat diet while keeping carbohydrates to a minimum. The third macronutrient category, protein, is an interesting one and often creates heaps of discussion. Carbohydrates and fat are primary energy sources for the body. Protein, on the other hand, is a source of essential amino acids which are the building blocks for the body. However, the amount of protein needed by each person varies greatly based upon a number of factors, including activity level, lean mass, sex, and personal preference to name a few. One question I am often asked is, “can you eat too much protein on a ketogenic diet?” Protein is a very satiating food, and usually the more protein a person eats, the less hungry the person is. One trick people use is to eat a diet high in protein (150 grams + per day) while limiting carbs and fat. This strategy is often wildly successful for fat loss, but it can create other problems to eat so much protein while limiting carb and fat calories so dramatically. I do not advocate eating a high protein/low carb/low fat diet, especially for women. But I do believe wholeheartedly that it is important to eat enough protein. This is even more critical on a ketogenic diet, where carbs are so limited. Under eating protein can cause the body to lose muscle. Some argue for limiting protein because 1) doing so leads to higher ketone levels and 2) they believe that eating too much protein can lead the body to create new glucose from protein (gluconeogenesis) and keep a person from transitioning effectively to fat burning. My friend Mike Berta explains the fallacies of this thinking so well that I am sharing his post rather than recreating my own. Mike can be contacted directly at [email protected] His Facebook group is cal Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Carbs Keep The Average Person Out Of Ketosis?

How Many Grams Of Carbs Keep The Average Person Out Of Ketosis?

I realize that this is highly variable, but what number of grams have you guys found to be the threshold? I suppose if you are right at the threshold, you'll be passing in and out of it, so maybe we'd want a 10g buffer or something? Personally, I'd like to stay outside of it, but only just, and am wondering what the general rule of thumb is these days. I do strength-increasing workouts and walk around a lot, but I avoid what most consider to be "exercise." 1 Worst Carb After Age 50 If you're over 50 and you eat this carb, you will never lose belly fat. HealthPlus50 I was at 3 servings of fruit a day for a while (roughly 75g of carbs) but feel like I might be able to go a little lower. I think the 3 cups (pre-cooked) of steamed spinach would add a largely negligible amount. The 50g of natto per day has something like 5-7g. No other beans or legumes to speak of. Continue reading >>

9 Reasons Why You Aren’t In A State Of Ketosis

9 Reasons Why You Aren’t In A State Of Ketosis

If you’re having trouble getting into ketosis, it is useful to understand the factors that actually impact blood ketone levels. When I first started on the ketogenic diet, I made sure to educate myself fully on how I can efficiently get into a fat-adapted state (ketosis). Just like everything else, there’s going to be some hurdles you’ll face when adopting a keto lifestyle. Watch out for these 8 ketogenic pitfalls you could be potentially be falling for. 1. Carbohydrates Pretty much all steps involved in producing ketones are inhibited by insulin, this means that ketone levels are extremely sensitive to carb intake. There isn’t an exact amount of carbohydrates that works for everyone to get into ketosis. But, there is a general guideline that works for most people. It has been estimated that around 50 grams per day or lower of carbohydrates will elevate your blood ketone levels. You should be eating less than 30 grams in order to get into ketosis. From personal experience, I found that if i’m more active on any given day, I can get away with eating more carbohydrates and still have decent blood ketone levels. I actually have been able to get away with upwards of 100 grams of carbs and still be in ketosis. I believe this is because when you are active, you are burning extra glycogen storages that come from carbohydrates. 2. Protein. Just like carbohydrates, increasing your intake of protein to fat in your diet will limit your ketone production. The reason behind this is because over half of amino acids in proteins are converted into glucose in the body, thus, producing an anti-keto effect. This is not as big of a deal for athletes / people who are very active because the body is utilizing the protein and amino acids to the point where it is not hindering your k Continue reading >>

What Happens If I Eat Sugar In Ketosis?

What Happens If I Eat Sugar In Ketosis?

The state of Ketosis is achieved through the use of either a low carbohydrate diet or in a state of starvation. Essentially your body has been restricted in glucose containing carbohydrates; glucose is your bodies primary fuel source for long enough to need to resort to alternative sources of fuel. In this case Ketone bodies, a byproduct of the breakdown of fatty acids, are used as an alternative to carbohydrates. Accordingly id your body is relying on ketone bodies for its energy needs it is in a state of ketosis. Low Carbohydrate diets rely on your bodies ability to use ketone bodies for energy by burning burn excess body fat for fuel. Video of the Day Table sugar, or sucrose, is a six carbon disaccharide containing one molecule of glucose and one molecule of glucose. Ingesting sugar in sufficient quantities, the amount varies depending on your body type and activity levels will stop ketosis as your body now has a supply of glucose to fuel it. Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Killers

Common Ketosis Killers

“I’ve tried your low-carb diet, Dr. Nally, and it didn’t work.” “Hmm . . . really?” If your mumbling this to yourself, or you’ve said it to me in my office, then lets have a little talk. I’ve heard this statement before. It’s not a new statement, but it’s a statement that tells me we need to address a number of items. If you’ve failed a low carbohydrate diet, I’d suspect you are pretty severely insulin resistant or hyperinsulinemic. You probably never really reached true ketosis. I’d want to have you checked out by your doctor to rule out underlying disease like hypothyroidism, diabetes, other hormone imbalance, etc. Next, switching to a low-carbohydrate lifestyle is literally a “lifestyle change.” It requires that you understand a few basic ketosis principles. And, it takes the average person 3-6 months to really wrap their head around what this lifestyle means . . . and, some people, up to a year before they are really comfortable with how to eat and function in any situation. I assume, if you are reading this article, that you’ve already read about ketosis and understand the science behind it. If not, please start your reading with my article The Principle Based Ketogenic Lifestyle – Part I and Ketogenic Principles – Part II. If this is the case, then please proceed forward, “full steam ahead!” There are usually a few areas that are inadvertently inhibiting your body transformation, so let’s get a little personal. First, this is a low carbohydrate diet. For weight loss, I usually ask people to lower their carbohydrate intake to less than 2o grams per day. How do you do that? (A copy of my diet is accessible through my membership site HERE.) You’ve got to begin by restricting all carbohydrates to less than 20 grams per day. Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Can I Eat That On Keto?

Can I Eat That On Keto?

This is a totally understandable question for a few reasons: Keto is often presented as a strict, rigid diet with a lot of rules, and even more dogma There are so many conflicting reports on what is, and isn’t, “keto friendly” Keto is often simplified to lists of “safe” foods The consequence of being knocked out of ketosis is given way too much weight I’ll tackle the big question first, and then break down that list further in this post. In a word: yes. Yes, you can eat that on keto. How do I know that, even though I have no idea what food you’re talking about? Because you can eat anything on a ketogenic diet, in the right quantity. Keto isn’t about specific foods, it’s about macronutrients and keeping your body burning fat for fuel. Even further, a low carb or ketogenic way of eating is about making informed food choices, based on what’s best for you at that moment. This concept is as simple or difficult as you want to make it. You may decide that eating a small piece of the special pie your grandma made at Thanksgiving is worth being kicked out of ketosis for a day. You may also decide that eating a slice of pie will lead you down the path of a week long sugar bender, and that is might be best for you to stick with the sugar-free dessert you brought. Knowing what your body needs is a key part of keto. In terms of the day-to-day foods you may be questioning, it comes down to a similar choice. When determining whether or not you want to eat a specific food, think about how many carbs are in that item as compared to the approximate number of carbs you eat in a day, and go from there. If you eat 20g of carbs in a day, maybe a daily yogurt with 12g of carbs isn’t in the cards for you. This will take some label-reading, but knowing the nutritional cont Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Can You Eat In Ketosis?

How Much Protein Can You Eat In Ketosis?

Having been a low-carb enthusiast and team Diet Doctor member for years, you would have thought I’d nailed ketosis ages ago. I haven’t. In the last post, Why You’re Not in Ketosis, I revealed why, and how I fixed it (by reducing my carb and protein intake to 20 and 60 grams per day respectively). But, I had a problem. Though it felt awesome to be back in ketosis, it sucked to eat so little protein – 60 grams a day isn’t much for a meat lover like me. Could I eat more protein AND remain in optimal ketosis? I was going to find out. The protein experiment I designed the following experiment: First, I would increase my protein intake from 60 grams a day to the level where I would no longer be in optimal ketosis. Then, I would reduce my protein intake until I was back in optimal ketosis, using what I ate on the last day to define my daily-protein limit. Finally, I’d eat to this daily-protein limit every day for a week to test its accuracy, adjusting my protein intake if necessary. To increase the trustworthiness of the experiment, I added five rules: 1. Keep eating 10-20 grams of carbs a day 2. Keep eating during a four-hour window (5-9pm) 3. Adjust my protein intake gradually 4. Make no other major changes to my life 5. Measure my blood-ketone levels every morning before eating “Nice plan”, I thought. But there was one thing I hadn’t taken into account… Preparation To start off the experiment, I measured my blood-ketone levels: 2.0 mmol/L. Not exactly shocking news – I had been eating 45-60 grams of protein and 10-20 grams of carbs a day for weeks, being in optimal ketosis almost every morning. But all that could end soon – it was protein time. Day 1: Taco-cheese shells On the first day of the experiment, I ate similarly to how I’d eaten lately – Continue reading >>

Will A Cheat Meal Knock Me Out Of Ketosis?

Will A Cheat Meal Knock Me Out Of Ketosis?

“Is a cheat day okay? The answer to your question is, if you are keto adapted. As I said before, that means that your cells essentially are running on ketones for fuel, as opposed to running on glucose, which is what the vast, vast, vast majority of Americans are running on, and therefore there’s all this disease here. The genesis of these metabolic diseases has to do with consumption of simple carbohydrates. So if you are keto adapted, and you’ve done your requisite carbohydrate depletion for 8-12 weeks, I always call this the clamp. If you were to go and eat a very, very heavy, carbohydrate-laden meal, because of the fact that you have this “clamp” if you will, if you were to go and test your blood sugars, they’re not going to shoot up to the point where you believe they may have shot up. If an individual that were not keto adapted were to eat, for example, a Snickers bar, their blood sugars may shoot up to 200 transiently. This is what we see: the blood sugars go up transiently in a keto-adapted individual and then they’re clamped right down within an hour or two to that normal level. The answer to your question is no – if you are a keto adapted individual and you are running your cells on fat, is a cheat meal going to knock you out of ketosis? No, it’s not going to knock you out of ketosis. Now, if you are an individual that is on the threshold of being in ketosis and you’re knocking your carbohydrates down – let’s say you started at 75, now you’re at 50 – and you go and eat a carbohydrate-laden meal? Yes, you’re going to have a problem. That is definitely going to delay your transition into ketosis, because what you’re doing is, you’re telling your body, “Hey! Up-regulate the enzymes that allow me to metabolize the carbohydrates Continue reading >>

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

One of the common pitfalls for people living a ketogenic lifestyle centers around protein and how it can sabotage your ketosis without you even knowing. You might think you are doing well, eating right, avoiding carbs, but you’re not seeing progress. One of the points I talked about here has to do with moderating your protein as a step to get back on track or break a plateau. So I thought I’d go into a little more depth. Your body has two main sources of energy: glucose and ketones. Ketones are only generated through fat metabolism. Glucose can be created by metabolizing carbs or proteins. A brief interruption to discuss carbs and protein Carbs are, basically, just sugars that are arranged in different structures that can be rearranged into glucose. Proteins, on the other hand, are a complicated matter. Proteins are strings of amino acids. There are 22 dietary amino acids, nine of which are essential, which means they cannot be generated by the cells in the body. So we must get those nine amino acids via our diet. And, of course, meat is the best dietary source for our amino acids. All of our body tissues are constructed of protein, so when we eat protein, we are supplying our tissues with material for rebuilding and healing. That’s why bodybuilders shovel huge amounts of protein into their gullet, because they are constantly breaking down their muscle fibers, so they need a constant stream of protein to heal and build their muscle. Interruption complete Our bodies can use ketones to power roughly 75% of its energy needs. The remaining 25%, almost all of which is used by the brain, comes from glucose. But, if we’re ketogenic, how do we get that glucose? If we are powered by fat, dietary and stored, and fat metabolism results in ketones, then where can we get the Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

More in ketosis