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How Much Sodium Ketosis

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Why Sodium Is So Important On A Ketogenic Diet

Why Sodium Is so Important on a Ketogenic Diet When insulin levels are kept low (in the case of following a LCHF lifestyle), the kidneys excrete sodium at a higher rate. This combined with adequate sodium consumption, lots of water consumption and coffee (which is a natural diuretic) can cause a slight case of hyponatremia (which is the technical term for low sodium levels in the blood stream). This can cause slight nausea/headaches, dizziness, loss of energy/fatigue, muscle weakness and muscle spasms/cramps. This causes another problem! Potassium wasting. Your body will use up its potassium stores to conserve the little bit of sodium you do have remaining. However this problem is easily fixed. Just add salt to all of your meals. Dr Stephen Phinney, who has been researching ketogenic diets for decades recommends approximately 3–5 g of sodium daily (one teaspoon of salt roughly equals 2g of sodium). This means the we have be having at least 1 teaspoon of salt throughout the day, ideally 2. These values have been used in research by Dr Phinney and have found to effectively maintain optimal circulatory reserve. I personally carry a grinder of Himalayan rock salt in my backpack at al Continue reading >>

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  1. Barbara_Greenwood

    We all know you need to take plenty of salt on keto... it helps the transition to fat adaptation, and eases fasting. At least, that's the general wisdom.
    Something came up on my twitter feed recently about a low salt diet actually increasing the risk of heart disease, and I think it said the optimal amount of sodium is 5-6g per day, which is two and a bit teaspoons of salt.
    Since I'm fasting today I weighed out 5g of Himalayan Pink salt.... and I am just staggered by how much salt it is. A heaped teaspoon... and that's only about half of what they want me to get through? Anyhow - I rather like salt, so I am happy to be nibbling on it during my fast today.

    But I am having a bit of a struggle accepting this is actually the amount that's healthy. I'm sure that, since I stopped using processed foods, I'm not having anywhere near that amount.... never mind the twice it.

  2. Duncan_K

    Reading your post made me realise I'm probably not getting enough sodium - I've been having a bouillon drink every morning and evening which works out as 4-5g salt, but only just realised that's only about 2-2.5g sodium. I've been getting occasional leg cramps at night recently which was weird as I've been on keto for six months with no problems. I'm going to up the salt.

  3. Barbara_Greenwood

    Do you use salt in cooking as well, Duncan? Remember that some foods naturally contain sodium. You know, like cheese, and BACON.

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The Role Of Salt In A Ketogenic-diet. ‘keto-flu’ Explained!

I was keen to understand why all the low-carb diet resources tell you to eat more salt. I therefore decided to look into this in greater detail. The problem I encountered was that nothing actually states the reasoning behind it; sources merely allude to the requirements, then make recommendations on how to achieve them. What I was keen to understand in particular, is the role of insulin in causing the kidneys to retain salt. The below is what I’ve managed to piece together. As always, I must state that I have no medical or dietary training; all I can do is try and present the results of my own reading in as clear and jargon-free way as possible. If readers’ comments can help guide my understanding, then all feedback will be gratefully received! So here goes… Salt! When you switch over to a ketogenic diet, you’re effectively changing the way your body creates and burns energy. On a glucose-based metabolism, the energy-form ‘glycogen’ is produced in the liver. This energy is water-soluble and transported around the body in your blood. The blood-stream is therefore our ‘road-network’ for distributing energy to all the cells and muscles that need it. Glycogen is also st Continue reading >>

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  1. leanllama

    New to Keto...How Much Sodium is too much?

    Started this past Monday...Man am I love the change after being on a strict 50/30/20 last 7 months(lost 40+lbs).
    I know sodium can cause water retention. Wondering how much is too much. Today I am about 2/3rds way through daily caloric intake and already have 2830 mgs sodium...Too Much?
    Interested in anyones opion, I know less is better but I am finding everything I eat has alot more sodium.
    Cheers

  2. Barry1337

    Originally Posted by leanllama
    Started this past Monday...Man am I love the change after being on a strict 50/30/20 last 7 months(lost 40+lbs).
    I know sodium can cause water retention. Wondering how much is too much. Today I am about 2/3rds way through daily caloric intake and already have 2830 mgs sodium...Too Much?
    Interested in anyones opion, I know less is better but I am finding everything I eat has alot more sodium.
    Cheers

    The current recommendation is to consume less than 2,400 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day. This is about 1 teaspoon of table salt per day. It includes ALL salt and sodium consumed, including sodium used in cooking and at the table.
    I'd suggest you drink a lot of water and try to eat stuff that doesn't contain that much sodium. For example sausages and pre-prepared hamburgers contain a lot of salt. Try eating as natural as possible.

  3. Atavis

    Originally Posted by Barry1337
    The current recommendation is to consume less than 2,400 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day. This is about 1 teaspoon of table salt per day. It includes ALL salt and sodium consumed, including sodium used in cooking and at the table.

    Whose recommendation is that?
    Lyle McDonald's recommendation on his forums and books is:
    3-5 gr sodium
    1 gr potassium
    500mg magnesium
    600-1200 mg calcium
    Sodium, potassium and magnessium get depleted on this diet due to the diuretic effect of ketones and glycogen depletion.

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The Importance Of Electrolytes On A Ketogenic Diet

Many people who start a ketogenic diet often experience the dreaded “keto-flu”, which is the name for the experience of one or a combination of the following symptoms: Even if you are following a well-formulated ketogenic diet, with a low amount of carbohydrate, moderate amount of protein, and high amount of fat as suggested, it is likely that you may still experience some of these symptoms. The reason being while your macronutrients may be in line, there is another important factor to consider, ensuring you keep your body properly nourished and functioning well. That key factor is the balance of electrolytes in the body. In this article, we will cover the importance of electrolytes on a ketogenic diet. What Are Electrolytes? Electrolytes are minerals found in the body that are the electrical signaling molecules used for maintaining functions within the body such as regulating your heartbeat and allowing muscles to contract for functional movement. The most relevant electrolytes in this context are sodium, potassium, magnesium, chloride, and calcium. Why Monitoring Your Electrolytes is Important. When you shift to a ketogenic diet, your body tends to release more water as oppos Continue reading >>

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  1. Barbara_Greenwood

    We all know you need to take plenty of salt on keto... it helps the transition to fat adaptation, and eases fasting. At least, that's the general wisdom.
    Something came up on my twitter feed recently about a low salt diet actually increasing the risk of heart disease, and I think it said the optimal amount of sodium is 5-6g per day, which is two and a bit teaspoons of salt.
    Since I'm fasting today I weighed out 5g of Himalayan Pink salt.... and I am just staggered by how much salt it is. A heaped teaspoon... and that's only about half of what they want me to get through? Anyhow - I rather like salt, so I am happy to be nibbling on it during my fast today.

    But I am having a bit of a struggle accepting this is actually the amount that's healthy. I'm sure that, since I stopped using processed foods, I'm not having anywhere near that amount.... never mind the twice it.

  2. Duncan_K

    Reading your post made me realise I'm probably not getting enough sodium - I've been having a bouillon drink every morning and evening which works out as 4-5g salt, but only just realised that's only about 2-2.5g sodium. I've been getting occasional leg cramps at night recently which was weird as I've been on keto for six months with no problems. I'm going to up the salt.

  3. Barbara_Greenwood

    Do you use salt in cooking as well, Duncan? Remember that some foods naturally contain sodium. You know, like cheese, and BACON.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

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