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How Much Protein Should I Eat On Keto?

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

When on the ketogenic diet, one of the most important things you’ll have to pay attention to is your macronutrient breakdown. This means you’ll be getting a certain portion of your calories form carbohydrates (a very small portion) at 5%, a larger portion of calories from protein (35%), and the largest number of calories from fats (65%). There are many online sites that can help you figure out how many calories you need on a daily basis, based on your height, weight, measurements, age, gender and level of activity. From there, you can also use online calculators to help you figure out the proper breakdown, in grams, for each macronutrient percentage you’ll be eating. You’ll multiply your total daily calories by each percentage to get the grams of each macronutrient that you’ll need. For example, if you need 1200 calories per day, and your carbohydrates are 5% of that total, then multiply 1200 by 5% to get the number of grams of carbohydrates you’ll be allowed to eat each day. In this case, 5% of 1200 calories is 60 calories. You then divide the calories by the grams per unit of carb, protein or fat. Carbohydrates and proteins both have 4 calories per gram and fats have 9 calories per gram. Again, in this example, 60 calories divided by 4 grams per carb leaves you with a total of 15 grams of carbs per day. There are several great phone apps that will do the calculations for you. My personal favorite is Carb Counter. This also makes restaurant eating a breeze. One last note on food and nutrient tracking applications—you can typically also use these to plan your meals ahead of time. Just plug in the proposed foods for the day to see where your calorie and macronutrient values will lie, and make adjustments from there. Then, you build your meals around those n Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Brief Overview A ketogenic diet is a way of eating that promotes a state of ketosis in the body. Generally speaking a ketogenic diet will have the following macronutrient ratios: High Fat – 60%-80% of total calories come from fat. Moderate Protein – 15%-35% of total calories come from protein. Low Carbohydrate – 5% or less of total calories come from carbohydrates. Everyone’s macronutrient breakdown will be different and depends on a variety of factors. Reference our Keto Macro Calculator to figure out what yours are! Eating in accordance with these macronutrient ratio’s will deplete your body of glucose and force it to start producing ketones. Your body will then use these ketones for energy. What is Ketosis From Wikipedia: Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose (sugar) provides most of the energy. With the abundance of high carbohydrate foods available in modern times, virtually all human beings that don’t make a concerted effort to restrict carbs are always in a state of glycolysis. There are a number of reasons why ketosis is beneficial when compared to glycolysis, which we will get into later. What are Ketones? Ketones are the fuel source your body is running on when it’s in a state of ketosis. They are produced in the liver when glycogen is depleted and are characterized as a slower burning fuel source when compared to glucose. Insulin and Keto This is where the magic happens. Eating a high carb diet means you’re always producing insulin to transport the glucose around your body. The fat can just sit around and watch because insulin is doing all the work. The fat is eventually stored, which leads to weight gain. In a Continue reading >>

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What are macros? If you’ve been reading up on the keto diet, you may have stumbled across the term “macros” and wondered what all the fuss is about. It’s thrown around everywhere by well meaning ketoers giving advice to newbies: “If it fits your macros”, “track those macros”, “your macros may be off”, ad nauseum. I’m guilty of it myself. But to someone trying to get started, this can be completely mind-boggling. A quick Google search doesn’t even really help. Is this an advanced function in an Excel worksheet? A fancy camera lense? What in the hell are people talking about? Exactly what are macros? Let me clarify. The term “macros” is short for MACRONUTRIENTS in the context of nutrition and the keto diet. Macronutrients are the energy-giving components of food that fuels our body. They include carbohydrates, protein, and fat; this is where your dietary calories come from. Grasping the concept of macros is important for the keto diet because you need to find the right balance of carbs, protein, and fats to get into ketosis, stay in ketosis, and turn your body into a fat burning machine. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are the only macronutrient that is not essential for survival. There are essential fatty acids and amino acids (the building blocks of fats and proteins), but there is no such thing as “essential carbohydrates”. Carbs are made up of sugars and starches. In order to successfully reach ketosis, you will need to limit your carbohydrate intake. Fiber is also considered a carb, but it doesn’t count towards your total carb tally. The reason for this is that we can’t really digest fiber so it has a minimal impact on your blood sugar. So, what does this mean for you? When you are looking at a nutrition label, look at the line that sa Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

5 Mistakes People Make When They Go Keto

5 Mistakes People Make When They Go Keto

There are lots of misconceptions about the ketogenic diet swirling around out there—you know, like the idea that eating tons of bacon is totally okay, or that you can slather absolutely everything in oil. Or that keto’s just about cutting out bread. But this increasingly trendy diet is a tad more complicated than that. Here are the basics: Keto requires eating close to 80 percent of your calories from fat, about 15 percent from protein, and just five percent from carbs. This shifts the body into a state called ‘ketosis,’ in which the body burns fat (in the form of ‘ketones’) for fuel instead of sugar. (You can learn more about the keto process here.) First developed to treat epilepsy and now used as part of treatment plans for health conditions like PCOS, infertility, diabetes, epilepsy, Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s, and Alzheimer’s, the ketogenic diet has been said to improve energy, mental clarity, and focus. It’s also become a popular means of weight management for some people. Eating keto means cutting out processed foods, sugars, and starches—including bread, beans, potatoes, and fruit—and eating way more healthy fats than you’re probably used to. Foods like meat, fish, eggs, non-starchy veggies, and all sorts of fats are game—in the right amounts. With so many foods off the table and such a high fat quota to hit, it’s no wonder so many keto newbies have trouble making the diet sustainable. It is doable, though! Make your keto lifestyle more balanced and successful by avoiding these common mistakes. Mistake #1: Approaching It As A Temporary Fad Diet Once you’ve nailed down your reason for going on the keto diet—whether you’re managing an illness, want to fuel your distance running differently, or want to lose weight—you have t Continue reading >>

Basics You Need To Know About Protein In Ketogenic Diet & Top 10 High Protein Foods

Basics You Need To Know About Protein In Ketogenic Diet & Top 10 High Protein Foods

To start your day with the energy you need to eat high-quality protein for breakfast. Protein helps the body control the insulin variations and reduces the unwanted cravings and excessive hunger until the next meal. Eating protein for breakfast might be an effective strategy to improve appetite control and satiety. That’s why we have to dig deeper and figure out what really is protein how to manage to eat enough to avoid further imbalances in our organism. One of the greatest myths about low-carbohydrate diets is that you should eat an enormous amount of protein, but in fact, it should be a high-fat diet. What is protein and why it’s important in our diet? Proteins are body’s building “bricks.” Most our body organs are built on protein such as muscle, skin, bones and others. The digestive process, immune system, blood are all based on protein to work properly. Even hormones, antibodies, enzymes are proteins. Your body uses protein to build or repair body tissues Imagine that your body is a car that needs fuel to work. So, for your body, that fuel is protein. Protein is a macronutrient along with carbohydrates and fat. Protein consists of long chains made of 20 different amino acids. Eight of them are essential for the human and are called “indispensable amino acids ”: phenyl-alanine, tryptophan, methionine, lysine, leucine, isoleucine, valine, and threonine. Another important amino acid is histidine which is required for growth (at children) and tissue repair. Why is protein really important in your weight loss process? One gram of protein has four calories. Even that the most people think about protein as fattening and high in calories, it’s not true. Foods that are higher in protein take a longer time to digest and metabolise. That means that your body Continue reading >>

Is A Vegan Ketogenic Diet Possible ?

Is A Vegan Ketogenic Diet Possible ?

Your friend the vegan Picture this. Your friend the vegan who’s always up on the latest plant-based superfood suddenly mentions wanting to try this thing called a ketogenic diet – more specifically, a vegan ketogenic diet. You’re told a ketogenic diet is super high in fat and very low in carbs. Because you’re a good friend, you think about what they’re saying, only to realize that vegan diets aren’t particularly fatty. Plants tend to store a lot of starch or sugar rather than fat. You then ask “don’t those two diets sort of oppose each other? ”. Your friend launches into listing all the plant foods that are high in fat, low in carbs and how a vegan ketogenic diet can totally work! After listening to this for a while you get bored, obviously, and don’t come away convinced this makes much sense or if it’s even feasible. But you’re a curious cat so you wonder how one might construct a vegan ketogenic diet if you had to. We answer this question here, but first let’s recap the basics features of both diets. Before diving in those diets if you have questions related to keto and low carb, please visit our community Keep in mind that when discussing the respective merits and demerits of a dietary approach here, we’re ignoring supplementation. This is done so that a diet is assessed on what’s available from its food alone, not its food + supplements. We’ll skip to the punchline of this post which Dr.Dominic D’Agostino sums up nicely on Joe Rogan’s podcast, saying there’s no way that you can hit the macronutrient ratios of a ketogenic diet that’s vegan unless it’s in a shake form Recapping the vegan diet A vegan diet splits food into the plant or animal categories, forbidding animals and permitting only plants. A vegan is thus not allowed Continue reading >>

Bone Broth + Ketogenic Diet: A Match Made In A Low-carb Heaven

Bone Broth + Ketogenic Diet: A Match Made In A Low-carb Heaven

Bone broth is an established superfood and many therapeutic diets have embraced its healing properties including the ketogenic diet. Bone broth is recognized as a healing food because of its high concentration of minerals and anti-inflammatory amino acids, as well as being one of the only food sources of the gut-healing proteins collagen and gelatin. In a moment, we’ll explain how bone broth is particularly beneficial for anyone following a keto diet. But first, let’s look closer at how bone broth fits in, since very specific macronutrient ratios are required to achieve desired results. The Keto Diet: How Does Bone Broth Fit in? The idea behind the keto diet is to train your body to burn fat for energy rather than glucose, which allows you to enter the fat-burning state: ketosis. Now, the only way to enter ketosis is by drastically reducing your carb consumption to approximately 5% of your diet, and increasing fat consumption to at least 70% of your diet. This way, your body has no choice but to rely on fatty acids for energy, which are its secondary ‘backup’ energy source when glucose isn’t readily available. The standard keto diet looks like this: 75% fat, 20% protein, 5% carbs. Since everyone has a unique body and lifestyle different, you can use the ketogenic diet calculator to determine your exact macronutrient needs. The keto calculator is an easy way to see how many grams of each macronutrient you need on the keto diet plan to keep your body in a state of ketosis, based on your current weight, height and activity levels. So, what would keto bone broth need to look like, in order to fit your macronutrient requirements? When you take a look at the nutrient profile of Kettle and Fire Bone Broth, you’ll see how both chicken bone broth and beef bone broth Continue reading >>

Paleo, Protein, And Weight Loss

Paleo, Protein, And Weight Loss

The typical Paleo diet ends up being slightly higher in protein, higher in fat, and lower in carbs than the standard American diet, so Paleo often gets pigeonholed as a “high-protein diet.” But it doesn’t have to be. You can do Paleo with any combination of protein, carbs, and fat you like. If you want a very high-fat, low-carb, low-protein true ketogenic diet, that diet can easily be Paleo. If you want a higher-carb, moderate-fat, low-protein pescetarian or even vegetarian diet, that diet can also be Paleo. On the other hand, protein gets a lot of good press for its ability to help with weight loss, and there does seem to be some truth to that. That doesn’t mean to eat as much as physically possible, or to eat only protein: too much of a good thing is not better. So how much protein will put you in the optimal range for weight loss? How much food does that actually imply? And do you have to make any special effort to achieve that amount of protein on Paleo, or does it happen automatically? Benefits of Protein for Weight Loss The research on high-protein diets is tricky, partly because any time you’re adding protein to a diet, you’re either adding more calories or decreasing something else. Many high-protein diets are also low-carb diets – is the benefit from the increased protein or the decreased carbs? It’s hard to say, but there is some evidence that protein per se may be valuable. This study goes over some of the reasons why higher protein intake should be useful for weight loss. Metabolic benefits: about 25% of the calories you eat as protein are used to digest the protein itself. For fat and carbs, that number is much lower. Preserving lean tissue. Higher-protein diets preserve muscle mass during weight loss, which makes it easier to maintain weigh Continue reading >>

Diet 911: Ketosis For Dummies

Diet 911: Ketosis For Dummies

Dear M&F, I’m trying to see my six-pack. I’m following a ketogenic diet, but my weight loss seems to have slowed down. Can you help me speed things up? —Wayne F., KS Ketogenic diets (around 50 grams of carbs per day) are extremely effective for getting lean because you reset the body’s enzymatic machinery to use fat as its primary fuel source in the absence of carbs. I see three problems with your diet that are certainly causing your fat-loss plateau—too much protein, not enough good fat, and residual carbohydrates. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done To break your plateau, pump up the fat in your diet to about 50% of your total daily calories and reduce the protein to 30%–40%. The rest of your calories will come from vegetables. Traditionally, bodybuilders opt to get their protein from tuna and lean meats such as chicken breast. However, on a diet like this, you should switch to darker meats and oily fish. Eating salmon, chicken thighs, lamb, and lean beef allows you to get your protein and fat in one source. The last issue is your consumption of “residual” carbohydrates—the carbs you’re not even aware you’re eating, like those in nuts and meal-replacement shakes. It’s OK t Continue reading >>

Daily Protein Requirement

Daily Protein Requirement

Your daily protein requirement is affected by several factors: Activity level: the more active you are, the more protein you can eat. This is especially true of resistance type exercise such as weight lifting. Essential protein intake: Nine of the 20 required amino acids (the molecular building blocks which make up proteins) are essential, meaning the body cannot make them so they must be obtained from the food we eat. Your gender and basic build: In general, men need more protein than women, and more muscular people also require more protein to maintain lean body mass. The official recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein intake is set at .36 grams per pound of body weight each day. This figure represents the minimum intake needed to maintain health. The protein requirements for those who are looking to optimize health, who are sick, injured or on a very low carb diet may be different. It’s also important to know that a daily protein requirement should never be based on percentage of calories. A person's protein requirements are constant no matter how many calories he or she eats each day because the amount of protein needed is a function of a person’s lean body mass (LBM) or on total ideal body weight if LBM is not known. Calculating protein needs should be based on maintaining positive nitrogen balance. Amino acids contain nitrogen. The protein we eat gets metabolized into amino acids for use in building new muscle and other tissues. Excess nitrogen is excreted via the urine. When the amount of nitrogen excreted is less than the amount of nitrogen in the food we ate, we can say that we are in positive nitrogen balance and it means we took in enough protein to build new tissues. If we don’t eat enough protein, then we get into a negative nitrogen balance. W Continue reading >>

Getting Started On A Ketogenic Diet

Getting Started On A Ketogenic Diet

A ketogenic diet is a type of very low carbohydrate diet designed to force your body to burn fat instead of glucose for energy. This process produces ketones, which gives these diets their "keto" name. Learn more about the advantages and disadvantages of these diets and how to start on one. How the Diet Works Carbohydrates are your body's favorite fuel source; it breaks them down into glucose. Without a steady intake of carbohydrates, your body turns to using protein for fuel. But if you also are limiting how much protein you eat, your body is forced to burn stored fat as its primary source of fuel. That can result in weight loss, and ketones are a byproduct of burning fat. The biggest factor in whether or not a diet is ketogenic is how low in carbohydrates it is. A moderate reduction in carbohydrate can be very helpful to a lot of people, but it won't be ketogenic. There are three approaches to low-carb eating and only one of which focuses on ketosis as a goal throughout the diet. Diets such as the Atkins Diet start out as a very low-carb ketogenic diet, but as people add carbohydrates, many or most will be eating too much carbohydrate to be in ketosis. It is probably more accurate to talk about the degree to which a diet is ketogenic rather than whether or not a diet is ketogenic. Understanding Ketosis Ketosis means that your body is in a state where it doesn't have enough glucose available to use as energy, so it switches into a state where molecules called ketones are generated during fat metabolism. Ketones can be used for energy, and have a special property—they can be used instead of glucose for most of the energy needed in the brain, where fatty acids can't be used. Also, some tissues of the body prefer using ketones, in that they will use them when available Continue reading >>

Too Much Protein Harms A Ketogenic Diet

Too Much Protein Harms A Ketogenic Diet

Too much protein can get you out of Ketosis Protein can get converted to glucose by a process called gluconeogenesis. If you consume too many carbohydrates, your body will stop making ketones and if you consume too much protein, your body will also stop making ketones. Eating too much protein and not eating enough micronutrients are the most common mistakes with the ketogenic diet. More on this here. mTor and too much protein Eating too much protein activates the mtor pathway. mTor is a protein that serves as a nutrient signaling pathway that is the key muscle building mechanism in all mammals. If you active the mTor pathway, cells grow and reproduce quickly. This pathway also reduces cellular repair and regeneration. Because of this, we do not want to stimulate this pathway if we are concerned about longevity and preventing diseases such as cancer. When the mTor pathway is not turned on, your cells are repairing themselves and cleaning up damaged cells (called authophagy). This is a very important component of anti-aging. The Atkins and Paleo diets typically stimulate mTor because of the high levels of protein consumed. The Ketogenic diet is better for anti-aging because a lower amount of protein is consumed, which is important for not stimulating mTor. How to figure out how much protein to eat without stimulating mTor The maximum amount of protein you should eat per day is a calculation based on lean body mass. The formula is 1 gram of protein for each kilogram of Lean body mass. How to figure lean body mass Weight in kilograms x bodyfat % = lbs of fat Weight – lbs of fat = lean body mass Then convert lbs to kg by dividing by 2.2 Example: This person weighs 181 lbs and has 15% bodyfat 181 lbs x 15% (0.15) = 27 lbs of fat 181 lbs – 27 lbs of fat = 154 lbs of lean b Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Lchf Keto Diet?

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Lchf Keto Diet?

Many people following a keto LCHF diet are unsure about how much protein they should be eating. It’s a common belief that a low carb diet should be high in protein. As we all know, eating a LCHF keto diet means eating most of your calories as fat, not protein. On a LCHF keto diet your macros (the composition of your diet) should look something like this: 70% fat/25% protein/5% carbs. You definitely don’t want to be eating more than 30% of your calories as protein. A common error we see people making is making protein the central focus and of all their meals and hence they end up eating a large percentage of their diet as protein, with too little fat and too few low carb veggies. What’s wrong with eating too much protein you ask? Read our post about protein to find out. When you are on a LCHF keto diet for weight loss, eating protein in excess results in a few things happening: Less fat is eaten and so the diet is not truly ketogenic. The benefits of being in ketosis do not happen. Peoples macros do not approach the 70% fat/25% protein/5% carbs recommendation You end up consuming too many calories, because your protein servings are huge! You get tired and bored with eating protein all the time and you end up going off your LCHF eating plan and start adding carbs back to your diet just to get some variety You end up not eating enough low carb veggies. The focus of a keto diet should be low carb vegetables which are the perfect vehicle for adding fat to the diet in the form of olive oil, avocado oil, butter and coconut oil. You can roast or saute your veggies in fat or steam them and then drizzle them with olive or other nut oils. See our useful guide to the best low carb vegetables. Your weight loss can slow down or stop People are very confused about how large thei Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Protein To Fat Ratio

Keto Diet Protein To Fat Ratio

Originally created in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder as a treatment for epilepsy, the ketogenic (Keto) diet uses an extremely low carb in order to change the way that your body uses nutrients for fuel. Instead of relying as heavily on carbohydrates are it normally does, a body on the keto diet will depend almost entirely on fat. The low carb intake also, as the diet’s name suggests, stimulates the creation of substances called ketones. These chemicals show up when your body does not have enough carbohydrates to burn and instead turns on your reserves of stored fat – a state called ketosis. In order to achieve this, your daily carbohydrate intake must drop below 50g. As mentioned, though, you’ll be needing fat as a fuel source at this point. So, what should you fat-to-protein ratio look like? Is it possible to use a keto protein powder to meet your nutritional needs? The Ratio Generally, the macronutrient recommendations for a ketogenic diet are: Fat – 60-75% of calories Protein -15-30% of calories Carbs – 5-10% of calories As you can see, protein intake on a keto diet can vary pretty widely, depending on your exact goals and needs. If you’re looking to build or maintain a large amount of muscle mass, for example, you’re going to want to keep your protein intake relatively high – in the 25 to 30 percent range. Keep in mind, however, that this will adjust how much of other nutrients you have room for. If protein accounts for 30 percent of all your calories, for example, your fat will be 70 percent and your carbs will have to very low at about 5 percent. In general, the idea is to give fat and protein top priority in deciding on your macronutrient distribution – filling in the rest of carbs. Endurance athletes and others who would traditionally depend on carb Continue reading >>

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