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How Much Protein Should I Eat On Keto?

More Than You Ever Wanted To Know About Protein & Gluconeogenesis

More Than You Ever Wanted To Know About Protein & Gluconeogenesis

My dear readers, the website/blog update has run into some snags. Rather than continuing to keep you waiting, though, I’m going to publish new posts and I’ll worry about transitioning them over later on. And since it’s been a few months since I last posted anything of substance, I’ve decided to drop this enormous, enormous post on you to make up for that lost time—and it might take you equally long to read it. Sorry about that, but hey, I haven’t written anything meaningful since May, so, depending on your point of view, this post is either a gift or a punishment. As I’ve said in the past, if you’re an insomniac or a cubicle dweller with lots of time to kill, you’re welcome. (The rest of you, go get yourself a cup of coffee or tea, come back, and get comfy.) I’ve been meaning to write this post for over a year, but it’s such a big topic and so much can go wrong that the thought of tackling it all was enough to make me not write it. But it’s gotten to the point that I’m tired enough of seeing the same questions asked and the same myths propagated over and over on various keto and low carb forums that I’ve decided this needs to be done, no matter how painful I might find it. Because seeing nonsense and fearmongering regarding the role of protein in low carb or ketogenic diets is even more painful. So if finally managing to organize my thoughts into some kind of coherent prose means I never have to read the phrase, “too much protein turns into sugar” ever again, it will be worth it. So that’s what’s on tap today, kids: Gluconeogenesis. That’s right, friends, it’s time to do some myth-busting surrounding the whacked-out notion that protein—lean protein, in particular (like a skinless chicken breast, or tuna canned in water)—is the Continue reading >>

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

The Basic Ketogenic Diet

Note: Please note that if you are interested in a Ketogenic Diet used to treat Epilepsy or Pediatric Epilepsy, please start at Johns Hopkins who are the pioneers in this field. The wikipedia page for the Ketogenic Diet diet also has information on the diet as it relates to treating epilepsy. The diet below is simply for rapid and effective weight loss and uses a 1 to 1 fat to protein ratio rather than the 4 to 1 fat to combined protein and carbs ratio of the Ketogenic Diet pioneered by Johns Hopkins used to treat epilepsy. [wp_ad_camp_3] Disclaimer: I am neither a doctor nor self proclaimed nutrition expert so please consult your doctor before starting any diet or taking any action that affects your health and wellbeing. After finishing Gary Taubes latest book, which seems to have rapidly become the cornerstone of a new approach to nutrition, I’ve become very interested in the Ketogenic diet. The speed of weight loss I’ve seen is incredible and my energy level has remained high. The science behind a ketogenic diet is solidly backed up by Taubes research published in “Good Calories, Bad Calories” and “Why we get fat“. According to Taubes’ research, it may also be the only way for people who have become severely insulin resistant, to effectively lose weight. The Ketogenic diet has always lived on the fringes of diet lore and has been seen as extreme. But the reality is that the low glycemic index diet (Low GI Diet) is effective because it is close to, but not quite, a ketogenic diet. Other diets like the South Beach Diet are also only effective because of the reduction in carbs and consequently insulin levels. The science behind this diet looks solid and it is part of the massive shift in nutrition research we’ve seen in the last few years. Prominent sport Continue reading >>

A Low Carb Keto Diet: The Beginners Guide.

A Low Carb Keto Diet: The Beginners Guide.

I’m sure you’ll agree with me when I say: It’s very hard to find a bulletproof diet, especially one that actually works… But don’t’ worry,because we have done some research about the low carb keto diet and came up with information that will give you a clear look on the matter. In this blogpost we will talk about the benefits of the low carb keto diet, what it actually means, things to consider when making the switch and extra helpful information like things to do when feeling a bit down due to the diet. Most of you have probably already heard off the rising and nowadays so often talked about low carb keto diet. What exactly is this new phenomenon and should you consider following a diet that sounds like u are transforming into some sort of action figure? Let’s find out together! What is the low carb keto diet? The keto diet is a low carb, high fat diet – yes it says high fat- where the body produces these so called ketones in the liver. When we lower the input of carbs, our body will become into a state of ketosis. This is a natural process that helps our body survive when our food intake is too low. It’s in this state that the mighty ketones are assembled and in combination with the high intake of fat, it forms the actual fuel for the temple (read body). It also replaces the carbohydrates that we’ve taking for ages. So if you’re not a fan of the carbs you found the right spot ;). If you are still a non-believer and you won’t separate from the carbs than your liver won’t produce the ketones mentioned before because the carbs will make our body produce glucose which in fact is the easiest molecule for the body to gain energy from. The body also produces insulin, which processes the glucose. Because the body uses mainly glucose as its primary ene Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Macros: How To Calculate Yours

Keto Diet Macros: How To Calculate Yours

The keto diet (ketogenic diet) has been around for quite some time, but recently there has been a surge in popularity for this ultra low carb eating regime. Firstly I want to emphasize that long-term, flexible dieting (eating normal levels of macros) is just as good at helping your reach your weight loss and fitness goals as a keto diet. It could be argued that flexible dieting is better as it is less restrictive and therefore more sustainable. But, a keto diet may be appropriate for someone looking for faster initial results¹. Those training for fitness competitions. Those trying to lose weight for an event but have a shorter time window. Those who have tried flexible dieting but because of metabolic issues are unable to lose weight eating normal levels of carbohydrates. What is a Keto Diet? The keto diet was first developed for use by those with epilepsy. It later became popular among bodybuilders to cut fat before competitions. It will cause your body to burn nothing but fat for energy instead of using glucose (carbohydrates). A person achieves this by greatly limiting carbs and eating more fat. In the absence of carbs, the body will begin converting both dietary fat and body fat into ketones which are then used by the cells of your body for energy. It’s important to understand that a calorie deficit is still required for fat loss to happen. Looking for keto food ideas? Keto Macro Calculation If you wish to calculate your keto diet macros, the first thing to do is to establish your estimated TDEE (total daily energy expenditure). Here’s the formula:² Now factor in your movement, since you probably don’t lie in bed all day. Sedentary Regular daily activity like a little walking, a couple flights of stairs, eating, talking etc. (REE X 1.2) Light activity Any ex Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should I Consume On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should I Consume On A Ketogenic Diet?

Share Proteins are one of the building blocks of body tissue and can be used as a fuel source and are a essential for the body. Unlike carbs, which are not essential for our body, protein and fat are a vital part of our diet. Without these two macronutrients, we would simply not survive. It’s important to remember that the ketogenic diet is a diet high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbs. Why moderate in protein? Too much protein can kick you out of ketosis, while too little protein may cause muscle loss and increased appetite. Why is protein so important? Protein is the more filling and satisfying than carbs. In other words, if you eat enough protein, you will feel less hungry and eat fewer calories. That’s why it’s critical to eat adequate amount of protein if your aim is to lose fat or maintain lean muscle mass. Protein has also been shown to increase energy expenditure. This means that by following a diet rich in protein, you will burn more calories. Another way to burn more calories is to build muscle mass. Protein is the most important macronutrient for preserving and building muscle tissue, especially for physically active individuals. More muscle means you burn more calories and slightly increase your base metabolic rate and you will burn slightly more calories even at rest. How much protein should you take? The amount of dietary protein can be determined by your body weight and activity level. People who are physically more active have higher protein requirements than those whose lifestyle less active or sedentary. A more accurate estimate, especially for people with high body fat, can be reached by calculating protein intake from lean mass, which is calculated as total body weight minus body fat. Other factors like gender or age can affect prote Continue reading >>

What's The Best Ketogenic Protein Powder?

What's The Best Ketogenic Protein Powder?

Finding the perfect whey supplement on a low-carb high-fat diet, especially the keto diet, is a challenge. There are so many keto protein powders on the market, it’s tough to narrow down your choices no matter what your other dietary needs are, but when you need a low-carb shake it can be especially difficult to make the right choice. And the truth of the matter, is that most supposedly "keto-friendly" protein powders actually aren't keto-friendly.​ ​First and foremost, make sure you are getting as much nutrients as possible from natural sources by eating eggs, fish, meat, nuts, and other foods that are high in protein and low in carbohydrates to ensure weight loss. It’s unlikely you’ll reach your intake goals for each day with just food, so you might have to turn to supplements to get there. ​Next, rule out a number of ketogenic diet shakes from your list of potential choices based on their general profiles. For instance, sweetened products are an option that improves the taste of the product, but it usually boosts the sugar content in the powders. Many flavored or sweetened protein shakes contain about 8 to 10 grams more carbohydrates than unsweetened powders. If you want something with flavor, look for ones that utilize lower calories sweeteners—preferably ones that are natural—for taste. Also, make sure you consider absorption. All the ketogenic protein shake in the world isn’t going to do your body any good if your body is unable to assimilate it. Proteins are assigned a digestibility rating that’s called the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score that’s based on how well your body is able to digest the amino acid in the product. Whey, casein, and egg whites have higher scores than peas and hemp for example. The higher the score, the Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Recently I had a client tell me that she and her husband were eating more than 2 pounds of bacon a week—usually three strips for breakfast and one or two with a salad for dinner. I’ve been a dietitian for almost 20 years. Few things surprise me. But I had to ask: “Why?” She told me that her husband had heard about a new diet on TV, the keto diet, and they decided to try it. Six months and countless packages of bacon later, her husband had lost 20 pounds and said he felt more energetic. I’m beginning to hear more and more people lecture me about the benefits of the ketogenic diet. “Keto burns fat fast! It turbo-charges your energy! It fights disease! You can eat all the bacon you want!” But as is so often the case with diets, underneath all the initial excitement, there’s a gut check. Here’s everything you should know about the ketogenic diet and whether or not you should try it for yourself. Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so your brain signals it to tap its reserve of ketones. It’s like a hybrid car that runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity. Okay, but what are ketones? They’re compounds created by your liver from your fat stores when blood insulin is low. “Your liver produces ketones all the time, but the rate depends on carbohydrate and protein intake,” says Jeff Volek, Ph.D., R.D., a professor of human sciences at Ohio State University. Eat a normal amount of carbs and protein, and ketogenesis idles. Cut carbs and protein back, and you push to half throttle. This takes about three days to induce. A ketogenic diet requires that fat comprise 60 to 80 percent of your total calo Continue reading >>

What You Should Know Before Starting A Keto Diet

What You Should Know Before Starting A Keto Diet

A ketogenic diet means that most of your calories are coming from fat, you are eating a moderate amount of protein, and keeping carbs low - around 50 grams net carbs. In my opinion, when done correctly this type of diet is best for controlling and preventing chronic disease - most notably diabetes and obesity - and can make you feel awesome! Note: I advocate for a little more protein and a little more carbs than the traditional hardcore ketogenic diet (i.e. carbs under 20 grams) and I am a proponent of a cyclical ketogenic diet which means carb refeeding 1-2 days per week - more on this below and in a future post. Here are some things to know before starting a ketogenic diet: 1. You need to increase your salt intake When you are in ketosis your body will rapidly be shedding electrolytes, most notably sodium, from your kidneys. Unless you have a medical condition by which you are forbidden to eat salt, add sea salt or Pink Himalayan Salt to your meals, and opt for bouillon balls and/or bone broth as other ways to get salt into your body. 2. You need to increase your fluid intake Water follows sodium, so as your kidneys are shedding off more sodium you are going to lose more water as well. Carbohydrates also hold onto water, so eating less carbs means less water stored in your body, and that you need to increase your water intake. Shoot for 2-3 liters of fluid per day at least. 3. Don’t eat too much protein It’s hard to eat too much protein, but it is still good to know that yes, you can have too much. Too much protein can cause your body to convert the excess amino acids to sugar, and sugar triggers the release of insulin (fat storage hormone) which can lead to fat gain. A rough estimate of how much protein you should be getting is 0.7-1.0 grams per pound of body wei Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Carbohydrates And Protein Should I Eat For Ketogenic Adaptation?

How Many Grams Of Carbohydrates And Protein Should I Eat For Ketogenic Adaptation?

For regular keto, it's usually between 40g-75g, as Rosie Moth mentioned. Like she said, KetoStix are important to monitor your state. I'd like to suggest an alternative to regular keto, however. Many people who consume ketogenic diets suffer consequences (usually long-term) from the lack of starches in their diet. This negatively influences their gut flora as well as their ability to produce mucus linings in their gut, which leads to other problems like increased risk of colon cancer. You can, however, have both starch and ketones. As explained in Paul Jaminet's Perfect Health Diet, ketosis can be induced by consumption of MCT oil in addition to consumption of a moderate amount of starch. He suggest that ketogenic dieters avoid reducing daily carb consumption below 75 g (300 calories) of starch in order to ensure adequate mucus production, and consuming 4-12 tbsp daily of MCTs in order to induce ketone production. I believe this is a healthier approach than simply cutting carbs out of the diet. Despite the fact that MCT oil does contain a lot of calories, they won't have the same weight-gain effects as other fats. They are immediately converted into ketones, rather than being stored in adipose tissue, and also cause the body to burn calories at a higher rate. Nevertheless, if you consume very high amounts (more than 4 tbsp) I'd suggest replacing some other fats with them. Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Daily Protein Amount

Low Carb Diet Daily Protein Amount

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. A lot of low carb dieters worry about eating too much protein. What is the recommended low carb diet daily protein amount to avoid gluconeogenesis? Is it possible to eat too much protein on a low-carb diet? Will eating lots of protein if you’re low carb lead to gluconeogenesis? If your body goes through gluconeogenesis, does that defeat the purpose of eating low-carb? If so, how much protein is too much? And, what is the recommended low carb diet daily protein amount? Lots of questions to consider here if you’re thinking about going low-carb. But first, some basics…. Protein is a critical macronutrient along with carbohydrates and dietary fats. Are you trying to lose weight? Specifically, more body fat? Then maybe you’re considering going to a low-carb diet plan. And, perhaps you know that the goal of a low-carb diet for many is to achieve a state of ketosis. What is ketosis? Ketosis is when your brain and cells are supplied with enough energy from bodyfat. It’s said that your brain’s preferred energy source is carbohydrates (this has been recently debated as some say the preferred source is fat). That’s a problem if you’re eating a low-carb diet. A low-carb diet is generally considered around 50 grams or less per day of carbs. (Fun cocktail party fact: a 16 oz. serving of ginger ale has almost 50 grams of carbs, all from simple sugars. And ginger beer contains even more carbs; tell all your Moscow Mule Continue reading >>

So What Exactly Is A Keto Diet? We're Breaking Down The Basics

So What Exactly Is A Keto Diet? We're Breaking Down The Basics

It seems like new diets are everywhere these days, and the ketogenic diet is hot right now — but how much do you really know about it? We’ve got the answers to all the health questions you didn’t even know that you had. For example… What is the ketogenic diet plan? The keto diet plan is a low-carb, high-fat, limited protein meal plan. Cutting carbohydrates can reduce your appetite and help you lose weight, but when you drastically reduce your carb intake and limit your protein consumption, you need to eat more healthy fats to balance out your diet. “In a clinical setting, a strict ketogenic diet would involve ultra-low carb consumption, like 20 or 30 grams a day,” director of the Lifestyle Medicine Clinic at Duke University Dr. Eric Westman explained to Time. “You’d want healthy fats to account for about 80% of your calories, and protein around 20%.” How does a ketogenic diet work? Ketones are energy-carrying molecules in your body. When you eat carbs, your body uses the glucose in them to create energy. By following a ketogenic diet plan, you can put your body into a state of “ketosis” which means that your body is using fat to create energy instead. Is a ketogenic diet safe? Ketogenic diets were actually first introduced to help treat certain medical ailments like epilepsy and seizures. Kids, older adults, and individuals with health complications like obesity, type 2 diabetes, or fatty liver disease should be careful and work with their doctor if they’re interested in trying the keto diet. But Dr. Westman thinks otherwise healthy adults should be fine. “If you’re a young and healthy adult, I have no safety concerns about removing carbs,” he told Time. “It’s really not a radical concept.” You start by adjusting your meals. Outside M Continue reading >>

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

If you haven’t been living under a rock for the past year or so, then you’ve most likely heard of the ketogenic (or keto) diet. If you have been living under one, I’m going to need you to crawl out from under it and take a seat because Ketogenic Dieting 101 is about to begin. So, Like, What Is It? Keto is a diet with high fats, moderate protein, and restricted carbohydrates. Initially designed to help children with epilepsy, it’s garnered attention for its effectiveness in regards to fat loss. The traditional ketogenic diet (also known as the therapeutic ketogenic diet), mimics the effects of starvation by forcing the body to burn its own fat stores rather than glucose. When you restrict carbohydrates, the body enters into a metabolic state known as ketosis, where the liver converts stored fat (triglycerides) into ketones. These ketones are what the body uses to fuel your brain, organs, and muscles. On the therapeutic ketogenic diet, the macro breakdown looks like this: However, as the ketogenic diet’s grown in popularity, especially among people who are looking to lose fat and build muscle, a new form of the diet’s emerged. While the traditional ketogenic diet is an extremely high-fat diet with sufficient protein intake, the physique ketogenic diet is a high-fat diet but with adequate protein intake. Huh, Sufficient and Adequate Protein Intake? This is where a lot of the confusion arises around the ketogenic diet, and it’s important to understand the difference. When the goal is fat loss, the concomitant goal is to preserve muscle mass. On a therapeutic ketogenic diet, protein is set to around 10-15% of total calorie intake. This is the sufficient amount of protein required to keep the body functioning and you healthy – basically so you don’t die. The Continue reading >>

Is A Vegan Ketogenic Diet Possible?

Is A Vegan Ketogenic Diet Possible?

It’s not often that you hear someone say, “I’m on a vegan ketogenic diet!” Low carb diets are often scorned in the high carb low fat vegan community – after all, low carbers only eat meat, and carbs make the world turn round. So, a low carb vegan diet would seem impossible. However, this isn’t the case at all! I was first introduced to the low carb world while vegan, and actually found it really easy to adapt my current diet to be low carb. Hopefully the following info helps you to do the same. Determine Your Daily Carbs on a Vegan Ketogenic Diet While conventional keto rules say to start at 20g of net carbs a day, vegan ketoers may find that 30g of net carbs is a little closer to an achievable goal. It really boils down to this – plant foods tend to all have a little carbohydrate in them, whereas animal products do not. Yes, you can just pour oil into your mouth all day, every day. But…that’s really, really boring. It’s also not sustainable for most people in the long term. So, increasing the target number of carbs just a little bit can be pretty beneficial to your tastebuds, and your sanity. I’ve worked with clients who can maintain ketosis while eating up to 50g of net carbs some days and a daily average of 30-40g. So, there’s certainly wiggle room. Of course, it’s still possible to eat 20g of net carbohydrates per day (back to drinking oil), so if you really want to limit carbohydrates, you have an option there. Don’t Count Too Much in the Beginning This is counterintuitive, as carb counting seems integral to the whole process. But counting is really not necessary, especially when you’re first starting out and getting the hang of things. You’ll want to make sure you’re used to eating a good variety of foods, and that this is a susta Continue reading >>

Truth About Protein On A Low Carb Diet

Truth About Protein On A Low Carb Diet

Let’s talk a bit about low carb and ketogenic diets and how they truly work within your body. Once you have an understanding of how that process works, it’s much easier to understand exactly how much protein you need! What is a ketogenic diet? Known as ketogenic diets, they work by reducing the quantity of carbohydrates in your diet for a long enough period of time to retrain your body to turn to fats, rather than carbs, for fuel. This process is called ketosis. By using fat for fuel, you are able to burn that stubborn stored fat while keeping your hard-earned muscle. When you fast, reduce the carbs in your diet, are pregnant or exercise for a long period of time, your body will turn to ketones for energy. It takes about 3-4 days of consuming very few carbs, 50 g or less per day, to kickstart ketosis. This is roughly the number of carbs found in 2 bananas. How Does it Work? Dietary carbohydrates are broken into glucose in the body, which is then used as your body’s main source of energy. Not too long ago it was believed that if you went too long without food, your body would burn muscle, hence why you will hear of many bodybuilders who swear by eating every two hours, with some even waking up in the middle of the night to get more calories in. But why would our bodies work that way? We evolved as hunters and gatherers, often going for long periods of time between meals. It only makes sense that our bodies would first burn fat rather than going to muscle for fuel. When glucose is in short supply, your liver will break down fats into ketones, which are then used throughout your body for energy. Muscles and other tissues in your body use ketones rather than glucose for energy metabolism when you are not consuming many carbs. In a healthy person, the production of ket Continue reading >>

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

Why The Ketogenic Diet May Help Fight Diabetes, Cancer

A diet extremely high in fat may not seem like the best way to lose fat. But there’s a growing body of research showing that the high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet is not only good for weight loss, but also may help in preventing disease. The ketogenic diet, or keto, relies on using your fat as fuel, instead of glucose from carbohydrates or protein. Simply put, the daily ketogenic diet consists of 75 percent fat, 20 percent of protein, and a teeny allotment of carbohydrates, about 5 percent. This balance of macronutrients is intended to put your body in a state of ketosis, which suppresses the release of insulin and blood glucose levels. The benefits of ketosis to your health are improvements in biomarkers like blood glucose, reduction of blood pressure and decreased appetite due to fullness linked to consumption of fats. You might think this sounds a lot like the Atkins diet — it’s not. The main difference lies in the protein content of the diet. Atkins tends to be very high in protein, while ketogenic is moderate. Getty Images stock It's not the easiest plan to follow, but the theory of ketosis as a possible prevention against disease is gaining attention from cancer specialists. Tumor immunologist Dr. Patrick Hwu, one of the leading cancer specialists in the U.S., has followed the keto diet for four years, although he prefers to call it the fat-burning metabolism diet, or fat-burning diet. More research is needed to prove its benefits, but Hwu, the head of cancer medicine at MD Anderson in Houston, believes in it after seeing improvements in his own health. Why keto works The body’s first and preferred fuel of choice is glucose — stored as glycogen. Anytime you eat a carbohydrate, be it lentils or licorice, the body turns it into glucose, or sugar. B Continue reading >>

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