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How Much Protein On Keto Bodybuilding

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Great bodybuilders and endurance athletes do two things very well: First, they know exactly how to train. Second, they feed their bodies the best possible food to achieve their training goals. But you're probably wondering: Am I really getting the most out of my food, or could I perform better on a ketogenic diet? Or maybe you are asking what is a ketogenic diet? Want to know what it is, then carry on reading... What is it? A ketogenic diet is one high in healthy fats, moderate in protein, and very low in carbohydrates. The keto diet forces the body to burn fat for energy, instead of carbohydrates, which is its default energy source. In a normal diet that contains high amounts of carbohydrates, the body converts carbs into glucose, which is used by the body, as well as the brain, for fuel and any leftover glucose that is not used is then stored as fat. In a ketogenic diet, also referred to as low-carb, the body has very little amounts of carbohydrates to turn into glucose, so it does the next best thing: it turns to the liver. The liver, then, takes the body’s fat supply and turns it into fatty acids, which are converted into ketones and so begins the metabolic process known as ketosis, which uses the body’s fat stores for energy. ​Now, I hear you say this is great for weight loss... ... but can a bodybuilder or a high endurance athlete follow this way of eating and have the energy needed for peak performance? The concern is: When you lower the amount of carbohydrates in your diet, you’re also lowering your glycogen levels, which is the default energy source for muscles during workouts, and when glycogen is lacking, so is performance. Then you may then wondering:​ Is there a ketogenic diet for bodybuilding and endurance athletes? ​ The good news is: Strength Continue reading >>

Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 171 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1534 kcal 5 % 18 % 77 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 144 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1294 kcal 6 % 21 % 73 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 117 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1054 kcal 7 % 24 % 69 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 91 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 814 kcal 8 % 29 % 63 % We have open-sourced KetoDiet Buddy, you can now find it on Github. What is the Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets are high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and 5-10% of calories from carbs. The exact amount of fat and protein is a matter of individual body responses and activity levels. However, most people on ketogenic diets don't consume over 5% of calories from carbohydrates. In most cases, you won’t need to count calories on a ketogenic diet. However, if you find it hard to lose weight or you are relatively fit and trying to lose a small amount of fat, you may also have to count calories. If you just started following a low-carb diet, don't forget to read my free Guide to Keto & Paleo Diet which includes a print-friendly PDF version! You will find all the information you need, including the keto food list and tips on how to follow the diet to achieve your goals. Maintenance Level Maintenance Level, also known as Total Energy Expenditure, is a level at which you maintain a stable bodyweight. According to Lyle McDonald: Maintenance Level = BMR + TEA + TEF where: BMR is the Basal Metabolic Rate, TEA is the Thermal Effect of Activity and TEF is the Thermal Effect of Feeding Basal Metabolic Rate is the amount of energy expended daily at rest. BMR Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Ketogenic Dieting 101: How To Use Fat As Fuel

Eating fat to burn fat sounds contradictory, if not nuts, right? The world is full of people who are fat because of high-fat diets, so why would a fit person want to follow suit? I'm not talking about stuffing your face full of peanut butter cups. I'm talking about following a ketogenic diet—or, put simply, a high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diet designed to make the body burn fat for fuel. Bodybuilders, fitness enthusiasts, and researchers alike have found that such diets are an effective fat-loss tool. In fact, studies have shown that ketogenic diets induce numerous favorable metabolic and physiological changes, including weight loss, less oxidative stress, improved body composition, reduced inflammation, and increased insulin sensitivity.[1-4] That being said, what does the science surrounding ketogenic diets have to say about individuals looking to run faster or farther, jump higher, or improve other aspects of sports performance? Shouldn't athletes be swilling Gatorade before, during, and after their events instead of adopting a high-fat, restricted-carbohydrate diet? Not necessarily. Ketogenic diets have become increasingly popular among athletes ranging from Olympic competitors to endurance runners, with good reason. Let's take a closer look at the science. What Exactly Is A Ketogenic Diet, Anyway? Ketogenic diets are very high-fat, moderate-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets.[5] The exact breakdown of the diet varies between individuals, but a general profile may reflect 70-75 percent fat, 15-20 percent protein, and only 5-10 percent carbohydrate. So, you're probably thinking, all I need to do then is watch out for the carbs, right? Not exactly. Ketogenic diets are not the same as high-protein, carbohydrate-restricted diets. I often hear Continue reading >>

Why Your High Protein Low Carb Diet Might Not Be A Keto Diet

Why Your High Protein Low Carb Diet Might Not Be A Keto Diet

In the 1970s Dr. Atkins popularized the ketogenic Diet. What a dream diet this was! Eat all you want and as long as you only eat protein and fat and do not consume carbohydrates, you will lose weight. It was a miracle! The caveat was pretty simple: You must eat HIGH fat, meaning 80% or more of your calories from fat. The rest of your calories would come from protein with trace carbs. Sedentary people were losing fat. Heck, I even saw an interview with Luther Vandross, the man whom we have all had in the background while making love at least once in our lives, stating that he went from "Fat Luther" to "Skinny Luther" by using the Atkins Diet. If it worked for the man who is responsible for more pregnancies than Flavor Flav, then this has to be legit. BUT, bad things happen when bodybuilding "GURUS" get wind of ideas like this. They make it even more idiotic! In the late 1990s the "keto" diet made a roaring comeback. Celebrities were using it. My neighbor who had a really fat butt was using it. Hell, even I tried it. But this was the actual ketogenic diet, meaning HIGH fat, moderate protein and trace carbs. This is a real keto diet. The body needs to be depleted of all glucose and carbs, AND you have to eat low protein. Marc Lobliner discusses why your high protein, low carb keto diet might not be putting you into ketosis. A ketogenic diet is low protein? Low protein? You heard me correct, low protein. The ketogenic diet, while good for the soccer mom whose only activity is loading groceries in her minivan, is HORRIBLE for bodybuilding! As bodybuilders we want about 1 gram of protein per pound of bodyweight per day (per ISSN and other guidelines) to build and maintain lean muscle mass. NO WAY can you get this when 80% of your diet is coming from pork rinds and pig butt. B Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Your Complete Meal Plan And Supplement Guide

Ketogenic Diet: Your Complete Meal Plan And Supplement Guide

So you've heard the arguments, weighed out the challenges and benefits, and decided you're all in. You're going keto. First off, you're in good company. More people—and more athletes—than ever are embracing a very low-carb, high-fat diet and sticking with it for months, or even years, on end. Once they successfully make the switch from using carbohydrates to using fat and ketones for fuel, they find they're leaner, healthier, and more mentally focused than ever. But for every lifter who ends up loving this approach, you'll find another who had a miserable experience and bailed after just a few days. This is a shame, because they probably could have felt great if they had simply had a better plan—or a plan at all. I'm not here to sell you on nutritional ketosis or explain what it is or the big-picture benefits it can provide. That's the domain of other articles. With the help of Myoplex athlete and longtime keto-adapted athlete Jason Wittrock, I'm here to provide you with your best induction experience. Here's what you need to know to ace your nutrition and supplementation during the crucial first month of ketogenic dieting, along with a complete sample meal plan! Your Must-Have (And Must-Not-Have) Keto Food List Feeling ready to start buying groceries? Slow down there, chief. Go through the pantry, fridge, freezer, and secret stashes under the bed, and get rid of foods with any significant carb content. In the first few days, you could end up craving them—badly. Sorry, no fruit for now. Even carrots and onions are too high-glycemic to work with keto, Wittrock says. Got that done? Cool. Now, here are some of the staples you should build your ketogenic diet around: Fatty nuts and seeds: cashews, macadamia nuts, pumpkin seeds Avocado Whole eggs Full-fat cheese Beef Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet: Bodybuilding Vs Fat Burning

The Keto Diet: Bodybuilding Vs Fat Burning

The keto or ketogenic diet has become all the rage in the fitness and bodybuilding community. Many have viewed the as a godsend, a tool that can help an individual burn fight while maintaining a musculature physique. But not every keto program is the same. Some ketogenic programs are geared to individuals looking simply to lose weight while others are designed for those looking to gain muscle and lose fat all at once. Weight Loss Keto Keto for weight loss will focus on a specific balance of fats and protein. Fat loss keto will see an individual eating higher amounts of fat while keeping their protein intake lowered. This ensures that energy is being obtain through consuming fats which will put your body into the fat burning mode of ketosis. Bodybuilding Keto Once again much like the weight loss program of keto, you’ll see your carb intake lowered, focusing primarily on fats and protein. But rather than consuming more fats over protein the process is flipped. You’ll still eat the fats in order to use the nutrient as an energy source, but this time the increased protein will promote more muscle growth. This is exactly the kind of keto that a bodybuilder should follow if their looking to make some lean, quality gains. Similarities Whether you’re adhering to a weight loss program or you’re looking to make solid gains with keto, both diet programs are centered around the fact that your carb intake is going to be nonexistent if not significantly lowered. Carbs aren’t the devil nor is it your best friend. It’s a tool just like any of the other macronutrients. Eating starchy carbs while you’re on a keto diet will ultimately become counter productive. The idea of the diet is for an individual to get energy from fat and use it in order to shed fat off of the body. E Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The Keto Diet With Sample Meal Plan

Ultimate Guide To The Keto Diet With Sample Meal Plan

1. Introduction to ketogenic dieting 2. What exactly is ketosis? 3. The 3 main types of keto diets 3.1. Standard keto dieting 3.2. Cyclical keto dieting 3.2. Targeted keto dieting 4. Which keto variation should I use? 5. Setting up your own keto diet 6. Food selection on keto diets 7. Alterations for cyclical keto dieting 8. Alterations for targeted keto dieting 9. Fine tuning TKD and CKD 10. Saturated fat intake on keto diets—considerations 11. Selected recipes for keto dieting 12. Frequently asked questions Intro to ketogenic dieting Ketogenic (herein referred to as “keto”) dieting has been around for decades and garnered a somewhat strong following in bodybuilding subculture. In a nutshell, keto diets are simply diets that are high in fat and protein and very low in carbohydrate (usually <10% total macronutrient intake); given this the body is diverted to utilize fats for energy since glucose stores become depleted. Keto diets can be effective for many individuals and tailored to suit their goals, whether it’s to build muscle, lose fat, develop strength, etc. While keto diets are often used mainly for health and fitness purposes, they are also implemented in medicine as treatment for epilepsy. [1] You may be asking, “What makes a keto diet different from any other low-carb diet?” The truth is not much, other than that some people believe keto diets are only effective when the body enters a state called ketosis and starts to produce ketones for energy (hence the name “ketogenic”), which requires extreme carbohydrate restriction. However, this supposition is shortsighted and will be touched on later in this guide. In this guide we will take an in-depth look at the physiology behind keto dieting, the different types/variations of keto diets there are, ho Continue reading >>

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

When embarking on a ketogenic diet for health or fat loss, finding the optimum protein intake can be very confusing for many beginners. For smooth adaptation in the transition to a ketogenic metabolism I typically guide people using a caloric spread of around 70-80% fat, 15-25% protein, and 5% carbohydrate from green fibrous vegetables – but this ratio varies for every individual and using percentages is confusing and misleading in many cases. The best way to look at macronutrients is not in percentage ratios, but in grams. The slew of bloggers and gurus spouting so much conflicting information leads many into a mental stalemate about how much protein they should be eating. This article lays out the metrics I most commonly use to quantify how much protein an individual should intake – there is no magic ratio and the needs, preferences, and goals of the individual determine the amount of protein they will likely require on their ketogenic diet which usually lies within a relatively broad range of 1-2.2g/kg (and in some cases even higher *cringe say the protein-phobic) of bodyweight or .5-1g/lb of lean body mass (Lean Body Mass equals Body Weight minus Body Fat). Myth: “Too much” protein turns immediately into sugar I almost always recommend people increase their intake of fish and seafoods in order to get the vital nutrient DHA into their central nervous system and mitochondrial membranes. We see amazing results when people opt for more fish and less red meat, which I also love, but land mammals are not nearly as nutrient dense as seafoods with their incredible levels of DHA, EPA, selenium, and iodine. Sometimes this means they will be eating more protein than they believe will allow them to be “ketogenic”, this protein-phobia can be counterproductive, which Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilders

The Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilders

PHILOSOPHY When you cut carbs out of your diet, your body must find an alternative source of energy. The body turns first to muscle tissue, breaking it down to fuel activity. However, if you take in an adequate amount of protein, this will help protect your muscle tissue and encourage your body to use stored body fat instead. The ketogenic diet is a way to trick your body into thinking it’s in starvation mode while you’re still consuming enough calories from protein and fat to provide satiety and protect your muscle mass from being used as fuel. The ketogenic diet is very similar to the Atkins Diet, with perhaps the biggest difference being that on Atkins you don’t pee on ketone strips to determine if you’re in ketosis. This is the condition in which your body is releasing stored fat to fuel activity, and ketone bodies are present in your urine, providing a measurable indication that you are in this state. WHAT YOU SHOULD EAT Meat, cheese, oils, fish, eggs, very low-carb protein products. WHAT YOU SHOULDN'T EAT Processed foods, sugars, grains, and even vegetables and fruits. CONS You can’t eat carbs and stay in ketosis, making this a fairly restrictive diet. During the initial stages, it’s best to cut even fruits and vegetables to make sure your carb intake is minimal and you reach ketosis as quickly as possible. And you have to pee on ketone strips to check your urine for ketones. Often people develop an odd breath odor when they enter ketosis. PROS You can consume your regular amount of calories (or slightly fewer), so you’re not likely to suffer from hunger. Add fibrous vegetables (broccoli, spinach, other greens) once you reach ketosis. Recently, some endurance athletes have started following a ketogenic diet program, reporting that it allows them to p Continue reading >>

Podcast: How Stress, Alcohol, Protein & Bodybuilding Affect Ketosis

Podcast: How Stress, Alcohol, Protein & Bodybuilding Affect Ketosis

Joe and Amber from THE PRIMAL EXAMPLE podcast recently interviewed me to talk about what it really means to be ketogenic, or to burn ketones instead of glucose for energy. How does bodybuilding while keto work? How do stress and alcohol affect ketosis? Should you measure your blood ketones, and who should try intermittent fasting? Trying to build muscle while keto? Worried about protein limits on keto? Find out about making gains, carbs vs net carbs and common misconceptions about how much protein you really need all while being in ketosis and hear some of my nutrition and fitness secrets to getting naturally JACKED without overloading on carbs. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets For Bulking

Ketogenic Diets For Bulking

The ketogenic diet is nothing new. The high fat, low or no carbohydrate diet was first developed in the 1920s as a treatment for pediatric epilepsy. In recent history, the ketogenic diet has been used by the bodybuilding and strength training community as one of the most popular and controversial ways to improve body composition. The diet was initially developed as an alternate means to fasting, which was found to induce the state of ketosis in the patient (1). Early physicians found not only a decreased frequency of epileptic seizures in patients who were in ketosis but also accelerated fatty acid oxidation, which then led to the loss of body fat. Ketosis is often referred to as the body’s “fat burning” mode (2). Some benefits often associated with ketogenic diet include: Reduction in body fat Appetite suppression Mood elevation and mental clarity (after the initial weaning period of 3-5 days) Stable blood glucose levels Reduced cardiovascular risk factors (chronically elevated insulin, triglycerides, etc.) Lowered cancer risk (cancer cells thrive on glucose) So, what exactly is ketosis? Ketosis (not to be confused with ketoacidosis in diabetic patients), occurs during a state of prolonged carbohydrate deficit, where the liver converts fatty acids into ketone bodies (acetoacetate, β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone). Normally, ketone concentration in the blood is very low and is primarily regulated by insulin and glucagon (4). It may reach high levels during periods of accelerated fatty acid oxidation combined with low carbohydrate intake or impaired carbohydrate use. Glucose is the preferred fuel source for various tissues in the body, including the brain. However, with very little glucose present and ketone body formation increased, most cells in the body can use Continue reading >>

Not All Low Carb Diets Are Keto: Why Most Bodybuilding Fans Get It Wrong!

Not All Low Carb Diets Are Keto: Why Most Bodybuilding Fans Get It Wrong!

When most people think of keto, they think of low carb. While ketogenic diets are low carbohydrate diets, the reality is that not all low carbohydrate diets are keto. As I’ve written before, it is quite popular for fitness professionals and YouTube fitness pundits to “beat up” low carbohydrate dieting. Much of this derives from the fact that many physique competitors, who are also quite often YouTube influencers, had horrible experiences with low carbohydrate diets. Low carbohydrate dieting often evokes imagery of meal after meal of bland, tough, chalky fish or chicken with vegetables in plastic Tupperware being choked down by bodybuilders. The truth is that, while many bodybuilders have experienced a low carbohydrate diet, the high protein, low fat, and low carb diet that most bodybuilders do is far from ketogenic. The bodybuilding version of a low carbohydrate diet, performed with the desire to get to minimal (and unhealthy) levels of bodyfat, is an extreme diet that can get you very lean in the short term, but lead to metabolic and hormonal damage in the long term. With this diet, once you get lean, it becomes nearly impossible to hold that level of conditioning for longer than a few days. The idea here is to peak for a show, and then fatten up for the off-season. On the other hand, the ketogenic diet is a high fat, moderate protein, high fat diet with a very different purpose – to get you to optimal levels of bodyfat and performance for the long term. While many who have done the typical bodybuilding low carb diet have experienced weakness, brain fog, and muscle loss, the ketogenic diet can increase strength, endurance, brain energy, and muscle gains. Let’s end the confusion between these two diet methods once and for all by examining the key differences b Continue reading >>

In Depth Look At Ketogenic Diets And Ketosis

In Depth Look At Ketogenic Diets And Ketosis

What exactly is Ketosis? The metabolic state of ketosis simply means that the quantity of ketone bodies in the blood have reached higher-than-normal levels. When the body is in a ketogenic state, this means that lipid energy metabolism is intact. The body will start breaking down your own body fat to fuel the body's normal, everyday functions. What's So Great About Being In Ketosis? Establishing this metabolic state of ketosis even for a short period of time has many outstanding benefits. Benefit 1 The main benefit of ketosis is that it increases the body's ability to utilize fats for fuel, which gets very lazy on a high-carbohydrate diet. When on high-carbohydrate diets, the body can usually expect an energy source to keep entering the body. But in the state of ketosis, the body has to become efficient at mobilizing fats as energy. Benefit 2 Ketosis has a protein-sparing effect, assuming that you are consuming adequate quantities of protein and calories—0.7 grams per pound of body weight per day—in the first place.[1] Once in ketosis, the body actually prefers ketones to glucose. Since the body has copious quantities of fat, this means there is no need to oxidize protein to generate glucose through gluconeogenesis. Benefit 3 Another benefit has to do with the low levels of insulin in the body, which causes greater lipolysis and free-glycerol release compared to a normal diet when insulin is around 80-120. Insulin has a lipolysis-blocking effect, which can inhibit the use of fatty acids as energy. Also, when insulin is brought to low levels, beneficial hormones are released in the body, such as growth hormone and other powerful growth factors. Benefit 4 Another small but very important benefit of the ketogenic diet is that when in the state of ketosis, ketones, alon Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

The question a lot of low carb athletes want to get answered to is: “How does a ketogenic diet affect performance?” Secondly: “How to build muscle on keto?” Can you even do it? Well, in my experience, YES you can. Let me give you my story and secrets… When I first heard of nutritional ketosis I didn’t immediately try it out. Being into resistance training, I figured that it couldn’t possibly ever work. Sounds familiar, right? If you’re physically active then you’ve probably been told about the importance of proper nutrition, post-workout glycogen synthesis, recovery, etc. etc. And that you need CARBS to do it. In the athletic community, carbohydrates are being held at the pillar stone of success. But you don’t need them. I’ve never been into this dogmatic belief so eventually, I decided to try out the keto diet. Let’s see what happens and if I lose strength, so be it… I can always get it back. It was meant to be a short experiment, but… After a month of eating less than 30 grams of carbs a day I was in ketosis. I’m not going to lie that some of my performance had suffered, but only temporarily. Other than that, I felt amazing and loved the keto diet. I thought to myself: Why hadn’t I tried it out before? The answer to that was fear of losing my gains – all in vain. I didn’t want to sacrifice the health benefits of low carb and how amazing it made me feel. But I also wanted to regain my performance and continue getting stronger… all while staying on a ketogenic diet. To me, it sounded like a challenge, which I was more than willing to accept My training consists of mainly bodyweight exercises, such as calisthenics, Yoga, and gymnastics. The keto diet is perfect for that and I’ve learned how to build muscle on ketosis. It’s doable Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets | Muscle Insider

Ketogenic Diets | Muscle Insider

For over 24-years, Vince Andrich has been the driving force behind many of the most innovative and successful companies in performance nutrition and sports supplements. His success developing go-to-market product strategies, as well as authoring numerous books and articles, have one common theme: find the science, or concept that actually helps bodybuilders in the real world. A: I dont think ketogenic diets are necessary to get into the kind of shape that will bring out a set of abs worthy of a shirtless summer. Even if you need to achieve ridiculously low levels of body fat for high-level bodybuilding competition, a ketogenic diet is not necessary and actually must be modified to work for bodybuilders. Let me explain: The term ketogenic diet refers to an eating program that contains almost no carbohydrate, has modest protein and requires consuming 4 grams of fat for every gram of protein and carbohydrate. This nutritional prescription is popular for the treatment of epilepsy and is often referred to as the 4:1:1 Diet or a standard ketogenic diet (SKD). Bodybuilders have used variations on the standard ketogenic diet theme to get shredded, and they can work quite well. The reason a recreational or competitive bodybuilder would want to use this method of dieting is simple: to get the body to use more stored body fat as fuel, which of course is the goal of any fat-loss plan. With a ketogenic diet, the strategy is to reduce carbohydrate intake to extremely low levels (less than 50 grams per day), which puts your body in a state of ketosis. That is, the severe reduction in carbohydrates causes your body to rapidly increase the quantity of ketones (or ketone bodies) in the blood. Ketones are a by-product of fat metabolism, and for proponents of this diet, being in a state o Continue reading >>

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