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How Much Protein Ketosis Bodybuilding

How Bodybuilders Should Eat

How Bodybuilders Should Eat

While conventional diets may be fine for the average person, they definitely don't work for bodybuilders. It takes an extraordinary nutrition plan to build an extraordinary physique. After lots of reading, research, and speculation (followed by more screwing up than you'd want to know about) I was finally able to derive a way of eating that not only works for bodybuilders, but works GREAT! Although I initially set out to find a diet that would maximize fat loss while preserving lean muscle tissue, I soon found that it works equally well to build muscle while minimizing fat gain. Let me reiterate that what I'm going to share with you is NOT just theoretical. It's well proven, even at the highest levels of bodybuilding – the IFBB Professional stage. Although you don't have to be a pro bodybuilder to reap the benefits, you will have to have some discipline and consistency. If you're the kind of person that likes to "wing it" when it comes to your diet, then the method I'll describe isn't for you. Regardless, anyone can benefit from the information I'm going to give you... if you actually apply it. To begin, let's look at the pros and cons of the traditional methods of dieting, because, once you clearly understand the flaws of other diets, you'll be able to better understand and implement a better alternative. Low-Carb Pros and Cons You don't have to be a nutrition guru to know that low-carb diets are extremely effective at burning body fat. As much as mainstream doctors and dietitians hate to let the 80s go, research has proven over and over again that low-carb diets burn fat more quickly than other types of diets. They work by decreasing blood glucose, insulin, and glycogen stores. This, in turn, promotes the mobilization and utilization of fatty acids for fuel, especia Continue reading >>

Podcast: How Stress, Alcohol, Protein & Bodybuilding Affect Ketosis

Podcast: How Stress, Alcohol, Protein & Bodybuilding Affect Ketosis

Joe and Amber from THE PRIMAL EXAMPLE podcast recently interviewed me to talk about what it really means to be ketogenic, or to burn ketones instead of glucose for energy. How does bodybuilding while keto work? How do stress and alcohol affect ketosis? Should you measure your blood ketones, and who should try intermittent fasting? Trying to build muscle while keto? Worried about protein limits on keto? Find out about making gains, carbs vs net carbs and common misconceptions about how much protein you really need all while being in ketosis and hear some of my nutrition and fitness secrets to getting naturally JACKED without overloading on carbs. Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilders

The Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilders

PHILOSOPHY When you cut carbs out of your diet, your body must find an alternative source of energy. The body turns first to muscle tissue, breaking it down to fuel activity. However, if you take in an adequate amount of protein, this will help protect your muscle tissue and encourage your body to use stored body fat instead. The ketogenic diet is a way to trick your body into thinking it’s in starvation mode while you’re still consuming enough calories from protein and fat to provide satiety and protect your muscle mass from being used as fuel. The ketogenic diet is very similar to the Atkins Diet, with perhaps the biggest difference being that on Atkins you don’t pee on ketone strips to determine if you’re in ketosis. This is the condition in which your body is releasing stored fat to fuel activity, and ketone bodies are present in your urine, providing a measurable indication that you are in this state. WHAT YOU SHOULD EAT Meat, cheese, oils, fish, eggs, very low-carb protein products. WHAT YOU SHOULDN'T EAT Processed foods, sugars, grains, and even vegetables and fruits. CONS You can’t eat carbs and stay in ketosis, making this a fairly restrictive diet. During the initial stages, it’s best to cut even fruits and vegetables to make sure your carb intake is minimal and you reach ketosis as quickly as possible. And you have to pee on ketone strips to check your urine for ketones. Often people develop an odd breath odor when they enter ketosis. PROS You can consume your regular amount of calories (or slightly fewer), so you’re not likely to suffer from hunger. Add fibrous vegetables (broccoli, spinach, other greens) once you reach ketosis. Recently, some endurance athletes have started following a ketogenic diet program, reporting that it allows them to p Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

The question a lot of low carb athletes want to get answered to is: “How does a ketogenic diet affect performance?” Secondly: “How to build muscle on keto?” Can you even do it? Well, in my experience, YES you can. Let me give you my story and secrets… When I first heard of nutritional ketosis I didn’t immediately try it out. Being into resistance training, I figured that it couldn’t possibly ever work. Sounds familiar, right? If you’re physically active then you’ve probably been told about the importance of proper nutrition, post-workout glycogen synthesis, recovery, etc. etc. And that you need CARBS to do it. In the athletic community, carbohydrates are being held at the pillar stone of success. But you don’t need them. I’ve never been into this dogmatic belief so eventually, I decided to try out the keto diet. Let’s see what happens and if I lose strength, so be it… I can always get it back. It was meant to be a short experiment, but… After a month of eating less than 30 grams of carbs a day I was in ketosis. I’m not going to lie that some of my performance had suffered, but only temporarily. Other than that, I felt amazing and loved the keto diet. I thought to myself: Why hadn’t I tried it out before? The answer to that was fear of losing my gains – all in vain. I didn’t want to sacrifice the health benefits of low carb and how amazing it made me feel. But I also wanted to regain my performance and continue getting stronger… all while staying on a ketogenic diet. To me, it sounded like a challenge, which I was more than willing to accept My training consists of mainly bodyweight exercises, such as calisthenics, Yoga, and gymnastics. The keto diet is perfect for that and I’ve learned how to build muscle on ketosis. It’s doable Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Great bodybuilders and endurance athletes do two things very well: First, they know exactly how to train. Second, they feed their bodies the best possible food to achieve their training goals. But you're probably wondering: Am I really getting the most out of my food, or could I perform better on a ketogenic diet? Or maybe you are asking what is a ketogenic diet? Want to know what it is, then carry on reading... What is it? A ketogenic diet is one high in healthy fats, moderate in protein, and very low in carbohydrates. The keto diet forces the body to burn fat for energy, instead of carbohydrates, which is its default energy source. In a normal diet that contains high amounts of carbohydrates, the body converts carbs into glucose, which is used by the body, as well as the brain, for fuel and any leftover glucose that is not used is then stored as fat. In a ketogenic diet, also referred to as low-carb, the body has very little amounts of carbohydrates to turn into glucose, so it does the next best thing: it turns to the liver. The liver, then, takes the body’s fat supply and turns it into fatty acids, which are converted into ketones and so begins the metabolic process known as ketosis, which uses the body’s fat stores for energy. ​Now, I hear you say this is great for weight loss... ... but can a bodybuilder or a high endurance athlete follow this way of eating and have the energy needed for peak performance? The concern is: When you lower the amount of carbohydrates in your diet, you’re also lowering your glycogen levels, which is the default energy source for muscles during workouts, and when glycogen is lacking, so is performance. Then you may then wondering:​ Is there a ketogenic diet for bodybuilding and endurance athletes? ​ The good news is: Strength Continue reading >>

Not All Low Carb Diets Are Keto: Why Most Bodybuilding Fans Get It Wrong!

Not All Low Carb Diets Are Keto: Why Most Bodybuilding Fans Get It Wrong!

When most people think of keto, they think of low carb. While ketogenic diets are low carbohydrate diets, the reality is that not all low carbohydrate diets are keto. As I’ve written before, it is quite popular for fitness professionals and YouTube fitness pundits to “beat up” low carbohydrate dieting. Much of this derives from the fact that many physique competitors, who are also quite often YouTube influencers, had horrible experiences with low carbohydrate diets. Low carbohydrate dieting often evokes imagery of meal after meal of bland, tough, chalky fish or chicken with vegetables in plastic Tupperware being choked down by bodybuilders. The truth is that, while many bodybuilders have experienced a low carbohydrate diet, the high protein, low fat, and low carb diet that most bodybuilders do is far from ketogenic. The bodybuilding version of a low carbohydrate diet, performed with the desire to get to minimal (and unhealthy) levels of bodyfat, is an extreme diet that can get you very lean in the short term, but lead to metabolic and hormonal damage in the long term. With this diet, once you get lean, it becomes nearly impossible to hold that level of conditioning for longer than a few days. The idea here is to peak for a show, and then fatten up for the off-season. On the other hand, the ketogenic diet is a high fat, moderate protein, high fat diet with a very different purpose – to get you to optimal levels of bodyfat and performance for the long term. While many who have done the typical bodybuilding low carb diet have experienced weakness, brain fog, and muscle loss, the ketogenic diet can increase strength, endurance, brain energy, and muscle gains. Let’s end the confusion between these two diet methods once and for all by examining the key differences b Continue reading >>

Evidence-based Recommendations For Natural Bodybuilding Contest Preparation: Nutrition And Supplementation

Evidence-based Recommendations For Natural Bodybuilding Contest Preparation: Nutrition And Supplementation

Go to: The popularity of natural bodybuilding is increasing; however, evidence-based recommendations for it are lacking. This paper reviewed the scientific literature relevant to competition preparation on nutrition and supplementation, resulting in the following recommendations. Caloric intake should be set at a level that results in bodyweight losses of approximately 0.5 to 1%/wk to maximize muscle retention. Within this caloric intake, most but not all bodybuilders will respond best to consuming 2.3-3.1 g/kg of lean body mass per day of protein, 15-30% of calories from fat, and the reminder of calories from carbohydrate. Eating three to six meals per day with a meal containing 0.4-0.5 g/kg bodyweight of protein prior and subsequent to resistance training likely maximizes any theoretical benefits of nutrient timing and frequency. However, alterations in nutrient timing and frequency appear to have little effect on fat loss or lean mass retention. Among popular supplements, creatine monohydrate, caffeine and beta-alanine appear to have beneficial effects relevant to contest preparation, however others do not or warrant further study. The practice of dehydration and electrolyte manipulation in the final days and hours prior to competition can be dangerous, and may not improve appearance. Increasing carbohydrate intake at the end of preparation has a theoretical rationale to improve appearance, however it is understudied. Thus, if carbohydrate loading is pursued it should be practiced prior to competition and its benefit assessed individually. Finally, competitors should be aware of the increased risk of developing eating and body image disorders in aesthetic sport and therefore should have access to the appropriate mental health professionals. Keywords: Hypertrophy, Cal Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Dieting: Frequently Asked Questions

Ketogenic Dieting: Frequently Asked Questions

Ketogenic dieting is more popular than ever these days, but unfortunately, that doesn't mean it's more understood than ever. In fact, given the many different names, styles, and goals that get associated with the term, the confusion seems to be growing! After researching ketogenic dieting for years and studying it firsthand in the lab, I believe it has a lot to offer to a wide range of people who want to burn fat, hold on to muscle, and live the healthiest life possible. Researchers have been digging into the details of ketogenic dieting for decades, but there's also fascinating new science happening in this area all the time. So, I'm devoting this installment of "Ask the Muscle Prof" to answering the most common questions I hear about ketogenic dieting. In addition to the questions I’ve answered in the article itself, I also did a live Google Hangout answering the most common questions from readers! After you’ve read the article, check it out at the bottom of the page to have even more of your burning keto questions answered in details! My goal is for you to have no excuse not to know what's going on in this exciting part of the nutrition world! The Terms "Fat-Adapted," "Keto-Adapted," And "In Ketosis" All Get Mixed Up Online. Do They Mean The Same Thing, Or Are There Differences? This is a great question. Ketosis is induced when carbohydrates in the diet are too low to provide the exclusive fuel source for the body, usually lower than 50 grams per day.[1] When this occurs, you enter into a unique metabolic state in which the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies at sufficient levels to allow your brain, organs, and muscles to function using them and fat as fuel.[2] Someone consuming a "traditional Western diet" has a blood ketone level that's Continue reading >>

Diet 911: Ketosis For Dummies

Diet 911: Ketosis For Dummies

Dear M&F, I’m trying to see my six-pack. I’m following a ketogenic diet, but my weight loss seems to have slowed down. Can you help me speed things up? —Wayne F., KS Ketogenic diets (around 50 grams of carbs per day) are extremely effective for getting lean because you reset the body’s enzymatic machinery to use fat as its primary fuel source in the absence of carbs. I see three problems with your diet that are certainly causing your fat-loss plateau—too much protein, not enough good fat, and residual carbohydrates. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done To break your plateau, pump up the fat in your diet to about 50% of your total daily calories and reduce the protein to 30%–40%. The rest of your calories will come from vegetables. Traditionally, bodybuilders opt to get their protein from tuna and lean meats such as chicken breast. However, on a diet like this, you should switch to darker meats and oily fish. Eating salmon, chicken thighs, lamb, and lean beef allows you to get your protein and fat in one source. The last issue is your consumption of “residual” carbohydrates—the carbs you’re not even aware you’re eating, like those in nuts and meal-replacement shakes. It’s OK t Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Do I Need: Protein Myths Busted

How Much Protein Do I Need: Protein Myths Busted

How Much Protein Do I Need: Protein Myths Busted When Clients Ask, Why Do I Need Protein, Can You Answer? As a trainer, youve heard it all when it comes to protein. There are myths galore about protein, from too much is damaging to your body to the idea that protein isnt important unless youre a serious lifter. Lets take a closer look at the function and role of protein, controversial myths, and offer some tips on protein intake. Then, youll be able to answer the question, how much protein do I really need. Protein is an essential nutrient that plays a huge role in helping to keep clients healthy. Further, its essential to building muscle mass. While some clients might be quick to jump on a high protein diet, others might do the opposite due to preferences or belief in myths. Either way, dietary protein consists of amino acids that are responsible for everything. For example, our structure, hormones, enzymes, and immune chemicals all need protein. Because theres such an ongoing functional need for amino acids, keeping a consistent pool of them is like keeping a sink full without a drain plug. Theyre constantly lost as theyre broken down which means theres an ongoing need to consume a diet high in protein rich foods. This is especially the case in goals that involve muscle growth and weight loss. Our clients must realize protein supplies the building blocks of muscle and connective tissue (like ligaments and tendons). So, in the case of resistance training, the body is intentionally breaking down muscle tissue to force it to adapt and build bigger or stronger lean body mass. Therefore, achieving a specific protein intake each day is essential for health, fitness, and weight loss goals. Oftentimes, clients looking for weight loss will consider a low-carb, high-protein di Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilders: The Complete Guide

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilders: The Complete Guide

On of the phases in our How to get shredded in 12 week is a transition into a ketogenic diet. Why is this? As discussed in our Introduction to the Ketogenic Diet, the diet offers numerous benefits for the broad population such as weight loss, reduced sugar cravings, fat loss, mood stabilisation and more. Since our introduction we've received numerous questions from clients and trainees about the ketogenic diet for bodybuilders including: What is the ketogenic diet for bodybuilding? Should the ketogenic diet be used by bodybuilders and how effective is it? What types of keto diet should I follow if I am a bodybuilding competitor? What are the best ketogenic diet food choices? Are cheat meals allowed on a ketogenic diet? What should my target macros be on a ketogenic diet? What is the ketogenic diet food pyramid? This post aims to answer these ketogenic diet for bodybuilding questions and more. Let's get started. The Ketogenic Diet in Bodybuilding The Ketogenic Diet is becoming more mainstream and now it has captured the attention of bodybuilders around the world. The diet offers an effective way to achieve body composition, weight loss and fat loss with minimal lean muscle loss. What are the other benefits of ketogenic diet for bodybuilders? Ability to build muscles with minimal fat levels increasing When on a cutting/shredding diet you will see minimal muscle and structure loss Your body will secrete an increased amount of serum anabolic hormones naturally What's so effective about the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet improves the body's fat burning ability while lowering insulin levels, carbohydrate intake and improving fat digestion. The results of this diet are called “ketosis” – this is a state in which your body will go once it starts using fat for fuel as Continue reading >>

Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Ketodiet Buddy Easy Way To Calculate Your Macros On A Ketogenic Diet

Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 171 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1534 kcal 5 % 18 % 77 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 144 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1294 kcal 6 % 21 % 73 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 117 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 1054 kcal 7 % 24 % 69 % Net Carbs Protein Fat 25 grams 92 grams 91 grams 100 kcal 366 kcal 814 kcal 8 % 29 % 63 % We have open-sourced KetoDiet Buddy, you can now find it on Github. What is the Ketogenic Diet? Ketogenic diets are high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates. Generally, the macronutrient ratio varies within the following ranges: 60-75% of calories from fat (or even more), 15-30% of calories from protein, and 5-10% of calories from carbs. The exact amount of fat and protein is a matter of individual body responses and activity levels. However, most people on ketogenic diets don't consume over 5% of calories from carbohydrates. In most cases, you won’t need to count calories on a ketogenic diet. However, if you find it hard to lose weight or you are relatively fit and trying to lose a small amount of fat, you may also have to count calories. If you just started following a low-carb diet, don't forget to read my free Guide to Keto & Paleo Diet which includes a print-friendly PDF version! You will find all the information you need, including the keto food list and tips on how to follow the diet to achieve your goals. Maintenance Level Maintenance Level, also known as Total Energy Expenditure, is a level at which you maintain a stable bodyweight. According to Lyle McDonald: Maintenance Level = BMR + TEA + TEF where: BMR is the Basal Metabolic Rate, TEA is the Thermal Effect of Activity and TEF is the Thermal Effect of Feeding Basal Metabolic Rate is the amount of energy expended daily at rest. BMR Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Ketogenic Diet For Bodybuilding

Bodybuilding isn’t easy or achieved quickly. It takes time, dedication, a lot of exercises, and the right diet plan. A lot has been said about ketogenic diets and their ability to strip body fat while preserving muscle, and it has made a name for itself amongst heavyweights in the field. But is the ketogenic diet for bodybuilding right for you? Most if not all fitness models and bodybuilder competitors include a low carb eating program at a point. The idea is before a competition or photo shoot; their muscles will have increased definition. When the event is complete, regular dieting is resumed. Bodybuilders or weightlifters looking to achieve a ripped physique can use high-fat ketogenic dieting for preserving lean muscle and increase fat loss efficiently.(1) What is a Ketogenic Diet In the most basic terms, a ketogenic diet is high in fat, has good protein levels, and is very low in carbohydrates. For a more detailed look check out our introduction to a ketogenic diet. This pushes your body into a ketogenic state, which means you start burning fat to fuel your everyday activities. Low-calorie diets can have similar slimming effects, but with them, you also risk losing muscle, which is the exact opposite of what bodybuilders are looking for. Another advantage of ketosis is the strong diuretic effect. This is a fancy way of telling you that you’ll shed water weight. Save LowCarbAlpha Ketogenic Diet for Bodybuilding It’s very common for weightlifters beginning a keto diet to experience loss of strength. Many people get turned off instantly blaming the low level of carbs and give up on this diet. Leave your ego at the door and simply push some lighter weights. You must realize your body is going through many changes adapting to high fat foods. Your strength will come Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To Bodybuilding On The Ketogenic Diet

A Comprehensive Guide To Bodybuilding On The Ketogenic Diet

A common belief among bodybuilders is that carbohydrates are essential for building the best physiques. However, carbohydrates have little to do with the success of many bodybuilders. The key to improving body composition is not through little intricacies like eating the right amount of carbs at the right times. The best bodies are built by implementing five simple principles, whether you are on the ketogenic diet or not. The Five Most Important Bodybuilding Principles The bodybuilding world is filled with radical concepts, silly supplements, and plenty of bro science, but these things — regardless of how hotly debated they are — may only provide you with a 1 to 2% boost in results. What you are really looking for is the tried and true bodybuilding principles that are backed by decades of science. The best results come from following the simple principles that will give you 80% of the results for the price of some hard work and discipline, not that $50 supplement that only leads to a 1% boost in performance. Here are the five principles every bodybuilder must follow: Train hard enough. You must give your muscles a stimulus to grow. Eat enough protein. You must give your muscles the building blocks they need to grow and your body the energy it needs to function. Eat the right amount of calories. Whether you want to cut body fat or increase muscle mass, it is important to eat the right amount of calories. On the ketogenic diet, you will manipulate your calorie consumption by eating more or less fat. Take care of your hormones. Resistance training, adequate nutrition, essential fatty acids and proper sleep should be your primary focus to increase your testosterone and HGH. Too much stress will put your body into a catabolic state that breaks down muscle for energy. Dri Continue reading >>

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