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How Much Protein Ketosis

Your Macros

Your Macros

Most people aim for a specific goal on a ketogenic diet. We aim to make sure the results of the calculator are accurate and can be used by anyone. Our keto calculator uses the Mifflin-St.Jeor Formula which was the most accurate (versus the Katch-McCardle Formula or the Harris-Benedict Formula) in a few studies. In this formula, the gender, height, weight, and age are needed to calculate the number of calories to consume. Our keto calculator uses body fat percentage to calculate your lean body mass. Using this number, we’re able to calculate how much protein you need to sufficiently lose weight without losing excess muscle. Eating too little or too much protein on a ketogenic diet (or any diet) can lead to dangerous or unwanted results. DEXA scans are proven to be the most accurate measurement of body fat. They’re commonly available at gyms and some doctor offices when requested. If you don’t have access to this, you can always go the old-fashioned route and use a good quality caliper. The last resort is using a guide to visually estimate – this can sometimes be a little bit inaccurate, so try to over estimate your body fat percentage. This will give us an idea of how much the minimum amount of calories your body will burn in a day. Our keto calculator uses this to calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). We use this number, along with your body fat percentage, to estimate how many calories you’ll need for your goals. The BMR is simply a number of calories we burn while our bodies are at rest and from eating and digesting food. Together they form what’s known as TDEE, or total daily energy expenditure. This is the keto calculator’s estimate for your total calories burned per day. If you use a heart rate monitor or third party software to monitor your calo Continue reading >>

Protein And Ketosis: Too Much Protien

Protein And Ketosis: Too Much Protien

The key to the keto diet is to maintain a high amount of fat intake, a moderate amount of protein intake, and a very low carb intake. How can protein knock you out of ketosis? Many of us think you can never eat too much protein. However, eating more protein than your body needs can interfere with your health and fitness goals in a number of ways, including weight gain, extra body fat, stress on your kidneys,1 dehydration, and leaching of important bone minerals. The reason too much protein is bad for ketosis is gluconeogenesis. What is gluconeogenesis? Gluconeogenesis is how your body turns protein into glycogen that can be used as glucose to burn for fuel. Why do I not want my body to turn “protein into glycogen that can be used as glucose to burn for fuel?” Remember the purpose of the keto diet is to get the body break down fatty acids, which then produces ketones for energy—the process known as ketosis. If the body uses protein for fuel, it is not in ketosis. This stalls any long-term progress from the keto diet and you won’t reap the benefits that come from using ketone bodies for energy, burning fat, and reducing your body’s reliance on carbs for fuel. Carbohydrates and/or protein can provide oxaloacetate to the liver. Thus, carbohydrates and/or protein can prevent ketone production or knock you out of ketosis. Carbohydrates also elevate insulin, which blocks the release of body fat and reduces the number of fatty acids making their way to the liver for conversion into ketones. A ketogenic diet, then, is one that limits carbohydrate and, to a lesser extent, protein. Where does ketosis come in? If our bodies have more acetyl-CoA than oxaloacetate, the liver will transform the surplus acetyl-CoA into ketone bodies. Our bodies can use these ketone bodies can Continue reading >>

How Much Protein On Keto

How Much Protein On Keto

When on the ketogenic diet, you have to pay some attention to how many calories in what proportions you’re consuming. In addition to carbs and fat, you need to know how much protein on keto is safe. Before I give you the magic answer, let’s look at some of the differences and potential dangers when consuming protein on a low carb diet. The first of many to pioneer the keto movement was the Atkins diet in the early 2000s. It’s not really a ketogenic diet, but more like a kind of low-carb diet. Basically, you restrict your carbohydrates to almost zero and eat more fat and protein. Sounds ketotic, and it will definitely establish nutritional ketosis at least every once in a while. However, the Atkins diet promotes eating protein until satiated, which is quite an ambiguous recommendation. There are potentially no limits to the foods you’re allowed to eat, such as fish, meat, eggs, sausages, nuts, oils, cheese etc. – all the keto goodies. What’s wrong with that, you may ask? The thing is that protein is the only macronutrient that cannot be stored within the body. Carbs get stored as liver and muscle glycogen (100-500 grams) Fat and extra carbs get stored as triglycerides in the adipose tissue (infinite) Protein needs to be converted into glucose through gluconeogenesis first before it can be stored within the body. So, it doesn’t matter how little carbohydrates you consume, if you still eat too much protein. If there’s excess glucose running through the bloodstream, you won’t shift into ketosis. Herein lies the difference between a low carb diet and a ketogenic one – one maintains a sugar burning metabolism, whereas the other switches over to ketones. But how much is too much? In order to establish nutritional ketosis, you need to keep stable blood sugar Continue reading >>

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

A few months ago, I read a book called The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Living. The authors are two of the world's leading researchers on low-carb diets. Dr. Jeff S. Volek is a Registered Dietitian and Dr. Stephen D. Phinney is a medical doctor. These guys have performed many studies and have treated thousands of patients with a low-carb diet. According to them, there are many stumbling blocks that people tend to run into, which can lead to adverse effects and suboptimal results. To get into full-blown ketosis and reap all the metabolic benefits of low-carb, merely cutting back on the carbs isn't enough. If you haven't gotten the results you expected on a low-carb diet, then perhaps you were doing one of these 5 common mistakes. There is no clear definition of exactly what constitutes a "low carb diet." Some would call anything under 100-150 grams per day low-carb, which is definitely a lot less than the standard Western diet. A lot of people could get awesome results within this carbohydrate range, as long as they ate real, unprocessed foods. But if you want to get into ketosis, with plenty of ketoness flooding your bloodstream to supply your brain with an efficient source of energy, then this level of intake may be excessive. It could take some self experimentation to figure out your optimal range as this depends on a lot of things, but most people will need to go under 50 grams per day to get into full-blown ketosis. This doesn't leave you with many carb options except vegetables and small amounts of berries. If you want to get into ketosis and reap the full metabolic benefits of low-carb, going under 50 grams of carbs per day may be required. Protein is a very important macronutrient, which most people aren't getting enough of. It can improve satiety and incr Continue reading >>

All You Need To Know About Protein On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

All You Need To Know About Protein On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet

Proteins, which consist of amino acids, are essential nutrients for the human body. They are one of the building blocks of body tissue and can be used as a fuel source. Unlike carbs, which are not essential for our body, protein and fat are a vital part of our diet. Without these two macronutrients, we would simply not survive. There is a misconception that the ketogenic diet is a high-protein diet. This is a myth; the ketogenic diet is a diet high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbs. Why moderate in protein? Too much protein can kick you out of ketosis, while too little protein may cause muscle loss and increased appetite. What is the ideal protein intake? Does quality matter? Is too much protein dangerous? Let's have a look at these frequently asked questions in more detail. Why is protein so important for weight loss? Studies show that protein is the most sating while carbs are the least sating macronutrients. In other words, if you eat enough protein, you will feel less hungry and eat fewer calories. That's why it's critical to eat adequate amount of protein if your aim is to lose fat. Protein has also been shown to increase energy expenditure. This means that by following a diet rich in protein, you will burn more calories. This metabolic advantage is not significant (around 100 kcal a day) but every little counts! Another way to burn more calories is to build muscle mass. Protein is the most important macronutrient for preserving and building muscle tissue, especially for physically active individuals. More muscles burn more calories and slightly increase your base metabolic rate. This means that you will burn slightly more calories even at rest. Although protein slightly increases insulin, there is no need to worry about negative effects on weight loss. Continue reading >>

What Is It Like To Go On A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is It Like To Go On A Ketogenic Diet?

It's do-able. Some people love it and some people hate it. Personally, I find that nutritional ketosis is almost ideal for me, whereas "normal" eating with lots of carbs in my diet leads to feelings of non-satiety, drowsiness, mood swings, insulin spikes, bloating, and sometimes nausea. A ketogenic diet consists of 70-80% calories from fat, 15-25% calories from protein, and 0-5% calories from net carbohydrates (carbs). You must restrict your daily net carbs to 20-40g daily. (total grams carbs) - (grams fiber) = (net grams carbs) Your transition period depends on a few factors: how strictly you limit your carbohydrate intake, how much energy you expend day-to-day, and how much energy in the form of glucose and glycogen you have stored in your body currently. My transition period takes 3 days. Day 1: This is an easy day. Your blood is still filled with circulating glucose, and any deficit will be taken from the glycogen in your liver to be converted to glucose. You may feel hunger pangs by the afternoon, and a small dip in insulin, which will feel normal to you because this is what happens every day on a normal diet and you are used to it. Day 2: This is an easy day, too. Your body is happily pulling glycogen from your liver, converting it to glucose, and all is well. Any small amount of carbs that you consume are burned away, nothing is being stored. You may feel the typical afternoon slowdown and hunger, as on day 1. Day 3: Hard day. Your body has been (or is nearly) depleted of glucose and glycogen. The small amount of carbs that you consume are not enough to fuel your brain. You have a feeling of satiety from all the fat you are consuming, but you may feel achy, have headaches, and feel sluggish. Your body is alerting you to the lack of glucose and glycogen. It will t Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Your Complete Meal Plan And Supplement Guide

Ketogenic Diet: Your Complete Meal Plan And Supplement Guide

So you've heard the arguments, weighed out the challenges and benefits, and decided you're all in. You're going keto. First off, you're in good company. More people—and more athletes—than ever are embracing a very low-carb, high-fat diet and sticking with it for months, or even years, on end. Once they successfully make the switch from using carbohydrates to using fat and ketones for fuel, they find they're leaner, healthier, and more mentally focused than ever. But for every lifter who ends up loving this approach, you'll find another who had a miserable experience and bailed after just a few days. This is a shame, because they probably could have felt great if they had simply had a better plan—or a plan at all. I'm not here to sell you on nutritional ketosis or explain what it is or the big-picture benefits it can provide. That's the domain of other articles. With the help of Myoplex athlete and longtime keto-adapted athlete Jason Wittrock, I'm here to provide you with your best induction experience. Here's what you need to know to ace your nutrition and supplementation during the crucial first month of ketogenic dieting, along with a complete sample meal plan! Your Must-Have (And Must-Not-Have) Keto Food List Feeling ready to start buying groceries? Slow down there, chief. Go through the pantry, fridge, freezer, and secret stashes under the bed, and get rid of foods with any significant carb content. In the first few days, you could end up craving them—badly. Sorry, no fruit for now. Even carrots and onions are too high-glycemic to work with keto, Wittrock says. Got that done? Cool. Now, here are some of the staples you should build your ketogenic diet around: Fatty nuts and seeds: cashews, macadamia nuts, pumpkin seeds Avocado Whole eggs Full-fat cheese Beef Continue reading >>

Truth About Protein On A Low Carb Diet

Truth About Protein On A Low Carb Diet

Let’s talk a bit about low carb and ketogenic diets and how they truly work within your body. Once you have an understanding of how that process works, it’s much easier to understand exactly how much protein you need! What is a ketogenic diet? Known as ketogenic diets, they work by reducing the quantity of carbohydrates in your diet for a long enough period of time to retrain your body to turn to fats, rather than carbs, for fuel. This process is called ketosis. By using fat for fuel, you are able to burn that stubborn stored fat while keeping your hard-earned muscle. When you fast, reduce the carbs in your diet, are pregnant or exercise for a long period of time, your body will turn to ketones for energy. It takes about 3-4 days of consuming very few carbs, 50 g or less per day, to kickstart ketosis. This is roughly the number of carbs found in 2 bananas. How Does it Work? Dietary carbohydrates are broken into glucose in the body, which is then used as your body’s main source of energy. Not too long ago it was believed that if you went too long without food, your body would burn muscle, hence why you will hear of many bodybuilders who swear by eating every two hours, with some even waking up in the middle of the night to get more calories in. But why would our bodies work that way? We evolved as hunters and gatherers, often going for long periods of time between meals. It only makes sense that our bodies would first burn fat rather than going to muscle for fuel. When glucose is in short supply, your liver will break down fats into ketones, which are then used throughout your body for energy. Muscles and other tissues in your body use ketones rather than glucose for energy metabolism when you are not consuming many carbs. In a healthy person, the production of ket Continue reading >>

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Here's Exactly How I Lost 50 Pounds Doing The Keto Diet

Of all the places to seek life-changing nutrition advice, I never thought the barber shop would be where I found it. But one day last January, after a couple years of saying to myself, "today's the day I make a change," my barber schooled me on something called keto. Normally, I take things he says with a grain of salt unless they're about hair or owning a business, but this guy could literally be on the cover of Men's Health. He's 6 feet tall, conventionally attractive, and his arms are about five pull-ups away from tearing through his t-shirt. If anyone else had implied that I was looking rough, I would've walked out in a fit of rage, but I decided to hear him out. I should clarify that I was out of shape, but my case wasn't that severe. I hadn't exercised in a few years and basically ate whatever I wanted and however much of it, but I was only about 30 to 40 pounds overweight. My barber went on to explain that this diet, paired with an appropriate exercise routine, allowed him to completely transform his body in less than a year, and all he ate was fatty foods. Once he showed me his "before" picture, I was sold. It was time to actually make a change. Short for ketogenic, keto is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet that forces your metabolism into what's called a state of ketosis. There's a much more scientific explanation to that, but it basically means that instead of burning carbohydrates (mainly glucose, or sugars), your body switches to burning fat as a primary source for energy. Keto isn't necessarily about counting calories, though the basic idea of eating less in order to lose weight still applies. This is more of a calculated way to rewire your metabolism so that it burns fat more efficiently over time, using very specific levels of each macronutrient Continue reading >>

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

The Keto diet is not really a diet, but rather a lifestyle change. A Ketogenic diet is best described as a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. Ketogenic Diet Macros Typically, the ketogenic diet consists of only 30-50 grams of carbohydrates a day. High in fat Moderate Protein The beginning of a ketogenic diet can be challenging for some who are not used to eating a very low carbohydrate diet. You’ll probably experience a lack of energy and brain fog as your body is in the beginning stages of making a metabolic shift. This shift is simply your body beginning to use fat for fuel rather than glucose. Your brain and body actually prefers to run on keytones rather than glucose for energy. The goal here is to use the fat on your body as fuel rather than glucose (from sugar or carbs) to burn fat and for overall daily energy requirements. For a full explanation as the ketogenic diet, please see more at: Fastest Method to Burn Fat WITHOUT Exercise Continue reading >>

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

A ketogenic diet requires that a person eat a high fat diet while keeping carbohydrates to a minimum. The third macronutrient category, protein, is an interesting one and often creates heaps of discussion. Carbohydrates and fat are primary energy sources for the body. Protein, on the other hand, is a source of essential amino acids which are the building blocks for the body. However, the amount of protein needed by each person varies greatly based upon a number of factors, including activity level, lean mass, sex, and personal preference to name a few. One question I am often asked is, “can you eat too much protein on a ketogenic diet?” Protein is a very satiating food, and usually the more protein a person eats, the less hungry the person is. One trick people use is to eat a diet high in protein (150 grams + per day) while limiting carbs and fat. This strategy is often wildly successful for fat loss, but it can create other problems to eat so much protein while limiting carb and fat calories so dramatically. I do not advocate eating a high protein/low carb/low fat diet, especially for women. But I do believe wholeheartedly that it is important to eat enough protein. This is even more critical on a ketogenic diet, where carbs are so limited. Under eating protein can cause the body to lose muscle. Some argue for limiting protein because 1) doing so leads to higher ketone levels and 2) they believe that eating too much protein can lead the body to create new glucose from protein (gluconeogenesis) and keep a person from transitioning effectively to fat burning. My friend Mike Berta explains the fallacies of this thinking so well that I am sharing his post rather than recreating my own. Mike can be contacted directly at [email protected] His Facebook group is cal Continue reading >>

Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis – How Much Is The Perfect Amount On A Keto Diet?

Too Much Protein Is Bad For Ketosis – How Much Is The Perfect Amount On A Keto Diet?

You heard it right, too much protein is bad for ketosis. The most common description of the ketogenic diet is that it’s a very low-carb, high fat (LCHF) diet. But the amount of protein you consume is every bit as important as carbohydrates and fat. Protein is an essential part of nutrition for maintaining lean mass and healthy cells, but the right amount is significant on a ketogenic diet. When beginning and maintaining an LCHF keto diet, you should calculate and track your protein consumption. Treat protein just like other macros (carbs and fat), if you want to get into ketosis and stay there. You’re not alone – too much protein on a Ketogenic Diet is a common mistake Many of the people we talk to that are complaining about not being able to achieve ketosis make the mistake of not factoring in the amount of protein they’re consuming. Their protein intake is far too high, and that’s bad for several reasons that we’ll touch on further. Protein intake on a ketogenic diet ought to be moderate and not excessive. We know that 75 percent of your keto diet should come from healthy, non-processed, fats but so many people miss factoring protein into that equation. “Low-Carb, High-Fat. NOT Low-Carb, High-Protein”. We’ve all seen people in their active wear chowing down on plain Lean Chicken Breast and Broccoli. Don’t do that! The important thing is that unlike many modern low carb diets in which protein dominates, on a ketogenic diet fat should be the dominating macro nutrient. Specifically, protein should be around 20% of your macros. Just enough to maintain lean mass and prevent cell degeneration. Not so much that it turns into your bodies primary fuel source via a process called gluconeogenesis. What is Gluconeogenesis? Gluconeogenesis is the process in you Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

One of the biggest mistakes people make when first adopting a ketogenic diet for weight loss is eating too much protein. A successful ketogenic diet requires strictly limiting carbohydrate consumption and upping the intake of healthy fats. This allows the metabolism to switch from primarily using glucose (sugar) for fuel to primarily using ketones (fat) for fuel. This is referred to as ketosis. When the cells begin to burn fat for fuel this includes body fat such as the fat around the belly, thighs, and hips. So to get into ketosis and shed pounds of body fat, you must eat a ketogenic diet which is a low-carb high-fat (LCHF) diet. But what about protein? Does it matter how much you eat? And what kind of protein is best for maximum weight loss? Protein and Weight Loss A common misconception is that a ketogenic diet is high in protein. The reality, however, is that a ketogenic diet is a moderate protein diet, or maybe even more accurately, an adequate protein diet. In fact, too much protein can actually inhibit your body from entering ketosis thus preventing you from experiencing the myriad of benefits of the diet. There are many reasons why adequate protein consumption is required for success on a ketogenic diet.Studies have shown that protein is the most satiating macronutrient while carbohydrate is the least satiating. Therefore, if you eat an adequate amount of protein you will feel more satisfied and be more likely to eat less calories. Protein is also the most important macronutrient for building and maintaining muscle mass. Muscles burn calories 24/7 even when you are not exercising. Protein and Ketosis Proteins are the building blocks of life, they provide the body with all of the essential amino acids. But more is not always better. When first adopting a ketogeni Continue reading >>

Protein On Keto – How Much Is Too Much?

Protein On Keto – How Much Is Too Much?

Protein is an oddly controversial macronutrient. It is an essential building block for muscle development, helping to promote health and good body composition. Protein also makes us feel full, which helps you lose weight. Yet, many people feel that too much protein is dangerous (it isn’t!). For anyone on a keto diet, protein is more complicated still. Too much protein will kick you out of ketosis. Yet, too little protein on keto isn’t good either. So, what’s the balance? I’m going to show you why protein matters and how much you should be having. After all, you want the best possible outcomes. Right? For one thing – protein helps in muscle building. That’s important for maintaining a healthy body composition, which then promotes health. Regardless of your weight, you need lean muscle and protein is a key aspect of that process (1,2,3). Protein is also important for health, offering various benefits. Many protein-rich foods are nutrient dense as well. So, if you have too little protein, you might miss out on other key nutrients too. If you’re losing weight, getting enough protein is critical. If your intake is too low, you’ll start to lose lean body mass rather than fat (4). That’s not what you want to do. Protein makes sure that you lose fat, not muscle. How Protein Helps Weight Loss Research shows that protein tends to be satiating, helping people to feel full for longer (5,6). This aspect alone is critical for losing weight (7). After all, feeling hungry is frustrating – and it’s a key reason why people fail diets. Protein also helps in other ways. For example, high-protein meals can lower cravings and help people to snack less (8). Likewise, protein increases energy used. This effect isn’t dramatic but any benefit helps. The muscle-building as Continue reading >>

Can Too Much Protein Stall Your Results?

Can Too Much Protein Stall Your Results?

It’s true that eating protein may boost metabolism and help you to feel fuller but this doesn’t mean that Atkins is the protein ‘free for all’ that many believe it to be and excessive amounts of steak, cheese, eggs and other foods shouldn’t be over-eaten, and this is for a valid reason. If you consume too much protein then this can be converted into glucose by a process called ‘gluconeogenesis’. The conversion of protein to glucose occurs as a result of the hormone, glucagon, which prevents low blood sugar and so isn’t a bad thing unless you are OVER-consuming protein. You see, when you reduce carbs, you go into ‘ketosis’ or fat burning and you produce ketones which are also used for energy. The small amount of glucose needed for brain function comes partly from the process of gluconeogenesis. This means you’ve no need for high amounts of carbs, above and beyond the ‘good’ carbs which you get from vegetables, pulses etc.; and this is for their nutritional factor as they are packed with fibre and other nutrients. When following Atkins, if you do overeat protein foods then you can stall the transition to ketosis; or even get knocked out of this fat burning state altogether. Don’t worry too much though as gluconeogenesis is a slow process and so you’ll not instantly stop burning fat if you eat a steak that’s too large, or you have an extra helping of bacon on your full English breakfast. However don’t eat large helpings of meat or eggs on a daily basis as this may set you back and stall weight loss. It’s also depends on you as a person as some people are more sensitive to protein and are best advised to err on the lower end of the scale when choosing meals. Others can eat more protein and needs will increase if you’re exercising too. S Continue reading >>

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