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How Much Protein Do I Need On Keto?

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

The question a lot of low carb athletes want to get answered to is: “How does a ketogenic diet affect performance?” Secondly: “How to build muscle on keto?” Can you even do it? Well, in my experience, YES you can. Let me give you my story and secrets… When I first heard of nutritional ketosis I didn’t immediately try it out. Being into resistance training, I figured that it couldn’t possibly ever work. Sounds familiar, right? If you’re physically active then you’ve probably been told about the importance of proper nutrition, post-workout glycogen synthesis, recovery, etc. etc. And that you need CARBS to do it. In the athletic community, carbohydrates are being held at the pillar stone of success. But you don’t need them. I’ve never been into this dogmatic belief so eventually, I decided to try out the keto diet. Let’s see what happens and if I lose strength, so be it… I can always get it back. It was meant to be a short experiment, but… After a month of eating less than 30 grams of carbs a day I was in ketosis. I’m not going to lie that some of my performance had suffered, but only temporarily. Other than that, I felt amazing and loved the keto diet. I thought to myself: Why hadn’t I tried it out before? The answer to that was fear of losing my gains – all in vain. I didn’t want to sacrifice the health benefits of low carb and how amazing it made me feel. But I also wanted to regain my performance and continue getting stronger… all while staying on a ketogenic diet. To me, it sounded like a challenge, which I was more than willing to accept My training consists of mainly bodyweight exercises, such as calisthenics, Yoga, and gymnastics. The keto diet is perfect for that and I’ve learned how to build muscle on ketosis. It’s doable Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should I Eat?

How Much Fat Should I Eat?

I’ve been asked by several new Ketovangelists about how they should calculate their fat, protein, and carb intake. This is, by far, one of the most common questions asked and it leads to lots of confusion, so I’m going to try my best to make it as simple as possible. First, let’s talk terms. Sometimes people refer to things called “macros” when asking this question (e.g. What are your macros? or What should my macros be?) What the heck are they talking about? The term “macros” is a shortened way of saying “macronutrients”, which another, sciency, way of saying “fats, proteins, and carbs”. Nutritionist break food down into two main subsets, macronutrients and micronutrients. Micronutrients are vitamins and minerals (among other things). Macronutrients are, as I said, one of three things (four if you count alcohol, which we are not): fats, proteins, and carbs. So when someone asks how much fat they should eat, or how many carbs they should eat, they are asking how about their macros. Okay, so enough of that, let’s get to the actual meat (no pun intended). Determining your macros is really quite simple, especially for Ketovangelists. We start with protein. How much protein should I eat? This is super simple. As a general guideline, this is the amount of protein per day for you: Female: 50g – 75g Male: 100g – 120g Simple. Like I said. Okay, that’s protein. So what about fats? How much fat should I eat? Okay, this is a little more involved. Not much. But a little. You want 65% – 80% of your calories to come from fat. So, if your presumed daily caloric requirement is 2000 calories, you’ll want between 1300 – 1600 calories from fat. Since each gram of fat is 9 calories, that would equate to between 144g – 177g per day of good fat. Of cours Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Can You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Can You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

You likely already know cutting the carbs is important on a keto diet, but protein intake matters, too! One of the biggest mistakes people run into when going and staying keto is eating too much protein. So, you might be left with the question: How much protein can you eat on a ketogenic diet? Let’s cover how you can avoid the mistake of consuming too much protein and exactly how much of it you can eat on a ketogenic diet. Eating Protein on the Ketogenic Diet A great appeal of the ketogenic diet is getting to eat plenty of foods that are filling and satisfying. Those foods include rich, fatty animal proteins. But how much of these proteins is the right amount? To answer that question, you need to understand how proteins work within the ketogenic diet and why it’s important to monitor your amounts for the best results. The Role of Protein in Ketosis Protein is an important building block of life; we need them to provide our bodies with all of the essential amino acids. Proteins are important for many different actions in the body, including regulation and function of the organs and tissues. Obviously, it’s important to make sure you’re getting enough of these complex molecules. The problem is that when you’re eating a ketogenic diet, it can be pretty easy to eat a lot of foods high in protein. You’re almost eliminating an entire macronutrient group from your diet (carbohydrates), so those new to keto might simply replace the carbs with more protein-rich foods. This is where you have to be careful, because more protein is not always better—in fact, it can keep you out of ketosis. A common misconception is that the ketogenic diet is a high protein diet—it’s not. It’s a high-fat, moderate-protein, and low-carb diet. Why Eating Too Much Protein is Bad Ket Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #013: Protein Intake On Keto

The Keto Diet Podcast Ep. #013: Protein Intake On Keto

Interview with Mike Mutzel, Functional Medicine Practitioner and author, chats with us about the importance of protein on a ketogenic diet, how your gut health dictates your ability to adapt, changes women can make to the ketogenic diet, and more. For podcast transcript, scroll down. SHOW NOTES + LINKS TIMESTAMPS Microbiome support for fat-burning success (14:07) Protein misconceptions on a ketogenic diet (24:13) The key to burning more fat efficiently (42:34) PARTNERS OF THE KETO DIET PODCAST Get the nourishment your body deserves and try Vital Proteins collagen protein, gelatin or liver capsules today. Instant Pot is a partner of the podcast! Get your Instant Pot pressure cooker for $10 off with code HEALTHFUL at InstantPot.com. 100% grass-fed & finished FERMENTED beef sticks with 1 billion naturally-occurring, gut-healing probiotics! Go to PaleoValley.com for 20% off. TRANSCRIPT FOR THIS EPISODE Leanne Vogel: You’re listening to episode number 13 of The Keto Diet Podcast. Hey, I’m Leanne from HealthfulPursuit.com, and this is The Keto Diet Podcast where we’re busting through the restrictive mentality of a traditional ketogenic diet to uncover the life you crave. What’s keto? Keto is a low-carb high-fat diet where we’re switching from a sugar-burning state to becoming fat-burning machines. If you’re in need of keto recipe food prep inspiration, I’ve prepped a free seven-day keto meal plan exclusive for podcast listeners. The plan is complete with a shopping list and everything you need to chow down on keto for seven whole days. Download your free copy at healthfulpursuit.com/ketomeal. Let’s get this party started. Hey guys, happy Sunday. If you’re celebrating Christmas, I hope Santa was really good to you, and that you’re enjoying all the wonderful Continue reading >>

Keto Targets For Fat, Protein & Carbs (lcn 60)

Keto Targets For Fat, Protein & Carbs (lcn 60)

Last updated on September 26th, 2017 Keto-safe targets for fat, protein & carbs Low Carb Nugget 60 To start or restart a ketogenic diet, you need to think about your macro-nutrient targets. Both carbs and protein need to be strictly limited, but dietary fat will be your friend. What are specific macro-nutrient targets? [Update] Show Links “Calories from Fat, Protein, Carbohydrates, Alcohol.” NutriStrategy. 2015. Last accessed: September 23, 2017. “How Much Protein Do We Need?” Sophie Egan. The New York Times. July 28, 2017. Transcript Low Carb Nugget 60 “Keto targets for fat, protein, and carbs” This is Episode 60 of the Low Carb Nugget for Saturday, September 23, 2017. I’m Jim Anderson. Monday I will be restarting my ketogenic diet, with the intention of getting in and staying in ketosis for at least three months. That is, until Christmas. However, my real goal is to lose weight and body fat. Namely, I want to lose fat around my mid-section — about four inches worth. I can’t directly control being in ketosis or losing weight. What I can directly control is what I eat, and how much I eat. My main method of control will be to keep a detailed food log. That’s what I am pledging to do from next Monday until Christmas Day — to record everything that I eat. And I’ll keep the records in a way that allows me to analyze and reflect on my macro-nutrient and micro-nutrient intake. That means using a computer program, of course. I’ve done this before. It works, but it does get tiresome. I’m sure I’ll be ready to drop the food log by Christmas. What will my macro-nutrient goals be? At least, what will they be at the start? For the first three weeks, I plan to eat something close to the Induction Phase of the Atkins Diet. This means very low carb. In Ph Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

One of the biggest mistakes people make when first adopting a ketogenic diet for weight loss is eating too much protein. A successful ketogenic diet requires strictly limiting carbohydrate consumption and upping the intake of healthy fats. This allows the metabolism to switch from primarily using glucose (sugar) for fuel to primarily using ketones (fat) for fuel. This is referred to as ketosis. When the cells begin to burn fat for fuel this includes body fat such as the fat around the belly, thighs, and hips. So to get into ketosis and shed pounds of body fat, you must eat a ketogenic diet which is a low-carb high-fat (LCHF) diet. But what about protein? Does it matter how much you eat? And what kind of protein is best for maximum weight loss? Protein and Weight Loss A common misconception is that a ketogenic diet is high in protein. The reality, however, is that a ketogenic diet is a moderate protein diet, or maybe even more accurately, an adequate protein diet. In fact, too much protein can actually inhibit your body from entering ketosis thus preventing you from experiencing the myriad of benefits of the diet. There are many reasons why adequate protein consumption is required for success on a ketogenic diet.Studies have shown that protein is the most satiating macronutrient while carbohydrate is the least satiating. Therefore, if you eat an adequate amount of protein you will feel more satisfied and be more likely to eat less calories. Protein is also the most important macronutrient for building and maintaining muscle mass. Muscles burn calories 24/7 even when you are not exercising. Protein and Ketosis Proteins are the building blocks of life, they provide the body with all of the essential amino acids. But more is not always better. When first adopting a ketogeni Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Protein Shake For A Ketosis Diet?

What Is A Good Protein Shake For A Ketosis Diet?

A ketosis diet -- more correctly termed a ketogenic diet --- normally includes three dietary characteristics: low carbohydrate, high fat and moderate protein intake. This type of diet puts you into ketosis, a metabolic condition where your body burns fat for energy rather than carbohydrates, its normal energy source. Protein shakes designed for low-carbohydrate diets will meet your need if you want to follow a ketogenic diet. Ask your doctor before making major diet changes. Video of the Day If you're following a ketogenic diet, you need a moderate amount of protein in your diet. If you consume too much protein, your liver will convert some of the protein to glucose to use for energy, explains Dr. Michael Eades, co-founder of Medi-Stat Medical Clinics. This slows the changeover to burning fat for energy. Protein intake must remain high enough to prevent muscle loss and low enough to not interfere with ketosis, author Lyle McDonald explains in his book, "The Ketogenic Diet: A Complete Guide for the Dieter and Practitioner." On average, you need 0.8 grams of protein per 2.2 pounds of body weight if you're sedentary and 0.9 grams if you're active, according to McDonald, although you might need as much as 150 grams of protein per day in the first few weeks of a ketogenic diet. Protein supplements often contain 20 to 30 grams of protein per serving; don't drink protein shakes that exceed your daily limit if you drink several per day. If you drink protein shakes, check the label to make sure the shakes contain no more than a few grams of carbohydrate. As long as you keep your carbohydrate intake to less than 50 to 80 grams per day, your body will go into ketosis, author and trainer Mark Sissons explains on his website, Mark's Daily Apple. However, keeping carbohydrates to les Continue reading >>

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

If you haven’t been living under a rock for the past year or so, then you’ve most likely heard of the ketogenic (or keto) diet. If you have been living under one, I’m going to need you to crawl out from under it and take a seat because Ketogenic Dieting 101 is about to begin. So, Like, What Is It? Keto is a diet with high fats, moderate protein, and restricted carbohydrates. Initially designed to help children with epilepsy, it’s garnered attention for its effectiveness in regards to fat loss. The traditional ketogenic diet (also known as the therapeutic ketogenic diet), mimics the effects of starvation by forcing the body to burn its own fat stores rather than glucose. When you restrict carbohydrates, the body enters into a metabolic state known as ketosis, where the liver converts stored fat (triglycerides) into ketones. These ketones are what the body uses to fuel your brain, organs, and muscles. On the therapeutic ketogenic diet, the macro breakdown looks like this: However, as the ketogenic diet’s grown in popularity, especially among people who are looking to lose fat and build muscle, a new form of the diet’s emerged. While the traditional ketogenic diet is an extremely high-fat diet with sufficient protein intake, the physique ketogenic diet is a high-fat diet but with adequate protein intake. Huh, Sufficient and Adequate Protein Intake? This is where a lot of the confusion arises around the ketogenic diet, and it’s important to understand the difference. When the goal is fat loss, the concomitant goal is to preserve muscle mass. On a therapeutic ketogenic diet, protein is set to around 10-15% of total calorie intake. This is the sufficient amount of protein required to keep the body functioning and you healthy – basically so you don’t die. The Continue reading >>

Keto Calculator: Calculate Your Macronutrient Goals

Keto Calculator: Calculate Your Macronutrient Goals

Use this Keto calculator to determine your macronutrient levels. This will be your best method for reaching and maintaining nutritional ketosis. I highly suggest using the Keto Gains calculator. Before starting, please make sure that you understand that: Carbs are a limit. Do not eat above your carb allowance daily. This will ensure ketosis. Protein is a goal. Your main priority. Always strive to hit your protein macro goal each day. You can eat more protein if desired. Fat is a lever. Eat as much as you need to feel satisfied and energized. Not a goal. Eat less to lose more. Eat more to gain. If you’ve ever heard somebody tell you to “track your macros,” this is the first step. Please start by entering your information below. Tracking Your Macros It’s important that you track your macros — at least temporarily — until you can get a feel for the amount of food you can eat. My favorite way to do this is with an app on my phone called My Fitness Pal. You can look up millions of different foods, create recipes, scan barcodes and more. I highly encourage you to check it out. Others prefer to use plain old pen and paper, and that’s completely fine. Remember to re-check your macros with the Keto Calculator as you lose weight. This is integral as your dietary needs will change over time. How to Find Body Fat Percentage There are a number different ways that you can calculate or estimate your body fat that include: Skinfold calipers Body measurements DEXA scans Comparison photos Chances are that you’ll likely opt for the last option — comparison photos. This method is fine despite not being as accurate. You can see some comparison photos of men and women below: Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Lchf Keto Diet?

How Much Protein Should I Eat On A Lchf Keto Diet?

Many people following a keto LCHF diet are unsure about how much protein they should be eating. It’s a common belief that a low carb diet should be high in protein. As we all know, eating a LCHF keto diet means eating most of your calories as fat, not protein. On a LCHF keto diet your macros (the composition of your diet) should look something like this: 70% fat/25% protein/5% carbs. You definitely don’t want to be eating more than 30% of your calories as protein. A common error we see people making is making protein the central focus and of all their meals and hence they end up eating a large percentage of their diet as protein, with too little fat and too few low carb veggies. What’s wrong with eating too much protein you ask? Read our post about protein to find out. When you are on a LCHF keto diet for weight loss, eating protein in excess results in a few things happening: Less fat is eaten and so the diet is not truly ketogenic. The benefits of being in ketosis do not happen. Peoples macros do not approach the 70% fat/25% protein/5% carbs recommendation You end up consuming too many calories, because your protein servings are huge! You get tired and bored with eating protein all the time and you end up going off your LCHF eating plan and start adding carbs back to your diet just to get some variety You end up not eating enough low carb veggies. The focus of a keto diet should be low carb vegetables which are the perfect vehicle for adding fat to the diet in the form of olive oil, avocado oil, butter and coconut oil. You can roast or saute your veggies in fat or steam them and then drizzle them with olive or other nut oils. See our useful guide to the best low carb vegetables. Your weight loss can slow down or stop People are very confused about how large thei Continue reading >>

What Is The Keto Diet? (and Should I Try It?)

What Is The Keto Diet? (and Should I Try It?)

Carbs are out. Fat is in. At least that’s the case if you believe the ketogenic diet. Claims that the keto diet can somehow trigger superhero-level exercise performance and fat-loss have grown so loud that it’s hard to believe the eating approach was originally designed as a way to treat epileptic seizures in children. But then, taking your body into ketosis — the process by which the body runs on fat because you don’t have enough carbs/glucose — is a rich resource for the seemingly unbelievable. This is, after all, a dieting method that requires you to purchase special test strips to examine your urine in order to confirm if you have “achieved” ketosis. (Yes, seriously.) So is the keto diet effective? Yes and no. The claims about keto superiority for fat loss and muscle gain are significantly inflated. But that doesn’t mean the diet is without value. To help you determine if the keto diet is the right approach for you, we dig into your biggest keto diet questions—and some you probably hadn’t even thought about asking. In the end, should you decide that going keto is best for you, you’ll at least know how to do it properly (most people don’t), understand what it’s really doing to your body (ditto), and be aware of the risks involved. What is a ketogenic diet? In a traditional ketogenic diet, you eat 80 percent of your daily calories from fat. The remaining 20 percent is divvied up between protein and carbohydrates—but most of it protein. Typically, carb intake is capped at 20 grams per day, or less than what you’ll find in a single apple, according to Andy Galpin, Ph.D., C.S.C.S., C.P.T., associate professor of kinesiology and director of the Biochemistry & Molecular Exercise Physiology Lab at California State University, Fullerton. This nu Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Is Too Much For A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Is Too Much For A Ketogenic Diet?

You possibly already know that cutting the carbohydrates is vital on a ketogenic diet, but protein consumption equally matters! One of the prevalent mistakes people make while following the ketogenic diet is consuming too much protein. So, you might be left with the overwhelming question: How much protein can you actually eat while on a ketogenic diet? Let’s find out how you can stay away from the mistake of consuming too much protein and precisely how much of it you can safely eat on a ketogenic diet. Eating protein on the ketogenic diet The biggest dilemma of the ketogenic diet is getting to eat ample amount of foods that are fulfilling and curbs hunger. Those foods comprise rich, fatty animal based proteins. But what quantity of these proteins is the right amount? To answer this overwhelming question, you need to realize how proteins work within the ketogenic diet and why it’s significant to keep track of your amounts for the good results. The role of protein in ketosis Protein is a vital building block of life; we need protein to supply our bodies with all of the necessary amino acids. Proteins are essential for several different actions in the body, including regulation and functioning of the internal organs and cells. Clearly, it’s imperative to make sure you’re getting adequate quantity of these complex vital molecules. The problem is that when you’re following a ketogenic diet, it can be tempting to eat a lot of foods high in protein content. You’re nearly removing an entire major group from your diet (carbohydrates), so those new to keto diet might unknowingly replace the carbohydrates with other protein-rich foods. This is exactly where you have to be cautious because too much protein is not always good—in fact, it can keep you out of ketosis and Continue reading >>

Daily Protein Requirement

Daily Protein Requirement

Your daily protein requirement is affected by several factors: Activity level: the more active you are, the more protein you can eat. This is especially true of resistance type exercise such as weight lifting. Essential protein intake: Nine of the 20 required amino acids (the molecular building blocks which make up proteins) are essential, meaning the body cannot make them so they must be obtained from the food we eat. Your gender and basic build: In general, men need more protein than women, and more muscular people also require more protein to maintain lean body mass. The official recommended daily allowance (RDA) for protein intake is set at .36 grams per pound of body weight each day. This figure represents the minimum intake needed to maintain health. The protein requirements for those who are looking to optimize health, who are sick, injured or on a very low carb diet may be different. It’s also important to know that a daily protein requirement should never be based on percentage of calories. A person's protein requirements are constant no matter how many calories he or she eats each day because the amount of protein needed is a function of a person’s lean body mass (LBM) or on total ideal body weight if LBM is not known. Calculating protein needs should be based on maintaining positive nitrogen balance. Amino acids contain nitrogen. The protein we eat gets metabolized into amino acids for use in building new muscle and other tissues. Excess nitrogen is excreted via the urine. When the amount of nitrogen excreted is less than the amount of nitrogen in the food we ate, we can say that we are in positive nitrogen balance and it means we took in enough protein to build new tissues. If we don’t eat enough protein, then we get into a negative nitrogen balance. W Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Macros: How To Calculate Yours

Keto Diet Macros: How To Calculate Yours

The keto diet (ketogenic diet) has been around for quite some time, but recently there has been a surge in popularity for this ultra low carb eating regime. Firstly I want to emphasize that long-term, flexible dieting (eating normal levels of macros) is just as good at helping your reach your weight loss and fitness goals as a keto diet. It could be argued that flexible dieting is better as it is less restrictive and therefore more sustainable. But, a keto diet may be appropriate for someone looking for faster initial results¹. Those training for fitness competitions. Those trying to lose weight for an event but have a shorter time window. Those who have tried flexible dieting but because of metabolic issues are unable to lose weight eating normal levels of carbohydrates. What is a Keto Diet? The keto diet was first developed for use by those with epilepsy. It later became popular among bodybuilders to cut fat before competitions. It will cause your body to burn nothing but fat for energy instead of using glucose (carbohydrates). A person achieves this by greatly limiting carbs and eating more fat. In the absence of carbs, the body will begin converting both dietary fat and body fat into ketones which are then used by the cells of your body for energy. It’s important to understand that a calorie deficit is still required for fat loss to happen. Looking for keto food ideas? Keto Macro Calculation If you wish to calculate your keto diet macros, the first thing to do is to establish your estimated TDEE (total daily energy expenditure). Here’s the formula:² Now factor in your movement, since you probably don’t lie in bed all day. Sedentary Regular daily activity like a little walking, a couple flights of stairs, eating, talking etc. (REE X 1.2) Light activity Any ex Continue reading >>

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