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How Much Protein Do I Need On Keto?

How Much Protein Can You Eat In Ketosis?

How Much Protein Can You Eat In Ketosis?

Having been a low-carb enthusiast and team Diet Doctor member for years, you would have thought I’d nailed ketosis ages ago. I haven’t. In the last post, Why You’re Not in Ketosis, I revealed why, and how I fixed it (by reducing my carb and protein intake to 20 and 60 grams per day respectively). But, I had a problem. Though it felt awesome to be back in ketosis, it sucked to eat so little protein – 60 grams a day isn’t much for a meat lover like me. Could I eat more protein AND remain in optimal ketosis? I was going to find out. The protein experiment I designed the following experiment: First, I would increase my protein intake from 60 grams a day to the level where I would no longer be in optimal ketosis. Then, I would reduce my protein intake until I was back in optimal ketosis, using what I ate on the last day to define my daily-protein limit. Finally, I’d eat to this daily-protein limit every day for a week to test its accuracy, adjusting my protein intake if necessary. To increase the trustworthiness of the experiment, I added five rules: 1. Keep eating 10-20 grams of carbs a day 2. Keep eating during a four-hour window (5-9pm) 3. Adjust my protein intake gradually 4. Make no other major changes to my life 5. Measure my blood-ketone levels every morning before eating “Nice plan”, I thought. But there was one thing I hadn’t taken into account… Preparation To start off the experiment, I measured my blood-ketone levels: 2.0 mmol/L. Not exactly shocking news – I had been eating 45-60 grams of protein and 10-20 grams of carbs a day for weeks, being in optimal ketosis almost every morning. But all that could end soon – it was protein time. Day 1: Taco-cheese shells On the first day of the experiment, I ate similarly to how I’d eaten lately – Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Protein Shake For A Ketosis Diet?

What Is A Good Protein Shake For A Ketosis Diet?

A ketosis diet -- more correctly termed a ketogenic diet --- normally includes three dietary characteristics: low carbohydrate, high fat and moderate protein intake. This type of diet puts you into ketosis, a metabolic condition where your body burns fat for energy rather than carbohydrates, its normal energy source. Protein shakes designed for low-carbohydrate diets will meet your need if you want to follow a ketogenic diet. Ask your doctor before making major diet changes. Video of the Day If you're following a ketogenic diet, you need a moderate amount of protein in your diet. If you consume too much protein, your liver will convert some of the protein to glucose to use for energy, explains Dr. Michael Eades, co-founder of Medi-Stat Medical Clinics. This slows the changeover to burning fat for energy. Protein intake must remain high enough to prevent muscle loss and low enough to not interfere with ketosis, author Lyle McDonald explains in his book, "The Ketogenic Diet: A Complete Guide for the Dieter and Practitioner." On average, you need 0.8 grams of protein per 2.2 pounds of body weight if you're sedentary and 0.9 grams if you're active, according to McDonald, although you might need as much as 150 grams of protein per day in the first few weeks of a ketogenic diet. Protein supplements often contain 20 to 30 grams of protein per serving; don't drink protein shakes that exceed your daily limit if you drink several per day. If you drink protein shakes, check the label to make sure the shakes contain no more than a few grams of carbohydrate. As long as you keep your carbohydrate intake to less than 50 to 80 grams per day, your body will go into ketosis, author and trainer Mark Sissons explains on his website, Mark's Daily Apple. However, keeping carbohydrates to les Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Can You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Can You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

You likely already know cutting the carbs is important on a keto diet, but protein intake matters, too! One of the biggest mistakes people run into when going and staying keto is eating too much protein. So, you might be left with the question: How much protein can you eat on a ketogenic diet? Let’s cover how you can avoid the mistake of consuming too much protein and exactly how much of it you can eat on a ketogenic diet. Eating Protein on the Ketogenic Diet A great appeal of the ketogenic diet is getting to eat plenty of foods that are filling and satisfying. Those foods include rich, fatty animal proteins. But how much of these proteins is the right amount? To answer that question, you need to understand how proteins work within the ketogenic diet and why it’s important to monitor your amounts for the best results. The Role of Protein in Ketosis Protein is an important building block of life; we need them to provide our bodies with all of the essential amino acids. Proteins are important for many different actions in the body, including regulation and function of the organs and tissues. Obviously, it’s important to make sure you’re getting enough of these complex molecules. The problem is that when you’re eating a ketogenic diet, it can be pretty easy to eat a lot of foods high in protein. You’re almost eliminating an entire macronutrient group from your diet (carbohydrates), so those new to keto might simply replace the carbs with more protein-rich foods. This is where you have to be careful, because more protein is not always better—in fact, it can keep you out of ketosis. A common misconception is that the ketogenic diet is a high protein diet—it’s not. It’s a high-fat, moderate-protein, and low-carb diet. Why Eating Too Much Protein is Bad Ket Continue reading >>

Keto Calculator

Keto Calculator

You will see that a lot of websites pretending the be the masters of the Ketogenic Diet that are trying to tell you that there is an EXACT amount of fat, proteins and carbohydrates that you need to take or your off! This is simply not true, what really matters is the ratio of Ketogenic to Anti-Ketogenic food that you ingest. That is why we had an engineer working on this calculator to make it fully customizable !! The Right Macros I know the ketogenic diet can be quite complex to follow at first if you don't know anything about calories. I created this calculator to help you figure out how many grams of each macro-nutrient you need everyday. The nutrient intake on a ketogenic diet typically works out to about 70-75% of calories from fat, 20-25% from protein, and 5-10% from carbohydrate on a daily basis. How To Use This Calculator 1. First you'll need to know how many calories you need daily. To figure this out, just use our Daily Calorie Intake Calculator bellow and follow the instructions. It will give you the amount of calories needed to maintain your weight, to lose 1 or 2 pounds per week or to gain 1 or 2 pounds per week. Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should I Consume On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Protein Should I Consume On A Ketogenic Diet?

Share Proteins are one of the building blocks of body tissue and can be used as a fuel source and are a essential for the body. Unlike carbs, which are not essential for our body, protein and fat are a vital part of our diet. Without these two macronutrients, we would simply not survive. It’s important to remember that the ketogenic diet is a diet high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbs. Why moderate in protein? Too much protein can kick you out of ketosis, while too little protein may cause muscle loss and increased appetite. Why is protein so important? Protein is the more filling and satisfying than carbs. In other words, if you eat enough protein, you will feel less hungry and eat fewer calories. That’s why it’s critical to eat adequate amount of protein if your aim is to lose fat or maintain lean muscle mass. Protein has also been shown to increase energy expenditure. This means that by following a diet rich in protein, you will burn more calories. Another way to burn more calories is to build muscle mass. Protein is the most important macronutrient for preserving and building muscle tissue, especially for physically active individuals. More muscle means you burn more calories and slightly increase your base metabolic rate and you will burn slightly more calories even at rest. How much protein should you take? The amount of dietary protein can be determined by your body weight and activity level. People who are physically more active have higher protein requirements than those whose lifestyle less active or sedentary. A more accurate estimate, especially for people with high body fat, can be reached by calculating protein intake from lean mass, which is calculated as total body weight minus body fat. Other factors like gender or age can affect prote Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Brief Overview A ketogenic diet is a way of eating that promotes a state of ketosis in the body. Generally speaking a ketogenic diet will have the following macronutrient ratios: High Fat – 60%-80% of total calories come from fat. Moderate Protein – 15%-35% of total calories come from protein. Low Carbohydrate – 5% or less of total calories come from carbohydrates. Everyone’s macronutrient breakdown will be different and depends on a variety of factors. Reference our Keto Macro Calculator to figure out what yours are! Eating in accordance with these macronutrient ratio’s will deplete your body of glucose and force it to start producing ketones. Your body will then use these ketones for energy. What is Ketosis From Wikipedia: Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose (sugar) provides most of the energy. With the abundance of high carbohydrate foods available in modern times, virtually all human beings that don’t make a concerted effort to restrict carbs are always in a state of glycolysis. There are a number of reasons why ketosis is beneficial when compared to glycolysis, which we will get into later. What are Ketones? Ketones are the fuel source your body is running on when it’s in a state of ketosis. They are produced in the liver when glycogen is depleted and are characterized as a slower burning fuel source when compared to glucose. Insulin and Keto This is where the magic happens. Eating a high carb diet means you’re always producing insulin to transport the glucose around your body. The fat can just sit around and watch because insulin is doing all the work. The fat is eventually stored, which leads to weight gain. In a Continue reading >>

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

An Introduction To The Ketogenic Diet

If you haven’t been living under a rock for the past year or so, then you’ve most likely heard of the ketogenic (or keto) diet. If you have been living under one, I’m going to need you to crawl out from under it and take a seat because Ketogenic Dieting 101 is about to begin. So, Like, What Is It? Keto is a diet with high fats, moderate protein, and restricted carbohydrates. Initially designed to help children with epilepsy, it’s garnered attention for its effectiveness in regards to fat loss. The traditional ketogenic diet (also known as the therapeutic ketogenic diet), mimics the effects of starvation by forcing the body to burn its own fat stores rather than glucose. When you restrict carbohydrates, the body enters into a metabolic state known as ketosis, where the liver converts stored fat (triglycerides) into ketones. These ketones are what the body uses to fuel your brain, organs, and muscles. On the therapeutic ketogenic diet, the macro breakdown looks like this: However, as the ketogenic diet’s grown in popularity, especially among people who are looking to lose fat and build muscle, a new form of the diet’s emerged. While the traditional ketogenic diet is an extremely high-fat diet with sufficient protein intake, the physique ketogenic diet is a high-fat diet but with adequate protein intake. Huh, Sufficient and Adequate Protein Intake? This is where a lot of the confusion arises around the ketogenic diet, and it’s important to understand the difference. When the goal is fat loss, the concomitant goal is to preserve muscle mass. On a therapeutic ketogenic diet, protein is set to around 10-15% of total calorie intake. This is the sufficient amount of protein required to keep the body functioning and you healthy – basically so you don’t die. The Continue reading >>

Your Macros

Your Macros

Most people aim for a specific goal on a ketogenic diet. We aim to make sure the results of the calculator are accurate and can be used by anyone. Our keto calculator uses the Mifflin-St.Jeor Formula which was the most accurate (versus the Katch-McCardle Formula or the Harris-Benedict Formula) in a few studies. In this formula, the gender, height, weight, and age are needed to calculate the number of calories to consume. Our keto calculator uses body fat percentage to calculate your lean body mass. Using this number, we’re able to calculate how much protein you need to sufficiently lose weight without losing excess muscle. Eating too little or too much protein on a ketogenic diet (or any diet) can lead to dangerous or unwanted results. DEXA scans are proven to be the most accurate measurement of body fat. They’re commonly available at gyms and some doctor offices when requested. If you don’t have access to this, you can always go the old-fashioned route and use a good quality caliper. The last resort is using a guide to visually estimate – this can sometimes be a little bit inaccurate, so try to over estimate your body fat percentage. This will give us an idea of how much the minimum amount of calories your body will burn in a day. Our keto calculator uses this to calculate your Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR). We use this number, along with your body fat percentage, to estimate how many calories you’ll need for your goals. The BMR is simply a number of calories we burn while our bodies are at rest and from eating and digesting food. Together they form what’s known as TDEE, or total daily energy expenditure. This is the keto calculator’s estimate for your total calories burned per day. If you use a heart rate monitor or third party software to monitor your calo Continue reading >>

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

Keto Problems: Too Much Protein?

A ketogenic diet requires that a person eat a high fat diet while keeping carbohydrates to a minimum. The third macronutrient category, protein, is an interesting one and often creates heaps of discussion. Carbohydrates and fat are primary energy sources for the body. Protein, on the other hand, is a source of essential amino acids which are the building blocks for the body. However, the amount of protein needed by each person varies greatly based upon a number of factors, including activity level, lean mass, sex, and personal preference to name a few. One question I am often asked is, “can you eat too much protein on a ketogenic diet?” Protein is a very satiating food, and usually the more protein a person eats, the less hungry the person is. One trick people use is to eat a diet high in protein (150 grams + per day) while limiting carbs and fat. This strategy is often wildly successful for fat loss, but it can create other problems to eat so much protein while limiting carb and fat calories so dramatically. I do not advocate eating a high protein/low carb/low fat diet, especially for women. But I do believe wholeheartedly that it is important to eat enough protein. This is even more critical on a ketogenic diet, where carbs are so limited. Under eating protein can cause the body to lose muscle. Some argue for limiting protein because 1) doing so leads to higher ketone levels and 2) they believe that eating too much protein can lead the body to create new glucose from protein (gluconeogenesis) and keep a person from transitioning effectively to fat burning. My friend Mike Berta explains the fallacies of this thinking so well that I am sharing his post rather than recreating my own. Mike can be contacted directly at [email protected] His Facebook group is cal Continue reading >>

Find Your Keto Macros

Find Your Keto Macros

Fine tune your fat-burning with the perfect keto ratio. Learn the special concerns for protein and fat ratios, how to track your keto macros and where to find the wiggle room. Best keto ratio for rapid fat-burning Printable keto food pyramid Online keto calculator Printable list of keto macros: calories, fat, net carbs, protein Keto macro is short for ketosis macro-nutrient. The three keto macro-nutrients are fats, proteins and carbs. Sometimes, calories are also considered part of the equation. What’s the best keto ratio? “Best” depends on your goals. A typical keto ratio has 75% of calories from fat, 20% of calories from protein and 5% of calories from fiber-rich carbs. A Typical Keto Ratio Keto Tip: A perfect ketogenic ratio happens when the amount of protein grams are equal to or slightly great than the grams of fat. Keto Food Pyramid Keto foods center around healthy fats, with moderate amounts of protein and scant carbs. During ketosis, think of fat as a food group. The Atkins Keto Food Pyramid illustrates which of the 200 ketosis foods to enjoy liberally and which ones to limit. Click the image to view, print or save. Tracking Keto Macros Track keto macros helps identify diet stalls and plateau. Macro tracking pinpoints troublesome keto ratios in your diet. For example: Are you eating enough fat? Are you eating too much protein? Track your keto foods and find out. Keto Wiggle Room If your keto ratio is off a bit, it’s not a big deal. You have wiggle room. If some days are over and some days are under your ideal goals, it’s fine. Keep your calories in check and track your keto macros by averaging several days at a time. A single day won’t make or break your plan. Testing for Ketosis Special test strips called keto sticks (or ketostix, keto strips) are u Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should I Eat?

How Much Fat Should I Eat?

I’ve been asked by several new Ketovangelists about how they should calculate their fat, protein, and carb intake. This is, by far, one of the most common questions asked and it leads to lots of confusion, so I’m going to try my best to make it as simple as possible. First, let’s talk terms. Sometimes people refer to things called “macros” when asking this question (e.g. What are your macros? or What should my macros be?) What the heck are they talking about? The term “macros” is a shortened way of saying “macronutrients”, which another, sciency, way of saying “fats, proteins, and carbs”. Nutritionist break food down into two main subsets, macronutrients and micronutrients. Micronutrients are vitamins and minerals (among other things). Macronutrients are, as I said, one of three things (four if you count alcohol, which we are not): fats, proteins, and carbs. So when someone asks how much fat they should eat, or how many carbs they should eat, they are asking how about their macros. Okay, so enough of that, let’s get to the actual meat (no pun intended). Determining your macros is really quite simple, especially for Ketovangelists. We start with protein. How much protein should I eat? This is super simple. As a general guideline, this is the amount of protein per day for you: Female: 50g – 75g Male: 100g – 120g Simple. Like I said. Okay, that’s protein. So what about fats? How much fat should I eat? Okay, this is a little more involved. Not much. But a little. You want 65% – 80% of your calories to come from fat. So, if your presumed daily caloric requirement is 2000 calories, you’ll want between 1300 – 1600 calories from fat. Since each gram of fat is 9 calories, that would equate to between 144g – 177g per day of good fat. Of cours Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should You Eat On Keto Diet

How Much Protein Should You Eat On Keto Diet

You have probably wondered how much protein you should be consuming on a keto diet in order to optimize your results, and you have probably checked a few of the keto calculators available online, only to find yourself even more confused than before. We all know that protein is essential for our health. Our bodies use it to maintain, build and repair the tissue of our organs and muscles. Additionally, it’s a major contributor to the feeling of fullness, which, as we all know, helps tremendously with diet compliance and weight loss. But what is the exact role protein plays in the keto diet and how much of it do you need to consume to maintain optimal ketosis? There is a lot of conflicting information online, so we would like to bring some clarity to the heated debate of protein and the keto diet. Let’s start with the basics. What is Protein and Why Is It Important? Protein is the most important structural component of your muscles and other bodily tissues such as organs, skin, hair and practically all body parts, and without it, your body cannot repair and maintain itself. Protein is made of amino acids. While our bodies can make some amino acids from scratch, we need to get others from our diet, and these are the so-called “essential amino acids”. The primary function of protein metabolism is to maintain the body and its tissues and functions. Protein can be used as an energy source, although it is clearly not the body’s first choice – carbs and fat come before that (1). Does Excess Protein Turn into Sugar on a Ketogenic Diet? There is a common misconception that excessive protein will turn into glucose, thus hampering your progress. First of all, when people say “excessive protein” will turn into sugar or kick you out of ketosis, they need to define how Continue reading >>

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

How To Build Muscle On Keto Blueprint

The question a lot of low carb athletes want to get answered to is: “How does a ketogenic diet affect performance?” Secondly: “How to build muscle on keto?” Can you even do it? Well, in my experience, YES you can. Let me give you my story and secrets… When I first heard of nutritional ketosis I didn’t immediately try it out. Being into resistance training, I figured that it couldn’t possibly ever work. Sounds familiar, right? If you’re physically active then you’ve probably been told about the importance of proper nutrition, post-workout glycogen synthesis, recovery, etc. etc. And that you need CARBS to do it. In the athletic community, carbohydrates are being held at the pillar stone of success. But you don’t need them. I’ve never been into this dogmatic belief so eventually, I decided to try out the keto diet. Let’s see what happens and if I lose strength, so be it… I can always get it back. It was meant to be a short experiment, but… After a month of eating less than 30 grams of carbs a day I was in ketosis. I’m not going to lie that some of my performance had suffered, but only temporarily. Other than that, I felt amazing and loved the keto diet. I thought to myself: Why hadn’t I tried it out before? The answer to that was fear of losing my gains – all in vain. I didn’t want to sacrifice the health benefits of low carb and how amazing it made me feel. But I also wanted to regain my performance and continue getting stronger… all while staying on a ketogenic diet. To me, it sounded like a challenge, which I was more than willing to accept My training consists of mainly bodyweight exercises, such as calisthenics, Yoga, and gymnastics. The keto diet is perfect for that and I’ve learned how to build muscle on ketosis. It’s doable Continue reading >>

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

Finding Your Optimal Protein Intake For A Ketogenic Diet

When embarking on a ketogenic diet for health or fat loss, finding the optimum protein intake can be very confusing for many beginners. For smooth adaptation in the transition to a ketogenic metabolism I typically guide people using a caloric spread of around 70-80% fat, 15-25% protein, and 5% carbohydrate from green fibrous vegetables – but this ratio varies for every individual and using percentages is confusing and misleading in many cases. The best way to look at macronutrients is not in percentage ratios, but in grams. The slew of bloggers and gurus spouting so much conflicting information leads many into a mental stalemate about how much protein they should be eating. This article lays out the metrics I most commonly use to quantify how much protein an individual should intake – there is no magic ratio and the needs, preferences, and goals of the individual determine the amount of protein they will likely require on their ketogenic diet which usually lies within a relatively broad range of 1-2.2g/kg (and in some cases even higher *cringe say the protein-phobic) of bodyweight or .5-1g/lb of lean body mass (Lean Body Mass equals Body Weight minus Body Fat). Myth: “Too much” protein turns immediately into sugar I almost always recommend people increase their intake of fish and seafoods in order to get the vital nutrient DHA into their central nervous system and mitochondrial membranes. We see amazing results when people opt for more fish and less red meat, which I also love, but land mammals are not nearly as nutrient dense as seafoods with their incredible levels of DHA, EPA, selenium, and iodine. Sometimes this means they will be eating more protein than they believe will allow them to be “ketogenic”, this protein-phobia can be counterproductive, which Continue reading >>

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What are macros? If you’ve been reading up on the keto diet, you may have stumbled across the term “macros” and wondered what all the fuss is about. It’s thrown around everywhere by well meaning ketoers giving advice to newbies: “If it fits your macros”, “track those macros”, “your macros may be off”, ad nauseum. I’m guilty of it myself. But to someone trying to get started, this can be completely mind-boggling. A quick Google search doesn’t even really help. Is this an advanced function in an Excel worksheet? A fancy camera lense? What in the hell are people talking about? Exactly what are macros? Let me clarify. The term “macros” is short for MACRONUTRIENTS in the context of nutrition and the keto diet. Macronutrients are the energy-giving components of food that fuels our body. They include carbohydrates, protein, and fat; this is where your dietary calories come from. Grasping the concept of macros is important for the keto diet because you need to find the right balance of carbs, protein, and fats to get into ketosis, stay in ketosis, and turn your body into a fat burning machine. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are the only macronutrient that is not essential for survival. There are essential fatty acids and amino acids (the building blocks of fats and proteins), but there is no such thing as “essential carbohydrates”. Carbs are made up of sugars and starches. In order to successfully reach ketosis, you will need to limit your carbohydrate intake. Fiber is also considered a carb, but it doesn’t count towards your total carb tally. The reason for this is that we can’t really digest fiber so it has a minimal impact on your blood sugar. So, what does this mean for you? When you are looking at a nutrition label, look at the line that sa Continue reading >>

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