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How Much Potassium On Keto

"keto-flu" And Sufficient Intake Of Electrolytes

People often ask me about potassium deficiency (or any other mineral deficiency) on a low-carb, ketogenic diet. I decided to summarise which minerals you should be aware of and what the adequate intake is... To pin or bookmark an easy to follow guide to keto-flu remedies, have a look at this post! What is "Keto-Flu"? Electrolytes (sodium, magnesium and potassium) are often underestimated on low-carb diets. As low-carb expert and scientific researcher Dr. Volek suggests, mineral and electrolyte management is the key to avoiding side effects typically associated with low carb dieting. When entering the induction phase of a Ketogenic Diet (50 grams or less of total carbs - about 20-30 grams of net carbs), most people experience "keto-flu”. This often scares them off and they start to think that low-carb is not right for their body. The "flu" is nothing else than a result of starving your body of carbohydrates. Stay strong! You can easily counteract these effects by replenishing electrolytes. Make sure you include foods rich in electrolytes in your everyday diet and take food supplements (if needed). Firstly, I would like to share my own experience with electrolyte deficiency. I have been really tired recently. It was actually so bad that I couldn't open my eyes and could barely get up even after 7-9 hours of sleep. Also, my energy levels at gym were very low. I woke up in the middle of the night and experienced heart palpitations (weird feeling that could be described as "heart beating too fast"). I knew what was going on: I was magnesium / potassium deficient. I have been on a low-carb diet for more than a year and always made sure I include food rich in these minerals in my diet. The truth is, I have been so busy recently that I didn't pay enough attention to my diet. Continue reading >>

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

Top-3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet (and How To Fix It)

A common question I get asked after clients start a ketogenic diet is “why do I feel lousy?” Like them, you’re probably thinking going keto will provide an immediate mental and physical boost. For some, it will. For others, you may experience adverse symptoms, also known as the “keto flu”. When you start a very low-carb ketogenic diet, you’ll flush water and sodium out of your body in the first few weeks. As your sodium levels fall, so too will potassium levels. This can leave you feeling tired, sluggish, and wondering what you got yourself into. Fear not, it’s only temporary. Here are some suggestions for avoiding key mineral deficiencies when jumping into a ketogenic diet. Sodium One of the biggest health and nutrition “myths” is that you should avoid salt. If you’re fit, healthy, and following a keto diet you’ll lose water and sodium in the first few weeks. For athletes, this problem can be compounded because you also lose sodium through your sweat, and as your sweat rate increases, your sodium and blood volume will decline. Not a good recipe for optimal energy and performance. On the flip side, if you’re overweight, out of shape or in poor health then your body is likely already holding on to too much sodium from high consumption of packaged and processed foods (i.e. sodium is used as the primary preservative) or from chronically elevated insulin levels. Therefore, a low-carb or keto approach is great way to restore healthy levels. Symptoms of low sodium include fatigue, headaches, compromised ability to perform (especially outdoors in the heat) and in more serious cases you may pass out. Remember that most of the sodium in your body is found in your bloodstream, so if your body gets deficient, you don’t have many reserves to tap into. In t Continue reading >>

The Importance Of Potassium In Low-carb Diets

The Importance Of Potassium In Low-carb Diets

What is Potassium and why is it needed? Just like magnesium, potassium is one of the main electrolytes within the body. Along with sodium and chloride, potassium is responsible for maintaining electrolyte balance. Electrolytes are responsible for sending electrical impulses around the body. Specifically, potassium assists in a range of essential bodily functions including: (1). Water balance Blood pressure control Muscle contractions Digestion Heart rate and rhythm pH balance Normal Ranges in the Body The average content of potassium in adults is 40-50 mmol (1.6-2.0 g)/kg of body weight (2). Someone who weighs 65 kg would therefore have a level of 2600-3250 mmol in their body. The concentration of potassium is greater within the intracellular fluid (150 mmol/L) with the remainder in the extracellular fluid (3.5-5.5 mmol/L) (2). The amount of total potassium is directly related to the level of lean tissue mass. As men generally have greater lean muscle mass, they have a greater level in the body. Testing of potassium levels is done within the blood. This means it is testing the extracellular fluid and subsequently the normal ranges for the test will be between 3.5-5.5 mmol/L. Recommended Intakes The body cannot naturally produce or make potassium and so it needs to be obtained from the diet. The recommended intakes vary between America and Europe. In the USA the Adequate Intake (AI) for adults is 4.7 g/day (4700 mg/d) and in Europe, the Reference Nutrient Intake (RNI) is set at 3.5 g/day (3500 mg/d) (3, 4). The lower reference nutrient intake (LRNI/ EMR), is the minimum amount that needs to be met within a day and is set at 2 g/day for adults (3). As the levels are directly correlated with muscle mass, men may require a slightly higher dose. Low and High Levels of Potass Continue reading >>

Using Supplements To Maximize Your Ketogenic Diet

Using Supplements To Maximize Your Ketogenic Diet

Science shows that the ketogenic diet is an effective way to lower blood sugar in diabetes, control insulin resistance, and optimize cholesterol. One of the most common questions we get from people is how to utilize supplements to further reap the benefits of a carbohydrate-restricted diet. Below we outline some science-backed supplements and reasons you might want to use them in order to optimize your carbohydrate-restricted diet. About 145 million Americans use nutritional supplements each year—that’s almost one-half of the population. [1] Fight Triglycerides with Fish Oil Supplements According to Nutrition Business Journal, Americans spend over 1.2 billion dollars on fish oil supplements per year. But what are they exactly and can they benefit your health? Fish oil supplements are capsules that contain various oils derived from the liver and skin of fatty fish such as salmon, sardines, and mackerel. They are rich on a special kind molecule called omega-3 fatty acids, a polyunsaturated fat which helps protect against heart disease and potentially a variety of other health conditions. Omega-3 fatty acids come in one of three varieties. The first one is called alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), which is found in foods like canola oil, soybean oil, walnuts, and chia seeds. The other two, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are only found in fatty fish and fish oil supplements. Omega 3 fatty acids are an essential food; this means that it isn’t naturally produced by the body and you must obtain it through dietary means. Unfortunately, many American don’t get enough of any of these three types of omega-3 fatty acids in their diets. Recent research suggests that fish oil supplements may lower levels of triglycerides, fat molecules found in the blood Continue reading >>

Top 3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet

Top 3 Mineral Deficiencies On A Ketogenic Diet

The keto diet is well known for its ability to produce weight loss. It does so through the process of ketosis which helps your body burn fat for energy instead of carbs. But it’s not without its potential downside. With low-carb diets or keto in particular, you often cut down on a lot of food groups and types in order to lose weight which means that you're not only cutting out the bad part but you're also taking out some of the good parts. And, with a shortage of vitamins and minerals, your body in return will feel the effects from it. These effects can make you feel sluggish or tired, and that can be a drag. But there’s good news! Yes, heave a sigh because, with proper planning and awareness, you can avoid these deficiencies of micronutrients and mineral imbalances or fix them accordingly if they do occur. You can achieve this by taking supplements (see our list of favorites) and eating the right foods that will help you achieve a balanced, healthy intake of nutrients while on the ketogenic diet. Here’s everything you need to know about the micronutrients, and mineral deficiencies you are more likely to experience while following a keto diet: Of course, it can be difficult to get all the potassium you need from fruits and vegetables alone, especially when you are restricted to keto-friendly foods only. Therefore we recommend NOW Potassium Citrate to make sure you’re getting the potassium you need. Of course, it can be difficult to get all the potassium you need from fruits and vegetables alone, especially when you are restricted to keto-friendly foods only. Therefore we recommend NOW Potassium Citrate to make sure you’re getting the potassium you need. Additionally, it’s best to use this supplement alongside eating proper fruits and vegetables. It's as easy Continue reading >>

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