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How Much Fat Ketosis

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

5 Most Common Low-carb Mistakes (and How To Avoid Them)

A few months ago, I read a book called The Art and Science of Low-Carbohydrate Living. The authors are two of the world's leading researchers on low-carb diets. Dr. Jeff S. Volek is a Registered Dietitian and Dr. Stephen D. Phinney is a medical doctor. These guys have performed many studies and have treated thousands of patients with a low-carb diet. According to them, there are many stumbling blocks that people tend to run into, which can lead to adverse effects and suboptimal results. To get into full-blown ketosis and reap all the metabolic benefits of low-carb, merely cutting back on the carbs isn't enough. If you haven't gotten the results you expected on a low-carb diet, then perhaps you were doing one of these 5 common mistakes. There is no clear definition of exactly what constitutes a "low carb diet." Some would call anything under 100-150 grams per day low-carb, which is definitely a lot less than the standard Western diet. A lot of people could get awesome results within this carbohydrate range, as long as they ate real, unprocessed foods. But if you want to get into ketosis, with plenty of ketoness flooding your bloodstream to supply your brain with an efficient source of energy, then this level of intake may be excessive. It could take some self experimentation to figure out your optimal range as this depends on a lot of things, but most people will need to go under 50 grams per day to get into full-blown ketosis. This doesn't leave you with many carb options except vegetables and small amounts of berries. If you want to get into ketosis and reap the full metabolic benefits of low-carb, going under 50 grams of carbs per day may be required. Protein is a very important macronutrient, which most people aren't getting enough of. It can improve satiety and incr Continue reading >>

How To Increase Fat Burning During Ketosis

How To Increase Fat Burning During Ketosis

Ketosis is also known as the body's process for generating energy by producing ketones when insufficient carbohydrates are available in the diet. In other words, a low-carb diet is called ketogenic because it forces the body to use fat for energy. Ketosis is a very effective means of burning fat, but there are certain techniques for increasing fat-burning through exercise and nutrition. How many carbs should you eat per day? When is the best time to eat them? What kinds of carbs are best? And what natural supplements prevent muscle loss caused by extreme ketogenic diets? Follow a few basic rules to answer these questions and achieve your fat-burning goals. Video of the Day Take in 30 to 50 g of carbohydrates per day, depending on your individual metabolism. Typically, this carb-depletion phase lasts five days and is followed by two days of carb-loading. For example, having 100 to 200 g of carbs per day for two days. This carb-cycling strategy helps to prevent dieting plateaus in which the body stops burning fat in response to what it perceives as starvation. Stack your carbohydrates around your workouts. Carbs are needed for two reasons: muscle recovery and energy. One good strategy is to take in half of your carbs before your workout and the other half after. Some people choose to take all of them before or after. Either way, taking in your carbohydrates in the morning will allow the body to switch into ketosis during the day, burning more fat. Limit resistance training workouts to 60 minutes to control cortisol levels. The stress hormone cortisol, part of the fight-or-flight response, slows down fat-burning and metabolizes muscle tissue. After about an hour of training, muscle-building hormones plummet, and cortisol increases significantly. Sometimes, training harder Continue reading >>

How To Lose Stubborn Belly Fat Through Ketosis

How To Lose Stubborn Belly Fat Through Ketosis

Losing stubborn belly fat is one of the biggest challenges when getting in shape. Belly fat is not only aesthetically unappealing, it has health consequences. It can make you vulnerable to many conditions such as diabetes and heart problems. In this blog, we will share with you why belly fat is so ‘stubborn’ to burn, explain what exactly is Ketosis and how you can lose stubborn belly fat through Ketosis. We will also share a specific exercise and a diet plan to help burn this belly fat. What is Stubborn Belly fat and why it is bad for our health? While you may have fat all over different parts of your body, it isn’t the same. Stubborn belly fat is the soft layers of fat around the waistline that covers your abs. To be more precise, there are three types of fat: Triglycerides– A fat circulates in your blood Subcutaneous Fat– The layer of fat directly below the skin’s surface. This is the fat you can grab with your hands Visceral Fat– The dangerous fat. This is located beneath the muscles in your stomach Belly fat unfortunately does not just sit still. Some visceral fat is necessary, but too much can lead to health problems. You can estimate whether you are carrying too much belly fat by measuring your waist with tape. Anything over 80 cm (31.5 inches) in women and 94 cm (37 inches) can provoke health issues. Carrying excess visceral fat is associated with an increased risk for: Coronary heart disease Cancer Stroke Dementia Diabetes Depression Arthritis Obesity Sexual dysfunction Sleep disorders Why is Stubborn belly fat so “Stubborn”? To understand what makes belly fat so difficult to burn,let’s dive into the biology. Burning fat is a two-part process: Lipolysis is the process whereby fat cells release molecules of stored fat into the blood. Oxidation Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Thankfully, the days of low-fat diet fads are mostly behind us, and people are better understanding the importance of eating healthy fats for health. But still, many of those eating keto will underestimate just how much fat they need to eat to see success on this way of eating. So, how much fat can you eat on a ketogenic diet? This article will cover why fat intake matters on the ketogenic diet and how it makes it successful, as well as how to find out how much fat you need. Then, we’ll touch on how you can make sure your fat intake stays high (while still getting enough calories) and the best types of fat to eat. The Importance of Fat on the Keto Diet Dietary fat is the cornerstone of the ketogenic diet. It’s the high fat intake and low carb intake that makes the diet “work” and keeps your body in ketosis — using those ketones for fuel and burning through fat. Having a very low carb intake allows you to deplete your body of carbohydrates and stored carbohydrates (glycogen) and conditioning it to begin turning to fat instead, leading to the creation of ketones for energy. Getting and keeping the body in this state of ketosis has many benefits that include weight loss and better health. High Fat and Enough Calories Matters Those new to keto or who have taken a break from it often struggle with eating enough fat at first. Since you’re greatly reducing your carb intake, you have to really increase your fat intake to replace the calories you were eating before from carbs. This can take some adjustment. If you’re not used to eating high fat, it might seem like a lot at the beginning. Fat is satiating, which is one of the advantages of keto because you can naturally avoid overeating due to its satisfying nature. That being said, it’s important to also eat enou Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Keto Diet Food List, Including The Best Vs. Worst Keto Foods

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet or keto diet has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. The keto diet works for such a high percentage of people because it targets several key, underlying causes of weight gain — including hormonal imbalances, especially insulin resistance coupled with high blood sugar levels, and the cycle of restricting and “binging” on empty calories due to hunger that so many dieters struggle with. Yet that’s not a problem with what’s on the keto diet food list. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvements. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) to dietary fat, courtesy of keto recipes and the keto diet food list items, including high-fat, low-carb foods. What Can You Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? Here are some examples of high-fat low-carb foods on the keto diet food list you can expect to eat lots of if you’re following the ketogenic diet: High amounts of healthy fats (up to 80 percent of your total calories!), such as olive oil, coconut oil, grass-fed butter, palm oil, and some nuts and seeds. Fats are a critical part of every ketogenic recipe because fat is what provides energy and prevents hunger, weakness and fatigue. All sorts of non-starchy vegetables. What vegetables can you eat on a ketogenic diet without worrying about increasing your carb intak Continue reading >>

13 Common Keto Mistakes

13 Common Keto Mistakes

Adjusting to the Ketogenic diet and lifestyle is a process, and, like any other process, there are some learning curves and speed bumps. These curves and bumps can lead to frustration and disappointment, but they don’t have to. I’ve put together a list of what I see as the most common keto mistakes (and what you can do about them). You are obsessing over macros On the surface, this might seem a little contradictory to some of the other items on this list, but hear me out for a second. The mistake isn’t tracking your macros. The mistake is OBSESSING over your macros. The biggest psychological benefit to keto is the freedom it provides. You’re no longer shackled to the hangry, sad existence filled with constant food preoccupation. You’re free to live. So don’t shackle yourself by fretting and obsessing about macros. You aren’t eating macros, you’re eating food. Make sure your food is keto-friendly, and you’re going to be doing just fine. You are obsessing over the scale I’ve written about this before, but it’s important enough to repeat. The number on the scale is the least important metric you can use to gauge your success. This is another pet peeve of mine that is similar to the previous mistake. Enjoy the freedom of your life, don’t fret about the number on the scale. The scale is always a snap shot of what happened two weeks ago. Think about it. Aside from water, which can fluctuate many pounds in a short period of time, in order for you to gain or lose weight, it requires time. The scale doesn’t tell you important information. Don’t sweat it. You are eating too much protein Protein is, probably, the most important macro, because it is essential (we cannot manufacture all the requisite amino acids) and it is required to build and rebuild al Continue reading >>

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What Are Macros? What They Are & How To Calculate

What are macros? If you’ve been reading up on the keto diet, you may have stumbled across the term “macros” and wondered what all the fuss is about. It’s thrown around everywhere by well meaning ketoers giving advice to newbies: “If it fits your macros”, “track those macros”, “your macros may be off”, ad nauseum. I’m guilty of it myself. But to someone trying to get started, this can be completely mind-boggling. A quick Google search doesn’t even really help. Is this an advanced function in an Excel worksheet? A fancy camera lense? What in the hell are people talking about? Exactly what are macros? Let me clarify. The term “macros” is short for MACRONUTRIENTS in the context of nutrition and the keto diet. Macronutrients are the energy-giving components of food that fuels our body. They include carbohydrates, protein, and fat; this is where your dietary calories come from. Grasping the concept of macros is important for the keto diet because you need to find the right balance of carbs, protein, and fats to get into ketosis, stay in ketosis, and turn your body into a fat burning machine. Carbohydrates Carbohydrates are the only macronutrient that is not essential for survival. There are essential fatty acids and amino acids (the building blocks of fats and proteins), but there is no such thing as “essential carbohydrates”. Carbs are made up of sugars and starches. In order to successfully reach ketosis, you will need to limit your carbohydrate intake. Fiber is also considered a carb, but it doesn’t count towards your total carb tally. The reason for this is that we can’t really digest fiber so it has a minimal impact on your blood sugar. So, what does this mean for you? When you are looking at a nutrition label, look at the line that sa Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should You Eat To Stay In Ketosis

How Much Fat Should You Eat To Stay In Ketosis

One of the most frequent questions I get is, “How much fat should one eat to stay in ketosis?” The answer isn’t simple. Staying in ketosis depends on many factors. But the best way to make sure you stay in ketosis is to make sure your diet consists of 60-75% healthy fats. Healthy Fats and Ketosis Some fats are more healthy than others! Healthy fats are essential for the human body. They represent a great deal of energy especially when the body is no longer using carbohydrates for energy. Healthy fats, are basically unsaturated fats. They are divided into 2 groups: the monounsaturated fats and polyunsaturated fats (including omega-3 fatty acids). Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated fats are commonly found in: vegetable oils, soybeans, fish, seeds, and nuts. The foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids are: fish (mackerel, salmon, and sardines), Chia seeds, avocado and/or avocado oil, olive oil and many more. How does this put you into ketosis? When the body requires an energy source after it is deprived of any other sources, such as glucose, it will start producing ketone bodies. This metabolic reaction is called Ketogenesis and Ketosis is a result of this process. Higher levels of ketone bodies in your blood or detectable ketone bodies in your urine are a definite sign you are in Ketosis. Ketosis is sometimes referred to by low carb dieters as “fat burning’’ mode since the body uses fat stored in the adipose tissue to produce ketone bodies. This is the mode that are low carb dieters are striving for by reducing and in some cases ELIMINATING their carb intake. How to stay in ketosis To stay in Ketosis, you need to adjust your macronutrient ratio so that your food will have 60-75% of healthy fats. For example, if your daily need of calories is 2000 kcal, then you wil Continue reading >>

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

How To Cut Fat On A Ketogenic Or Low Carb Diet (and Why You Might Want To)

Reduce fat intake? On a low carb or ketogenic diet? Amy, have you done lost yo' mind? You know people use the abbreviation “LCHF,” right? And that means low carb high fat, right? I’ve heard from many, many people who are struggling to lose body fat on a low carb or ketogenic diet. And while there are many possible reasons for this, the simplest, most obvious, and most common one is, they’re eating too darn much fat. What is this madness you speak of? This is possible. It is, as they say, “a thing.” Remember: when you reduce your carbohydrate intake to the point that your body must switch over to running primarily on fat for fuel, you go from being a “sugar burner” to being a “fat burner.” But what this means is that you’re burning fat. It doesn’t mean that the fat you’re burning will automatically and unfailingly come from your love handles and thunder thighs adipose tissue (your stored body fat). It could be coming from your fatty coffee, avocado smoothie, fat bombs, or a heavier-than-you-realize hand with nuts, cheese, and ranch dressing. Bottom line: the more fat you eat, the less of a need your body has to tap into its stored fat to use for fuel. If you’re already lean and happy with your weight, this is no problem. You might need a bunch of fat just to maintain your weight. (I hate you. Lucky you.) But if you’re struggling with fat loss on low carb despite doing “all the right things” and being on-point with your diet, there’s a chance you’re simply overdoing the dietary fat. It’s true. If your carbs are very low, then insulin will be pretty low, which is what allows you to get into “fat burning mode.” But just because insulin is low doesn’t mean you’ll magically drop body fat regardless of how many calories you take Continue reading >>

Find Your Keto Macros

Find Your Keto Macros

Fine tune your fat-burning with the perfect keto ratio. Learn the special concerns for protein and fat ratios, how to track your keto macros and where to find the wiggle room. Best keto ratio for rapid fat-burning Printable keto food pyramid Online keto calculator Printable list of keto macros: calories, fat, net carbs, protein Keto macro is short for ketosis macro-nutrient. The three keto macro-nutrients are fats, proteins and carbs. Sometimes, calories are also considered part of the equation. What’s the best keto ratio? “Best” depends on your goals. A typical keto ratio has 75% of calories from fat, 20% of calories from protein and 5% of calories from fiber-rich carbs. A Typical Keto Ratio Keto Tip: A perfect ketogenic ratio happens when the amount of protein grams are equal to or slightly great than the grams of fat. Keto Food Pyramid Keto foods center around healthy fats, with moderate amounts of protein and scant carbs. During ketosis, think of fat as a food group. The Atkins Keto Food Pyramid illustrates which of the 200 ketosis foods to enjoy liberally and which ones to limit. Click the image to view, print or save. Tracking Keto Macros Track keto macros helps identify diet stalls and plateau. Macro tracking pinpoints troublesome keto ratios in your diet. For example: Are you eating enough fat? Are you eating too much protein? Track your keto foods and find out. Keto Wiggle Room If your keto ratio is off a bit, it’s not a big deal. You have wiggle room. If some days are over and some days are under your ideal goals, it’s fine. Keep your calories in check and track your keto macros by averaging several days at a time. A single day won’t make or break your plan. Testing for Ketosis Special test strips called keto sticks (or ketostix, keto strips) are u Continue reading >>

Too Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet Limits Results.

Too Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet Limits Results.

Introduction Ketosis is a metabolic state in which you are using fat as your main source of energy instead of glycogen(carbs). This is accomplished by reducing your carbohydrate intake so low that your body is forced to use an alternate fuel source, in this case it is fat. Ketosis is a high fat, moderate protein, extremely low carbohydrate diet. In this article, we will discuss the benefits if any of a high-fat ketogenic diet. Discussion A typical ketogenic diet is around 70-80% of your calories from dietary fat. If you are on a 2,000 calorie a day diet your fat intake would be around 1,500 calories from fat. What is the purpose of so much fat? Does fat keep you in ketosis? It does not keep you in ketosis. Fat is neutral on a ketogenic diet. It does not put you in ketosis or throw you out of ketosis. What throws you out of ketosis is too much protein and/or too many carbohydrates. People who embark on a ketogenic diet are under the assumption that because they are burning a lot of fat on a ketogenic diet it is body fat they are burning, thus they expect to lose a lot of weight quickly. Frankly, this is not correct. I will give you a cheap example. Let us say you consume 2,000 calories of fat and you burn 2,000 calories a day. How much bodyfat are you burning? The answer is 0. Let us say that you consume 1,500 calories of fat and you burn 2,000 calories. How much body fat are you burning? You are burning roughly 500 calories of body fat. The above scenarios are just examples, no one will burn 100% of daily required energy from fat. The point I am trying to make is that dietary fat LIMITS body fat oxidation. Therefore why do we consume so much fat on a ketogenic diet? Honestly, there is no reason to, It just slows down weight loss because you are consuming extra calories Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Too Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Can You Eat Too Much Fat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Eating a low carb, high fibre, moderate protein diet will often naturally lead to elimination of processed high carb foods, increased satiety and reduced energy intake. Reducing insulin will then allow stored body fat to be used for fuel. However if someone was trying to lose weight I would not recommend emphasising dietary fat once they were fat adapted in order to allow energy to be supplied from body fat. Ketones can rise to high levels in fasting as we burn our own body fat (endogenous ketosis), but chasing this state with exogenous ketones or heaps of processed fat can lead to a high energy state (endogenous ketosis) which can drive insulin resistance and fat storage. Some people aiming for ketosis to lose weight can overdo the fat calories and not achieve the weight loss. If your aim is weight loss it’s better to be in calorie deficit and be burning stored body fat, than to have high blood ketones produced by MCT oil and butter. While counting calories may be beneficial for some people to retrain their appetite initially, a better long term approach may be to try some form of intermittent fasting to reset insulin sensitivity and reduce overall calorie intake. You can use your blood sugar or your weight to help guide your fasting frequency. If your body fat and blood sugars are under control then go ahead and indulge in supplemental MCT oil or some extra butter in your coffee for the mental buzz, but keep in mind that, while ketosis will lead to increased satiety for most people, calories matter in the long run. In the end I think you should be consuming the most nutrient dense foods that will keep your blood sugars at normal healthy levels. The food lists in the table below to suit your blood sugar levels and body weight goals. approach average glucose waist : h Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How much fat should you eat on a ketogenic diet? That depends. Are you following a ketogenic diet for weight maintenance or weight loss? Depending on the reason, you might want to formulate it slightly differently, as Dr. Ted Naiman illustrates with an example above. If you want to lose weight, then you should be a bit careful about how much fat you’re adding. Do eat enough to feel satisfied – that’s important to make it sustainable. But more than that will slow down your weight loss. You want your body to burn off body fat rather than added dietary fat. Once you reach a normal weight, you will need to add more fat to maintain it. You’ll know when that time comes as your hunger will increase. Just follow your hunger, there’s normally no need to ever count calories. For more details watch the first interview with Dr. Naiman, below. More A Quick Guide to Ketogenic Diets Low Carb for Beginners How to Lose Weight Videos More with Dr. Ted Naiman Here’s What Happened as Obesity Doubled Massive Type 2 Diabetes Improvement in 3 Months, No Meds Continue reading >>

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

When on the ketogenic diet, one of the most important things you’ll have to pay attention to is your macronutrient breakdown. This means you’ll be getting a certain portion of your calories form carbohydrates (a very small portion) at 5%, a larger portion of calories from protein (35%), and the largest number of calories from fats (65%). There are many online sites that can help you figure out how many calories you need on a daily basis, based on your height, weight, measurements, age, gender and level of activity. From there, you can also use online calculators to help you figure out the proper breakdown, in grams, for each macronutrient percentage you’ll be eating. You’ll multiply your total daily calories by each percentage to get the grams of each macronutrient that you’ll need. For example, if you need 1200 calories per day, and your carbohydrates are 5% of that total, then multiply 1200 by 5% to get the number of grams of carbohydrates you’ll be allowed to eat each day. In this case, 5% of 1200 calories is 60 calories. You then divide the calories by the grams per unit of carb, protein or fat. Carbohydrates and proteins both have 4 calories per gram and fats have 9 calories per gram. Again, in this example, 60 calories divided by 4 grams per carb leaves you with a total of 15 grams of carbs per day. There are several great phone apps that will do the calculations for you. My personal favorite is Carb Counter. This also makes restaurant eating a breeze. One last note on food and nutrient tracking applications—you can typically also use these to plan your meals ahead of time. Just plug in the proposed foods for the day to see where your calorie and macronutrient values will lie, and make adjustments from there. Then, you build your meals around those n Continue reading >>

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