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How Many Calories Ketosis

Ketosis + If – How Many Kcals To Consume [situational]

Ketosis + If – How Many Kcals To Consume [situational]

This write-up is part of a series that adds insight to the combo strategy of ketosis and intermittent fasting (IF) that I’ve been using over the past two years. In this specific post I’m providing a rationale for the amount of calories you should/may consume when switching to ketosis and IF and when you come from a different nutritional background – a higher carbohydrate diet with/without IF, a keto diet without IF, or any other protocol. Here we go… How Many Kcals to Consume If you are just starting out with either of these two strategies (intermittent fasting, ketosis), the combination of both, or if you’re just new to health optimization, I’d recommend first determining how many calories you are currently consuming, on average (I hate this word). To do that, you can use any of the many web applications or phone apps designed for this purpose. I personally use Cronometer, which is a web and phone app. Many people use alternatives, such as MyFitnessPal or other apps. It’s a matter of personal choice. Just plug-in the foods you eat in a day and see what caloric number they add up to. Once you find out how much you eat in any particular day, I’d recommend using that same number of calories for the ketogenic diet and IF you are switching to. More specifically: if you are currently consuming, say, 2,800 kcals/day, use the same calorie count when switching to ketosis and IF. You can later reduce/adjust the number of calories if you feel so. Often, when doing intermittent fasting with 2 meals during your feeding window you may have to force-feed to meet your pre-established number of kcals per day. In my case, for example, I often find it difficult to consume 1,500-1,7000 kcals in two meals with my intermittent fasting of 18/6 (18 hours of fasting, 6 hours of Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Ketogenic Diet Beginners Guide

Brief Overview A ketogenic diet is a way of eating that promotes a state of ketosis in the body. Generally speaking a ketogenic diet will have the following macronutrient ratios: High Fat – 60%-80% of total calories come from fat. Moderate Protein – 15%-35% of total calories come from protein. Low Carbohydrate – 5% or less of total calories come from carbohydrates. Everyone’s macronutrient breakdown will be different and depends on a variety of factors. Reference our Keto Macro Calculator to figure out what yours are! Eating in accordance with these macronutrient ratio’s will deplete your body of glucose and force it to start producing ketones. Your body will then use these ketones for energy. What is Ketosis From Wikipedia: Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body’s energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose (sugar) provides most of the energy. With the abundance of high carbohydrate foods available in modern times, virtually all human beings that don’t make a concerted effort to restrict carbs are always in a state of glycolysis. There are a number of reasons why ketosis is beneficial when compared to glycolysis, which we will get into later. What are Ketones? Ketones are the fuel source your body is running on when it’s in a state of ketosis. They are produced in the liver when glycogen is depleted and are characterized as a slower burning fuel source when compared to glucose. Insulin and Keto This is where the magic happens. Eating a high carb diet means you’re always producing insulin to transport the glucose around your body. The fat can just sit around and watch because insulin is doing all the work. The fat is eventually stored, which leads to weight gain. In a Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Many Carbs Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

If you’re considering going “keto,” keep in mind you’ll need to consider everything — worked out down to the last gram — regarding how many carbohydrates you can consume. One thing’s for sure: the statement “low carb” isn’t open to interpretation. This isn’t a quick fix “fad” diet; it’s meant to promote real and lasting change for your body — change that’s ultimately going to help you become less dependent on glucose and able to melt through fat for energy instead! You need to actually cause a metabolic shift, and just simply guessing if your carbs are low enough isn’t going to be the most efficient way to do that. While you’re on the ketogenic diet, you absolutely must keep your carbohydrate count within the specified range your body operates in — at all times. If not, you won’t reach a state of ketosis, thus rendering the entire program null and void. With that in mind, it’s important to realize you’re doing this as a more long-term process for lasting results. No matter what your goals or desired outcome, eating a lower carb diet than you are now is certainly going to benefit you in the long run. So, How Many Grams of Carbs Should I Have? If you’re a “normal” person — and by normal, we simply mean “non-athlete” — then you’ll be alright following the standard ketogenic dietary ratios. (And we use the word “standard” here because there isn’t just one version of the ketogenic diet — but more on that in a bit.) You can enjoy fantastic benefits going keto, including effortless fat loss, increased lifespan, improved energy, and sharper mental focus. Everyone responds differently to different amounts of carbohydrates, but there are some general starting points. But to achieve those, you’ll need to make yo Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should I Eat?

How Much Fat Should I Eat?

I’ve been asked by several new Ketovangelists about how they should calculate their fat, protein, and carb intake. This is, by far, one of the most common questions asked and it leads to lots of confusion, so I’m going to try my best to make it as simple as possible. First, let’s talk terms. Sometimes people refer to things called “macros” when asking this question (e.g. What are your macros? or What should my macros be?) What the heck are they talking about? The term “macros” is a shortened way of saying “macronutrients”, which another, sciency, way of saying “fats, proteins, and carbs”. Nutritionist break food down into two main subsets, macronutrients and micronutrients. Micronutrients are vitamins and minerals (among other things). Macronutrients are, as I said, one of three things (four if you count alcohol, which we are not): fats, proteins, and carbs. So when someone asks how much fat they should eat, or how many carbs they should eat, they are asking how about their macros. Okay, so enough of that, let’s get to the actual meat (no pun intended). Determining your macros is really quite simple, especially for Ketovangelists. We start with protein. How much protein should I eat? This is super simple. As a general guideline, this is the amount of protein per day for you: Female: 50g – 75g Male: 100g – 120g Simple. Like I said. Okay, that’s protein. So what about fats? How much fat should I eat? Okay, this is a little more involved. Not much. But a little. You want 65% – 80% of your calories to come from fat. So, if your presumed daily caloric requirement is 2000 calories, you’ll want between 1300 – 1600 calories from fat. Since each gram of fat is 9 calories, that would equate to between 144g – 177g per day of good fat. Of cours Continue reading >>

How Many Grams Of Fat Does Ketosis Burn?

How Many Grams Of Fat Does Ketosis Burn?

I try to look all over the internet to find if anyone knows how much fat is being burned a day from ketosis. Many people ask about calories, but I don't care about that. Is it possible to know a range. I don't want to eat too much fat and not be able to burn my fat stores too. Continue reading >>

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

A Breakdown Of The Fat/protein/carb Ratio For A Ketogenic Diet

When on the ketogenic diet, one of the most important things you’ll have to pay attention to is your macronutrient breakdown. This means you’ll be getting a certain portion of your calories form carbohydrates (a very small portion) at 5%, a larger portion of calories from protein (35%), and the largest number of calories from fats (65%). There are many online sites that can help you figure out how many calories you need on a daily basis, based on your height, weight, measurements, age, gender and level of activity. From there, you can also use online calculators to help you figure out the proper breakdown, in grams, for each macronutrient percentage you’ll be eating. You’ll multiply your total daily calories by each percentage to get the grams of each macronutrient that you’ll need. For example, if you need 1200 calories per day, and your carbohydrates are 5% of that total, then multiply 1200 by 5% to get the number of grams of carbohydrates you’ll be allowed to eat each day. In this case, 5% of 1200 calories is 60 calories. You then divide the calories by the grams per unit of carb, protein or fat. Carbohydrates and proteins both have 4 calories per gram and fats have 9 calories per gram. Again, in this example, 60 calories divided by 4 grams per carb leaves you with a total of 15 grams of carbs per day. There are several great phone apps that will do the calculations for you. My personal favorite is Carb Counter. This also makes restaurant eating a breeze. One last note on food and nutrient tracking applications—you can typically also use these to plan your meals ahead of time. Just plug in the proposed foods for the day to see where your calorie and macronutrient values will lie, and make adjustments from there. Then, you build your meals around those n Continue reading >>

What Is It Like To Go On A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is It Like To Go On A Ketogenic Diet?

It's do-able. Some people love it and some people hate it. Personally, I find that nutritional ketosis is almost ideal for me, whereas "normal" eating with lots of carbs in my diet leads to feelings of non-satiety, drowsiness, mood swings, insulin spikes, bloating, and sometimes nausea. A ketogenic diet consists of 70-80% calories from fat, 15-25% calories from protein, and 0-5% calories from net carbohydrates (carbs). You must restrict your daily net carbs to 20-40g daily. (total grams carbs) - (grams fiber) = (net grams carbs) Your transition period depends on a few factors: how strictly you limit your carbohydrate intake, how much energy you expend day-to-day, and how much energy in the form of glucose and glycogen you have stored in your body currently. My transition period takes 3 days. Day 1: This is an easy day. Your blood is still filled with circulating glucose, and any deficit will be taken from the glycogen in your liver to be converted to glucose. You may feel hunger pangs by the afternoon, and a small dip in insulin, which will feel normal to you because this is what happens every day on a normal diet and you are used to it. Day 2: This is an easy day, too. Your body is happily pulling glycogen from your liver, converting it to glucose, and all is well. Any small amount of carbs that you consume are burned away, nothing is being stored. You may feel the typical afternoon slowdown and hunger, as on day 1. Day 3: Hard day. Your body has been (or is nearly) depleted of glucose and glycogen. The small amount of carbs that you consume are not enough to fuel your brain. You have a feeling of satiety from all the fat you are consuming, but you may feel achy, have headaches, and feel sluggish. Your body is alerting you to the lack of glucose and glycogen. It will t Continue reading >>

Find Your Keto Macros

Find Your Keto Macros

Fine tune your fat-burning with the perfect keto ratio. Learn the special concerns for protein and fat ratios, how to track your keto macros and where to find the wiggle room. Best keto ratio for rapid fat-burning Printable keto food pyramid Online keto calculator Printable list of keto macros: calories, fat, net carbs, protein Keto macro is short for ketosis macro-nutrient. The three keto macro-nutrients are fats, proteins and carbs. Sometimes, calories are also considered part of the equation. What’s the best keto ratio? “Best” depends on your goals. A typical keto ratio has 75% of calories from fat, 20% of calories from protein and 5% of calories from fiber-rich carbs. A Typical Keto Ratio Keto Tip: A perfect ketogenic ratio happens when the amount of protein grams are equal to or slightly great than the grams of fat. Keto Food Pyramid Keto foods center around healthy fats, with moderate amounts of protein and scant carbs. During ketosis, think of fat as a food group. The Atkins Keto Food Pyramid illustrates which of the 200 ketosis foods to enjoy liberally and which ones to limit. Click the image to view, print or save. Tracking Keto Macros Track keto macros helps identify diet stalls and plateau. Macro tracking pinpoints troublesome keto ratios in your diet. For example: Are you eating enough fat? Are you eating too much protein? Track your keto foods and find out. Keto Wiggle Room If your keto ratio is off a bit, it’s not a big deal. You have wiggle room. If some days are over and some days are under your ideal goals, it’s fine. Keep your calories in check and track your keto macros by averaging several days at a time. A single day won’t make or break your plan. Testing for Ketosis Special test strips called keto sticks (or ketostix, keto strips) are u Continue reading >>

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

How Much Fat Should You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet?

Thankfully, the days of low-fat diet fads are mostly behind us, and people are better understanding the importance of eating healthy fats for health. But still, many of those eating keto will underestimate just how much fat they need to eat to see success on this way of eating. So, how much fat can you eat on a ketogenic diet? This article will cover why fat intake matters on the ketogenic diet and how it makes it successful, as well as how to find out how much fat you need. Then, we’ll touch on how you can make sure your fat intake stays high (while still getting enough calories) and the best types of fat to eat. The Importance of Fat on the Keto Diet Dietary fat is the cornerstone of the ketogenic diet. It’s the high fat intake and low carb intake that makes the diet “work” and keeps your body in ketosis — using those ketones for fuel and burning through fat. Having a very low carb intake allows you to deplete your body of carbohydrates and stored carbohydrates (glycogen) and conditioning it to begin turning to fat instead, leading to the creation of ketones for energy. Getting and keeping the body in this state of ketosis has many benefits that include weight loss and better health. High Fat and Enough Calories Matters Those new to keto or who have taken a break from it often struggle with eating enough fat at first. Since you’re greatly reducing your carb intake, you have to really increase your fat intake to replace the calories you were eating before from carbs. This can take some adjustment. If you’re not used to eating high fat, it might seem like a lot at the beginning. Fat is satiating, which is one of the advantages of keto because you can naturally avoid overeating due to its satisfying nature. That being said, it’s important to also eat enou Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should I Eat On A Keto Diet?

How Many Calories Should I Eat On A Keto Diet?

The ketogenic diet is based on the process of ketosis, which is characterized by high levels of ketones in the blood that occur during the conversion of fats into fatty acids and ketones. The diet encourages the body to use ketones stored in fat cells more efficiently for energy, according to Diet Ketogenic. Video of the Day The goal of the keto diet is to make fat from fatty acids the primary source of energy, rather than from carbohydrates, or glucose. The diet promotes weight loss through fat, rather than muscle, according to Diet Ketogenic. On a proper ketogenic diet, recommended foods include high-protein choices, such as beef, steak, chicken, any type of fish, pork, butter and certain types of oils, including olive oil and flaxseed. According to Keto, these foods will not throw you out of ketosis, as they either have minimal or no carbohydrate content. The ketogenic ratio is the ratio of fat to protein plus carbohydrates in the diet, according to the Ketogenic Resource. Ketogenic diets typically contain a ratio range of 2-to-1 to 5-to-1. A typical diet has a ratio of 3-to-1 which, to produce 1,500 kcal, would contain 145.16 g of fat and 145.16/3 = 48.39 g of protein plus carbohydrates. This calculates as 145.16 x 9 = 1,306.44 kcal from fat and 48.39 x 4 = 193.56 kcal from protein plus carbohydrates -- 1306.44 + 193.56 = 1,500 kcal. Continue reading >>

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Definitive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you want to lose weight or build muscle faster and think the ketogenic diet might help, you want to read this article. How did a diet meant for treating epileptic seizures turn into a popular weight loss fad? That’s the story of the ketogenic diet, which was introduced in 1921 by an endocrinologist named Dr. Henry Geyelin. Geyelin, presenting at the annual meeting of the American Medical Association, explained that the ancient Greeks had discovered that fasting was an effective method of managing epileptic seizures. Hippocrates wrote about it and, like Geyelin, found that the seizures would return once eating resumed. Why? What was it about fasting that suppressed the seizures? Well, epileptic seizures are triggered by electrical abnormalities in the brain. The causes can vary, from genetics to brain injury, but more common is chronic inflammation throughout the body. Geyelin found that when people fast, two major changes occur in the blood: glucose levels fall and ketone levels rise. You’ve probably heard of glucose, also known as blood sugar, but not ketones, which are carbon-oxygen molecules produced by the liver that cells can use for energy instead of glucose. This finding fascinated Geyelin and he set out to determine if similar effects could be achieved without starvation. A decade of work proved they could, and the “ketogenic diet,” as it would be later called, was born. The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to maintain a state of ketosis, wherein the body’s primary energy source is ketones, not glucose. Early studies showed it was an extremely effective treatment for seizures, but in 1938, it was eclipsed by the anticonvulsant drug phenytoin. This medication became the standard treatment for epilepsy, effectively retiring the ketogenic diet from cli Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Lose Weight With Ketosis

Ketogenic Diet: Lose Weight With Ketosis

If you’ve faced a health or weight loss plateau, you might have heard about the ketogenic diet. But what is ketosis? Going into ketosis, or a state of fat burning, isn’t complicated, but it takes motivation. It’s a way to burn stubborn fat and lose weight. Today we’ll explore questions like what is the ketogenic diet, what is ketosis and how does it work, what are keto foods, and the benefits and dangers involved in following a ketogenic diet plan. As a bonus: I’ll provide a 1 week ketogenic diet plan plus a complimentary workout plan. Together, they will help you burn stubborn fat. We try so hard to lose a few kilos or pounds, but most of the time we don’t manage to. Luckily, there is an easy way to turn the body into a fat burning machine: the ketogenic diet. Why the ketogenic diet? It’s commonly believed that consuming fewer calories will lead to weight loss. It looks something like this: Calories stored (or lost) = Calories consumed – Calories burned Following this equation, if we eat less, we’ll create a calorie deficit and in turn, use our stored fat . Assumably, we’ll lose weight. It seems easy to do. But, things go wrong. First, as many know from experience, eating less is torturous. Second, we often don’t lose weight with calorie restriction diets. Worse than that, we sometimes lose the weight and gain it back–and do damage to our metabolism in the process. Losing weight and gaining it back means a slower metabolism. This is because body fat storage is not just a matter of calories in and calories out. It is the result of millions of years of evolution. To understand what happens, we need to review some basic biochemistry. We know that an adult has: A glycogen (carbohydrate) reserve that lasts about 1 to 2 days of survival, maximum. Fat Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Eat Too Many Calories On Lchf?

Is It Possible To Eat Too Many Calories On Lchf?

Is it possible to eat too many calories on LCHF? The answer to this and other questions – for example, what type of exercise is best on LCHF? And what should you do if you sleep really poorly? – in this week’s Q&A with Dr. Andreas Eenfeldt: Exercising on LCHF – cardio or weights? I have just recently started this way of eating and am going to the gym five days a week. I am morbidly obese. I am enjoying the exercise, I will do a mix of boxing, HIIT circuit, PT session and cardio and weights. I have been told that cardio any more than once a week is no good and has adverse effects. Could you elaborate further on this for me if it is indeed true or is it up to the individual? For me personally, I feel that the exercise can only benefit me. On a side note, my PT actually supports this way of eating too! Christine Hi Christine! I think the exercise and the cardio is likely to benefit you. Just remember that if you’re morbidly obese then diet quality (few carbs) and only eating when hungry are the most important things, at least when it comes to weight loss. So focus on getting those right first and consider postponing exercise until those earlier habits are simple to maintain. However, if you’re confident you can do everything at once, good for you! Best, Andreas Eenfeldt Can I eat too many calories? Can I eat too many calories? My carbs are under 18 grams per day, my fat is quite high 130g – 250 grams and my protein around 80 grams. My calories are around 2,500… sometimes up to 2,800. I have 48 kg (105 lbs) to lose. My blood ketones read 0.3 – 0.4 mmol/L in the mornings and in the evening 0.6 – 1.6mmol/L. I eat no junk or processed foods or sweeteners or sugars. I am aged 59, partially disabled with fibromyalgia, CFS and arthritis. My weight loss is very Continue reading >>

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Should I Count Calories On A Ketogenic Diet?

Calorie counting is a great tool for people to use to get a rough idea of caloric intakes, as well as a way to pinpoint mistakes they might have made if they hit a plateau. You might have been told that counting calories is not needed on a ketogenic diet because it causes more weight loss than other diets. That’s not exactly true. Would you be burning more calories than a low fat diet? Most likely, but that’s because of your protein intake. What about high carb vs. low carb? The truth is, there are no studies that properly show a fat loss advantage between low carb and high carb diets. There’s been over 20 long-term studies done in the last 50 years trying to give a solid conclusion on this, but all of the results have been the same: there is no significant difference in weight loss between a low carb and high carb diet. [1][2][3] The Ketogenic Diet and How This Ties In The thing about a ketogenic diet is if you tell people to eat as much as they want, they will tend to eat slightly less than other diets. Naturally, you will eat less if you’re eating food that can satiate you easier. You will have more fullness from vegetables, satiety from protein, feel fuller for longer from the fat, and endure higher levels of thermogenesis from unprocessed foods. So what does that all mean? In a nutshell, it means that you will eat less food, and therefore less calories. Your body can dig into your fat stores, since you’re naturally restricting calories, and you’ll lose weight. With high carb diets, usually with a good amount of processed foods, you will see swings in blood glucose. This makes it easy for people to give in to cravings, and succumb to the “carb addiction” created from serotonin and dopamine. There are no magical metabolic advantages to a ketogenic die Continue reading >>

How Many Calories Should I Eat On Keto?

How Many Calories Should I Eat On Keto?

One of the most common questions I see about keto is “how many carbs should I eat in a day?” The next thing people usually want to know is, “how many calories should I eat in a day?” Totally reasonable. There seem to be two schools of thought on this: those who ignore calories, and those who eat at a huge deficit. But, what should you do? So, how many calories should I eat on keto? Well, the answer lies somewhere in between not counting calories at all and going crazy, and being obsessive and eating very few calories. You’ve probably figured that much out, but it’s worth stating anyway. There are many bro science-y keto advocates that preach the fallibility of the calories-in-calories-out model. And they’re not totally wrong – saying 100 calories of corn chips is the same to your body as 100 calories of broccoli isn’t really correct. Your body will get far more out of the broccoli, and it will actually decrease inflammation, whereas the corn chips will create inflammation. As a quick reminder, inflammation is basically excess water in the body, which can cause swelling and weight gain. It also puts pressure on your various organ systems. So, the general idea with foods is that we want to reduce inflammation throughout the body. What are your goals on keto? Not everyone follows a ketogenic diet to lose weight. In fact, there are many medical conditions which studies have shown to be greatly improved by the individual remaining in ketosis. So, if your goal has nothing to do with weight loss, you can pretty much stop reading this article now, and just eat however much you want. ;) For the small minority of you who are trying to actually gain weight, I’d advise a similar protocol as above, but just keep eating. For many people, weight loss is the goal, a Continue reading >>

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