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How Long Does Dka Last

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary

Canine Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Canine diabetic ketoacidosis, sometimes known as DKA, is a potentially fatal disease that most commonly occurs in dogs with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, although in rare cases it has been known to appear in nondiabetic dogs. This condition symptomatically resembles that of diabetes but usually goes unnoticed until a near-fatal situation is at hand. For this reason, it is important to understand the causes, symptoms and treatment options. How Canine Diabetic Ketoacidosis Develops Under normal conditions, the pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, which helps to regulate the level of glucose in the blood cells. When the pancreas is ineffectively able to create enough insulin, a dog becomes diabetic. By default, a dog's body will begin looking for alternative fuel sources, such as fat. The problem is that when too much fat is consumed by the body, the liver then begins to produce ketones. This excessive level of ketones causes the condition known as canine diabetic ketoacidosis. There are two scenarios in which this can occur: in dogs with poorly controlled diabetes and in dogs with undiagnosed diabetes. Recognizing the Symptoms Because of the potentially deadly side effect Continue reading >>

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  1. Shama

    I was diagnosed as t1 four weeks ago. I was admitted to hospital with BGLs of 19 and ketones were 5.5, so I was DKA.
    I spent 24 hours in emergency while they brought down my ketones to zero then spent another 8 days in hospital getting stabilised and learning how to inject insulin etc.
    My question is: how long does it take to fully recover from DKA? I went back to work yesterday and was exhausted after 7 hours (including a short lunchbreak). I deliberately didn't do very much; just got through my backlog of emails and did a bit of reading. When I got home, I perked up a bit after dinner. Today, it was the same at work but tonight I am SO tired I can barely walk and I can't do *anything* other than sit and watch tv. I can't keep doing this. I need to be able to function at least a bit in the evenings, and this is without me doing my usual job of answering complex (and long) phone calls and emails. Is this normal??
    I wasn't in a coma (I walked into emergency). I lost 3kg in the fortnight before I was admitted despite eating heaps, and lost more weight before that. I had a lot of muscle pain and muscle cramps before diagnosis, and couldn't walk up a hill without having to stop all the time to catch my breath. (plus the classic insatiable thirst and peeing heaps)
    When I first got out of hospital I basically just tried to get on with normal life and started exercising, ie a 20 minute walk most days. Then I carried lots of heavy boxes (long story) over several days. I was fine at the time then lost some stamina late last week. The DE (after I'd done all this exercise, not before!) said now was not the time to hit the gym, just as a throwaway comment. I didn't ask her to elaborate but did scale back my daily walks a bit.
    I'm going to ring the DE or endo tomorrow to see if this is normal and if I need more time before going back to work (I'm not driving yet, hubby can't afford to take time off to pick me up early each day and the bus home involves two 15 minute walks each end and a 45 minute bus ride). But I would like to know other people's experiences with DKA recovery, particularly if it was a pre-diagnosis one with several weeks of symptoms.
    Thanks in advance :)

  2. Magenta76

    Hi Shama, sucks that you have to be here, but glad that you found us!!
    I, unfortunately, have a LOT of experience with DKA's... (something like 9 or 10 in 13 years of diagnosis) Each of them the recovery time has been different.
    My diagnosis, I have no idea what my level of ketones was, I know my BSL was 30something, and I was incredibly ill, and weighed something ridiculous like 50kgs.... with hindsight I was probably presenting symptoms at least 2 or 3 months before I was diagnosed.
    After my diagnosis, I took the probably set standard, month off. I went back to work as a chef after that, I don't really remember what it felt like, I was 22 so I probably was not too bad. I think we all would have different recovery times to anything and everything, so I don't think anyone could give you a straight answer on how long it will take for your body to go back to "normal". Talk to your HP's but take it day by day would be the best bet. Not really helpful, I know, but can't say any more than that.
    My last DKA was extremely severe. We're talking coma, organ failure type stuff. That was 18 months ago. My body is still recuperating from that one. I know that for me, each time I have a DKA, the whole episode is worse, and I take longer each time to get better. I just wish I discovered and knew about all the triggers for me. Stress is a large factor for about half of mine, which unfortunately means that when I get the all clear to work again, I have to change my career.
    Good luck with everything, and I hope you are feeling better soon. Try not to overdo it. Your body would still be adjusting. Let it. :)

  3. tantan

    Hi Shama,
    I have a similar story to you. I was diagnosed about 4 years ago, with ++++ ketones (whatever that means), a BGL of 32.7, and weight loss of 9kg in the preceding 3 and a half weeks. My understanding is that DKA involves the body basically chewing up fat because the lack of insulin means it can't access the glucose in your body, even if you're eating lots of it! So a lot of that weight loss is coming from storage (and we all need some fat storage for normal functioning! :-) ). At the end of the day, it will take a body awhile to replenish those stores, work properly again, and get back to the state it was at prior to diagnosis (and prior to the weeks leading up to diagnosis).
    I can't remember how long it took me to recover fully. I was diagnosed several weeks before Christmas, which was a massively busy time at the company where I was working. The doctor at the hospital gave me a medical certificate for at least a week off, but I actually only took about two days. However, I only worked shorter days for at least a week, maybe two, once I went back. I wasn't allowed to drive, so my co-worker would pick me up in the morning on her way to work, and my husband would pick me up in the afternoon when he finished at his work (which was always about 1-2 hours earlier than my usual finishing time). I found that I felt better in the mornings, so that worked for me.
    I think the best one can do for one's body after something like DKA is to eat healthily and get plenty of sleep!
    All the best!
    Tanya

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Diabetic Ketoacidosis ?

I am a type 1 diabetic and I have a problem that I cant seem to figure out. I have an appointment with my doctor in about a month, because they cant get me in any earlier. But what happens is I get really sick to my stomach, my blood sugar usually drops EXTREMELY fast, I get dizzy, a headache, and I always seem to yawn a lot. I have some ideas about what it might be, like ketoacidosis. But I am not entirely sure. Do you have any ideas? I would suggest that you go to your local drug store and obtain a canister of ketosticks. Check your urine for ketone. It is a very simple test. This will tell if you have ketonuria. If this is the case it is important that you see a doctor immediately. Call you doctor and tell them what is happening and you need help very quickly. If your doctor does not see you, go to an emergency room. This is a very serious situation. Take care, Wanda QUOTE posted on the "about portions'' thread: "The presence of ketones is called "ketonuria," and further dehydration and ketone build-up can result in ketoacidosis which is a medical emergency. The bottom line is that the presence of ketones in someone with type 1 diabetes shows a dangerous lack of insulin and the Continue reading >>

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  1. Shama

    I was diagnosed as t1 four weeks ago. I was admitted to hospital with BGLs of 19 and ketones were 5.5, so I was DKA.
    I spent 24 hours in emergency while they brought down my ketones to zero then spent another 8 days in hospital getting stabilised and learning how to inject insulin etc.
    My question is: how long does it take to fully recover from DKA? I went back to work yesterday and was exhausted after 7 hours (including a short lunchbreak). I deliberately didn't do very much; just got through my backlog of emails and did a bit of reading. When I got home, I perked up a bit after dinner. Today, it was the same at work but tonight I am SO tired I can barely walk and I can't do *anything* other than sit and watch tv. I can't keep doing this. I need to be able to function at least a bit in the evenings, and this is without me doing my usual job of answering complex (and long) phone calls and emails. Is this normal??
    I wasn't in a coma (I walked into emergency). I lost 3kg in the fortnight before I was admitted despite eating heaps, and lost more weight before that. I had a lot of muscle pain and muscle cramps before diagnosis, and couldn't walk up a hill without having to stop all the time to catch my breath. (plus the classic insatiable thirst and peeing heaps)
    When I first got out of hospital I basically just tried to get on with normal life and started exercising, ie a 20 minute walk most days. Then I carried lots of heavy boxes (long story) over several days. I was fine at the time then lost some stamina late last week. The DE (after I'd done all this exercise, not before!) said now was not the time to hit the gym, just as a throwaway comment. I didn't ask her to elaborate but did scale back my daily walks a bit.
    I'm going to ring the DE or endo tomorrow to see if this is normal and if I need more time before going back to work (I'm not driving yet, hubby can't afford to take time off to pick me up early each day and the bus home involves two 15 minute walks each end and a 45 minute bus ride). But I would like to know other people's experiences with DKA recovery, particularly if it was a pre-diagnosis one with several weeks of symptoms.
    Thanks in advance :)

  2. Magenta76

    Hi Shama, sucks that you have to be here, but glad that you found us!!
    I, unfortunately, have a LOT of experience with DKA's... (something like 9 or 10 in 13 years of diagnosis) Each of them the recovery time has been different.
    My diagnosis, I have no idea what my level of ketones was, I know my BSL was 30something, and I was incredibly ill, and weighed something ridiculous like 50kgs.... with hindsight I was probably presenting symptoms at least 2 or 3 months before I was diagnosed.
    After my diagnosis, I took the probably set standard, month off. I went back to work as a chef after that, I don't really remember what it felt like, I was 22 so I probably was not too bad. I think we all would have different recovery times to anything and everything, so I don't think anyone could give you a straight answer on how long it will take for your body to go back to "normal". Talk to your HP's but take it day by day would be the best bet. Not really helpful, I know, but can't say any more than that.
    My last DKA was extremely severe. We're talking coma, organ failure type stuff. That was 18 months ago. My body is still recuperating from that one. I know that for me, each time I have a DKA, the whole episode is worse, and I take longer each time to get better. I just wish I discovered and knew about all the triggers for me. Stress is a large factor for about half of mine, which unfortunately means that when I get the all clear to work again, I have to change my career.
    Good luck with everything, and I hope you are feeling better soon. Try not to overdo it. Your body would still be adjusting. Let it. :)

  3. tantan

    Hi Shama,
    I have a similar story to you. I was diagnosed about 4 years ago, with ++++ ketones (whatever that means), a BGL of 32.7, and weight loss of 9kg in the preceding 3 and a half weeks. My understanding is that DKA involves the body basically chewing up fat because the lack of insulin means it can't access the glucose in your body, even if you're eating lots of it! So a lot of that weight loss is coming from storage (and we all need some fat storage for normal functioning! :-) ). At the end of the day, it will take a body awhile to replenish those stores, work properly again, and get back to the state it was at prior to diagnosis (and prior to the weeks leading up to diagnosis).
    I can't remember how long it took me to recover fully. I was diagnosed several weeks before Christmas, which was a massively busy time at the company where I was working. The doctor at the hospital gave me a medical certificate for at least a week off, but I actually only took about two days. However, I only worked shorter days for at least a week, maybe two, once I went back. I wasn't allowed to drive, so my co-worker would pick me up in the morning on her way to work, and my husband would pick me up in the afternoon when he finished at his work (which was always about 1-2 hours earlier than my usual finishing time). I found that I felt better in the mornings, so that worked for me.
    I think the best one can do for one's body after something like DKA is to eat healthily and get plenty of sleep!
    All the best!
    Tanya

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the sp

How Long Does Diabetes Ketoacidosis Last?

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a common complication of diabetes in children, which needs hospitalisation and can be fatal. In most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis, death is caused due to cerebral edema or complication of DKA. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can be the first sign or presenting symptom in some cases of type 1 diabetes (before diabetes is diagnosed or they have any other symptoms). According to studies, about 20 to 40% of newly diagnosed patients of type 1 diabetes are admitted in DKA. Duration of Diabetic ketoacidosis: with appropriate treatment (fluid replacement and insulin therapy), DKA can be corrected in about 24-48 hours (depending on the severity of DKA at presentation). In most cases, the duration of therapy is about 48 hours. Treatment for DKA aims to correct the metabolic abnormalities of DKA such as high blood sugar level, high ketone levels and serum osmolality with insulin and fluids. Treatment of DKA includes: Insulin replacement to correct blood glucose levels. Fluid and electrolyte replacement to correct dehydration and imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Treating the cause of DKA (such as infection, injury etc). Duration of fluid replacement: fluid is Continue reading >>

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  1. KinkingPump

    Hi
    A few weeks ago I was admitted to A&E- long story short my sugar was up around 35 as my pump had kinked, I was vomiting up everything. The sugar had been rising for about 12 hours, the first ketone reading I did practically turned the dip stick black, but within 4 hours it was coming back as no ketones (I know how to down water!) and my BS 7.
    I had an easy day the following day and just slept, drank loads of water and then started trying to do "normal" routine stuff the day after that. It took about a week before I was back to normal, I felt crampy and achey, couldn't concetrate on anything and just wanted to sleep! Is there any way of speeding this recovery up? How long does "recovery" take from an episode like this until you feel normal in yourself again? And how do people manage with work- I was getting tellings off for my lack of concentration, I didn't want to go on the sick per se as I didn't feel that I needed to be home in bed, but equally I wasn't capable of performing (I'm an engineer- not a physical labourer, someone who does calculations and lots of sums!)... What should I have done?
    Thanks for any responses, experiences and tips would be really appreciated- I've been diabetic since I was 9 (now 22) and this is the first time I've had real problems (was a teenager with HBAs in the teens on injections, and only been on a pump 9 months with a HBA of 8 now so guessing I'm a lot more sensitive to the highs that I was before!)

  2. SimonClifford

    I kinked mine last night. Was awoken by the pump's blocked-cannula alarm (Aviva Combo), thankfully & nothing untoward had happened.
    Sent from the Diabetes Forum App

  3. Lady_luce_x

    I had DKA just before I went on my pump, which was caused initially by a sickness bug. i was on placement for my university degree at the time. I was in hospital for about 24 hours, and then my mum took me home. I had 3 days off to recover, and like you said mainly just slept and drank water. The week following I felt very crampy and achey, and i think it took a week or so to feel "normal" again. Now if my pump ever messes up (on friday night it disconnected over night) and i ended up with ketones, i recovered without need of A&E but I felt rubbish yesterday (tired, crampy, irritable) and today I'm not feeling 100%. I think once youve had a high level of ketones it takes awhile for your body to recover, they are "poisonous toxins" afterall. Hope you feel better soon

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