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How Long Can You Be In Ketosis

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Dr. Edelman, MD Endocrinologist describes the benefits of the medication glucophage for people with diabetes. If you need help with diabetes management or diabetes supplies call a Liberty Medical representative at 1-866-654-2378 or visit http://www.libertymedical.com today.

Why This Doctor Recommends Keto (with A Catch)

Would clinical nutritionist Dr. Josh Axe, DNM, DC, CNC, recommend the keto diet? "Absolutely," he told POPSUGAR. But there is a catch. You can't do it forever. A brief refresher, if you don't already know: the keto diet is a high-fat, moderate-protein, low-carb diet in which you switch your body's primary energy source from carbohydrates to fat (i.e., from glucose to ketones). Up to 80 percent of your calories come from fat — we're not kidding when we say high-fat! That's what differentiates this diet from something like Paleo or Atkins — they're both low-carb, but with keto, the emphasis is on the fats. "I don't think somebody should be on a full ketogenic diet for more than three months," he said. "What I teach is not that everybody should be on a ketogenic diet — the basis of what I teach is traditional Chinese medicine, or TCM — but if somebody has the goal of overcoming epilepsy, fighting cancer, overcoming blood sugar issues like diabetes, losing weight, or even some hormonal issues, the ketogenic diet is a great temporary diet." "Everybody is different; depending on somebody's genetics, depending on somebody's health goals or struggles, certain people should be on ce Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Saraleesaralee

    Is it possible to stay on ketogenic diet for life-long?

    I have been on ketogenic diet for 2 weeks. It controls my blood sugar level really well. However I am not over weight. And I am worried about potential long term side effects of the diet. For example, high LDL level, steoporosis, auto immune disease, too much weight loss, vesicular stiffness. I was wondering if there is anyone in this forum has been on ketogenic diet for years? And do you experience any side effects from the diet?

  2. Aaron1963

    I've been on a strict ketogenic diet for 6 months, and was doing LCHF for much of the 5 months prior to that but didn't make any attempts at it being ketogenic so I may have been in and out of ketosis some during that period. I now have a blood ketone meter and remain in ketosis according to it.
    I did suffer excessive weight loss initially. I lost about 40kg (about 90 lbs.), and it ended up sending me from being very obese to being underweight. But I've always eaten very little protein, which I continued to do, plus I was doing intermittent fasting, sometimes not eating anything for days at a time. Once I stopped the intermittent fasting and concentrated on getting adequate protein, my weight went back up to my ideal weight and stabilized there. I've heard from several people that you really need to watch your protein when doing a ketogenic diet being it's easy for excess to hinder weight loss and/or increase your BG.
    I have had a few issues while doing a ketogenic diet, but not 100% sure which if any can be attributed to ketosis vs. some other factor. First off, as winter was approaching I got extremely cold all the time, especially my fingers and toes, but even my whole body was cold. I thought it might have been the caffeine I was getting as part of my ketogenic diet involves drinking lots of coffee with HWC, coconut oil, and butter. I switched to decaf and the problem pretty much went away, but I don't know if it was the caffeine, the ketosis, the massive weight loss (lack of body fat), something else, or a combination of factors.
    I've also had excessive itching and a rash. That's normal for me during the winter months, but this year it started a bit early, went longer, and was much worse than normal. I think it may very well have been my usual sensitivity to the cold dry weather, aggravated by toxins released during my rapid weight loss, and perhaps ketones being emitted through the skin. It's just recently started to clear up and the rash is gone and most of the itching.
    I got keto-breath for a week or two when I first concentrated on going keto. It was very noticeable, but disappeared after that and no issues anymore with my breath.
    This diet is very sustainable for me. I tried my whole adult life to diet to lose weight and was never successful. This time I wanted to lose weight, but my primary focus was controlling my BG, meaning reducing carbs down to a low-carb level, which caused me to gravitate naturally to a LCHF diet. For the first time I have no desire to go back to my old way of eating. I love this diet and it's completely satisfying. So I killed two birds with one stone - got my BG under control, down to non-diabetic levels, and got my weight down to ideal. Plus with the huge benefits (IMHO) of having my body use ketones rather than glucose, I'm totally sold on this way of eating for the rest of my life and have absolutely no worries about not being able to stick to my diet. I really have no strong urges for carbs anymore, and only end up going off the plan rarely due to social pressures or inadvertently eating hidden/unknown carbs.
    My LDL has gone up, but I've heard from others that usually it's benign large fluffy LDL that typically goes up when on a ketogenic diet. And my body is still adjusting. Also I've heard that LDL by itself is not a good measure of risk. So I'm not worried about it, but will keep an eye on things. I also have taken my ketogenic diet to an extreme, hitting a KR of 3.0 or higher almost everyday, and sometimes up to 4.0 or more. Not sure if eating much more fat than necessary for ketosis affected my LDL any or not. Initially my LDL dropped significantly as well as my trigs, but both increased at my last doctor's visit. I may try a more normal KR in the future while monitoring my blood ketones to verify I stay in ketosis and see if there's any difference in my BG, cholesterol, or other tests.
    I did also suffer from other typical symptoms during my keto adaptation phase. Most went away within about two weeks. But it's just been here at the 6-month mark where my BG numbers suddenly stabilized with very little change, and quite low, and overall I just feel absolutely fantastic. I feel like I'm bursting with energy and joined a gym and suddenly love running and working out whereas I hated them all my life.
    Well, I don't have years of experience with ketosis to report anything to you about that. Other than I've heard lots of other people with years of experience and not heard of anyone having any real side effects other than the things I've mentioned. However some people do find ketosis isn't for them and give up very soon. For those that feel it is working for them and stick with it, seems there's no significant side effects. But I'll let the others who've been in ketosis for longer than me speak for themselves.

  3. furball64801

    Hi and welcome to DD I know of a guy called no more carbs that was on it over 2 yrs. It is possible he is still on it, that chat site closed down but he was going strong on it.

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FREE 6 Week Challenge: https://gravitychallenges.com/home65d... Fat Loss Calculator: http://bit.ly/2O6rsdo The carb cycling diet is one of my favorite diets because it is one of the fastest way to burn fat while retaining as much muscle as possible. Most people don't know that carb cycling is actually a form of ketogenic dieting. The ketogenic diet is a diet that is lower in carbohydrates, which makes our body convert more dietary fat and body fat in to keytones in the liver. Which it then goes on to use for energy. Like I've said in many of my videos the human body prefers to use carbs as its primary source of energy. You're body won't produce too many keytones on a high carbohydrate diet, because your body won't need extra energy from fat due to the fact that its getting its energy from the more preferred carbohydrates. The only way for our body to use more fat for energy is by not having its preferred source there all the time. Eliminating carbs completely, however can have many drawbacks on our health and well being. Protein, carbs, and fats are all important and necessary for our body. So in comes the cyclical ketogenic diet aka carb cycling and also known originally as the anabolic Diet. There are many different approaches to carb cycling, but the general idea is that At some points of the week you're going to have a high amount of carbohydrates, and at other points of the week you're going to have a low amount of carbohydrates. Setting up the high carb and low carb splits will vary from one plan to the next. Some people may have very small changes in the amount of carbs they have from day to day. An example of this would be to set up a low carb, medium carb, and high carb day. Let's say 300 grams of carbs on high carb, 250 grams of carbs on your medium carb, and 200 grams of carbs on your no carb day. Another more advanced approach would be to do a High carb, low carb, and no carb day. The way that I like to set this kind of split up is by having a high amount of carbs on my high carb day, which for me would be somewhere around 400 grams, I would have one third or at the most half that amount for low carb day, and then try to get as close to 0 grams as possible on my no carb day and then repeat. An even more advanced approach would be to just cycle between high and no carb days. Or take it even a step further and do high, no, no. I don't really recommend having any more than two no carb days in a row. Make sure you don't jump to any extreme carb restrictions. An example of this is doing a 800 calorie diet when you could lose weight and maintain a better body composition with a 1500 calorie diet. Jumping to an extreme will not help you lose weight faster, in fact it'll probably backfire. Also in case you're wondering what kind of food you can eat on your no carb day, some great options are fish, chicken breast, ground turkey, protein shakes, Steak occasionally, and you can also have healthy fat sources like avocados, coconut oil, olive oil. and fatty fish like Salmon. For carbs make sure you are eating good sources of carbs like oats, brown rice, and sweet potatoes and avoid the junk food carbs. You can incorporate one cheat meal on one high carb day in the week, but that's it one cheat meal. You may notice that your strength and energy levels may go down while dieting like this. In fact you may feel like straight up garbage in the beginning. Understand that a lot of people feel this way when creating any kind of a calorie deficit. You're body will take a little while to adapt to using fat for energy instead of carbs. So the first 2 weeks can feel miserable. Give your body some time to adapt. A good idea is to plan your high carb days the day before a heavy lifting day, because this way you have stored glycogen available for your heavy lifts the next day. If you have no idea how many carbs to have on each day, try using a calorie calculator to find your maintenance macros and then add at least 50 grams of carbs to get the number for your high carb day. I'll include a calorie calculator in the description. Once you have your high carb number you should be able to figure out your low carb day. No carb day is obviously no carbs. After doing a carb cycling plan you may need to do some reverse dieting

Ketogenic Diet Faq

With all the new people finding, switching, and transitioning into a low carb diet, I figured it was about time I put together an FAQ on all the common questions that are asked when someone is starting out. I don’t go too in depth in the answers, but I tried to give a direct answer and then link to a more in depth article on the topic to help you fully understand it. If you have any other questions you’d like to be added, changed, or are unsure about – please feel free to leave a comment below so I can fully explain, or make changes to the answers on this page. Best wishes, and to all the new people out there – good luck and happy dieting! Frequently Asked Questions Click any of the questions below and it will take you to the answer. How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis? A ketogenic diet is not a diet that you can whimfully choose to go on and off of at any point. It takes time for your body to adjust and go into a state known as ketosis. This process? Anywhere from 2 – 7 days, depending on your body type, activity levels, and what you’re eating. The fastest way to get into ketosis is to exercise on an empty stomach, restrict your carbohydrate intake to 20g or less Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Saraleesaralee

    Is it possible to stay on ketogenic diet for life-long?

    I have been on ketogenic diet for 2 weeks. It controls my blood sugar level really well. However I am not over weight. And I am worried about potential long term side effects of the diet. For example, high LDL level, steoporosis, auto immune disease, too much weight loss, vesicular stiffness. I was wondering if there is anyone in this forum has been on ketogenic diet for years? And do you experience any side effects from the diet?

  2. Aaron1963

    I've been on a strict ketogenic diet for 6 months, and was doing LCHF for much of the 5 months prior to that but didn't make any attempts at it being ketogenic so I may have been in and out of ketosis some during that period. I now have a blood ketone meter and remain in ketosis according to it.
    I did suffer excessive weight loss initially. I lost about 40kg (about 90 lbs.), and it ended up sending me from being very obese to being underweight. But I've always eaten very little protein, which I continued to do, plus I was doing intermittent fasting, sometimes not eating anything for days at a time. Once I stopped the intermittent fasting and concentrated on getting adequate protein, my weight went back up to my ideal weight and stabilized there. I've heard from several people that you really need to watch your protein when doing a ketogenic diet being it's easy for excess to hinder weight loss and/or increase your BG.
    I have had a few issues while doing a ketogenic diet, but not 100% sure which if any can be attributed to ketosis vs. some other factor. First off, as winter was approaching I got extremely cold all the time, especially my fingers and toes, but even my whole body was cold. I thought it might have been the caffeine I was getting as part of my ketogenic diet involves drinking lots of coffee with HWC, coconut oil, and butter. I switched to decaf and the problem pretty much went away, but I don't know if it was the caffeine, the ketosis, the massive weight loss (lack of body fat), something else, or a combination of factors.
    I've also had excessive itching and a rash. That's normal for me during the winter months, but this year it started a bit early, went longer, and was much worse than normal. I think it may very well have been my usual sensitivity to the cold dry weather, aggravated by toxins released during my rapid weight loss, and perhaps ketones being emitted through the skin. It's just recently started to clear up and the rash is gone and most of the itching.
    I got keto-breath for a week or two when I first concentrated on going keto. It was very noticeable, but disappeared after that and no issues anymore with my breath.
    This diet is very sustainable for me. I tried my whole adult life to diet to lose weight and was never successful. This time I wanted to lose weight, but my primary focus was controlling my BG, meaning reducing carbs down to a low-carb level, which caused me to gravitate naturally to a LCHF diet. For the first time I have no desire to go back to my old way of eating. I love this diet and it's completely satisfying. So I killed two birds with one stone - got my BG under control, down to non-diabetic levels, and got my weight down to ideal. Plus with the huge benefits (IMHO) of having my body use ketones rather than glucose, I'm totally sold on this way of eating for the rest of my life and have absolutely no worries about not being able to stick to my diet. I really have no strong urges for carbs anymore, and only end up going off the plan rarely due to social pressures or inadvertently eating hidden/unknown carbs.
    My LDL has gone up, but I've heard from others that usually it's benign large fluffy LDL that typically goes up when on a ketogenic diet. And my body is still adjusting. Also I've heard that LDL by itself is not a good measure of risk. So I'm not worried about it, but will keep an eye on things. I also have taken my ketogenic diet to an extreme, hitting a KR of 3.0 or higher almost everyday, and sometimes up to 4.0 or more. Not sure if eating much more fat than necessary for ketosis affected my LDL any or not. Initially my LDL dropped significantly as well as my trigs, but both increased at my last doctor's visit. I may try a more normal KR in the future while monitoring my blood ketones to verify I stay in ketosis and see if there's any difference in my BG, cholesterol, or other tests.
    I did also suffer from other typical symptoms during my keto adaptation phase. Most went away within about two weeks. But it's just been here at the 6-month mark where my BG numbers suddenly stabilized with very little change, and quite low, and overall I just feel absolutely fantastic. I feel like I'm bursting with energy and joined a gym and suddenly love running and working out whereas I hated them all my life.
    Well, I don't have years of experience with ketosis to report anything to you about that. Other than I've heard lots of other people with years of experience and not heard of anyone having any real side effects other than the things I've mentioned. However some people do find ketosis isn't for them and give up very soon. For those that feel it is working for them and stick with it, seems there's no significant side effects. But I'll let the others who've been in ketosis for longer than me speak for themselves.

  3. furball64801

    Hi and welcome to DD I know of a guy called no more carbs that was on it over 2 yrs. It is possible he is still on it, that chat site closed down but he was going strong on it.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

In terms of donation for kidney transplant, there is no specific age limit per se. What is more important than the specific age of the patient donating the kidney is that the donor should be healthy. So we do pretty extensive screening of the donor to ensure that they do not have any major illnesses that would cause any problems periopertaively, including with anesthesia exposure with surgery itself and post operatively, specifically with regards to their kidney function down the line. People do not need two kidneys to survive. But as long as the donor is healthy, in other words if the donor has diabetes, they have a risk for developing kidney problems down the line. So diabetic patients are not considered for donation in general. Patients who have difficulty to control their blood pressure are not generally considered for donation. Blood pressure is easy to control and they may be just on one medication, they may be considered for donation. Patients who have heart problems or any severe medical problems are not generally considered for donation because they may have problems around the time of surgery and down the line after surgery. So the ability of a patient to donate a kidney depends much more on how healthy they are, as opposed to just the age itself.

Is There A Time Limit For Ketosis?

There are some examples of humans being in ketosis for extended periods without ill effects. As Rose mentioned, the Inuit probably lived more or less their whole lives in ketosis, or at least most of them were in ketosis most of the time. They weren't the only such culture, either???maybe the Masai and maybe the Bison people of the American Great Plains did likewise, at least sometimes. There there was the one-year-long experiment in which Vilhjalmur Stefannson and another subject ate nothing but meat while under medical observation. Then there are the thousands of children who have gone on a ketogenic diet to treat their epilepsy. Many of them stayed on the diet continuously for years. In Caraballo 2011 they reported on more than 200 patients who had been on the diet for between 1 and 12 years, with a mean of 3.5 years. In that and in other studies, it seems like there weren't any common, bad side-effects. (There were some side-effects, but they weren't too bad or too common. The worst was stunted growth, but I think that was not due to ketosis but due to the fact that those diets were usually calorie-restricted and water-restricted, and children need calories and water to grow!) Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Saraleesaralee

    Is it possible to stay on ketogenic diet for life-long?

    I have been on ketogenic diet for 2 weeks. It controls my blood sugar level really well. However I am not over weight. And I am worried about potential long term side effects of the diet. For example, high LDL level, steoporosis, auto immune disease, too much weight loss, vesicular stiffness. I was wondering if there is anyone in this forum has been on ketogenic diet for years? And do you experience any side effects from the diet?

  2. Aaron1963

    I've been on a strict ketogenic diet for 6 months, and was doing LCHF for much of the 5 months prior to that but didn't make any attempts at it being ketogenic so I may have been in and out of ketosis some during that period. I now have a blood ketone meter and remain in ketosis according to it.
    I did suffer excessive weight loss initially. I lost about 40kg (about 90 lbs.), and it ended up sending me from being very obese to being underweight. But I've always eaten very little protein, which I continued to do, plus I was doing intermittent fasting, sometimes not eating anything for days at a time. Once I stopped the intermittent fasting and concentrated on getting adequate protein, my weight went back up to my ideal weight and stabilized there. I've heard from several people that you really need to watch your protein when doing a ketogenic diet being it's easy for excess to hinder weight loss and/or increase your BG.
    I have had a few issues while doing a ketogenic diet, but not 100% sure which if any can be attributed to ketosis vs. some other factor. First off, as winter was approaching I got extremely cold all the time, especially my fingers and toes, but even my whole body was cold. I thought it might have been the caffeine I was getting as part of my ketogenic diet involves drinking lots of coffee with HWC, coconut oil, and butter. I switched to decaf and the problem pretty much went away, but I don't know if it was the caffeine, the ketosis, the massive weight loss (lack of body fat), something else, or a combination of factors.
    I've also had excessive itching and a rash. That's normal for me during the winter months, but this year it started a bit early, went longer, and was much worse than normal. I think it may very well have been my usual sensitivity to the cold dry weather, aggravated by toxins released during my rapid weight loss, and perhaps ketones being emitted through the skin. It's just recently started to clear up and the rash is gone and most of the itching.
    I got keto-breath for a week or two when I first concentrated on going keto. It was very noticeable, but disappeared after that and no issues anymore with my breath.
    This diet is very sustainable for me. I tried my whole adult life to diet to lose weight and was never successful. This time I wanted to lose weight, but my primary focus was controlling my BG, meaning reducing carbs down to a low-carb level, which caused me to gravitate naturally to a LCHF diet. For the first time I have no desire to go back to my old way of eating. I love this diet and it's completely satisfying. So I killed two birds with one stone - got my BG under control, down to non-diabetic levels, and got my weight down to ideal. Plus with the huge benefits (IMHO) of having my body use ketones rather than glucose, I'm totally sold on this way of eating for the rest of my life and have absolutely no worries about not being able to stick to my diet. I really have no strong urges for carbs anymore, and only end up going off the plan rarely due to social pressures or inadvertently eating hidden/unknown carbs.
    My LDL has gone up, but I've heard from others that usually it's benign large fluffy LDL that typically goes up when on a ketogenic diet. And my body is still adjusting. Also I've heard that LDL by itself is not a good measure of risk. So I'm not worried about it, but will keep an eye on things. I also have taken my ketogenic diet to an extreme, hitting a KR of 3.0 or higher almost everyday, and sometimes up to 4.0 or more. Not sure if eating much more fat than necessary for ketosis affected my LDL any or not. Initially my LDL dropped significantly as well as my trigs, but both increased at my last doctor's visit. I may try a more normal KR in the future while monitoring my blood ketones to verify I stay in ketosis and see if there's any difference in my BG, cholesterol, or other tests.
    I did also suffer from other typical symptoms during my keto adaptation phase. Most went away within about two weeks. But it's just been here at the 6-month mark where my BG numbers suddenly stabilized with very little change, and quite low, and overall I just feel absolutely fantastic. I feel like I'm bursting with energy and joined a gym and suddenly love running and working out whereas I hated them all my life.
    Well, I don't have years of experience with ketosis to report anything to you about that. Other than I've heard lots of other people with years of experience and not heard of anyone having any real side effects other than the things I've mentioned. However some people do find ketosis isn't for them and give up very soon. For those that feel it is working for them and stick with it, seems there's no significant side effects. But I'll let the others who've been in ketosis for longer than me speak for themselves.

  3. furball64801

    Hi and welcome to DD I know of a guy called no more carbs that was on it over 2 yrs. It is possible he is still on it, that chat site closed down but he was going strong on it.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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