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How Long Can Ketoacidosis Last

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How Long Can You Survive On Each Planet Without A Spacesuit? We know how long a human being could survive on Earth, but what about the other planets in our solar system? Learn about how soon you would die on each planet. Facebook : https://www.fb.com/scienceversion Instagram : https://www.instagram.com/scienceversion

How Can I Survive Type 1 Diabetes Without Insulin?

This week, Wil offers some thoughts on that universal question: “How long can I really go without insulin?” Please take a read; his findings might surprise you and even bust a myth or two. Jake, type 1 from Minneapolis, writes: I’ve had diabetes for 18 years and I had someone ask me a question the other day that I didn’t really have an answer to. The question was how long I would be able to survive without any insulin. I told them 3–4 days, but I don’t know if this is true. Any info from a cinnamon whiskey swizzling T1? [email protected] D’Mine answers: If Tom Hanks’ character in Castaway had been one of us, he would’ve never lived long enough to go half-crazy and end up talking to a volleyball named Wilson. OK, so that’s a mixed blessing. But I guess the lesson there is: don’t get washed up on a deserted island if you can avoid it. To be honest, like you, I had always pegged my zero-insulin survival time in the “couple of days” zone; but once I got to thinking about your question I realized that I didn’t know how I knew that, where I learned it, or if it was even correct at all. Now, as background for you sugar-normals, type 2s, and type 3sin type 1s like Jake an Continue reading >>

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  1. Shama

    I was diagnosed as t1 four weeks ago. I was admitted to hospital with BGLs of 19 and ketones were 5.5, so I was DKA.
    I spent 24 hours in emergency while they brought down my ketones to zero then spent another 8 days in hospital getting stabilised and learning how to inject insulin etc.
    My question is: how long does it take to fully recover from DKA? I went back to work yesterday and was exhausted after 7 hours (including a short lunchbreak). I deliberately didn't do very much; just got through my backlog of emails and did a bit of reading. When I got home, I perked up a bit after dinner. Today, it was the same at work but tonight I am SO tired I can barely walk and I can't do *anything* other than sit and watch tv. I can't keep doing this. I need to be able to function at least a bit in the evenings, and this is without me doing my usual job of answering complex (and long) phone calls and emails. Is this normal??
    I wasn't in a coma (I walked into emergency). I lost 3kg in the fortnight before I was admitted despite eating heaps, and lost more weight before that. I had a lot of muscle pain and muscle cramps before diagnosis, and couldn't walk up a hill without having to stop all the time to catch my breath. (plus the classic insatiable thirst and peeing heaps)
    When I first got out of hospital I basically just tried to get on with normal life and started exercising, ie a 20 minute walk most days. Then I carried lots of heavy boxes (long story) over several days. I was fine at the time then lost some stamina late last week. The DE (after I'd done all this exercise, not before!) said now was not the time to hit the gym, just as a throwaway comment. I didn't ask her to elaborate but did scale back my daily walks a bit.
    I'm going to ring the DE or endo tomorrow to see if this is normal and if I need more time before going back to work (I'm not driving yet, hubby can't afford to take time off to pick me up early each day and the bus home involves two 15 minute walks each end and a 45 minute bus ride). But I would like to know other people's experiences with DKA recovery, particularly if it was a pre-diagnosis one with several weeks of symptoms.
    Thanks in advance :)

  2. Magenta76

    Hi Shama, sucks that you have to be here, but glad that you found us!!
    I, unfortunately, have a LOT of experience with DKA's... (something like 9 or 10 in 13 years of diagnosis) Each of them the recovery time has been different.
    My diagnosis, I have no idea what my level of ketones was, I know my BSL was 30something, and I was incredibly ill, and weighed something ridiculous like 50kgs.... with hindsight I was probably presenting symptoms at least 2 or 3 months before I was diagnosed.
    After my diagnosis, I took the probably set standard, month off. I went back to work as a chef after that, I don't really remember what it felt like, I was 22 so I probably was not too bad. I think we all would have different recovery times to anything and everything, so I don't think anyone could give you a straight answer on how long it will take for your body to go back to "normal". Talk to your HP's but take it day by day would be the best bet. Not really helpful, I know, but can't say any more than that.
    My last DKA was extremely severe. We're talking coma, organ failure type stuff. That was 18 months ago. My body is still recuperating from that one. I know that for me, each time I have a DKA, the whole episode is worse, and I take longer each time to get better. I just wish I discovered and knew about all the triggers for me. Stress is a large factor for about half of mine, which unfortunately means that when I get the all clear to work again, I have to change my career.
    Good luck with everything, and I hope you are feeling better soon. Try not to overdo it. Your body would still be adjusting. Let it. :)

  3. tantan

    Hi Shama,
    I have a similar story to you. I was diagnosed about 4 years ago, with ++++ ketones (whatever that means), a BGL of 32.7, and weight loss of 9kg in the preceding 3 and a half weeks. My understanding is that DKA involves the body basically chewing up fat because the lack of insulin means it can't access the glucose in your body, even if you're eating lots of it! So a lot of that weight loss is coming from storage (and we all need some fat storage for normal functioning! :-) ). At the end of the day, it will take a body awhile to replenish those stores, work properly again, and get back to the state it was at prior to diagnosis (and prior to the weeks leading up to diagnosis).
    I can't remember how long it took me to recover fully. I was diagnosed several weeks before Christmas, which was a massively busy time at the company where I was working. The doctor at the hospital gave me a medical certificate for at least a week off, but I actually only took about two days. However, I only worked shorter days for at least a week, maybe two, once I went back. I wasn't allowed to drive, so my co-worker would pick me up in the morning on her way to work, and my husband would pick me up in the afternoon when he finished at his work (which was always about 1-2 hours earlier than my usual finishing time). I found that I felt better in the mornings, so that worked for me.
    I think the best one can do for one's body after something like DKA is to eat healthily and get plenty of sleep!
    All the best!
    Tanya

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How Long Can A Person With Type 1 Diabetes Live With No Treatment?

This will depend a great deal on two things: Is the person still in the honeymoon period? A person who is newly diabetic usually retains some insulin production. This can last for months or even years. Is the person aware that they are out of insulin? There are methods for mitigating (a little) the lack of insulin if one is aware of it. If a person is a long term diabetic with 0 insulin production and they are unaware that they are out of insulin so they continue to eat and drink like normal, they can fall into DKA (diabetic keto-acidosis) within 24 hours and without treatment death is likely within a few days. If said person still has SOME insulin production, then as soon as they stop consuming more carbs than their body can deal with, their situation may stabilize and while death is still likely, it can take months, or even a year or two. If a person has 0 insulin production and is AWARE of the lack of insulin, they will immediately stop consuming carbohydrates and begin drinking water in copious quantities. They will also begin exercising. Exercising will help reduce blood sugar to some extent, and drinking lots of fluids can help flush the ketones that cause DKA out. The person Continue reading >>

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  1. Natalia & Enana

    Hi.
    I just put my cat in a veterinary emergency clinic with high ketoacidosis. They gave her an IV and insulin and other things I could afford. They told me to keep her there for 48 hours but I'm picking her up tomorrow and taking her to her vet. I dont know if my beautiful cat will survive. What are her chances? What are your suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Nat

  2. Sue and Oliver (GA)

    I am so sorry your kitty has DKA, Nat. It is possible to turn it around and she is in the best place to have that happen. We do have many cats who have survived and come home and lived long lives.
    What you can do - learn how to keep her safe at home. The best way to do that is to home test for blood glucose and for ketones. We test our cat's blood glucose levels just like we would our diabetic children. Here is a good site for beginning info: Newbie hometesting site and a video: Video for hometesting We have taught hundreds of people how to test over the internet. We would love to teach you. Testing for ketones will help you determine before DKA that he is heading into dangerous territory: ketones
    You can get the supplies for both these kinds of testing at any drug store. We use human glucometers and ketostix.
    Read about the best diet for your cat here: http://www.catinfo.org We feed wet lo carb food. BUT don't change the diet until you are hometesting. Oliver went down 100 points overnight when we switched from dry to wet. If we hadn't been hometesting, he would have overdosed.
    I am giving you a lot of info at once. The board is going down in 25 minutes and will be off for 2 hours for maintenance. Come back on later tonight or in the morning and post specifically for DKA. People who have dealt with it can give you lots of tips on how to care for your kitty when she gets home.

  3. Robert and Echo

    Nat, sending best wishes for your cat. Please keep us updated on her condition. Many cats do recover from DKA but, as you already know, it can be expensive treatment.
    _Rebecca

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis Damian Baalmann, 2nd year EM resident A 45-year-old male presents to your emergency department with abdominal pain. He is conscious, lucid and as the nurses are hooking up the monitors, he explains to you that he began experiencing abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting about 2 days ago. Exam reveals a poorly groomed male with dry mucous membranes, diffusely tender abdomen with voluntary guarding. He is tachycardic, tachypneic but normotensive. A quick review of the chart reveals a prolonged history of alcohol abuse and after some questioning, the patient admits to a recent binge. Pertinent labs reveal slightly elevated anion-gap metabolic acidosis, normal glucose, ethanol level of 0, normal lipase and no ketones in the urine. What are your next steps in management? Alcoholic Ketoacidosis (AKA): What is it? Ketones are a form of energy made by the liver by free fatty acids released by adipose tissues. Normally, ketones are in small quantity (<0.1 mmol/L), but sometimes the body is forced to increase its production of these ketones. Ketones are strong acids and when they accumulate in large numbers, their presence leads to an acidosis. In alcoholics, a combination o Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Natalia & Enana

    Hi.
    I just put my cat in a veterinary emergency clinic with high ketoacidosis. They gave her an IV and insulin and other things I could afford. They told me to keep her there for 48 hours but I'm picking her up tomorrow and taking her to her vet. I dont know if my beautiful cat will survive. What are her chances? What are your suggestions.
    Thanks,
    Nat

  2. Sue and Oliver (GA)

    I am so sorry your kitty has DKA, Nat. It is possible to turn it around and she is in the best place to have that happen. We do have many cats who have survived and come home and lived long lives.
    What you can do - learn how to keep her safe at home. The best way to do that is to home test for blood glucose and for ketones. We test our cat's blood glucose levels just like we would our diabetic children. Here is a good site for beginning info: Newbie hometesting site and a video: Video for hometesting We have taught hundreds of people how to test over the internet. We would love to teach you. Testing for ketones will help you determine before DKA that he is heading into dangerous territory: ketones
    You can get the supplies for both these kinds of testing at any drug store. We use human glucometers and ketostix.
    Read about the best diet for your cat here: http://www.catinfo.org We feed wet lo carb food. BUT don't change the diet until you are hometesting. Oliver went down 100 points overnight when we switched from dry to wet. If we hadn't been hometesting, he would have overdosed.
    I am giving you a lot of info at once. The board is going down in 25 minutes and will be off for 2 hours for maintenance. Come back on later tonight or in the morning and post specifically for DKA. People who have dealt with it can give you lots of tips on how to care for your kitty when she gets home.

  3. Robert and Echo

    Nat, sending best wishes for your cat. Please keep us updated on her condition. Many cats do recover from DKA but, as you already know, it can be expensive treatment.
    _Rebecca

  4. -> Continue reading
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