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How Long Can I Stay In Ketosis

Ketosis And Alcohol

Ketosis And Alcohol

When it comes to the ketogenic lifestyle, there are lots of confusing and conflicting opinions floating around, and they can lead to all kinds of mistakes. One of those confusing areas is how alcohol fits into a ketogenic lifestyle. Hopefully, after you read this, you’ll have a pretty good understanding and some tools to use to make informed decisions along the way. First off, not all alcoholic beverages are the same. Alcohol is the same across the board; it’s a macronutrient with seven calories per gram, so that’s the starting point. It’s a byproduct of fermentation. Essentially, a sugar compound is acted upon by yeast and the yeast produces alcohol and carbon dioxide. Depending on the type of sugar compound, you get different kinds of alcoholic beverages. Hard liquor, or spirits, takes the process a little further and adds distillation. That is, essentially, the process of “boiling off” the alcohol and then re-condensing (as it cools) it into more a more concentrated form. When you something marketed as “Distilled 9 times”, that just means they went through the boiling and condensing process nine times. Okay, so that’s where alcohol comes from, but that’s not all there is to it. Like said, the type of sugar compound determines the type of alcohol. For example, beer is made with, basically four ingredients. Barley, hops, water, and yeast. Barley is the primary ingredient, it’s where the sugar (maltose) comes from for the yeast. It’s also very similar to wheat. It’s a very bad carb. And it’s the reason that some people call beer “liquid bread”. It is far too rich in carbohydrates, not just the sugars, but the other “glutenous carbs”. So it’s a definite no for Ketovangelists. Beer does not fit into a ketogenic lifestyle. (Sidenote: A Continue reading >>

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

Understanding A High-fat Ketogenic Diet—and Is It Right For You?

While food trends come and go, high-fat diets—lauded for their weight-loss potential and brain-function benefits—have proven to have some staying power. Functional medicine M.D. Sara Gottfried contributes frequently to goop on the topic of weight-loss resistance. She’s spent the past two years rigorously studying the ketogenic diet—high-fat, low-carb, moderate-protein. Named for ketones, which Gottfried explains are “the energy source made by the body when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energy demand,” the goal of the diet is to get the body to burn fat instead of sugar. Gottfried recommends the keto diet (as it’s commonly called) to help with a range of brain and focus issues—she finds ketones to be “very efficient fuel for the brain”; she also says it works well for some patients (not all) who want to lose weight but have trouble kicking sugar cravings. We talked to her about who the keto diet is right for (and whom, or when, it isn’t); the nutritional ins and outs of mastering it; and which keto-friendly meals are healthy for practically everyone, regardless of what diet we do (or don’t) practice. A Q&A with Sara Gottfried, M.D. Q What is ketosis? A In most circles, ketosis refers to nutritional ketosis, an optimized state in which you burn fat instead of sugar. Nutritional ketosis has been used to treat epilepsy since the 1920’s and its popularity for mental acuity and weight loss has surged recently. More technically, ketosis refers to a metabolic state in which most of your body’s energy comes from ketones in the blood, as opposed to glycolysis, in which energy supply comes from blood glucose. Ketones are the energy source made by the body (in the liver) when there’s not enough carbohydrates to be burned for energ Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

Switching to a Ketogenic diet can be exciting, and you may be wondering how long it will be before you can expect to see results or ask “how long does it take to get into Ketosis?” This is perfectly normal, and almost everyone wonders the same thing when they switch to a low carb, high fat diet. The truth is, there is no one size fits all answer; it really does depend on who you are, what you eat, and how long it takes for your body to adjust. The good news is, for most people, this change takes place within a few days or weeks. Keep reading to find out how you can improve your body’s efficiency, and learn how to stay in Ketosis for the long-term. After all, it’s easier to stay in Ketosis once you’re there. How Do I Get into Ketosis? To answer your question of “how long does it take to get into Ketosis,” you must first ask “what is Ketosis” and “how do I get into Ketosis?” Let’s get started: Ketosis is a metabolic process and describes when the body uses fat for fuel. This occurs when there is a lack of glucose. As we generally eat a high carb, high sugar diet in the Western world, most people never enter Ketosis. Just because you lose weight does not mean you are in Ketosis, either, it just means you are eating a calorie deficient. When you switch to a low-carb diet and restrict your glucose, you might experience the Keto flu; these symptoms are your body learning to use fat as fuel, and signaling there is a change. For most people, this is a welcome change, but for other people, the transition takes a few weeks. It can even take a few people months to get into Ketosis, but this is usually because they are not following a strict Ketogenic diet. To get into Ketosis, you must: Eat less than 20g of carbs per day Restrict your intake of protein and Continue reading >>

What To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

What To Know About The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet, described as “Atkins on steroids” for its focus on foods high in fat and protein and low in carbohydrates, is growing in popularity but some nutritionists warn it may not live up to the hype. The diet’s proponents say that it is the best way to lose weight without feeling hungry and that it increases energy levels. Celebrities including Kim Kardashian and Adriana Lima and athletes from LeBron James to Tim Tebow have all reportedly followed some form of low carb diets. “Absolutely this diet works,” New York-based registered dietitian nutritionist Maya Feller told ABC News. “It is going to give people weight loss.” The ketogenic, keto for short, diet was developed in the 1920s after it was noticed that after fasting, epileptics would experience a marked reduction in their seizures. The diet is designed to get your body into a state called ketosis where your body is so low on carbohydrates it starts burning fat for fuel. Ketosis is also what the body does when fasting. Keto dieters drastically cut carbohydrates to about 10 percent of their daily diet, which in some cases can be just 20 grams of carbohydrates per day. That amount of carbohydrates is equivalent to one slice of white bread per day, according to Feller. Nutritionists also stress that followers of a keto diet should get their fat intake from healthy fats like olive oils and nuts. Samantha Kafedzic, 31, has lost 17 pounds since starting on a keto diet four weeks ago. Kafedzic, who admits she now eats “very different” meals from her daughter, said she feels better overall in addition to the weight loss. “I have more energy with this one running around,” Kafedzic said, pointing to her daughter. “My workouts are so much better. I definitely have more stamina.” The key t Continue reading >>

7 Tips To Stay Shredded While Gaining Mass

7 Tips To Stay Shredded While Gaining Mass

Sponsored Content I’ll start with two words you might already be familiar with: ketogenic diet. The words “keto” and “macros” have been floating around in the bodybuilding community a lot recently. If you’re familiar, you probably know keto as a way to get shredded: the basic mantra is "eat fat to lose fat." Now you’re thinking… “Wait, this is a keto article? There’s no way to add muscle while in ketosis.” You’re mistaken, and I can prove it because I’ve done it. Ketosis for shredding is only half the story. If you get systematic about the way you eat, cycling off of keto weekly for about 24 hours to refeed, then you can absolutely add lean mass AND stay shredded while you’re doing it. A brief keto overview: (You can skip ahead to the tips if you already know the basics) In a nutshell, a ketogenic diet requires switching your metabolism from glycolysis (burning glucose, a byproduct of carbohydrates) to ketosis (burning ketones, a byproduct of fat). To accomplish that switch, you have to deplete your body of glycogen and keep your blood glucose levels incredibly low. That means eating a high percentage of fat, a moderate amount of protein (too much protein and it can get converted into glycogen), and an extremely low amount of carbohydrates. We all know high protein as a bodybuilding essential and we’ve been talking about carb timing for decades. But flipping into ketosis basically requires that you look at that all-important third macro: fat. And more importantly, ketosis requires looking at all three of those macros in relationship to each other. To stay shredded while getting big, you actually have to lower your protein calories a bit and replace those calories with fat. There’s a lot of research being done on the benefits of operating Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

How To Get Into Ketosis Faster On A Low Carb Diet

This post may be sponsored or contain affiliate links. We may earn money from purchases made through links mentioned in this post, but all opinions are our own. We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliates sites. Want to be a fat-burning machine without having to count calories? Here’s a few ideas on how to get into ketosis faster on a low carb diet. Do you want to look leaner for bikini season? Yoga pants starting to feel a little tighter? One way to burn fat fast is to go on a ketogenic diet. The physiological process of burning stored fat instead of sugar, can be achieved within a short amount of time after following a strict keto diet. It is possible to get there in a day. In fact, some people show you how to get into ketosis, this fat burning state, in 24 hours. Do you need to fast? Becoming keto adapted where the body burns fat rather than sugar isn’t as hard as you might think. And, you don’t have to starve yourself to get there quickly. The great news for those who want to know how to get into ketosis faster is, well … you don’t have to fast. Fasting has been used for thousands of years by virtually every religion and traditional society. There are some people who think that a complete fast (not just intermittent fasting) is a way to get into ketosis faster. But the great thing about following a ketogenic diet is that you can eat until your heart—er, stomach—is content. You just have to eat enough of the right foods. And, of course, eat very little of the wrong foods. Is getting into ketosis safe without a doctor? Before reviewing how to get into ketosis quickly, let’s take a look at a quick background: T Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: The Complete Beginner’s Guide

Ketogenic Diet: The Complete Beginner’s Guide

The ketogenic diet (also known as the keto diet) is a way of eating where you actively help your body burn the excess fat that it has already stored. In order to do that, the amount of carbohydrates that you consume per day is limited (to 20-25 g of net carbs/day), and fat and protein make up the rest of your caloric intake. When you limit the amount of carbs (i.e. sugar and starches) that you are consuming, you enter a state called “nutritional ketosis”: your body can no longer rely on carbohydrates for its energy needs and it now needs to start burning fat as its primary fuel source. As a result, blood glucose remains much more stable throughout the day, and many people report increased energy and lower appetite, which makes it easier to control the amount of food you’re eating. The ketogenic diet was primarily designed as a treatment for epilepsy and is nowadays most often used for weight loss (1). It has multiple benefits that go beyond weight control, such as improving blood sugar regulation and insulin sensitivity, lowering the risk of Type 2 Diabetes and of heart disease, and it possibly even protecting against cancer. In this article, we’ll explain you the basics of the ketogenic diet and help you get started. Feel free to save this guide by pinning it to your Pinterest account or sharing it on your social media to read later. Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs To Stay In Ketosis

How Many Carbs To Stay In Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is probably one of the most meticulous ways of eating out there. For it to actually work you need to be careful and know how many carbs to stay in ketosis. Nutritional ketosis occurs as the result of our body running low on glycogen and the liver producing ketone bodies. It can be caused by either a prolonged period of fasting or by restricting carbohydrate intake significantly. At first, your body will show signs of withdrawal, because glucose is its primary fuel source. To start using ketones effectively you need to go through a period of adaptation. The length this of time this takes depends on several things. How many carbs have you been eaten before. How many carbs are you eating on keto right now. How well your body is accepting ketones for fuel. There isn’t a set magic barrier, that once crossed, will instantly put you into ketosis. As said, the liver will start to produce ketones as a substitute for glucose. The lower your daily carbohydrate intake, the sooner your liver glycogen will be depleted and the quicker your body will start utilizing. For complete adaptation to take place as quickly as possible, you would have to restrict your carbs to under 30 grams per day. NET, that is. Some people have a higher carb tolerance than others. At first, it’s advisable to go even lower than 30 grams, for ketosis to occur faster. Eating less than 20 grams for the initial 2 weeks will definitely hasten adaptation. After this initial period, your body’s biochemistry will have been completely altered. Your liver enzymes will have changed from preferring glucose to loving fat and ketones. Even our hungry brain will be satisfied and won’t create sugar cravings. However, how many carbs to stay IN ketosis is a totally different question. Despite our inc Continue reading >>

Combining Alkaline And Ketogenic Diets For Greater Health

Combining Alkaline And Ketogenic Diets For Greater Health

I hope you had a chance to read my previous blog on the many health benefits of an alkaline diet and my blog on the benefits (and potential drawbacks) of a keto diet... If you haven’t, I would suggest that you do so prior to reading this blog, as this information builds upon that material. In this blog I’ll be talking about the benefits of combining a ketogenic diet to your alkaline diet and lifestyle. First some history. While research studies overwhelmingly showed benefits to a ketogenic diet (you can see a lot of this research in the previous blog here), I had found a lot of patients and clients had had side effects. Here’s just one example: “Nausea and fatigue overrode any benefits like weight loss or improved health,” 47-year-old Liz told me about her massive misfire trying a ketogenic diet for three months. For a long time I weighed the benefits and frankly, some of the negative feedback from clients, relating to a ketogenic diet. But after a good deal of research I still became a huge supporter of keto. Why? Well, read on! Traditional ketogenic diets neglect alkalinity Over the years guiding patients through ketogenic diets, I eventually discovered the missing component creating many of these roadblocks and negative reactions. Traditional ketogenic diets neglect alkalinity, which for women this can especially become disastrous. After years combining research with empirical evidence from hundreds of patients, I juxtaposed a ketogenic diet and alkalinity with my Keto-Alkaline ™ Diet, which becomes the perfect plan for fat loss and optimal health by allowing your body to use fat for fuel while staying alkaline. Ketogenic proponents got it partly right by utilizing fat as fuel. So did alkaline-diet folks by recognizing how crucial staying alkaline becomes Continue reading >>

How Long Is It Safe To Stay In Ketosis? : General Low-carb : Active Low-carber Forums

How Long Is It Safe To Stay In Ketosis? : General Low-carb : Active Low-carber Forums

I vaguely remember reading many many years ago that the body can begin to eat it's own organs if you're on it too long, but I don't remember where I read it and I haven't seen any modern literature stating anything like it. That does not refer to a properly formulated ketogenic plan. It could refer to a plan with insufficient protein or insufficient calories for the long term. It's a survival strategy. Ketosis simply means you are burning fat (either recently ingested or stored) which will fuel your muscles, and that you are producing ketones which can fuel the brain (in lieu of glucose) once you are keto-adapted. I vaguely remember reading many many years ago that the body can begin to eat it's own organs if you're on it too long, but I don't remember where I read it and I haven't seen any modern literature stating anything like it. I thought this is the best place to ask as we'd have some professionals here. Thank you for your help. You may be thinking of diabetic ketoacidosis which is not the same as ketosis. Also, the body does start to eat it's own organs after a prolonged period of starvation. That's why 21 days is usually the recommended optimal time for a therapeutic water-only fast. More than 40 days is considered very dangerous because at that point there are likely to be no more non-malignant growths and fat for the body to use as energy so it starts using the vital organs. The important word is starvation which, again, is entirely different to ketosis. Jimmy Moore has been in ketosis for ages and was getting Dexa scans showing he was gaining muscle. So no... your body doesn't eat itself. :-\ Thanks for the feedback everyone. I really appreciate it. I have ordered the Atkins Diet Book, so just awaiting it's arrival now to give it a go. I'm pretty much in ket Continue reading >>

How To Burn Stored Body Fat — A Ketosis Primer

How To Burn Stored Body Fat — A Ketosis Primer

“So, how do you tell your body to start burning stored body fat?” my friend and fellow mother asked. “Cut the carbs,” answered another mom. “I go into ketosis just about every afternoon.” “Ketosis? Isn’t that bad for you?” The short answer? No. I talk to a lot of people who want to lose weight. They try all sorts of things — exercise, calorie restriction, you name it. Sometimes, they lose the weight. Inevitably, they gain it back. That’s because what they’re doing is going on a diet — a temporary fix at best. What they need is a lifestyle change, a perspective shift, a new paradigm. Of course, you all know the paradigm I espouse — a conversion to eating real, traditional foods. Yet even a conversion to eating real food won’t necessarily help the pounds melt away. If you’re still eating 200 grams of carbohydrates a day — even if they’re “traditional” carbohydrates like sprouted or soaked grains, unrefined sweeteners, etc, you’re not going to lose weight without making some serious changes. If your body is regularly storing body fat (you gain a little bit of weight each year), then something is wrong with how your body metabolizes food. Let me introduce you to a new concept: the body fat setpoint. The body fat setpoint is the mass of body fat that your body attempts to defend against changes in either direction. It’s your body’s attempt to maintain homeostasis. This is why if you exercise more, you eat more. It’s also why if you restrict calories, your metabolism slows down to compensate. Why should you care about the body fat setpoint? From Stephan at Whole Health Source: We care because this has some very important implications for human obesity. With such a powerful system in place to keep body fat mass in a narrow range, Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

Many Americans suffer from various chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet contains excessive amounts of protein and carbohydrates, neither of which is good for your health because it eventually causes you to develop insulin and leptin resistance. As a result, you gain excess weight, develop inflammation and become prone to cellular damage. To avoid this problem, significant changes in your diet are necessary, and the best way is inducing your body into a state of nutritional ketosis, a condition where your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar. In order to reach nutritional ketosis, you must follow a ketogenic diet. But what exactly is a ketogenic diet? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about a ketogenic diet – how you can apply it to your lifestyle and what positives you can reap from it. The Various Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a dietary approach that focuses on minimal carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and high healthy fat consumption — the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In fact, it’s what I recommend for most people who would like to optimize their health. There are many reasons why you should try a ketogenic diet. It can be very beneficial for people suffering from chronic conditions, or for people who would simply like to be healthier than their current state. You’ll be excited to know that a ketogenic diet can help with the following: • Weight loss If you’re trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were Continue reading >>

I Tried The Viral Diet That Lets You Eat Heavy Cream And Steak — And It Was Harder Than I Thought It Would Be

I Tried The Viral Diet That Lets You Eat Heavy Cream And Steak — And It Was Harder Than I Thought It Would Be

The Ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carb diet. It's gotten really popular lately as a way to lose weight relatively quickly while eating a lot of foods you'd have to give up on other diets. I tried it for a week to see what it's like. Chances are, at least one of your Facebook friends has tried the Ketogenic diet lately. And though you may have seen photos of their meals on your feed, you may not be sure what it is. Essentially, when going "Keto," you bump up your fat intake while severely limiting carbs. This diet says that you can eat full-fat cheese, bacon, butter, and other things that most other diets frown upon, so it's maybe not that surprising that some keto converts become enthusiastic loyalists, shouting the tenets of the plan wherever they go. Georgie Fear, a registered dietitian and sports nutrition specialist, told INSIDER that the major pro of the diet, besides getting to eat all of those things that are off-limits on other diets, is that you don't have to worry about how many calories you're eating or worry about the old "everything in moderation" adage. But there are some potentially major health-related drawbacks to eating this way as well. "You are at an increased risk of bone fractures, and up to a one in four chance of having kidney stones," Fear said. "It also causes fatty liver and gallstone formation. Low carbohydrate diets also worsen athletic performance and many people report low energy, nausea, and fatigue. High saturated fat diets are known to induce insulin resistance and hypothalamic inflammation leading to dysregulation of energy intake favoring obesity. Gut bacteria populations shift in a high fat, low carbohydrate diet, and emerging research is uncovering links between these changes and worsened risk of mental illness, immune system dy Continue reading >>

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

Is Constant Ketosis Necessary – Or Even Desirable?

162 Comments Good morning, folks. With next week’s The Keto Reset Diet release, I’ve got keto on the mind today—unsurprisingly. I’ve had a lot of questions lately on duration. As I’ve mentioned before, a good six weeks of ketosis puts in place all the metabolic machinery for lasting adaptation (those extra mitochondria don’t evaporate if/when you return to traditional Primal eating). But what about the other end of the issue? How long is too long? I don’t do this often, but today I’m reposting an article from a couple of years ago on this very topic. I’ve added a few thoughts based on my recent experience. See what you think, and be sure to share any lingering questions on the question of keto timing and process. I’ll be happy to answer them in upcoming posts and Dear Mark columns. Every day I get links to interesting papers. It’s hard not to when thousands of new studies are published every day and thousands of readers deliver the best ones to my inbox. And while I enjoy thumbing through the links simply for curiosity’s sake, they can also seed new ideas that lead to research rabbit holes and full-fledged posts. It’s probably the favorite part of my day: research and synthesis and the gestation of future blogs. The hard part is collecting, collating, and then transcribing the ideas swirling around inside my brain into readable prose and hopefully getting an article out of it that I can share with you. A while back I briefly mentioned a paper concerning a ketone metabolite known as beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB, and its ability to block the activity of a set of inflammatory genes. This particular set of genes, known as the NLRP3 inflammasome, has been linked to Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, and age-related macular d Continue reading >>

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