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How Long Can I Stay In Ketosis

Ketogenic Diet: The Complete Beginner’s Guide

Ketogenic Diet: The Complete Beginner’s Guide

The ketogenic diet (also known as the keto diet) is a way of eating where you actively help your body burn the excess fat that it has already stored. In order to do that, the amount of carbohydrates that you consume per day is limited (to 20-25 g of net carbs/day), and fat and protein make up the rest of your caloric intake. When you limit the amount of carbs (i.e. sugar and starches) that you are consuming, you enter a state called “nutritional ketosis”: your body can no longer rely on carbohydrates for its energy needs and it now needs to start burning fat as its primary fuel source. As a result, blood glucose remains much more stable throughout the day, and many people report increased energy and lower appetite, which makes it easier to control the amount of food you’re eating. The ketogenic diet was primarily designed as a treatment for epilepsy and is nowadays most often used for weight loss (1). It has multiple benefits that go beyond weight control, such as improving blood sugar regulation and insulin sensitivity, lowering the risk of Type 2 Diabetes and of heart disease, and it possibly even protecting against cancer. In this article, we’ll explain you the basics of the ketogenic diet and help you get started. Feel free to save this guide by pinning it to your Pinterest account or sharing it on your social media to read later. Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Lose Weight On The Lchf Diet?

How Long Does It Take To Lose Weight On The Lchf Diet?

I just wanted to talk a little bit about what you can expect when it comes to weight loss on a low-carb, high-fat diet. If you’re like me, when I first started reading about eating low carb, I got very excited about these stories of weight loss just seeming to happen as if by magic, with the pounds falling off more quickly than you can count. However when I started eating low carb – that didn’t happen for me. Not straight away anyway. It took a fair bit of adjusting and reading and trial and error before I found my sweet spot and really got to grips with what was happening with my body. Here are a few of the main points I learned. If you’re experiencing weight loss stalls, or you just want to know what to expect, hopefully, this will help you. You Really Have to Watch Your Protein Intake Low carb, high-fat diets that are geared around getting you into a fat-burning state must include only moderate amounts of protein. When I first started, I used the 0.8g of protein per pound of lean muscle calculation. This put me at about 100g of protein/ day. My weight loss didn’t start until I tinkered with this and dropped my daily intake of protein to 45-55g per day. At the time I wasn’t exercising, and I am 5′ 8″. Eating more protein than your body needs will lead to your body breaking down the protein into glucose, keeping your blood sugars high and blocking your keto-adaptation. Now that I exercise more I have increased my protein – but only a little. I still won’t go over 60g a day usually. Once I dropped my protein intake, the weight loss started, and continued at a steady rate (about 2lbs/week). Weight Loss Will Only Happen After Your Body Has Healed How soon you start dropping excess fat will depend on how much healing your body needs to do. Healing will Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

A question a lot of people who start a Ketogenic Diet want to know is, how long does it take to get into ketosis? After all, it is being in a state of ketosis that makes the diet, “ketogenic” in the first place. Being in Ketosis not only supercharges your body to be in an optimal fat-burning zone. It also gives you a longer, sustained energy, enhanced cognition, improved focus and other neuroprotective benefits. The Advantages of Ketosis don’t end there Being on a Ketogenic Diet and having your body rely on fats as its fuel comes with cardiovascular benefits as well. It has been shown that ketosis lowers bad LDL cholesterol while increasing good HDL cholesterol, decreasing a person’s risk of heart disease as well as improving insulin resistance amongst others. There are also studies into the ketogenic diet’s effects on Alzheimers Disease, Bipolar Disorder among others that have shown promising results. The Ketogenic Diet itself was used in the early 1900’s to control epileptic seizures and is still used today for those resistant to seizure medication. But we won’t dive deeply into all of that today. Today we’re going to answer the question, how long does it take to get into ketosis? So, how long does it take to get into Ketosis? Nobody can tell you accurately how long it will take to get into ketosis as the time it takes for your body to start creating ketone bodies varies between individuals. We all have unique metabolisms, varying resistance to insulin, previous diet, and other biological factors that differentiate us from one another. If one were to give a timeframe, it would be safe to say that typically you can expect your body to get into ketosis within a period of 2-10 days if you stick to the recommended macro nutrients. (use our keto calculator Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is a Ketogenic Diet? If medicine doesn't control seizures in epilepsy, sometimes doctors prescribe a ketogenic (or keto) diet. A ketogenic diet is a strict high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that can reduce, and sometimes stop, seizures. It's called "ketogenic" because it makes ketones in the body. Ketones are made when the body uses fat for energy. By replacing carbs with fat in the diet, the body burns more fat and makes more ketones. The ketogenic diet is prescribed by a doctor. Kids on the diet need to be followed closely by a dietitian to make sure they follow the diet and get the nutrients they need. The diet starts with fasting during an overnight hospital stay. Who Needs a Ketogenic Diet? Children with seizures that are not well-controlled by medicines (called intractable epilepsy) and severe epilepsy syndromes (such as infantile spasms or Lennox-Gastaut syndrome) might benefit from a ketogenic diet. Studies show that the ketogenic diet also may help treat other conditions, such as diabetes, obesity, and even cancer. How Does a Ketogenic Diet Work? Although the ketogenic diet for epilepsy has been around since 1920, doctors aren't exactly sure how the higher ketone levels works. Some seizure types seem to respond better than others to the ketogenic diet. In babies, the keto diet is given in formula. Young children may be fed by a tube that is place in the stomach by a surgeon. This helps the child stay on the diet. How Long Do Kids Need a Ketogenic Diet? You should know if a ketogenic diet works for your child within a few months. If it does, your doctor may recommend weaning your child off the diet after 2 years of seizure control. The weaning process is done over several months to avoid triggering seizures. Some people stay on a ketogenic diet for years. Are Continue reading >>

Keto Diet Weight Loss Rate – How Fast Can You Lose Weight?

Keto Diet Weight Loss Rate – How Fast Can You Lose Weight?

“I have to lose extra weight fast, urgently, right here and right now. I can not wait a minute, otherwise I cannot wear my favorite clothes to a party, wedding, concert etc.” You are familiar with those thoughts, aren’t you? We always wait until the last day, and then we begin to panic and search for a diet for rapid weight loss. You try to water or juice fast, lose 3-5 kg (6.6 – 11 lb) of nothing but water weight and despite what the scales say, you look no different and feel weak and dehydrated. The keto diet is the safest way to lose weight very fast, but just what is the keto diet weight loss rate? Read on to find out. What is the keto diet weight loss rate? I’m sure there are only ketogenic diet followers among my readers. Well, I’m almost sure of that. Some of you have just entered our low-carb club, and you are really wondering – what is the keto diet weight loss rate? After all, you could be in the category of those who need to fit into a sexy dress just next week. Keep track of your progress! Weight loss is easier when you’re collecting analytic data on yourself! Add to cart Select options Select options Add to cart So, let’s find out what is the weight loss rate on a ketogenic diet. First of all we have to figure out how exactly how our calories get burned with a keto diet. The principle of calorie burning is very simple, although to be honest, I do not agree with it. As for me it is complicated. I think everything is very difficult with our bodies. I will explain it with simple words, without bothering your brain with any detailed information. You are definitely in a rush to start doing whatever needs to be done to fit into the same dress. When you live your usual life without any diet your body gets energy from carbohydrates. As soon as you Continue reading >>

How Long Can You Eat Ketogenic? Isn't It Dangerous In The Long-term?

How Long Can You Eat Ketogenic? Isn't It Dangerous In The Long-term?

1) Is Keto diet dangerous for the liver, the kidneys, the heart? Especially the way the body has to work to turn fats into glyco for the body. Is it harmful in anyway? There’s no evidence to suggest that it is harmful to any of the organs you mention. There is no evidence to suggest that it is harmful to you in any way, really. There is a lot more evidence that a Low Fat diet it much more harmful in almost every way. It’s actually VERY normal for the human body to spend generating most of its glycogen from fat (ie, being in the “Fat burning zone” of cardio). Insulin tells your cells to take up glucose and store it - for fat cells that means turning it into fat - which is then later turned back into glycogen once the blood glucose levels drop. 2) Is it a diet I can stay on, on a lifelong basis? Because I don’t want to gain all my weight back in the end, I want to continue my sports sessions and I want to be in good health. Is keto diet compatible with that? And yes, it’s very compatible with that. You can find evidence of powerlifters, cyclists, and everything in between thriving on a ketogenic diet. Until you get adapted it can be pretty tough (maybe a month or two), but once you are, you will not notice adverse effects. I will tell you though, it it challenging to do mostly because it seems EVERYTHING in the WHOLE WIDE WORLD except what you cook at home or Chipotle is just full of carbs - so I always feel like I’m fighting a battle against the world to maintain the diet when I am in any situation that is outside my “normal” routine. Continue reading >>

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss

10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss What is Nutritional Ketosis? Ketosis is an eating plan where the body uses ketones to fuel the brain and body instead of glucose like most people use when on the SAD (standard American diet). It can be very helpful for blood sugar and consistent energy because fat is a very stable source of fuel. We all have a few million calories of fat we would gladly burn off, right? It takes a while to get into ketosis and it can be elusive if you are not paying close attention. It can be very safe for a period of time (even forever) but each person has to decide what feels compatible with their own lifestyle. Some experts do not think it is an optimal state for athletes but others experts disagree. I think we all have bio hack ourselves to see what feels right. Of course, I believe that the paleo template is good starting place for optimal health but ketosis can be an add-on or tweak for people who get stuck or feel hopeless. It can be a powerful and effective way to lose weight without hunger and many of my friends have had success with it. Always ask your doctor before beginning any new nutrition or weight loss plan. Here are some ways to make it work for you: 1. Eat Less Protein I have a made a handy dandy chart here for figuring out the right amounts for you. Most average ladies need about 50-100 grams, no more, fyi. You have to self experiment a little to find what is right for you. The idea is that protein can turn to sugar if someone eats more than they need, then the sugar spikes blood glucose encouraging fat storage. 2. Eat More Fat I used to see this all the time in clients, I say add more fat and people add a tsp of evoo to their salad, NO!!! I am talking about seeing fat as a food group not a side item. Avocad Continue reading >>

5 Of The Best Keto Supplements (to Help You Stay In Ketosis)

5 Of The Best Keto Supplements (to Help You Stay In Ketosis)

The Best Keto Supplements for a Ketogenic Diet The Ketogenic Diet has been proven time and time again to help with medical conditions such as: Alzheimer’s Disease: Research is increasingly linking sugar with Alzheimer’s, and a Ketogenic diet can reduce the symptoms of this disease and slow down it’s progression. (source) Parkinson’s Disease: One study found a Ketogenic Diet can help the symptoms of this disease. (source) Polycistic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS): The Ketogenic Diet can help reduce insulin levels. Elevated insulin levels are associated with PCOS. (source) Insulin Resistance/Diabetes: A Ketogenic Diet is designed to not produce an insulin response in the body, resulting in lower insulin levels in the blood, helping to control these diseases. Acne: Studies have been linking sugar and insulin levels to acne, and a Ketogenic Diet has virtually no sugar. (source) Cancer: The Ketogenic Diet is currently being used to treat some types of cancer and to slow tumor’s growth. (source) Heart Disease: Eating more fat on Keto improves risk factors for heart disease such as body fat percentages, blood pressure, blood sugar, and HDL Levels. (source) Read More: Keto 101 (What The Heck is a Ketogenic Diet?) As time goes on, however, staying in Ketosis can get more difficult than it was in the beginning. You still want to reap the benefits of being in Ketosis, but staying in it can get tough because your body adapts, you get busy, or you may even get bored. Sure, if you eat 100% perfectly and never, ever have anything go wrong or unplanned in your life. But that’s not me. And I’m going to guess that’s not you either. (Sorry, I love you but the truth sometimes hurts) If you’re needing a little bit of help, Keto supplements can be a good avenue to explore. Unfortuna Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Faq

Ketogenic Diet Faq

With all the new people finding, switching, and transitioning into a low carb diet, I figured it was about time I put together an FAQ on all the common questions that are asked when someone is starting out. I don’t go too in depth in the answers, but I tried to give a direct answer and then link to a more in depth article on the topic to help you fully understand it. If you have any other questions you’d like to be added, changed, or are unsure about – please feel free to leave a comment below so I can fully explain, or make changes to the answers on this page. Best wishes, and to all the new people out there – good luck and happy dieting! Frequently Asked Questions Click any of the questions below and it will take you to the answer. How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis? A ketogenic diet is not a diet that you can whimfully choose to go on and off of at any point. It takes time for your body to adjust and go into a state known as ketosis. This process? Anywhere from 2 – 7 days, depending on your body type, activity levels, and what you’re eating. The fastest way to get into ketosis is to exercise on an empty stomach, restrict your carbohydrate intake to 20g or less per day, and be vigilant with your water intake. To improve the rate at which you enter ketosis, there is a method called Fat Fasting. I’ve written an article on Fat Fasting on a Ketogenic Diet and everything involved with it. Make sure that if you use this method, it is only for a few days, otherwise it can bring harm to you. Where Can I Find Low Carb Recipes? Everywhere on the internet! There’s recipes on almost every health website nowadays, and a quick Google of what you want will definitely help you out. You can even convert high carb recipes that use sugar or fruits in them to low c Continue reading >>

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Everything You Should Know About The Ketogenic Diet

Recently I had a client tell me that she and her husband were eating more than 2 pounds of bacon a week—usually three strips for breakfast and one or two with a salad for dinner. I’ve been a dietitian for almost 20 years. Few things surprise me. But I had to ask: “Why?” She told me that her husband had heard about a new diet on TV, the keto diet, and they decided to try it. Six months and countless packages of bacon later, her husband had lost 20 pounds and said he felt more energetic. I’m beginning to hear more and more people lecture me about the benefits of the ketogenic diet. “Keto burns fat fast! It turbo-charges your energy! It fights disease! You can eat all the bacon you want!” But as is so often the case with diets, underneath all the initial excitement, there’s a gut check. Here’s everything you should know about the ketogenic diet and whether or not you should try it for yourself. Ketogenesis has existed as long as humans have. If you eat a very low amount of carbohydrates, you starve your brain of glucose, its main fuel source. Your body still needs fuel to function, so your brain signals it to tap its reserve of ketones. It’s like a hybrid car that runs out of gas and reverts to pure electricity. Okay, but what are ketones? They’re compounds created by your liver from your fat stores when blood insulin is low. “Your liver produces ketones all the time, but the rate depends on carbohydrate and protein intake,” says Jeff Volek, Ph.D., R.D., a professor of human sciences at Ohio State University. Eat a normal amount of carbs and protein, and ketogenesis idles. Cut carbs and protein back, and you push to half throttle. This takes about three days to induce. A ketogenic diet requires that fat comprise 60 to 80 percent of your total calo Continue reading >>

You Asked: Should I Try The Ketogenic Diet?

You Asked: Should I Try The Ketogenic Diet?

You Asked: Should I Try the Ketogenic Diet? Dont let its fancy name fool you. A ketogenic diet is, essentially, a low-carb, high-fat dietalbeit one taken to extremes. In a clinical setting, a strict ketogenic diet would involve ultra-low carb consumption, like 20 or 30 grams a day, says Dr. Eric Westman, director of the Lifestyle Medicine Clinic at Duke University. Thats about the number of carbohydrates in one small apple. Westmans research on carb-restricted diets suggests they can help reduce appetite, spur weight loss and improve markers of heart disease. His findings arent outliers. From Atkins and South Beach to Mediterranean and Zone, low-carb, high-fat dietsor LCHF plansare all the rage , and growing evidence suggests theyre a big improvement on the typical carb-heavy American diet. But the keto diet is the most carb-restrictive member of the LCHF gang. Along with slashing carbs, a ketogenic plan also calls for limiting your protein consumption. If you know your macronutrients, you recognize that cutting carbs and restricting protein means seriously upping your fat intake. And thats exactly what a true ketogenic diet entails. Youd want healthy fats to account for about 80% of your calories, and protein around 20%, Westman says. (For comparisons sake, the average American gets roughly 50% of her calories from carbs, 15% from protein, and 30% from fat, per the CDC .) Like the guidance to cut carbs, this advice to reign in protein intake dovetails with some of the latest nutrition science , which suggests limiting protein can lower risk for disease and extend life for people younger than 65. So what, exactly, does ketogenic mean? The name refers to a specific type of energy-carrying molecule, called a ketone. Most people are always in a state of glucosis, meaning Continue reading >>

Following A Ketogenic Diet For 5 Years, The Story Of Glucose Transporter 1 Deficiency Syndrome

Following A Ketogenic Diet For 5 Years, The Story Of Glucose Transporter 1 Deficiency Syndrome

T hose of us advocating an ultra-low carb™ diet struggle with the question of the long term effects of following such a prescription. The flak from high-carb (or balanced diet, as they call it) advocates originates in this basic premise: there is no long term research. Their answer to the problem: Stay the course (which we already know is NOT working). The current norm for many controlled nutritional studies is 12 weeks to a year. Clearly, this span of time in relation to the human lifespan is too short. Basing life-long recommendations on such short-lived studies could easily end up being a case of misrepresentation. As for myself, I believe it’s the strategic reintroduction of carbs at specific times that is the healthiest approach—the topics in both Carb Backloading™ and Carb Nite®. Lack of research also allows people to post opinion pieces about supposed effects of long-term ketogenic diets, effects that we don’t actually see in practice. But there’s still the elephant in the room: What really happens with long-term adherence to an ultra-low carb diet? We can look to clinical populations with certain diseases who are enrolled in studies that are generally longer in duration, stronger in design and much stricter with adherence. We must be careful when extrapolating, however—i.e. generalizing the results to the entire population—but it offers good insights and opens up areas of new research. Some of the most important insights into various fields of human study come from looking at diseased or injured populations—looking at such cases literally exploded the field of cognitive research and transformed the science of the mind from speculation to fact. Such research can do the same in the realm of diet and health. A recent work published by Bertoli et Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Do you want to lose weight? Here’s number 16 of my 18 best tips. All of the published tips can be found on the How to Lose Weight page. Before we get started, here’s a short recap of the tips so far: The first and most crucial piece of advice was to choose a low-carb diet. The next were eating when hungry, eating real food, eating only when hungry, measuring progress wisely, being persistent, avoiding fruit, beer and artificial sweeteners, review your medications, stressing less and sleeping more, eating less dairy and nut products, stocking up on vitamins and minerals, using intermittent fasting and finally, exercising smart. This is number sixteen: 16. Get into optimal ketosis Warning: Not recommended for type 1 diabetics, see below. We’ve now arrived at tip number 16. If you’re still having trouble losing weight, despite following the 15 pieces of advice listed above, it might be a good idea to bring out the heavy artillery: optimal ketosis. Many people stalling at weight plateaus while on a low carb diet have found optimal ketosis helpful. It’s what can melt the fat off once again. So how does this work? A quick run-through: The first tip was to eat low carb. This is because a low-carb diet lowers your levels of the fat-storing hormone insulin, allowing your fat deposits to shrink and release their stored energy. This tends to cause you to want to consume less calories than you expend – without hunger – and lose weight. Several of the tips mentioned above are about fine-tuning your diet to better this effect. Video course Do you know exactly how to eat a low-carb and high fat diet (LCHF)? This is required for ketosis. If not the easiest way is watching this high quality 11-minute video course on how to eat LCHF, and the most important things to think a Continue reading >>

I Tried The Viral Diet That Lets You Eat Heavy Cream And Steak — And It Was Harder Than I Thought It Would Be

I Tried The Viral Diet That Lets You Eat Heavy Cream And Steak — And It Was Harder Than I Thought It Would Be

The Ketogenic diet is a high-fat, low-carb diet. It's gotten really popular lately as a way to lose weight relatively quickly while eating a lot of foods you'd have to give up on other diets. I tried it for a week to see what it's like. Chances are, at least one of your Facebook friends has tried the Ketogenic diet lately. And though you may have seen photos of their meals on your feed, you may not be sure what it is. Essentially, when going "Keto," you bump up your fat intake while severely limiting carbs. This diet says that you can eat full-fat cheese, bacon, butter, and other things that most other diets frown upon, so it's maybe not that surprising that some keto converts become enthusiastic loyalists, shouting the tenets of the plan wherever they go. Georgie Fear, a registered dietitian and sports nutrition specialist, told INSIDER that the major pro of the diet, besides getting to eat all of those things that are off-limits on other diets, is that you don't have to worry about how many calories you're eating or worry about the old "everything in moderation" adage. But there are some potentially major health-related drawbacks to eating this way as well. "You are at an increased risk of bone fractures, and up to a one in four chance of having kidney stones," Fear said. "It also causes fatty liver and gallstone formation. Low carbohydrate diets also worsen athletic performance and many people report low energy, nausea, and fatigue. High saturated fat diets are known to induce insulin resistance and hypothalamic inflammation leading to dysregulation of energy intake favoring obesity. Gut bacteria populations shift in a high fat, low carbohydrate diet, and emerging research is uncovering links between these changes and worsened risk of mental illness, immune system dy Continue reading >>

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