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How Ketosis Occurs

Are There Different Types Of Ketosis?

Are There Different Types Of Ketosis?

Before reading this, if you haven’t already, I suggest reading What is a Ketogenic Diet and Understanding Ketosis so you will have a stronger understanding of what it means to be in a state of ketosis. The next step necessary in comprehending the ketogenic diet is learning the different types of ketosis that can occur. For this article, we will refer to three different forms of ketosis: fasting ketosis, nutritional ketosis, and pathological ketosis. The different types of ketosis vary in their degree of ketone production as well as their method of induction. Fasting Ketosis The idea of fasting has been around for hundreds of years and played a major part in the origins of the ketogenic diet. In fact, many great philosophers, such as Hippocrates, Socrates, and Aristotle, all praised the many benefits of fasting. Paracelsus, physician and father of toxicology, was quoted saying, “Fasting is the greatest remedy—the physician within.” While these early scientists and philosophers were definitely ahead of the game in recognizing the potential of fasting, the mechanisms were still yet to be understood. Ketosis tends to occur when insulin and blood glucose levels decrease to an extent that allows for increased fat oxidation, which is ultimately followed by greater ketone production. A minor state of ketosis can occur following periods of complete food restriction, such as an overnight fast. This may produce ketone levels around 0.1 mmol/L to 0.03 mmol/L. Shorter duration fasts typically will not raise ketone levels above these levels because the rate of ketone metabolism matches ketone synthesis. As the fast continues, the rate of ketone production exceeds ketone clearance, resulting in an increase in blood ketone levels (1). While a minor state of ketosis can occur du Continue reading >>

How Do We Follow Keto Diet Without Harming Our Body Where No Nutrition Deficit Happens?

How Do We Follow Keto Diet Without Harming Our Body Where No Nutrition Deficit Happens?

So basically, ketosis occurs when there's no glycogen left in your body or there's no external supply/intake of glycogen/carbs in to the body. So every cell in your body starts to turn into fat burning mode. So basically on ketosis your body needs 75% fats, 20% proteins, 5% carbs. For a person on a 3000 calorie diet that equals to 250 grams of fat, 155 protein, 38 carbs. So basically your fats should be 80% from clean sources. Coconut oils, olive oil, MCT's. This is a very key step. Second important thing being since you cut carbs, your body won't hold water and you'll get dehydrated so it's important for you to up your sodium intake by adding more salt to food and also drink more water. Third thing being there are three 3 minerals which are important being magnesium, potassium, calcium. You can supplement calcium to your body. But it's very important that you get magnesium and potassium from natural sources such as vegetables, so for the above diet you have 38 grams of carbs, so make sure all those 38 grams of carbs comes from vegetables. This will help you prevent a fatty liver but will make sure you aren't nutrient deficient. Also add a good multivitamin, fish oil, B12 vitamin, iron tablet. This will make sure you're all good and healthy. Also doing all this can help you avoid keto-flu. Avoid beets, carrots. Have lots of green leafy veggies, cabbage, beans, peppers etc. Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of The Ketosis Diet?

What Are The Dangers Of The Ketosis Diet?

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, when the "Atkins" and low carb dieting thing was just coming on in a big way, there was a terrific number of idiotic claims made about the dangers of it -- many of them confusing (as the questioner points out) diabetic ketoacidosis, a serious condition, with voluntary nutritional ketosis, even though there is no relation whatever. But, leaving all that aside, some caution is in order. The diet seems to stress the adrenals. This has been noted anecdotally by many people who've followed the diet. It was also noted by Dr Wolfgang Lutz, one of the early pioneers of the diet, who personally practiced the diet for 40-odd years, as well as advocated the diet to thousands of his patients. He noted in his book on the subject ("Life Without Bread" was the title, though it was published later I believe under a different title) that some patients would suffer mild autoimmune reactions that required small doses of corticosteroids to control. This sounds like what would happen if the adrenals are failing to produce a normal amount of steroids. You can find a lot more of a mostly-anecdotal nature by searching for "ketogenic jaminet". Paul Jaminet is a popular health blogger who has written about what he perceives to be problems with the ketogenic diet, including the possibility of deficiency of mucus and other key glycoproteins. He has some scientific backing for what he is saying, but it is far from air-tight. Read and judge for yourself. You can also learn a lot from the comments below his posts. Jaminet and others have also written about the risk of kidney stones on the ketogenic diet, and this is a serious concern, albeit a rare occurence. As far as the kidney stress goes: this would I believe be easy to avert simply by taking some alkali during Continue reading >>

How Ketosis Diet Works

How Ketosis Diet Works

When it comes to weight loss, it’s not the amount of calories you consume that’s most important, but how your body uses them. Over the long run, this difference in what your body “decides” to do with the calories you eat makes all the difference. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a metabolic process that happens when the body does not have enough glucose for energy. How ketosis occurs Your body enters a state called “ketosis” when you eat a low- or no-carb diet. Because your body doesn’t have carbs to burn for energy, you burn fat instead. Molecules called ketones then build up in your bloodstream. This is a good thing. Difference between ketosis and diabetic ketoacidosis It shouldn’t be confused with diabetic ketoacidosis, a dangerous condition that affects people with type 1 diabetes. In order to reach a state of ketoacidosis, insulin levels must be so low that the regulation of blood sugar and fatty acid flow is impaired. Take a look at this chart: Body Condition Quantity of Ketones Being Produced After a meal 0.1 mmol/L Overnight fast 0.3 mmol/L Ketogenic diet 1-8 mmol/L >20 days fasting 10 mmol/L Ketoacidosis >20 mmol/L As you can see, the amount of ketones you produce when you’re in a state of ketosis is much lower than what’s produced when someone is in a state of ketoacidosis. The latter is uncontrolled diabetes. Ketosis to lose weight In fact, ketosis has proven to be safe and effective in numerous studies. In one, participants lost an average of 22 pounds after 2.5 cycles of a ketogenic diet. Also, most kept the weight off after a year.1 What is the ketogenic diet? The keto diet is a low-carb, high-fat diet that causes weight loss and provides health benefits. Effects of ketogenic diet Another study focused on the long-term effects of a ketogenic Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis, And How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis, And How Long Does It Take To Get Into Ketosis?

Ketosis is a natural state of the body in which it is fueled almost solely by fat. This happens when a person fasts or adheres to a very low carbohydrate diet. The exciting thing about ketosis and ketogenic diets is that you can lose a lot of weight while eating a normal quantity of food. You don’t have to suffer through skimpy portions. There are other benefits of keeping a ketogenic diet as well. These will be explained in the following article. An Explanation of Ketosis The root “keto” in the word ketosis comes from the type of fuel that the body produces when blood sugar is in low supply. The small molecules that are used as fuel are called “ketones.” If you consume very few carbohydrates and only a moderate amount of protein, then the body begins to produce ketones. Ketones are made by the liver from fat. Both the body and the brain can use them as fuel. The brain cannot directly function from fat. It must convert the fat into ketones. Legionella Testing Lab - High Quality Lab Results CDC ELITE & NYSDOH ELAP Certified - Fast Results North America Lab Locations legionellatesting.com When you go on a ketogenic diet, your body almost solely runs on fat. Your insulin levels become rather low as well. Since you are burning so much fat, this is a great way to lose weight. Studies show that ketogenic diets result in greater weight loss. The fastest way to get into ketosis is by fasting. However, you cannot fast for very long, so you need to start a low carb diet. The Brain and Ketones Many people think that the brain needs carbohydrates to function. This is not really true. The brain can work well simply by burning ketones. The reality is that many people feel like they have even more energy and focus when they are fueled by ketones. Benefits of Ketosis There ar Continue reading >>

The Results Of My Four Day Fast To Start A Ketogenic Diet

The Results Of My Four Day Fast To Start A Ketogenic Diet

Greetings Ketonians! Dr. Anthony Gustin writing to you today. Many of you know I created Perfect Keto to help ketosis be accessible to everyone who wants it, and that includes me. One of my favorite quotes from Fr. Peter Drucker is, That’s why I encourage everyone on a ketogenic diet to test their ketone levels. I’m taking it about 10 steps further than just ketone blood tests by conducting an intensive two-month ketosis experiment on myself to learn precisely what changes occur in my body in ketosis. I began with a four day fast and I’m pleased to share that the results are in! They truly rocked all the old ideas I had about fasting and ketosis and I can’t wait to share them with you. If you think I’m nuts and wondering why the hell I would fast, start by reading my article about why I am choosing to fast here. The reason is I wanted to maximize my transition into ketosis. I’ve tracked body composition, lab blood work, ketone levels, microbiome tests and other noteworthy biomarkers to answer the questions I had for myself. Does fasting lead to massive lean tissue losses? Does it destroy your metabolism? Is it unbearable? Does it sap your energy? All of these questions and more are answered in this article. The Results of My Four Day Fast to Start A Ketogenic Diet Since there’s about a 0.003984% chance you read linked article about fasting, let me explain something from the start, this fast was never going to be a water fast. There are a few reasons to not do a water fast, but we won’t get into that here. We’ll get into what type of fasts I’m now doing regularly and why. My fast was similar to what researcher Valter Longo has shown to actually be preferential to a water fast in many ways, in what he dubbed the “fasting mimicking diet.” Much of hi Continue reading >>

Overview Of Ketosis In Cattle

Overview Of Ketosis In Cattle

(Acetonemia, Ketonemia) By Thomas H. Herdt, DVM, MS, DACVN, DACVIM, Professor, Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences and Diagnostic Center for Population and Animal Health, Michigan State University Ketosis is a common disease of adult cattle. It typically occurs in dairy cows in early lactation and is most consistently characterized by partial anorexia and depression. Rarely, it occurs in cattle in late gestation, at which time it resembles pregnancy toxemia of ewes (see Pregnancy Toxemia in Ewes and Does). In addition to inappetence, signs of nervous dysfunction, including pica, abnormal licking, incoordination and abnormal gait, bellowing, and aggression, are occasionally seen. The condition is worldwide in distribution but is most common where dairy cows are bred and managed for high production. Etiology and Pathogenesis: The pathogenesis of bovine ketosis is incompletely understood, but it requires the combination of intense adipose mobilization and a high glucose demand. Both of these conditions are present in early lactation, at which time negative energy balance leads to adipose mobilization, and milk synthesis creates a high glucose demand. Adipose mobilization is accompanied by high blood serum concentrations of nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs). During periods of intense gluconeogenesis, a large portion of serum NEFAs is directed to ketone body synthesis in the liver. Thus, the clinicopathologic characterization of ketosis includes high serum concentrations of NEFAs and ketone bodies and low concentrations of glucose. In contrast to many other species, cattle with hyperketonemia do not have concurrent acidemia. The serum ketone bodies are acetone, acetoacetate, and β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB). There is speculation that the pathogenesis of ketosis cases oc Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Not to be confused with Ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state in which some of the body's energy supply comes from ketone bodies in the blood, in contrast to a state of glycolysis in which blood glucose provides energy. Ketosis is a result of metabolizing fat to provide energy. Ketosis is a nutritional process characterised by serum concentrations of ketone bodies over 0.5 mM, with low and stable levels of insulin and blood glucose.[1][2] It is almost always generalized with hyperketonemia, that is, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood throughout the body. Ketone bodies are formed by ketogenesis when liver glycogen stores are depleted (or from metabolising medium-chain triglycerides[3]). The main ketone bodies used for energy are acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate,[4] and the levels of ketone bodies are regulated mainly by insulin and glucagon.[5] Most cells in the body can use both glucose and ketone bodies for fuel, and during ketosis, free fatty acids and glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis) fuel the remainder. Longer-term ketosis may result from fasting or staying on a low-carbohydrate diet (ketogenic diet), and deliberately induced ketosis serves as a medical intervention for various conditions, such as intractable epilepsy, and the various types of diabetes.[6] In glycolysis, higher levels of insulin promote storage of body fat and block release of fat from adipose tissues, while in ketosis, fat reserves are readily released and consumed.[5][7] For this reason, ketosis is sometimes referred to as the body's "fat burning" mode.[8] Ketosis and ketoacidosis are similar, but ketoacidosis is an acute life-threatening state requiring prompt medical intervention while ketosis can be physiological. However, there are situations (such as treatment-resistant Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Affect Caffeine Sensitivity?

Does Ketosis Affect Caffeine Sensitivity?

Caffeine might cause disturbance in glucose metabolism, which could affect ketosis, although only anecdotal evidence of this exists. Insulin resistance, which is the inability of cells to respond to and absorb glucose, can raise glucose levels and cause weight gain. Ketosis decreases insulin resistance by improving insulin sensitivity, which is the the ability of cells to absorb glucose which ultimately help in weight loss. Caffeine might increase insulin resistance. Increase in insulin resistance makes losing weight difficult. It also increase the chance of having type 2 diabetes. Although caffeine might raise glucose levels after eating a meal high in carbohydrates, it's unclear that this effect occurs after a low-carbohydrate meal such as those eaten by low-carbohydrates dieters. It's also unclear whether blood glucose would rise high enough to keep a low-carbohydrates dieter out of ketosis. Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Why Women Need To Drink Their Way Through Labour

Ketosis: Why Women Need To Drink Their Way Through Labour

If you labour for a long time, you could be in danger of dehydration and developing complications such as ketosis. Here’s how to keep yourself safe and healthy during birth. There's so much going on during labour that the last thing that either you, or your birth partner, may think of is getting you to drink enough. Not that sort of drink obviously. There's no ordering a cheeky mojito with your epidural but you do need to keep your intake of water up when you're giving birth if you want to stay healthy, hydrated and keep any chance of developing a nasty case of ketosis at bay. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a complication of dehydration, and a lack of carbohydrates (or glucose) for energy in the body. It is the result of the abnormal accumulation of ketone bodies in the blood stream, body tissues and urine. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis happens when the muscles have little, or no, glucose for energy to be able to function efficiently. Once the glucose supply in the blood stream is depleted, the body starts to break down its fat stores for energy instead. This produces ketones, often causing a fever, body weakness and the muscles to function inefficiently, including the uterus. In cases where the ketosis is prolonged, the condition can develop into ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis makes the person feel unwell and can damage their body organs. This is something that can occur for people who have uncontrolled diabetes. Ketosis and labour Ketosis is a common outcome for women who experience a prolonged labour (or pre-labour), becoming dehydrated and often causing their contractions to weaken, slow or stop. This can start to happen if glycogen (or glucose) is not being replenished through eating and drinking during labour. During labour, a woman has high-energy needs and her sto Continue reading >>

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The Beginners Guide To Ketosis: Investigating Low-carb, High-fat Eating

The only hard and fast rule of health is that health is personal and what works well for one person may not work for someone else. Aside from that rule, there are “frameworks” that seem to benefit large groups of people. One more level down from that are alternative strategies that benefit smaller groups. Ketosis is likely one of those alternative strategies that works well for certain, smaller groups of people. So, right off the bat I want you to understand that Ketosis might not be for everyone. I’m going to lay out the case for potential benefits of Ketosis. If it sounds interesting and beneficial to you, then consider trying it. (see our free cheat sheet to help you). What is Ketosis Ketosis occurs when liver glycogen gets depleted and the body burns fatty acids for fuel. The primary driver of this state is a very low carbohydrate intake. Often, it also requires a low protein, higher fat intake. You can also achieve a state of ketosis by not eating altogether. The creation of ketones is a byproduct of this metabolic state. Ketones are a source of fuel, just as glucose is a source of fuel. Ketones tend to have some added benefits, though. What role does Ketosis play in human health? Ketosis allows our bodies to function in the absence of carbohydrates, both physically and mentally. Instead of burning carbohydrates, or converting protein to glucose, the body burns ketones. This is pretty much a survival mechanism. It allows your body to function in a state of caloric deprivation. This is why ketosis often gets bad press (as it’s linked to “starvation”). Being a survival mechanism doesn’t make it invalid as a strategy, though. There can still be potential benefits to be had. Let’s cover a few of them… Ketosis and Accelerated Fat Loss Being in ketosis Continue reading >>

The Difference Between Ketosis And Ketoacidosis

The Difference Between Ketosis And Ketoacidosis

When you hear these two terms it’s easy to see how they can be confused. The confusion also stems from the fact that the two are both metabolic processes involving the breakdown of fats in the body (plus they look and sound like similar words). The truth is ketosis and ketoacidosis are two completely different things. Ketosis and the Ketogenic Diet Ketosis is a normal metabolic process in which the body has a high fat-burning rate. It is a healthy and natural state your body enters when your body is running on fat rather than glucose1. The state of ketosis occurs when ketone levels are raised in the blood due to the conversion of fats into fatty acids and ketones. This happens when the body runs out of carbohydrates – usually because a person hasn’t eaten in a while, for example during fasts, or they eat a very low-carbohydrate diet – leaving little sugar to convert into glycogen. Without glycogen, the body breaks down fat cells for energy. A low-carb, high fat diet, also known as a ketogenic diet, is necessary to enter and stay in ketosis long-term. When you eat a low-carbohydrate diet, your body enters the metabolic state of ketosis within 2 days but it can vary from person to person. There are many benefits2 to being in longer-term ketosis including: lowered triglycerides levels no spikes in blood glucose levels greater mental clarity lowered blood pressure and cholesterol reduced food and sugar cravings weight loss Ketoacidosis – The Body in a State of Toxicity Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state of toxicity. It occurs when the body fails to regulate ketone production resulting in severe accumulation of keto acids which cause the pH of the blood to decrease substantially making the blood more acidic. The most common causes for ketoacidosis are Type 1 Diabete Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Ketosis

How To Maintain Ketosis

The ketogenic diet is all the rage right now, and more people are learning about the benefits of ketosis on their health and weight loss goals. However, there’s still some confusion around the process itself and the correct ways to maintain ketosis. This information will help you maintain a steady state of ketosis safely and efficiently, no matter your needs. Getting into Ketosis First things first. Before we can maintain ketosis we have to get understand what is ketosis and get into this primal metabolic state. Ketosis occurs when the body has little to no access to carbohydrates, its normal source of fuel, and begins breaking down and burning fat for energy instead. The ketosis process can have many benefits including: Curbed hunger and faster weight loss Improved blood sugar regulation Enhanced cognitive performance Better mental focus Less chance of inflammation Reducing risk for conditions like type II diabetes When the body’s in ketosis, fats are broken down and ketone bodies, or “ketones,” are created for the body to use for energy. Three Main Ways of Maintaining Ketosis Long-term Short-term Cyclical The way you use the ketogenic diet depends on your specific needs, but what’s important is making sure you maintain a state of ketosis during the full time you’re on keto. This is not the same as simple going low-carb, and it requires some extra effort and tracking. However, the results are worth the extra work! Short-Term vs Long-Term Ketosis Just as it sounds, the only difference between short- and long-term ketosis is the amount of time you properly follow the ketogenic diet. The standard version of the ketogenic diet involves eating around 20-50 grams of net carbs per day to keep the body in ketosis, although the exact amount depends on each person. C Continue reading >>

The Beginner's Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

The Beginner's Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

Heard about the ketogenic diet but not quite sure where to start? What does it do to your body? How does it help? How does it not? What can you eat? Here are some questions we've answered for you in this simple guide to the ketogenic diet! 1. What Does A Ketogenic Diet Mean? The Ketogenic diet is a low carb, high-fat diet. It involves lowering carbohydrate intake drastically and replacing it with fat. This process pushes your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. 2. What Is Ketosis? Ketosis is a natural metabolic state in which the body burns fat for energy or fuel. Ketosis occurs when there is limited access to glucose, which is generally the body's preferred source of fuel. In this state, ketones become the main source of energy for the body and brain instead of glucose or blood sugar. 3. How Does The Body Go Into Ketosis? Ketosis most often occurs when one is on a very low-carb diet. To go into ketosis people usually need to consume less than 50gms of carbs a day. 4. What Can You Eat On A Ketogenic Diet? While on a ketogenic diet, one can consume - - All kinds of meat - Eggs - Nuts - Healthy Oils: Extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil - Butters - Cheeses - Preferably unprocessed feta, cheddar, goat or mozzarella cheese - Low-carb vegetables - Primarily green vegetables, tomatoes These are well within the range of foods that allow the body to go into ketosis. If you're vegetarian and looking to follow the ketogenic diet, you can replace the meat with cottage cheese. 5. What Foods Should You Absolutely Avoid? - Fruits (All kinds!) - Beans and Legumes - Kidney beans, chickpeas, lentils, etc. - Sugary foods - Candy, sodas, fruit juices, milkshakes, smoothies etc. - Unhealthy fats - Processed vegetable oils, sandwich spreads, etc. - Wheat based products - Rice, pasta, Continue reading >>

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