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Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

Ketones And Carbohydrates: Can They Co-exist?

For reasons I’m still struggling to understand, the idea of “nutritional ketosis” (NK, to be distinguished from starvation ketosis, SK or diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA) is often discussed and debated in much the same way as religion or politics. Perhaps this can be said of all nutrition, which is a shame. Nevertheless, in my continued defiance of such sensitive topics, I’d like to add another layer of complexity and nuance to this discussion. The “rule of thumb” for NK is that caloric intake is determined as follows (this excludes a subset of ketogenic diets known as calorie-restricted KD which, as the name suggests, is specifically restricted in calories): Carbohydrate (total, not “net”): less than 50 gm/day, but ideally closer to 30 gm/day Protein: up to 1 to 1.5 gm/kg, but ideally below about 120 gm/day Fat: to satiety Let me illustrate what this looks like for Joe (left), Jane (middle), and Jeff (right — an example of a calorie restricted KD), three hypothetical people in NK — but each with different caloric requirements. As a general rule, as caloric requirement increases the proportion of calories derived from carbohydrate and protein decreases (and the contribution of dietary fat increases), even while absolute intake of carbohydrate and protein increases. Anyone who has bought a blood ketone meter knows how tough it can be to get “into” ketosis by carbohydrate restriction (since everyone asks, I use the Abbott Precision Xtra meter which uses two different strips: one for glucose and one for beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB). Most practitioners consider the minimum threshold of NK to be a fasting serum level of BHB above 0.5 mM. I’m a bit more stringent in my practice and like to see fasting BHB levels above 1 mM. To give you a sense of one per Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Eat 20 Grams Of Carbs A Day And Still Not Lose Weight Or Be In Ketosis?

Is It Possible To Eat 20 Grams Of Carbs A Day And Still Not Lose Weight Or Be In Ketosis?

I mostly agree with the other answers, but for what it’s worth, I’ll share my (our) admittedly anecdotal experiences. If you’re seemingly struggling to get into ketosis then first of all review everything you’re eating again for hidden carbs, and be ruthless. We were surprised in the beginning how many supposedly low carb things are sometimes not really. Additionally, though perhaps more controversial, keep away from artificial sweetners for a while and see if that helps, in particular the soda pop variety. (Aspertame, Ascesulfame etc). The rationale I’ve read for this (don’t remember where), even though theoretically sweetners have no calories, is that there’s some suspicion that they are sufficiently “sweet” (even though “fake”) to also trick your metabolism into secreting insulin as it normally would…! And as you may now by now, insulin basically stops fat metabolism, but because sweetener doesn’t actually contain any calories it leaves your body short-changed. This may help explain (if true) how counter productive drinking artificially sweetened drinks really may be when trying to lose weight as they effectively therefore tend to suppress fat metabolism (if they trigger any kind of insulin response) and they therefore result in even more depressed blood glucose levels than you’d otherwise have, leaving you constantly hungry and making it more difficult to stick to a diet and more tempting to stuff your face full of food… Another thing to emphasize, don’t overdo the proteien. This is (according to Phinney and Volek, in the “The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living” and “The Art and Science of Lowe Carbohydrate Performance”) where most people go wrong when trying this, they eat too much proteien. As has been mentioned, the Continue reading >>

Do I Have To Stay At 20g Of Carbs A Day To Lose Weight And Enter Ketosis?

Do I Have To Stay At 20g Of Carbs A Day To Lose Weight And Enter Ketosis?

While in ketosis, your body effectively uses fat for fuel. In general, the daily intake of net carbs required to enter ketosis could vary from 20 to 100 grams per day (and very rarely over 100 grams per day). Most people, who have experienced ketosis, claim to have reached that state at about 20-50 grams of net carbs per day. I'd suggest you start at 20-30 grams and see how you can adjust it for your needs. There are two ways to find your ideal net carbs intake: Low to high method Start from a low level of net carbs to ensure you quickly enter ketosis (~ 20 grams of net carbs per day). When you detect ketosis after about 2-3 days, start adding net carbs (about 5 grams each week) until you detect a very low-level or no ketones (using Ketostix or blood ketone meter). This is usually the most reliable and quickest way to discover your net carbs limit. It could be a bit hard the first couple of days, as you have to give up almost all carbs from one day to another but it will be worth it. This method is highly recommended. High to low method Assuming you're not in ketosis, start from a relatively high level of net carbs (~ 50 grams) and keep reducing (about 5 grams each week) until you detect presence of ketones. This is a less difficult approach but not recommended, as you may spend a long time out of ketosis before you find you net carbs limit. If you can't see any ketones, be patient. It typically takes 2-3 days for your body to deplete glycogen stores, so don't expect to be in ketosis after just a day of low-carb. Remember, ketosis is a favourable condition and an indication that your body uses fat for fuel but you can lose weight even without being in ketosis. Diet high in fat, adequate in protein and low in carbohydrates is naturally sating, making you less hungry and, Continue reading >>

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

How Ketosis Helps You Lose Weight Through Suppressed Appetite

One of the reasons The Bulletproof Diet with Bulletproof Coffee works so well for people looking to lose weight is that Bulletproof Intermittent Fasting helps your body to more easily enter a state called cyclical ketosis, which is great for a whole bunch of reasons. Ketosis is a cornerstone of becoming Bulletproof; listen to these recent Bulletproof Radio episodes with ketosis experts Jimmy Moore and Dominic D’Agostino to get the scoop on how and why it works. It’s what happens when your body switches to burning fat instead of sugar for energy, and it only happens when you eat almost no carbohydrates, or when you hack it using certain kinds of oils. Many people first stumble upon the idea of ketosis while looking for a weight loss strategy. That can be a major part of it for so many people out there who have tried just about every other diet out there but haven’t seen the results they’d hoped for. But when people experience the mental clarity and focus that ketosis brings, the game changes! This post walks you through one of the most important yet underrated mechanisms that makes ketosis so effective for people who have tried everything else to lose weight and failed to keep it off: appetite suppression. Ketosis works for weight loss in the short term, but that’s not why it’s so amazing. Short term weight loss is easy (I’ve lost at least 200 pounds of short term weight…because it always roared back on with a vengeance so I could lose it again!) When you look at keeping your weight off forever, ketosis provides a level of appetite suppression that is actually liberating. Ketosis helps you literally stop thinking about food all the time. Why Calorie Counting Is So Ineffective One of the reasons old-fashioned, calorie-restricted diets tend to fail is becau Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Can An Average Person Have Each Day To Stay In Nutritional Ketosis?

How Many Carbs Can An Average Person Have Each Day To Stay In Nutritional Ketosis?

The answer is highly variable from person to person. A safe way to start is to keep under 20 grams of carbohydrates a day, avoiding all sugars and starches as much as possible. (Save those 20 grams for real food, such as vegetables or small traces of milk sugar in things like cheese that are mostly fat or protein.) This should be low enough to get almost anyone into ketosis within a week or two. Once you have determined that you are in ketosis (using the test strips or breath analyzer), you can try increasing your level of carbs to see if you remain in ketosis. Some people can go quite high (100 grams or more) and still stay in ketosis, as long as they stick with complex carbs like steel-cut oatmeal or beans. However, many who have weight issues have become insulin-resistant, and they may need to stay at very low carb levels to remain in ketosis. I find that I need to keep my carbs below 20 grams at all times to ensure staying in ketosis. If you try for yourself, maybe you will have better luck and be able to eat more. Just keep testing and remember that the strips are not incredibly accurate; if you show no ketones in the morning and some at night, you're probably in ketosis the whole day. Continue reading >>

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

The Paleo Guide To Ketosis

Ketosis is a word that gets tossed around a lot within the Paleo community – to some, it’s a magical weight-loss formula, to others, it’s a way of life, and to others it’s just asking for adrenal fatigue. But understanding what ketosis really is (not just what it does), and the physical causes and consequences of a fat-fueled metabolism can help you make an informed decision about the best diet for your particular lifestyle, ketogenic or not. Ketosis is essentially a metabolic state in which the body primarily relies on fat for energy. Biologically, the human body is a very adaptable machine that can run on a variety of different fuels, but on a carb-heavy Western diet, the primary source of energy is glucose. If glucose is available, the body will use it first, since it’s the quickest to metabolize. So on the standard American diet, your metabolism will be primarily geared towards burning carbohydrates (glucose) for fuel. In ketosis, it’s just the opposite: the body primarily relies on ketones, rather than glucose. To understand how this works, it’s important to understand that some organs in the body (especially the brain) require a base amount of glucose to keep functioning. If your brain doesn’t get any glucose, you’ll die. But this doesn’t necessarily mean that you need glucose in the diet – your body is perfectly capable of meeting its glucose needs during an extended fast, a period of famine, or a long stretch of very minimal carbohydrate intake. There are two different ways to make this happen. First, you could break down the protein in your muscles and use that as fuel for your brain and liver. This isn’t ideal from an evolutionary standpoint though – when you’re experiencing a period of food shortage, you need to be strong and fast, Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

When you’re on a low-carb diet, your body kicks into action, breaking down fats into ketone bodies to use for energy. This increase in ketones -- called ketosis -- is a normal adaptation to cutting carbs. In fact, the switch to ketosis is why low-carb diets work. Even though you could eat enough carbs to prevent ketosis, it's important to clarify why you want to avoid it. There's nothing unhealthy about ketosis, so you may just need to correct any misinformation to make the best decision for your weight-loss goals. Video of the Day Deal With Concerns Over Ketosis Ketosis is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is unfortunate -- ketosis is normal, while ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition related to type 1 diabetes. Most people on a low-carb diet tolerate ketosis without any problems. Then after the pounds are dropped, carb intake is gradually increased so you're out of ketosis by the time you reach the maintenance phase. If you decide to stay in an induction phase longer than the low-carb plan recommends, consult your doctor to be safe. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing ketoacidosis from lack of insulin. Due to the complex metabolism of diabetes, they end up with high levels of blood glucose and ketones, which upsets the body's normal acid-base balance. When that happens, ketosis becomes ketoacidosis, causing symptoms like thirst, frequent urination, dry mouth, nausea, belly pain, rapid breathing and fruity-smelling breath. If you have symptoms, contact your doctor immediately -- diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency. You may be wary about ketosis because you've heard about "ketosis flu." It's not really flu, but in the first few days or weeks of a low-carb diet, some people experience headaches, dizziness, fatigue, constipation or wea Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Per Day On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet?

How Many Carbs Per Day On A Low-carb Ketogenic Diet?

Although my initial plan was to include this post in All You Need to Know About Carbs on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet, I decided it deserves to be discussed separately. How Many Carbs per Day to Stay in Ketosis? As described in my post How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work? Weight Loss and 3 Main Effects of Ketosis, weight loss on a ketogenic diet is achieved by limiting the daily intake of net carbs and getting your body in a metabolic state known as ketosis. While in ketosis, your body effectively uses fat for fuel. In general, the daily intake of net carbs required to enter ketosis could vary from 20 to 100 grams per day (and very rarely over 100 grams per day). Most people, who have experienced ketosis, claim to have reached that state at about 20-50 grams of net carbs per day. I'd suggest you start at 20-30 grams and see how you can adjust it for your needs. There are two ways to find your ideal net carbs intake: Low to high method Start from a low level of net carbs to ensure you quickly enter ketosis (~ 20 grams of net carbs per day). When you detect ketosis after about 2-3 days, start adding net carbs (about 5 grams each week) until you detect a very low-level or no ketones (using Ketostix or blood ketone meter). This is usually the most reliable and quickest way to discover your net carbs limit. It could be a bit hard the first couple of days, as you have to give up almost all carbs from one day to another but it will be worth it. This method is highly recommended. High to low method Assuming you're not in ketosis, start from a relatively high level of net carbs (~ 50 grams) and keep reducing (about 5 grams each week) until you detect presence of ketones. This is a less difficult approach but not recommended, as you may spend a long time out of ketosis before you find yo Continue reading >>

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet

Cyclic Ketogenic Diet

A cyclic ketogenic diet (or carb-cycling) is a low-carbohydrate diet with intermittent periods of high or moderate carbohydrate consumption. This is a form of the general ketogenic diet that is used as a way to maximize fat loss while maintaining the ability to perform high-intensity exercise. A ketogenic diet limits the number of grams of carbohydrate the dieter may eat, which may be anywhere between 0 and 50g per day. The remainder of the caloric intake must come primarily from fat sources, as well as protein sources, in order to maintain ketosis. (Ketosis is the condition in which the body burns fats and uses ketones instead of glucose for fuel.) The Cyclical Ketogenic Diet can be complex, as it requires the dieters to closely watch the number of carbohydrate grams they eat during the intermittent period that they are not maintaining a strictly low carb/moderate protein diet.[1] When following a low carbohydrate diet, for the first few days, there is an adaptation period during which most people report feeling run-down or tired. Some people report feeling irritable, out of sorts, and unable to make decisions. For most people these feelings disappear after the adaptation period, however, and are replaced with feelings of calm and balance, and more consistent energy.[1] Although most people report a waning of cravings while in ketosis, some people may crave carbohydrates during ketosis for psychological reasons. During a hypocaloric ketogenic diet, the carb cravings may combine with hunger pangs, making matters worse.[2] (However, it is noteworthy that most people report having no hunger pangs on a ketogenic diet, due to its higher fat and protein contents, which help to increase a sense of fullness).[1] A CKD offers a way to combat this. It offers a cyclical "refeed" Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

You’ve probably seen dozens of headlines about the ketogenic diet by now, which has made its way into popular culture largely by celebrities and supermodels giving the long-standing fad diet a repeated stamp of approval. Is this the diet to follow if you have diabetes? Studies suggest the answer isn’t so simple. Some science shows its meal plan may be helpful, while other research, like one study published in September 2016 in Nutrients, highlights the importance of whole grains in the diets of people with diabetes — a restricted food category in the ketogenic diet. While the keto diet can offer many potential benefits for diabetes management, following it requires pretty serious commitment. So take a beat before you take the plunge — and consider these questions that can help you and your medical team determine if it’s right for you: How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work Exactly? There’s a good reason the ketogenic diet is also referred to as a low-carb, high-fat diet. Indeed, following the ketogenic diet means reducing carbohydrate intake to typically less than 50 grams (g) of carbohydrates per day, while increasing fat and protein intake, according to a review published in August 2013 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. To put that into perspective, an individual on an average, non-restricted diet can easily eat more carbohydrates than that in one typical meal — for instance, a turkey, cheese, and veggie sandwich on whole-grain bread with a small, 1 ounce (oz) bag of classic potato chips would come in at around 51 g of carbs. These dietary changes drive down insulin levels, eventually leading your body into a state of ketosis, during which it is burning fat rather than carbohydrates. What Are Some of the Potential Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet for Continue reading >>

Which High-protein Diet Is Best: Atkins, Dukan, Or Ketogenic?

Which High-protein Diet Is Best: Atkins, Dukan, Or Ketogenic?

If you've been on the lookout for a new way to lose weight, you've probably noticed that low-carb, high-protein diets—like Atkins, the ketogenic diet, and the Dukan diet—have become kind of a big deal. Not only did all three make the cut on Google's annual list of most searched diets, but two (Atkins and Dukan) are also on the 2016 US News & World Report's roundup of best weight-loss diets. Each of these diets follow the same basic premise: limiting carbs means the body turns to stored fat for fuel. But is one of these plans more likely to lead to pounds-shedding success? We caught up with Edwina Clark, R.D., head of nutrition and wellness at Yummly, to find out how these three diets compare. "The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, moderate protein, low-carb diet," says Clark. Up to 75 percent of your daily calories come from fat, 5 to 10 percent from carbs, and the rest from protein. By severely limiting carbs to 50 grams or less, this diet forces your bod to burn fat for energy, a process known as ketosis. Unlike the Atkins and Dukan diets, the keto plan doesn't work in phases. Instead, you sustain the low-carb, high-fat, high-protein eating ratios until you reach your goal weight. There is no maintenance plan once you reach your goal. Unsurprisingly, limiting your carb intake this much means missing out on quite a few (delish) foods, including legumes, root vegetables, and most fruits. Starchy veggies, such as squash and sweet potatoes, are also off the table, along with refined carbs. Thanks to carb counting and food restrictions, meal prepping is paramount to following this plan. The rapid weight loss you'll experience at the start of this diet might be helpful in the motivation department, but you're not dropping fat from the get-go, says Clark. "Carbs are stored w Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Can You Eat 50-100g Of Carbs And Still Get To Ketosis, By Offsetting Via The Gym, Swimming, Running, Etc.?

Can You Eat 50-100g Of Carbs And Still Get To Ketosis, By Offsetting Via The Gym, Swimming, Running, Etc.?

You have good answers already. I will however add the following points: You didn’t make clear whether you mean as a once off or as an ongoing daily eating pattern. It is much easier to answer in the affirmative if this level of carbs is more of an occasional event, which is then combined with sufficiently lengthy and intense exercise to burn the carbs and again deplete any stored glycogen. Also people vary, so whether you can consume that level of carbs and maintain ketosis partly depends how sensitive you are to carbohydrates. Bear in mind that you really have to do quite a lot of intense exercise to offset an excess of carbs, finger in the air I mean about 1.5–2h of running, for example. Also I’d like to point out that there is in practice as I see it a big difference between 50g per day (which is the approximate level recommended by Phinney and Volek, and may actually be low enough for some people to make progress towards ketogenic adaptation) and 100g (which is likely too much for most people and will likely cause people to struggle to get into or maintain ketosis, as I understand it.) So you need to be more specific I think. (To add, many of course find even 50g to be too much particularly in the beginning, which is why 25g is often recommended in the early stages to ensure your metabolism “gets the message”.) Ideally, in my view, to properly answer this question for your case, you should get a glucose & ketone meter and start researching your body’s behaviour, so you can objectively know how you respond to your chosen level of carbs, as well as how effectively your exercise actually depletes your glycogen stores and boosts your ketone production. I use the Abott Freestyle Optium Neo which works well. (See some of my other answers where I’ve recounted Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should You Eat To Get Into Ketosis?

How Many Carbs Should You Eat To Get Into Ketosis?

Limiting carbs is one of the easiest ways to get into ketosis. It doesn’t require fasting; it doesn’t even require you to eat fewer calories — all you have to do is restrict your carbohydrates and eat just enough protein (and not too much) to stimulate fat burning and ketone production. Other factors like fat consumption, stress, and activity levels are important to consider as well, but knowing how many carbs you need to eat to get into ketosis is a good place to start. How Many Carbs For Ketosis? Regardless of how many variables impact ketosis, it is important to start somewhere, and carbs are the most important metric to start with on the ketogenic diet. For most people, keeping total carbs below 35g and net carbs below 25g (ideally, below 20g) will get them into a deep ketosis after about a week. (To figure out your net carb consumption, simply subtract total fiber intake from total carbs.) Note: Some sweeteners are considered keto-friendly and do not raise blood sugar levels. These can be subtracted from the total carbs as well. For more, read our Guide to Low Carb Sweeteners > To eat such a small amount of carbs, you must be vigilant about your food choices. You may find that many of your favorite foods will put you over the carbohydrate limit for the day with just one serving. Even healthier foods like fruits and vegetables are packed with sugar and carbs, but don’t get discouraged — there is plenty of delicious food you can eat on the ketogenic diet. For example, you can have a Bacon Breakfast Bagel for breakfast, a Thai BBQ Pork Salad for lunch, and a Keto BBQ Chicken Pizza for dinner. Mouthwatering aren’t they? Check out this list for some more ideas of what you should and should not eat on the ketogenic diet: Do Not Eat Grains – wheat, corn, ric Continue reading >>

Reach Ketosis In 3 Days

Reach Ketosis In 3 Days

Low carbers know ketosis is the superhero of fat burning. Want to get there quickly? Try a few rapid keto techniques and eat specific low carb foods. Why ketosis makes a difference in fat loss Fast 3-Day Keto technique Printable list of 200 keto foods Online keto calculator When carbs are restricted or absent from your diet, your body must rely almost solely on fat for energy. Ketosis happens when your carb levels are very low, 20 to 50 carbs (or less) per day. How to Reach Ketosis Quickly The fastest way to reach ketosis using your diet is by limiting carbs: 20 to 50 grams per day, or less than 10% of total daily calories. Some low carbers eat less than 5%. Specific diet and exercise techniques, such as intermittent fasting and high intensity interval training (HIIT) workout routines help you get into ketosis quickly and maximize your fat loss. 3 Day Keto Technique This keto method helps eliminate liver glycogen stores rapidly. Follow this plan exactly, and you’ll reach ketosis within a few days. Day 1 Eat low carb during the day or avoid fruit, starchy veggies, grains, sugary treats, rice, bread and pasta. Do not eat anything after 6 pm. Day 2 In the morning before eating, perform a HIIT routine, another kind of intense exercise or weight training. Start eating a ketogenic diet with 0 to 2% of calories from carbs. (0 to 5 grams of net carbs per 1000 daily calories.) Example: 2% of 1000 daily calories = 20 calories. Carbs have 4 calories per gram, so 20 calories = 5 carbs. Day 3 In the morning (before eating) perform medium intensity, steady state exercises or weight training. Continue eating high fat keto foods. (Optional) Add extra butter, coconut oil or MCT oil to your meals. Allow no more than 5% of your total daily calories from carbs. How to Know You’re in Ke Continue reading >>

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