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How Ketones Are Formed?

What Is Ketone? - Definition, Structure, Formation & Formula

What Is Ketone? - Definition, Structure, Formation & Formula

Background of Ketone Did you know that our friend aldehyde has a very close relative named ketone? By definition, a ketone is an organic compound that contains a carbonyl functional group. So you may be wondering if aldehydes and ketones are relatives, what makes them different? Well, I am glad you asked because all you have to remember is this little guy: hydrogen. While aldehyde contains a hydrogen atom connected to its carbonyl group, ketone does not have a hydrogen atom attached. There are a few ways to know you are encountering a ketone. The first is by looking at the ending of the chemical word. If the suffix ending of the chemical name is '-one,' then you can be sure there is a ketone present in that compound. Want to know another way to tell if a ketone is lurking around the corner? By its physical property. Ketones have high boiling points and love water (high water solubility). Let's dig a little deeper with the physical property of a ketone. The oxygen in a ketone absolutely loves to take all the electrons it can get its hands on. But, by being an electron-hogger, oxygen's refusal to share creates a sticky situation where some atoms on the ketone have more or less charge than others. In chemistry, an electron-hogging atom is referred to as being electronegative. An electronegative atom is more attractive to other compounds. This attractiveness, called polarity, is what contributes to ketones' physical properties. Structure & Formula Ketones have a very distinct look to them; you can't miss it if you see them. As shown in Diagram 1, there are two R groups attached to the carbonyl group (C=O). Those R groups can be any type of compound that contains a carbon molecule. An example of how the R group determines ketone type is illustrated in this diagram here. The Continue reading >>

Synthesis Of Ketones

Synthesis Of Ketones

Like aldehydes, ketones can be prepared in a number of ways. The following sections detail some of the more common preparation methods: the oxidation of secondary alcohols, the hydration of alkynes, the ozonolysis of alkenes, Friedel‐Crafts acylation, the use of lithium dialkylcuprates, and the use of a Grignard reagent. The oxidation of secondary alcohols to ketones may be carried out using strong oxidizing agents, because further oxidation of a ketone occurs with great difficulty. Normal oxidizing agents include potassium dichromate (K 2Cr 2O 7) and chromic acid (H 2CrO 4). The conversion of 2‐propanol to 2‐propanone illustrates the oxidation of a secondary alcohol. The addition of water to an alkyne leads to the formation of an unstable vinyl alcohol. These unstable materials undergo keto‐enol tautomerization to form ketones. The hydration of propyne forms 2‐propanone, as the following figure illustrates. When one or both alkene carbons contain two alkyl groups, ozonolysis generates one or two ketones. The ozonolysis of 1,2‐dimethyl propene produces both 2‐propanone (a ketone) and ethanal (an aldehyde). Friedel‐Crafts acylations are used to prepare aromatic ketones. The preparation of acetophenone from benzene and acetyl chloride is a typical Friedel‐Crafts acylation. The addition of a lithium dialkylcuprate (Gilman reagent) to an acyl chloride at low temperatures produces a ketone. This method produces a good yield of acetophenone. Hydrolysis of the salt formed by reacting a Grignard reagent with a nitrile produces good ketone yields. For example, you can prepare acetone by reacting the Grignard reagent methyl magnesium bromide (CH 3MgBr) with methyl nitrile (CH 3C&tbond;N). Continue reading >>

Ketone Body Formation

Ketone Body Formation

Ketone body formation occurs as an alternative energy source during times of prolonged stress e.g. starvation. It occurs in the liver from an initial substrate of: long chain fatty acids; the fatty acids undergo beta-oxidation by their normal pathway within mitochondria until acetyl-CoA is produced, or ketogenic amino acids; amino acids such as leucine and lysine, released at times of energy depletion, are interconverted only to acetyl-CoA Then, three molecules of acetyl-CoA are effectively joined together in three enzyme steps sequentially catalyzed by: acetyl CoA acetyltransferase HMG-CoA transferase HMG-CoA lyase Coenzyme A is regenerated and the ketone body acetoacetate is formed. Finally, acetoacetate is reduced to another ketone body, D-3-hydroxybutyrate, in a reaction catalyzed by 3-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase. This requires NADH. The oxidate state of the liver is such that the forward reaction is generally favoured; this results in more hydroxybutyrate being formed than acetoacetate. Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

Ketone Body Metabolism

Ketone Body Metabolism

Ketone body metabolism includes ketone body synthesis (ketogenesis) and breakdown (ketolysis). When the body goes from the fed to the fasted state the liver switches from an organ of carbohydrate utilization and fatty acid synthesis to one of fatty acid oxidation and ketone body production. This metabolic switch is amplified in uncontrolled diabetes. In these states the fat-derived energy (ketone bodies) generated in the liver enter the blood stream and are used by other organs, such as the brain, heart, kidney cortex and skeletal muscle. Ketone bodies are particularly important for the brain which has no other substantial non-glucose-derived energy source. The two main ketone bodies are acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) also referred to as β-hydroxybutyrate, with acetone the third, and least abundant. Ketone bodies are always present in the blood and their levels increase during fasting and prolonged exercise. After an over-night fast, ketone bodies supply 2–6% of the body's energy requirements, while they supply 30–40% of the energy needs after a 3-day fast. When they build up in the blood they spill over into the urine. The presence of elevated ketone bodies in the blood is termed ketosis and the presence of ketone bodies in the urine is called ketonuria. The body can also rid itself of acetone through the lungs which gives the breath a fruity odour. Diabetes is the most common pathological cause of elevated blood ketones. In diabetic ketoacidosis, high levels of ketone bodies are produced in response to low insulin levels and high levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Ketone bodies The term ‘ketone bodies’ refers to three molecules, acetoacetate (AcAc), 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) and acetone (Figure 1). 3HB is formed from the reduction of AcAc i Continue reading >>

Urine - For Ketone, Ketone Bodies (ketonuria)

Urine - For Ketone, Ketone Bodies (ketonuria)

Sample The is done on the urine. Indication It is advised in diabetic patients for the early diagnosis of ketoacidosis. To evaluate the diabetic patient in a coma. Definition Increased ketone bodies in blood are called Ketonemia. Increased excretion in the urine is called Ketonuria. Pathophysiology Ketone bodies are seen in case of decreased availability of carbohydrates like starvation or frequent vomiting. Another possibility is decreased utilization of carbohydrates like diabetes mellitus, and glycogen storage disease. High fat and low carbohydrates diet are ketogenic and increase ketone bodies in the blood. Ketones are the end product of fatty acid catabolism. Ketones are formed when the glucose as a source of energy is not present. This situation happens when there is no insulin so glucose cannot enter the cells. In that case, ketone bodies are the source of energy for the body, particularly to the brain. In case of fasting for 3 to 4 days, then 30 to 40% body energy is provided by the ketone bodies. Ketones bodies are the end product of fatty acid breakdown and consists of : Beta-hydroxybutyric acid. Acetoacetic acid. Acetone. The β- hydroxybutyric acid + acetoacetic acid readily converts to acetone. In the blood: Acetone is the minor amount. Acetoacetate and β- hydroxybutyrate are equal in amount and are the main ketone bodies. in a healthy person, ketones are formed in the liver but there is a negligible amount in urine. The outcome of Increased Ketones in the blood leads to : Electrolyte imbalance. Dehydration. If not corrected then leads to acidosis coma and ultimately death. Ketones are present in the urine when a threshold level of ketones exceed the normal level in the blood. Normal In Urine Ketone bodies are negative. Small amount = < 20 mg/dL. Moderate Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis- Enzyme For Ketones Formation?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis- Enzyme For Ketones Formation?

Case details A 54- year-old man with Type 1 diabetes is referred to an ophthalmologist for evaluation of developing cataract. Blood chemistry results are shown below- Fasting blood glucose 198 mg/dl Hemoglobin A 15 gm/dl Hemoglobin A 1c 10% of total Hb Urine ketones Positive Urine glucose Positive Which of the following enzymes is most strongly associated with ketones formation in this patient? A) Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex B) Thioesterase C) Thiophorase D) Thiokinase E) Thiolase. The correct answer is- E- Thiolase. Out of the given options thiolase is the only enzyme involved in the ketogenesis. The process of ketogenesis starts from the action of thiolase. In fact, the actual specific enzyme for ketogenesis is HMG Co A Synthase (mitochondrial isoform) which is not mentioned in the given options. Ketone bodies Acetoacetate, D (-3) -hydroxybutyrate (Beta hydroxy butyrate), and acetone are often referred to as ketone bodies (figure-1). Figure-1- Acetoacetate is the primary ketone body, the other ketone bodies are derived from it. The term “ketones” is actually a misnomer because beta-hydroxybutyrate is not a ketone and there are ketones in blood that are not ketone bodies, e.g., pyruvate, fructose. Ketogenesis takes place in liver using Acetyl co A as a substrate or a precursor molecule. Enzymes responsible for ketone body formation are associated mainly with the mitochondria. Steps of synthesis Acetoacetate (First ketone body) is formed from acetyl CoA in three steps (Figure-2). 1) Two molecules of acetyl CoA condense to form Acetoacetyl CoA. This reaction, which is catalyzed by thiolase, is the reverse of the thiolysis step in the oxidation of fatty acids. 2) Acetoacetyl CoA then reacts with acetyl CoA and water to give 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies Metabolism

Ketone Bodies Metabolism

1. Metabolism of ketone bodies Gandham.Rajeev Email:[email protected] 2. • Carbohydrates are essential for the metabolism of fat or FAT is burned under the fire of carbohydrates. • Acetyl CoA formed from fatty acids can enter & get oxidized in TCA cycle only when carbohydrates are available. • During starvation & diabetes mellitus, acetyl CoA takes the alternate route of formation of ketone bodies. 3. • Acetone, acetoacetate & β-hydroxybutyrate (or 3-hydroxybutyrate) are known as ketone bodies • β-hydroxybutyrate does not possess a keto (C=O) group. • Acetone & acetoacetate are true ketone bodies. • Ketone bodies are water-soluble & energy yielding. • Acetone, it cannot be metabolized 4. CH3 – C – CH3 O Acetone CH3 – C – CH2 – COO- O Acetoacetate CH3 – CH – CH2 – COO- OH I β-Hydroxybutyrate 5. • Acetoacetate is the primary ketone body. • β-hydroxybutyrate & acetone are secondary ketone bodies. • Site: • Synthesized exclusively by the liver mitochondria. • The enzymes are located in mitochondrial matrix. • Precursor: • Acetyl CoA, formed by oxidation of fatty acids, pyruvate or some amino acids 6. • Ketone body biosynthesis occurs in 5 steps as follows. 1. Condensation: • Two molecules of acetyl CoA are condensed to form acetoacetyl CoA. • This reaction is catalyzed by thiolase, an enzyme involved in the final step of β- oxidation. 7. • Acetoacetate synthesis is appropriately regarded as the reversal of thiolase reaction of fatty acid oxidation. 2. Production of HMG CoA: • Acetoacetyl CoA combines with another molecule of acetyl CoA to produce β-hydroxy β-methyl glutaryl CoA (HMC CoA). • This reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme HMG CoA synthase. 8. • Mitochondrial HMG CoA is used for ketogenesis. Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

What are ketones and what causes them? Ketones are the result of the body burning fat for energy or fuel. For a person with diabetes, ketones are often the result of prolonged high blood sugar and insulin deficiency. Without the right amount of insulin, glucose starts to build up in the blood stream and doesn't enter the cells. The cells burn fat instead of glucose, and ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. Some causes of high blood sugar are: Missing an insulin dose or skipping some oral medications. A disconnected or blocked insulin pump tube. Being sick with the flu. High levels of stress. Eating more carbohydrates than your medication covers. What are the signs that I should test for ketones? Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, frequent thirst, blurry vision, dry mouth, vomiting, and fatigue. There are several scenarios that should prompt a test for ketones. If your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. When your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl and you are planning on exercising. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and whenever blood sugars are elevated. How do I test for ketones? There are two ways to test for ketones - by testing your urine or your blood. Ketones appear first in the blood stream and are later present in the urine, so testing your blood for ketones is the best way to check for an early problem. To check urine for ketones, you must collect a urine sample or dip a ketone test strip into a fresh stream of urine. After waiting for the time suggested by the ketone strip manufacturer, you compare the color strip to the chart on the bottle. The darker the color, the higher the amount of ketones in the urine. At this time, there are just a few mete Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies

Ketone Bodies

Ketone bodies Acetone Acetoacetic acid (R)-beta-Hydroxybutyric acid Ketone bodies are three water-soluble molecules (acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and their spontaneous breakdown product, acetone) that are produced by the liver from fatty acids[1] during periods of low food intake (fasting), carbohydrate restrictive diets, starvation, prolonged intense exercise,[2], alcoholism or in untreated (or inadequately treated) type 1 diabetes mellitus. These ketone bodies are readily picked up by the extra-hepatic tissues, and converted into acetyl-CoA which then enters the citric acid cycle and is oxidized in the mitochondria for energy.[3] In the brain, ketone bodies are also used to make acetyl-CoA into long-chain fatty acids. Ketone bodies are produced by the liver under the circumstances listed above (i.e. fasting, starving, low carbohydrate diets, prolonged exercise and untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus) as a result of intense gluconeogenesis, which is the production of glucose from non-carbohydrate sources (not including fatty acids).[1] They are therefore always released into the blood by the liver together with newly produced glucose, after the liver glycogen stores have been depleted (these glycogen stores are depleted after only 24 hours of fasting)[1]. When two acetyl-CoA molecules lose their -CoAs, (or Co-enzyme A groups) they can form a (covalent) dimer called acetoacetate. Beta-hydroxybutyrate is a reduced form of acetoacetate, in which the ketone group is converted into an alcohol (or hydroxyl) group (see illustration on the right). Both are 4-carbon molecules, that can readily be converted back into acetyl-CoA by most tissues of the body, with the notable exception of the liver. Acetone is the decarboxylated form of acetoacetate which cannot be converted Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies As A Fuel For The Brain During Starvation

Ketone Bodies As A Fuel For The Brain During Starvation

THE STATUS OF OUR KNOWLEDGE OF STARVATION AND BRAIN METABOLISM IN HUMANS WHEN I BEGAN MY RESEARCH This story begins in the early 1960s when the general level of knowledge about whole-body metabolism during human starvation was grossly deficient. This was partly caused by a lack of accurate and specific methods for measuring hormones and fuels in biological fluids, which became available about 1965.11 Rigidly designed protocols for studying human volunteers or obese patients, who underwent semi- or total starvation for prolonged periods of time, were not widely employed, and much of the published data regarding metabolic events during starvation were not readily accessible. To complicate matters further, a great deal of the available data was confusing because much of the supposition regarding mechanisms used by the body to survive prolonged periods of starvation was based upon information that was obtained from nonstandardized and often erroneous procedures for studying metabolism. For example, the rate of urinary nitrogen excretion during starvation was sometimes confounded by the consumption of carbohydrate during the studies. Today, students of biochemistry take for granted the fact that tissues of the human body have a hierarchy of fuel usage. They know that the brain, an organ devoted to using glucose, can switch to use ketone bodies during prolonged starvation (2–3 days), thus sparing glucose for other tissues (i.e. red blood cells must use glucose as a fuel; without mitochondria, they have no choice!). However, this fundamental insight into human metabolism was not recognized in the early 1960s, when my research in this area began. How this simple but fundamental fact that ketone bodies provide critical fuels for the brain was discovered and its implication for Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketone Bodies, And Ketoacidosis – An Excerpt From Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition

Ketosis, Ketone Bodies, And Ketoacidosis – An Excerpt From Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition

The following text is excerpted from Lipids (Chapter 8) of Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition. Ketone Bodies and Ketosis: Ketones are organic chemicals in which an interior carbon in a molecule forms a double bond with an oxygen molecule. Acetone, a familiar chemical, is the smallest ketone possible. It is composed of three carbons, with the double bond to oxygen on the middle carbon. Biological ketone bodies include acetone, larger ketones, and biochemicals that can become ketones. The most important of the ketone bodies are hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, both of which are formed from condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules. Acetone is formed from a nonenzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate. Ketone bodies are fuel molecules that can be used for energy by all organs of the body except the liver. The production of ketone bodies is a normal, natural, and important biochemical pathway in animal biochemistry (17, p. 577). Small quantities of ketone bodies are always present in the blood, with the quantity increasing as hours without food increase. During fasting or carbohydrate deprivation, larger amounts of ketone bodies are produced to provide the energy that is normally provided by glucose. Excessive levels of circulating ketone bodies can result in ketosis, a condition in which the quantity of circulating ketone bodies is greater than the quantity the organs and tissues of the body need for energy. People who go on extremely low-carbohydrate diets to lose a large excess of body fat usually go into a mild ketosis that moderates as weight is lost. There is no scientific evidence that a low-carbohydrate diet is capable of producing sufficient ketone bodies to be harmful. Excess ketone bodies are excreted by the kidneys and lungs. Exhaled acetone gives the brea Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies

Ketone Bodies

Introductory discusion of fat metabolism, exercise, and fasting. Fatty acids can be used as the major fuel for tissues such as muscle, but they cannot cross the blood-brain barrier, and thus cannot be used by the central nervous system (CNS). This becomes a major problem during starvation (fasting), particularly for organisms such as ourselves in which CNS metabolism constitute a major portion of the resting basal metabolic rate. These organism must provide glucose to the CNS to provide for metabolic needs, and thus during the initial fasting period must break down substantial amounts of muscle tissue (protein) to provide the amino acid precursors of gluconeogenesis. Obviously the organism could not survive long under such a regime. What is needed is an alternate fuel source based on fat rather than muscle. The so-called ketone bodies serve this function: Note that only two of the ketone bodies are in fact ketones, and that acetone is an "unintentional" breakdown product resulting from the instability of acetoacetate at body temperature. Acetone is not available as fuel to any significant extent, and is thus a waste product. CNS tissues can use ketone bodies any time, the problem is the normally very low concentrations (< 0.3 mM) compared to glucose (about 4 mM). Since the KM's for both are similar, the CNS doesn't begin to use ketone bodies in preference to glucose until their concentration exceed's the concentration of glucose in the serum. The system becomes saturated at about 7 mM. The limiting factor in using ketone bodies then becomes the ability of the liver to synthesis them, which requires the induction of the enzymes required for acetoacetate biosynthesis. Normal glucose concentrations inhibit ketone body synthesis, thus the ketone bodies will only begin to be Continue reading >>

Blood Ketones

Blood Ketones

On This Site Tests: Urine Ketones (see Urinalysis - The Chemical Exam); Blood Gases; Glucose Tests Elsewhere On The Web Ask a Laboratory Scientist Your questions will be answered by a laboratory scientist as part of a voluntary service provided by one of our partners, the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS). Click on the Contact a Scientist button below to be re-directed to the ASCLS site to complete a request form. If your question relates to this web site and not to a specific lab test, please submit it via our Contact Us page instead. Thank you. Continue reading >>

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