diabetestalk.net

How Is Ketosis Treated

Rhr: The Ketogenic Diet And Cancer

Rhr: The Ketogenic Diet And Cancer

The conventional view of cancer is that it is caused by DNA mutations in the cell nuclei. However, the metabolic theory of cancer proposes that some cancers are caused by a dysfunction of cellular respiration and that the restriction of glucose in the diet may prevent and even reverse some cancers. Today I’ll review the research supporting this theory and explore how the ketogenic diet may impact cancer tumor growth. In this episode we discuss: A disorder of energy metabolism Metabolic dysfunction may be a root cause How the ketogenic diet can help Existing research on keto and cancer Additional evidence supporting the metabolic theory Why keto alone may not be enough Chris Kresser: Hey, everybody, Chris Kresser here. Welcome to another episode of Revolution Health Radio. Today, we have a question from Kelsey. Let’s give it a listen. Kelsey: Hi, Chris, I was just wondering about your thoughts on the ketogenic diet as an approach to cancer prevention and therapy. I just read something about how cancer cells can only thrive on glucose, and in its absence we can prevent cancer potentially. So I was wondering if you could discuss this in a podcast. I think that would be great. Thank you. Chris: Okay. Thanks, Kelsey, for sending that question in. It’s a really great question, one that’s been on my mind a lot recently, actually, and I’ve been diving into the research on. Most of you probably know that cancer dogma holds that malignancies are caused by DNA mutations inside the nuclei of cells and that these mutations ultimately lead to runaway cellular proliferation, which is the hallmark feature of cancer. A disorder of energy metabolism But there are some cancer biologists out there that feel that while mutations are ubiquitous in cancer, they may not be the primar Continue reading >>

Has Anybody Ever Seen A Patient That Treat Their Non Stoppable Terminal Cancer With Ketosis And Fasting?

Has Anybody Ever Seen A Patient That Treat Their Non Stoppable Terminal Cancer With Ketosis And Fasting?

By definition the cancer you describe is non stoppable and terminal. Fasting will tend to starve the cancer but cancer patients loose weight anyway so fasting will likely kill off the patient. I have seen desperate cancer patients do all kinds of things but starving themselves would be counterproductive. The only hope for these patients is immuno-therapy, getting the immune system to fight the cancer. The problem is that the cancer became deadly because it got away from the immune system. The immune system couldn’t/didn’t find it and/or attack it in the first place. Continue reading >>

Ketotic Cows: Treatment And Prognosis (proceedings)

Ketotic Cows: Treatment And Prognosis (proceedings)

12Next An absolute requirement for treating ketosis in cattle is to identify and treat the primary cause for the negative energy balance. Symptomatic treatment for ketosis without attacking the primary cause is doomed to failure. Propylene glycol is a routine treatment for ketosis. Only 2 oral formulations are approved for use in cattle as a treatment and the dose rate is 8 oz, q 12 h, for up to 10 days (2 other formulations labeled for use as preventive treatment). Research suggests that 296 ml once/day as on oral drench is just as effective as 887 ml once/day. Propylene glycol is absorbed from the rumen as propylene glycol, some propylene glycol is metabolized to propionate in the rumen, but most is absorbed intact and metabolized to glucose in liver. Propylene glycol increases serum [glucose], decreases serum β-OH butyrate & NEFA concentrations but only if a functional liver as propylene glycol must be metabolized. Propylene glycol is only beneficial if rumen motility to aid mixing and absorption. Glycerol (same dose rate as propylene glycol) and sodium propionate (uncertain dose rate) also reported to be of use but are both considered inferior to propylene glycol. Sodium propionate may have palatability problems. Calcium propionate has been examined, but the evidence is not convincing that it is superior to propylene glycol, even though it also has calcium. Not very soluble, and large volumes need to be administered. 500 ml of 50% Dextrose IV is also a routine treatment (one time administration of 250 g). Numerous approved products for treating ketosis in cattle. A cow uses 50-70 g glucose/hour for maintenance and 200 g glucose/hour high production, from a total blood glucose pool <40 g. Milk is 4.5% lactose, 50 kg of milk contains 2.25 kg lactose (glucose and gala Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets For Psychiatric Disorders: A New 2017 Review

Ketogenic Diets For Psychiatric Disorders: A New 2017 Review

If you have a brain, you need to know about ketogenic diets. The fact that these specially-formulated low-carbohydrate diets have the power to stop seizures in their tracks is concrete evidence that food has a tremendous impact on brain chemistry and should inspire curiosity about how they work. I first became interested in ketogenic diets as a potential treatment for bipolar mood disorders, given the many similarities between epilepsy and bipolar disorder. Ketogenic diets have been around for about 100 years, and have proved to be invaluable tools in the treatment of stubborn neurological conditions, most notably epilepsy. They have also shown promise in the management of other brain-based disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease, ALS, Traumatic Brain Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, and chronic headaches, as well as in metabolic disorders like obesity, cancer, and type 2 diabetes. But where does the science currently stand on the ketogenic diet and psychiatric disorders like bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and Alzheimer’s Disease? How many human studies do we have, and what do they tell us? If you are struggling with mood, attention, or memory problems, should you try a ketogenic diet? If you are a clinician, should you recommend a ketogenic diet to your patients? A recent review article “The Current Status of the Ketogenic Diet in Psychiatry” by researchers at the University of Tasmania in Australia [Bostock et al 2017 Front Psychiatry 20(8)] brings us nicely up to date on all things ketogenic and mental health. I summarize the paper below and offer some thoughts and suggestions of my own. [Full disclosure: I am a psychiatrist who studies nutrition and eats a ketogenic diet.] First, some basics for those of you who are unfamiliar with these special diets. Definition Continue reading >>

Did You Notice Any Difference In Depression Symptoms Once Your Body Went Into Ketosis?

Did You Notice Any Difference In Depression Symptoms Once Your Body Went Into Ketosis?

I would be very careful to adopt this type of diet. Reading through the webpage you linked to, it is typical marketing for a new “super diet” that tends to promote the advantages while covering the dangers in a bed of roses. Fortunately for you I’ve already tried such a diet and can save you from some suffering. A keto diet was a kind of fun experiment in my workplace where I saw at least one person eat salads or vegetables exclusively for lunch literally for months on end. They looked like they were up to something and being curious I brought along my sheep plushie to see them and asked why they were eating veggies only… like my sheep? They were amused and shared their diet plan with me. Fast foward to recent times where from August until now I appeared to lose a lot of weight so a keto diet definitely works. I had my SO say I actually looked like a Bollywood actress and we had a few charming conversations over it… But a diet that “works” on the surface to produce results is not a story that ends happily ever after. I was warned about the need for a lot of water during ketosis and also I may end up in a state of caloric deficiency especially with my quite harsh dance workout routines. I saved that thought for “later” because I was having a great time and people were saying I lost a lot of weight recently. I started noticing oddities from around the 5th week onwards. I had nausea and stomach pain nearly every day. Yes, I joked I had “morning sickness”. No I didn’t see a doctor. I knew this was from my diet. I suffered from lethargy and low motivation that would very strangely persist until something shocked me enough to pump out some adrenalin. But I felt perfectly fine and healthy. Even when I seemed to be unnecessarily aggressive on my expectat Continue reading >>

Ketosis: Symptoms, Signs & More

Ketosis: Symptoms, Signs & More

Every cell in your body needs energy to survive. Most of the time, you create energy from the sugar (glucose) in your bloodstream. Insulin helps regulate glucose levels in the blood and stimulate the absorption of glucose by the cells in your body. If you don’t have enough glucose or insufficient insulin to get the job done, your body will break down fat instead for energy. This supply of fat is an alternative energy source that keeps you from starvation. When you break down fat, you produce a compound called a ketone body. This process is called ketosis. Insulin is required by your cells in order to use the glucose in your blood, but ketones do not require insulin. The ketones that don’t get used for energy pass through your kidneys and out through your urine. Ketosis is most likely to occur in people who have diabetes, a condition in which the body produces little or no insulin. Ketosis and Ketoacidosis: What You Need To Know Ketosis simply means that your body is producing ketone bodies. You’re burning fat instead of glucose. Ketosis isn’t necessarily harmful to your health. If you don’t have diabetes and you maintain a healthy diet, it’s unlikely to be a problem. While ketosis itself isn’t particularly dangerous, it’s definitely something to keep an eye on, especially if you have diabetes. Ketosis can be a precursor to ketoacidosis, also known as diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis is a condition in which you have both high glucose and high ketone levels. Having ketoacidosis results in your blood becoming too acidic. It’s more common for those with type 1 diabetes rather than type 2. Once symptoms of ketoacidosis begin, they can escalate very quickly. Symptoms include: breath that smells fruity or like nail polish or nail polish remover rapid breat Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Treatment Of Epilepsy

Ketogenic Diet For Treatment Of Epilepsy

Go to: Description The ketogenic diet includes 80% fat, 15% protein, and 5% carbohydrate; the ratio of fat to carbohydrate plus protein ranges from 2:1 to 4:1, with higher ratios seen as more restrictive but more effective.2,3 Most of the fat in the classic, most commonly used ketogenic diet is provided as long-chain triglycerides. A variant of the classic ketogenic diet is the medium-chain triglyceride diet, which was introduced in an attempt to improve its palatability by allowing more carbohydrates yet preserving ketosis. Although it can be more ketogenic, it is less used, as it often causes gastrointestinal side effects. Several infant formulas are also available. The ketogenic diet predisposes to nutritional deficits in energy, proteins, minerals, and vitamins and excess in lipids, saturated fat, and cholesterol. Use of such an unbalanced diet requires particular attention to implementation and monitoring, particularly in children. Strict adherence to the dietary plan is required, and even small amounts of food beyond the diet or deviation in food preparation might cause considerable reduction in the efficacy of the diet. Initiation of the ketogenic diet is preceded by a 24- to 48-hour fast, with the patient being hospitalized. During the fast, the patient can drink water or sugar-free beverages and can eat unsweetened gelatin. Alternatively, Bergqvist et al have shown that a gradual initiation results in fewer adverse events and is overall better tolerated yet maintains the efficacy of the diet.4 Contraindications such as β-oxidation defects, liver disease, or metabolic disease interfering with glucose or ketone homeostasis must be excluded before initiation of the diet. Laboratory parameters of blood and urine glucose and ketones need to be monitored during fast Continue reading >>

After Been On A Keto Diet For A Month And 2 Weeks, I Took Coffee With Milk And Sugar Yesterday And Experienced A Stomach Ache, Why? How Do I Start Incorporating My Regular Meals Into A Keto Diet As I Want To Stop Keto?

After Been On A Keto Diet For A Month And 2 Weeks, I Took Coffee With Milk And Sugar Yesterday And Experienced A Stomach Ache, Why? How Do I Start Incorporating My Regular Meals Into A Keto Diet As I Want To Stop Keto?

The key is to slowly re-introduce carbs back into your diet. Two reasons: By avoiding carbs for a long period of time you may lack the digestive enzymes to break down carbs for a period of time. Thus you may experience gastrointestinal distress. If you reintroduce carbs too quickly, you may be susceptible to putting on body fat. Somewhat related to reason one, your body is not used to using carbohydrates for energy due to being in ketosis for a long period of time. This is a bit of an arbitrary number, but I would start at 50g per day and assess it from there. If you feel okay, try increasing it 15–20g per week until you reach your old maintenance level. Hello.. First of all.. what is ketosis? Or what does ketosis aim at? It's a conversion of body's dependency on glucose for energy to ketones.. now when producing glucose through its natural source ie Carbs.. carbs break down to form glucose under the action of insulin.. now incase of Ketosis.. spiking up of insulin is out of question as you no more need glucose for energy but ketones! Now.. why did you feel stomach ache? WeLL here's why.. over 2 months of restriction on glucose production and all of a sudden the Sugar that you had made a sudden spike in insulin.. which caused stomach ache.. most of my clients also complain about puking sensation and headache.. all you have to know is that it is not harmful.. 2 days of high carb meals and youre back to your normal glucose production and you won't face any problem of stomach ache then onwards.. just incase you want to continue keto and yet enjoy a high carb treat once in a blue moon.. You need to know about ALA supplement.. 600–900mg of ala will act as insulin mimicer which will avoid insulin production and hence avoid the above mentioned problems while cheat meals du Continue reading >>

Is Nutritional Ketosis Bad For A 16 Year Old?

Is Nutritional Ketosis Bad For A 16 Year Old?

I love what nutritional ketosis does for me, but I would not recommend my 16 year old self to undertake it. There are a few reasons. The biggest one is that at that age, I really didn't understand my body well at all. I had little awareness of hunger vs thirst, good pain vs bad pain from working out, and determining what my personal physical and mental limits were. Please don't misunderstand, I'm not saying "you're a silly teenager who knows nothing". Not at all! However, it is really important to be aware of yourself when undertaking any dramatic eating regimen, and having the benefit of living with yourself and making decisions for yourself for 20+ years vs 6+ years makes a huge difference in your success. It's easy to fall into bad habits on ketosis, like relying too heavily on dairy to get your fat macros (I'll just add more butter) instead of eating a balanced diet with adequate nutrients for your growing body. Will power, do you have it? Most teenagers are eating and enjoying all kinds of foods that simply aren't permissible on ketosis. Chips, pop, pizza, burritos, pasta, ice cream, and even some "healthy" snacks like carrot sticks, Gatorade, and watermelon are no-nos. You might develop an (eating) disorder because these are formative years and what you put in your mouth impacts your body and mind. It's easy to think of ketosis as a quick fix with minimal effort, and far better to develop a healthy relationship with food AND exercise to achieve your body goals. Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

There is a lot of confusion about the term ketosis among medical professionals as well as laypeople. It is important to understand when and why nutritional ketosis occurs, and why it should not be confused with the metabolic disorder we call ketoacidosis. Ketosis is a metabolic state where the liver produces small organic molecules called ketone bodies. Most cells in the body can use ketone bodies as a source of energy. When there is a limited supply of external energy sources, such as during prolonged fasting or carbohydrate restriction, ketone bodies can provide energy for most organs. In this situation, ketosis can be regarded as a reasonable, adaptive physiologic response that is essential for life, enabling us to survive periods of famine. Nutritional ketosis should not be confused with ketoacidosis, a metabolic condition where the blood becomes acidic as a result of the accumulation of ketone bodies. Ketoacidosis can have serious consequences and may need urgent medical treatment. The most common forms are diabetic ketoacidosis and alcoholic ketoacidosis. What Is Ketosis? The human body can be regarded as a biologic machine. Machines need energy to operate. Some use gasoline, others use electricity, and some use other power resources. Glucose is the primary fuel for most cells and organs in the body. To obtain energy, cells must take up glucose from the blood. Once glucose enters the cells, a series of metabolic reactions break it down into carbon dioxide and water, releasing energy in the process. The body has an ability to store excess glucose in the form of glycogen. In this way, energy can be stored for later use. Glycogen consists of long chains of glucose molecules and is primarily found in the liver and skeletal muscle. Liver glycogen stores are used to mai Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: 25 Proven Benefits And How To Know If It’s Right For You

Ketogenic Diet: 25 Proven Benefits And How To Know If It’s Right For You

The ketogenic diet has been touted for its many health benefits such as weight loss, cognitive function, neurodegenerative diseases, and cancer. In this post, we cover: Different ways to get into ketosis Physiology and pathways that are changed when you are in ketosis, which explains how the ketogenic diet derives its benefits Genetic factors that may affect the safety and effectiveness of ketosis 17 Health conditions that may be helped by the ketogenic diet Negative effects of ketosis and how to mitigate them Ketogenic Diets Improve Cognitive Function and Brain Health Ketogenic Diet as a Cancer Treatment Ketogenic diets are defined by a low carbohydrate (typically under 50 grams/day) and high fat intake, leading to an elevation of free fatty acids and ketone bodies in the blood (R). The first ketogenic diets in the medical literature are noted in publications in the 1920s, although wider popularity and increased research was not seen in medical literature until the 1960s (R). Variations of the diets have remained popular for the past 20-30 years, with proponents claiming that the diets boost weight loss and energy while offering protection from certain metabolic diseases (R). A ketogenic diet and fasting affect the body similarly. Both deplete the body’s glucose reserves, so the body starts turning fatty acids into ketones (R). When the body doesn’t have enough carbohydrates from food, it burns fat by producing ketones or ketone bodies (R, R). In non-diabetics, ketosis can be achieved in 3 ways, i.e. Fasting or severe caloric restriction (R) Prolonged physical exercise in fasted state, depending on intensity and duration (R, R2) Nutritional ketosis, i.e. by consuming a very low carbohydrate diet Supplementation, such as by supplementing with medium chain triglyceri Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

History Of The Ketogenic Diet

History Of The Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet became popular as a therapy for epilepsy in the 1920s and 30s. It was developed to provide an alternative to non-mainstream fasting, which had demonstrated success as an epilepsy therapy. However, the diet was eventually largely abandoned due to the introduction of new anticonvulsant therapies. Although it emerged that most cases of epilepsy could be effectively controlled using these medications, they still failed to achieve epileptic control in around 20% to 30% of epileptics. For these individuals, and particularly children with epilepsy, the diet was re-introduced as a technique for managing the condition. The role of fasting in the treatment of disease has been known to mankind for thousands of years and was studied in detail by ancient Greek physicians and ancient Indian physicians. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, “On the Sacred Disease,” describes how alterations in diet played a role in epilepsy management. The same author also describes in “Epidemics” from the collection, how a man was cured of epilepsy when he abstained completely from consuming food or drink. The first modern scientific study into fasting as a cure for epilepsy was conducted in France, in 1911. At the time, potassium bromide was used to treat epileptics, but this agent slowed patients’ mental capabilities.. Instead, twenty epilepsy patients followed a low-calorie, vegetarian food plan that was combined with fasting. Two patients showed significant improvements, although most could not adhere to the dietary restrictions. However, the diet was found to improve the patient’s mental abilities compared with the effects of taking potassium bromide. Also during the early 20th Century, an American called Bernarr Macfadden, popularised the idea of fasting as Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet In The Treatment Of Epilepsy

Ketogenic Diet In The Treatment Of Epilepsy

Ryan W Y Lee MD (Dr. Lee of Shriners Hospitals for Children in Honolulu and the John A Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaii has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.) Miki Wong MACO RDN (Ms. Wong of Shriners Hospitals for Children–Honolulu has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.) Barry Wolf MD PhD, editor. (Dr. Wolf of Henry Ford Hospital has no relevant financial relationships to disclose.) Key points • The ketogenic diet is a medical treatment for intractable epilepsy and should only be administered under direct medical supervision. • The ketogenic diet is an effective treatment for seizures that are refractory to antiepileptic drugs. It has been used as an earlier treatment option for infantile spasms, with some promising results. • The ketogenic diet serves as an effective treatment option regardless of seizure type, seizure syndrome, and age. • If a patient has some improvement in seizures on the ketogenic diet, but still continues to have seizures, fine-tuning the diet by adjusting the calories or the ratio may provide additional seizure control. • The ketogenic diet is not considered a “healthy” or “all-natural” therapy for seizures. The diet is very restrictive and does not provide adequate vitamins and nutrients for optimal growth. Thus, all patients on the ketogenic diet are required to take daily vitamin and mineral supplements in order to maintain optimal nutrition. • The ketogenic diet does have potential side effects, as do all treatment options for seizures. The most common side effects associated with starting the diet include nausea and vomiting. The most common side effects associated with long-term therapy on the diet include constipation and reflux. The risk of kidney stones is increased i Continue reading >>

More in ketosis