diabetestalk.net

How Is Ketosis Reversed

Could A High-fat, Low-carb Diet Someday Replace Dialysis?

Could A High-fat, Low-carb Diet Someday Replace Dialysis?

MORE A type of low-carb, high-fat diet that's typically used to manage seizures for children with epilepsy could reverse kidney disease in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics, a new animal study suggests. If successful in humans, the so-called ketogenic diet could have the potential to replace dialysis, which is a procedure that artificially filters blood in place of a damaged or failed kidney, said study researcher Charles Mobbs, professor of neuroscience and geriatrics and palliative care medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City. "I speculate that this may be useful to completely cure diabetic kidney failure , and I hope that it's possible," Mobbs told MyHealthNewsDaily. "If it's possible, we can potentially not require dialysis. That's a big deal." However, a lot more research in mice is needed before any studies can be done in humans, Mobbs said, let alone determine if the diet can reverse advanced kidney disease in humans, he said. "That's the first thing we want to establish in mice: Can we truly reset the clock? Can we completely correct the [kidney] impairments?" Mobbs said. Other experts say the finding is promising for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics with earlier-stage kidney disease, but more research must be done to provide evidence that the diet can make an impact on end-stage kidney disease , or kidney failure. Type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin (needed to move blood sugar into cells for energy) to control blood sugar levels, according to the National Institutes of Health. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body becomes resistant to insulin, leading to high blood sugar levels. Overweight and obesity, a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes, according to the N Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Nutrition

Ketogenic Nutrition

“Nutritional ketosis is an amazing tool for reversing disease processes including inflammation, diabetes type 2, autoimmunity, and even cancer growth. It is a serious medical tool which can be used to improve health while allowing the patient to be their own manager.” Dr. Toni Bark, M.D. If you haven’t heard of the ketogenic lifestyle, you probably will very soon. This diet is the most beneficial not just for weight loss, but for health and disease prevention and reversal as well. So, what is the ketogenic – or “keto” – diet? It’s fairly simple. Most people fuel their bodies with carbohydrates, sugar and (usually) too much animal protein. With keto, that fuel comes from fatty acids and ketones. 75-85% of caloric content comes from good fats. Basically, once you achieve ketosis by depleting your body of available glycogen and using macros that consist of low or no carb, average protein and high fats. This trains your body to burn fat instead of carbs. All of our cells, excluding red blood cells, have a furnace called mitochondria which can use glucose or fats to produce energy for the cell. Glucose molecules contain twice the amount of oxygen as ketones or fatty acids, they also create half the amount of energy. Therefore, using fats for energy allows more energy production with greatly reduced oxidative byproducts. For endurance athletes, ketosis allows you to have great amounts of available stored energy in the form of free fatty acids for muscle and ketones for the brain. There is no “hitting the wall” after reaching the 2000 calories of stored glycogen. No matter how many carbs one eats prior to a race, only 2000 calories of glycogen can be stored. But, in ketosis, the average slim athlete has 40,000 calories of stored fats for burning. The benefi Continue reading >>

How I Used Ketone Bodies To Help Reverse My Brain Cancer

How I Used Ketone Bodies To Help Reverse My Brain Cancer

I had stage-4 bone marrow cancer that metastasized to the brain. My brain cancer was secondary, but it what was shutting my body down quickly. I had lost over 50 pounds and was so weak I was in a wheelchair. I not only had to reverse the bone marrow cancer that was primary, I also had to quickly bring down the cancer in my brain and reverse that as well. Ketone Bodies Feed Your Brain, Not Cancer The brain needs glucose 24 hours a day to function. Since sugar feeds cancer, the brain is taking in sugar 24 hours a day and the cancer is been fed 24 hours per day. But, if you understand the brain, you will also know there is another FUEL the brain will use and prefers over sugar – it’s ketone bodies or keto acids. Ketones are what your body produces when it converts fat (as opposed to glucose) into energy. I made the switch immediately to get my body in ketosis, so the only fuel my brain was getting were ketone bodies. Normal healthy brain cells use ketones for fuel but cancer cells (because their mitochondria is damaged) cannot use ketone bodies and the cancer begins to die. I still monitor my body to make sure my sugars are low and I’m in ketosis. Toxins Destroy the Brain There are many toxins that can pass the blood brain barrier and affect the brain. You have to minimize your exposure to toxins immediately. Example: Environmental toxins, heavy metals, household products and cleaners, perfumes, colognes, lotions, etc. One of the hardest toxicities that damages your brain are artificial sweeteners, sucralose, Splenda®, Sweet N Low®, etc. Say NO to sugar-free processed foods that contain these artificial sweeteners, along with diet sodas, diet drinks or pretty much “diet” anything. You must read your labels. But then again, whole foods such as fruits, vegetables Continue reading >>

Virta Health: Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes With Ketogenic Coaching

Virta Health: Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes With Ketogenic Coaching

The just launched tech company Virta Health can help you reverse your type 2 diabetes, with the help of a ketogenic diet, a mobile app and coaching by nutritionists and doctors. It’s possible to sign up and pay cash if you’re not on an employer-sponsored health plan. The price has been a bit unclear until now, but appears to be $400 per month for the first year: diaTribe (dT): How will the individual version of Virta Health be priced? Virta Health (VH): Most of Virta’s patients come through employer-sponsored health plans, and Virta is covered for those people. For patients who come to Virta directly, we offer an out-of-pocket (cash-pay) option that costs roughly $400 per month for the first year. Virta has both monthly and yearly payment options, and also offers a patient assistance program based on the ability to pay. After you apply online, you’ll receive more information about Virta that includes pricing details, which you can review before scheduling a consultation. diaTribe: Virta Health: Reversing Type 2 Diabetes with Low-Carb Diets & Coaching More A Ketogenic Diet for Beginners How to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes Earlier The Launch of Virta Health – Reversing Type 2 Diabetes in 100 Million People? Top videos about type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Lifestyle Reversed My Depression

How The Ketogenic Lifestyle Reversed My Depression

I didn’t want to get out of bed, but I had to. I had to go to work, which, for me, on this particular day, meant walking 10 feet to my desk and opening up my laptop. The alarm on my phone had just gone off, so I knew it was 5 AM. By sheer force of will, I got out of bed and started my day. The previous day was the same as the one before it and the one before it and so on. But the tedium wasn’t the worst of it, the worst of it was that I had spent all of the previous day (and countless ones before it) angry, sad, and frustrated. And I knew that this day was going to be the same. I didn’t enjoy life. I didn’t enjoy anything. I didn’t know it at that moment, but in a little while, I would realize that I was depressed. And I had been depressed for a while. My job wasn’t particularly stressful, but it was unchallenging enough to make me dread it. I was also coming off a failed business start, one that I had spent way too many hours on over the past 10 months, so I was feeling like a particularly huge failure. I don’t know what was different about that day, but a couple of hours after I started work, I came to an emotional crossroads. Sitting there, I decided I had two choices, I could either give up or I could change something. I couldn’t give up, because I had a family to support. So I really only had one choice, and that was to change something. Sitting there, at my desk, with my head resting in my hands, I decided…and this may sound odd to someone who can’t relate, but I decided to change the most immediate and fundamental thing I could. I was going to change what I eat, and I was going to get back to being ketogenic. I had tried the ketogenic lifestyle before, but without any real determination or discipline. I decided that day that I was going to go Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

How A Thin Diabetic Reversed Her Type 2 Diabetes

I received a letter from reader Sarah, who has successfully used low-carbohydrate high-fat diets and intermittent fasting to reverse her type 2 diabetes. Interestingly, she is not particularly overweight as measured by body mass index, yet still suffered from T2D. At her heaviest, she only had a BMI of 24.9, which puts her in the ‘normal’ range. She writes: The letter I immigrated to US from P.R. China in the end of 1998 when I was 31 years old; I weighed about 55 kg (121 lbs). While I was in China, I lived thousands of miles away from my family, so I had sort of an intermittent fasting life style from age 19 to 31 years old. The meals in China were mostly vegetables and very little protein. I had an annual physical check up every year, but was never told of any abnormal blood results. After I immigrated to the U.S., my lifestyle suddenly changed from one meal per day to three meals consisting of mainly grains with little fat and protein. I gained about 25 pounds (11 kg) in a couple of years, my weight did not continue going up. My heaviest was about 145 pounds (66 kg). When I was diagnosed with diabetes in Dec 2004: Weight: 142 pounds (64 kg) Height: 5 feet 4 inches (163 cm) HbA1c: 9.4 FG: 214 I was told to exercise, so I started yoga shortly after my diagnose. I lost about 10 pounds (5 kg) and 2 inches (5 cm) from my waist but still required metformin. In the spring of 2005, I relocated to Galveston from Houston because of my work as an engineer. My endocrinologist sent me to a nutritionist who measured my after meal glucose in her office, it was near 200 mg/dl (11.1 mmol/l) three hours after lunch which was only one low-fat pita bread. I was devastated, my previous family doctor always told me that if I exercise daily, my blood sugar will come down to normal, so Continue reading >>

Vascular Plaque Reduction With Ketogenic Diet – A Case Study

Vascular Plaque Reduction With Ketogenic Diet – A Case Study

Does your diet really reverse vascular disease? I mean, will the diet you’re following ACTUALLY reverse the plaque burden that has occurred over the years of eating the SAD diet (Standard American Diet)? It appears that the ketogenic diet does. At least that’s what research is showing, and that’s what I am seeing clinically. Let me give you an example. Reversal of vascular disease is what I saw last week in this patient case study in my office. Meet “Mrs. Plaque” (name has been changed to protect her identity). She is a very pleasant 78 year old female who has been seeing me as a patient for the last 10 years. We identified worsening cholesterol and hyperinsulinemia in this patient a few years ago, and last year, she finally decided to go on a ketogenic diet after we noted slight worsening blood sugar (HbA1c increased to 6.1%), worsening cholesterol and a recent TIA (transient ischemic attack or “mini stroke”). We identified a 44% blockage in her left internal carotid artery and a 21% blockage in the right internal carotid artery putting her at risk for further cerebral ischemic events like a stroke and/or other vascular events like a possible heart attack down the road. She refused STATIN therapy as she had previous myalgia and side effects with their use in the past. Past Medical History: Hyperlipidemia, Impaired Fasting Glucose (Pre-Diabetes),.Asthma, GERD, Irritable Bowel, Generalized Anxiety, Idiopathic Peripheral Neuropathy, Surgical Menopause (Hysterectomy) with Secondary Atrophic Vaginitis, Recent TIA, Cataracts, Appendectomy Medications: Plavix 75mg one daily, Premarin Cream 0.635mg every other day, Xanax 0.5mg at bedtime for anxiety, Lyrica 50mg one nightly for neuropathy, Vitamin D 2000 IU daily , TUMS 750mg twice a day. Her carotid ultrasound a Continue reading >>

Discover The Best Diet To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes!

Discover The Best Diet To Reverse Type 2 Diabetes!

In my last post on best foods that fight diabetes, we looked at 4 foods which had the scientific evidence to show that they had the innate properties to increase insulin sensitivity and lower blood glucose levels. Today we are going to look at what is probably the best diet to reverse Type 2 diabetes. For folks who don’t have diabetes, eating such foods will definitely help in preventing Type 2 diabetes, along with a healthy diet that is devoid of refined carbs and sugar. However, for those who already have Type 2 diabetes, having a relatively healthy diet as described above and eating foods that control diabetes is not enough; they can only control their diabetes because once diagnosed with the condition there is little that can be done to reverse the condition, so says the medical community. This means that diabetics will always need to take medication to get their blood sugar levels down to normal. But this in itself comes with a host of issues because all drugs have side effects, some of which can be serious. Side Effects of Diabetes Medications Take Metformin for instance, it’s one of the most common drugs prescribed for Type 2 diabetes patients. The side effects range from having a metallic taste in the mouth to lactic acidosis, which is essentially lactic acid building up in the bloodstream faster than it can be removed. This is just 1 medication; depending on how serious the diabetes is, more medications may be added – which translates to more adverse effects. And diabetes medications do not cure or reverse the condition. If the diabetes isn’t reversed, folks with the condition will always face the risks of hypoglycemia i.e. very low blood sugar and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) i.e. very high blood sugar in the short-term and dia Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Researchers have found that by administering a low-carb, high-fat diet in mice, that diabetic kidney damage was reversed, and also uncovered an array of genes associated with kidney failure. Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have for the first time determined that the ketogenic diet, a specialized high-fat, low carbohydrate diet, may reverse impaired kidney function in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. They also identified a previously unreported panel of genes associated with diabetes-related kidney damage, whose changes in expression were reversed by the diet. The findings were published online in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE. Charles Mobbs, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience and Geriatrics and Palliative Care Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and his research team evaluated mice that were genetically predisposed to have Type 1 or 2 diabetes. The mice were allowed to develop diabetic nephropathy, or kidney damage. Half of the mice were put on the ketogenic diet, while the control group maintained a standard high carbohydrate diet. The researchers found that after eight weeks, molecular and functional indicators of kidney damage were reversed in the mice on the ketogenic diet. Microscopic analysis showed that kidney pathology in the model of Type 2 diabetes was partially reversed. "Our study is the first to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes," said Dr. Mobbs. "This finding has significant implications for the tens of thousands of Americans diagnosed with diabetic kidney failure, and possibly other complications, each year." The ketogenic diet is a low-carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high-fat diet typically used to control seizures in children with epilepsy. Many cells can get their e Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Ketogenic Diet: Is The Ultimate Low-carb Diet Good For You?

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is it safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss. What is a ketogenic diet? In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones. Because it lacks carbohydrates, a ketogenic diet is rich in proteins and fats. It typically includes plenty of meats, eggs, processed meats, sausages, cheeses, fish, nuts, butter, oils, seeds, and fibrous vegetables. Because it is so restrictive, it is really hard to follow over the long run. Carbohydrates normally account for at least 50% of the typical American diet. One of the main criticisms of this diet is that many people tend to eat too much protein and Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes

The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication. Cutting through the Fat: What is Diabetes? Before we get to research, we need to review some basic medical terminology. Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases in which the body has elevated blood levels its main energy source: a sugar called glucose. There are two reasons why this occurs. In some people, there is insufficient production of a chemical called insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lower levels of glucose in the blood. People who suffer from low insulin levels have type I diabetes and they comprise approximately 5 to 10% of all diabetics. [1] Type I diabetes is usually inherited and type I diabetics usually have to inject insulin to maintain proper levels of blood glucose. The other 90% to 95% of people with diabetes are type II diabetics. [1] In this version, the body doesn’t produce enough insulin for proper function or cells in the body do not react to insulin and take in sugar from the blood. Type 2 diabetes is not inherited. However, lifestyle factors such as high body weight, poor exercise and eating habits all increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. [2] It can be managed by improving dietary and lifestyle habits and also using proper medication. [2] Diabetes results in a higher concentration of s Continue reading >>

How To Come Off Of A Fat Loss Or Ketogenic Diet Correctly

How To Come Off Of A Fat Loss Or Ketogenic Diet Correctly

Diets by definition are temporary. This is what gets a lot of people in trouble because there is a defined time frame of when they monitor their caloric intake, and once that time period is up it’s easy to undo all the progress one made in just a few short weeks by returning to old eating habits. So while an individual reaches adequate levels of weight and fat loss during their diet, they can quickly gain back all the weight and fat they lost initially if not more. This leads to a false sense of morality tied into people’s nutrition and outrageous claims of people blaming their genetics for their body composition because “I’ve tried every diet and nothing works for me.” Well…I am here to tell you that you don’t have to fall into this viscous cycle as long as you know how to properly come off of either a fat loss or ketogenic diet. REVERSE DIETING. Boom – two key words is all it takes. Reverse dieting means there is a strategic and slow increase of either calories or specific macronutrients back into one’s every day nutrition versus an all-out binge returning to eating whatever anyone wants because “they earned it” – this will LIMIT (not eliminate) fat gain as you add calories back into the mix (because let’s face it – NO ONE wants to be in a caloric deficit year round!). So yes, calorie or macronutrient (i.e. protein, fat, carbs) counting must continue. Fail to take this phase of your diet into account and your scale numbers will skyrocket before you can think twice. So….hopefully you have followed a proper diet protocol meaning you didn’t start your diet at an absurdly low calorie count with high workload. Like your weight training, diets should be progressive – meaning the longer your diet goes you SLOWLY lower your food intake (keep Continue reading >>

Ketosis Symptoms

Ketosis Symptoms

Note: Ketosis and its symptoms are often confused with diabetic ketoacidosis. However, diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition, where a severe deficiency of insulin, leads to a toxic buildup of blood glucose, accompanied by excessive breakdown of fat and muscle tissues. However, such alarming levels of ketone bodies are not usually seen in healthy individuals. Our body produces energy from the glucose we get from the consumed carbohydrates. But when glucose is not available, the liver produces ketone bodies to provide the body with the required energy. Although ketones are always present in the body, their levels can rise during a period of prolonged fasting. This condition is called ketosis. The most common cause of ketosis is following a low-carb diet. When one switches over from a high-glycemic diet to a low-glycemic diet, their body enters into a stage of ketosis. The body does not immediately start producing ketones, but if carbohydrates are not included in the diet for a long time, say two days or more, the body starts utilizing the energy from its fat stores. The glucose is thus preserved only for dire conditions like preventing protein and muscle breakdown. The initial stage of ketosis is considered relatively harmless. In fact, ketosis has also been deliberately induced through a ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy. However, prolonged ketosis is harmful for the body and is highly discouraged. Symptoms The most common symptoms of ketosis include: Fatigue Dizziness Headache Excessive thirst Nausea accompanied by abdominal pain Problems with sleeping Bad breath Cold hands and feet Metallic, sweet, or fruity taste in the mouth Strong smelling urine Loss of appetite Temporary sense of euphoria Diagnosis A confirmatory urine test can be done to see whether Continue reading >>

Ketosis… The Cure For Diabetes?

Ketosis… The Cure For Diabetes?

A reduced insulin load diet will lead to normalised blood sugars and improved insulin sensitivity. A reduced insulin load diet can be achieved by reducing carbohydrates, moderating protein and choosing higher fibre foods. Intermittent fasting also reduces insulin load. Measuring your blood sugars is a simple and cost effective way to check that your metabolic health is on track. A diet of nutrient dense, high fibre, high fat foods is the best way to optimise nutrition and minimise the risks associated with diabetes. how to become diabetic… In the “good old days” there were periods of feast and famine. Food was typically eaten with the fibrous packing that it came with. In today’s modern food environment we are encouraged by the food industry (and those sponsored by it) to eat breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, pre-workout meals, post workout stacks, sports gels during exercise, and maybe some Gatorade to speed recovery. Today’s food is plentiful, typically highly processed and low in fibre. Carbohydrate and sugar based foods have a long shelf life, can be transported long distances and therefore cheap. Win, win? Maybe not. As we keep loading our bodies with simple sugars and carbohydrates our pancreas has to work overtime to produce insulin to shuttle excess sugar from the blood to your fat stores. Over time we become insulin resistant and the pancreas can’t keep up. Once your blood sugars get high enough you will be diagnosed with “type 2 diabetes” and put on medication to improve your insulin sensitivity, for a time. If nothing changes in your food intake your insulin sensitivity will continue to deteriorate until you reach a point when you’ll need to inject insulin to keep your blood sugars down. Injecting excessive amounts of insulin will cause you Continue reading >>

More in ketosis