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How Is Ketosis Prevented

Carbohydrates And The Ketogenic Program

Carbohydrates And The Ketogenic Program

A low-carb diet will lead the body to break down fats in order to produce ketones, which will be used as fuel. The boost in ketone production is called ketosis, and this is a state wherein the body adapts as the dieter finally eliminates the carbs in his or her system. The transition to ketosis is the main reason why a ketogenic or low-carb diet works. Although traditionally we have been advised to consume sufficient carbohydrates to avoid ketosis, the growing body of scientific evidence is showing that that may not be the healthiest diet choice. So, let’s be really clear, there is nothing detrimental about ketosis. Forget about this misrepresentation so that you can make sound weight-loss decisions. Ketosis vs Ketoacidosis Ketosis is sometimes confused with an unrelated condition called ketoacidosis, which can be dangerous to your health. Ketosis is a normal state where the body uses fat as energy, while ketoacidosis is a condition that is linked to type 1 diabetes. A majority of individuals on low-carb diets can endure ketosis without any issues. Following weight loss, carbohydrate intake may increased a little. So the decision to remain in ketosis or not is dependent on your weight loss and health goals. In many instances the health benefits of a keto diet really out ways the benefit of weight loss. Although they obviously go hand in hand. Ketosis Flu You also might be cautious of ketosis due to a condition called “ketosis flu,” but this is not actually flu. In the first few days of the diet, some may have headaches, fatigue, nausea and constipation. You do not have to worry though, as it is only temporary—ketosis flu will only last for a few days. This happens because the body begins to adjust to the reduction of carbs. Ketosis flu is brought about by the lo Continue reading >>

Dr. Gonzalez Dismantles The Ketogenic Diet For Cancer [13 Mins.]

Dr. Gonzalez Dismantles The Ketogenic Diet For Cancer [13 Mins.]

In early 2012, I started to see some chatter online about the ketogenic diet as a potential anti-cancer diet. I’ve understood for many years that different diets work for different people, and I was intrigued by the ketogenic diet for cancer. Could this be another possible dietary strategy to heal cancer? So naturally I shared information about it on this site, thinking it might be a viable option for some. At that time there were no other sites (at least none as large as this one) talking about the ketogenic diet and how it may help cancer patients. In 2013, awareness of the keto diet exploded. This was mostly due to Dr. Mercola’s articles, interviews, and endorsement. Since then, many others have jumped on the bandwagon. And at first glance, there is a compelling hypothesis which presents the ketogenic diet as a method to starve cancer cells of their primary fuel, glucose, thus killing the cancer. Despite the zealous promoters of it, some of whom I have great respect for, my opinion of the ketogenic diet has changed. What caused my change of heart in promoting the ketogenic diet for cancer patients? It started with several long phone conversations and email exchanges I had with cancer healing expert friend who was adamant that the ketogenic diet did not work in healing cancer long term. This coincided with the recurrence of cancer in someone I knew who was promoting the ketogenic diet (as effective). It appeared to have some positive short term results for some people (shrinking or slowing down tumors), but I was beginning to have some doubts about it working long term. This uneasiness persisted for many months and I could not shake it. So I finally made the decision to take down my very popular post and youtube video about it. Then came the coup de grace from Dr. Continue reading >>

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

A lot of people are confused by the term “ketosis.” You may read that it is a “dangerous state” for the body, and it does sound abnormal to be “in ketosis.” But ketosis merely means that our bodies are using fat for energy. Ketones (also called ketone bodies) are molecules generated during fat metabolism, whether from the fat in the almonds you just ate or fat you were carrying around your middle. When our bodies are breaking down fat for energy, most of it gets converted to energy, but ketones are also produced as part of the process. When people eat less carbohydrates, their bodies turn to fat for energy, so it makes sense that more ketones are generated. Some of those ketones (acetoacetate and ß-hydroxybutyrate) are used for energy; the heart muscle and kidneys, for example, prefer ketones to glucose. Most cells, including the brain cells, are able to use ketones for at least part of their energy. Is ketosis a bad thing? There is an assumption that if a body is burning a lot of fat for energy, it must not be getting “enough” glucose. However, there is no indication, from studying people on reduced carbohydrate diets, that this is the case (though there is usually a short period of adjustment, less than a week, in most cases). It takes about 72 hours to burn up all of the reserve glycogen (sugar loads). Although it’s true that our bodies can’t break fat down directly into glucose (though, interestingly, they easily use glucose to make fat), our bodies can convert some of the protein we eat into glucose. Indeed, this works well for people who don’t tolerate a lot of sugar, because this conversion happens slowly so it doesn’t spike blood glucose. What is the danger of ketosis? It is important that if you are following a ketogenic nutritional pro Continue reading >>

Cancer & Alzheimer’s May Be Prevented By Doing This

Cancer & Alzheimer’s May Be Prevented By Doing This

The top killers in America are heart disease, obesity, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease. Want to know something interesting? All of these diseases are linked to insulin and leptin resistance. To put it more simply: there is an underlying problem that is caused by eating too many carbs and/or protein. Processed foods and grains, which Americans consume like they’re going out of style, are loaded with sugars. By eating all of these sugars, the body develops a resistance to leptin and insulin, and that makes the body hold on to fat. Additionally, this resistance can trigger inflammation and cellular damage. How can you fix this? It may be time to have your body enter into nutritional ketosis. This means that your body starts burning fat instead of glucose (sugar). As more research has surfaced, studies indicate that a ketogenic diet could be the answer for many health problems, including cancer, heart disease, obesity, diabetes, and Alzheimer’s. A ketogenic diet is a very low carb diet that primarily consists of healthy fats, omega-3 fatty acids, and omega-9 fatty acids. You can get most of these from foods like sprouted nuts and seeds, avocados, coconut oil, or olive oil, in addition to many others. The goal with this diet is to eliminate glucose entirely, except from whole fruits and vegetables, so that your body begins burning fat for energy. The body only burns fat for energy once glucose is no longer available. Not only does this aid optimal health, but it helps you lose weight more efficiently, considering that your body is constantly burning fat for energy. There are certain people who should not jump right into a ketogenic diet. If you are a diabetic on medication, take medication for high blood pressure, or are breastfeeding, there are certain extra measures Continue reading >>

Alzheimer's

Alzheimer's

Considered a disease of aging, Alzheimer's is typically diagnosed after 65 but can be diagnosed much earlier. It is expected to affect one in 85 people globally by 2050. Aging itself can cause a natural degeneration of neurons (nerve cells in the brain) and the circuitry between neurons. Aging mice were able to navigate mazes and recognize objects better while on a ketogenic diet compared to a control group of mice on a regular diet. Another animal study showed that ketogenic diet fed to brain-injured juvenile mice protected neurons from damage and even allowed them to regenerate. The effectiveness of ketogenic therapy for epilepsy has been proven in many clinical studies. Although we still do not understand how it works to control seizures, there is compelling evidence that many neurological conditions are linked—people with Alzheimer’s disease, for example, have a higher incidence of seizures. Seizures are common in people with diseases with metabolic defects, and studies show that dietary intervention is the most effective treatment. Doctors agree that physical exercise, social and mental activity and a healthy diet maximize brain health in the face of Alzheimer's disease. So what constitutes a healthy diet for someone with or at risk for Alzheimer's? According to the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, avoiding saturated fats and eating a diet rich in carbohydrate from vegetables, legumes, whole grains and fruit are key recommendations to prevent Alzheimer’s disease. Similarly, the current federal dietary guidelines for American adults recommends “fruits, vegetables, whole grains, fat-free and low-fat dairy products, and seafood” and discourages “solid fats.” These recommendations are the opposite of ketogenic diets, which rely on fat as the Continue reading >>

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

The Top 10 Ketosis Mistakes And How To Prevent Them

What mistakes are you making when it comes to your health? I know I’ve been making plenty. That’s why I’m tracking my data in this recent ketosis experiment that I’m doing. What about you? Most people think that the ketogenic diet is just “low-carb” which leads them to make many mistakes that prevent them from not reaping all of the benefits of ketosis that they could. What benefits? How about an improved immune system, increased longevity, lower inflammation, effortless weight loss, decreased hunger, reduced risk for disease and more. Read on to know the top 10 ways that people make mistakes with ketosis and how you can prevent them. 1: Not tracking protein intake By far the biggest problem with a ketogenic diet is not tracking how much protein you are eating. The far majority of people are simply eating too much lean protein, which ends up kicking them out of ketosis. Protein can turn into carbs by a metabolic process called gluconeogenesis, meaning “making new carbs.” This then spikes insulin, and reduces ketone levels. Even though you are eating super low carb, this could make your body switch back and forth between energy systems, which will lead to high levels of fatigue or “low carb flu.” The easiest way to avoid this mistake is by tracking your ketone levels to see how you respond to different amounts and different types of meat. Everyone is different, so the only way you can tell is by tracking. I “listened to my body” before and it didn’t work. I wasn’t in ketosis when I thought I was. I also thought ketosis kind of sucked. It didn’t, I was just wrong. The only way you know is by tracking. If you consume more fat with protein, it will slow this effect. So think fattier cuts of meat, and less muscle meat. But wait, are you going to Continue reading >>

Dr. Oz: Ketogenic Diet Boosts Weight Loss, Can Prevent Cancer And Alzheimer’s

Dr. Oz: Ketogenic Diet Boosts Weight Loss, Can Prevent Cancer And Alzheimer’s

Dr. Mehmet Oz said the low carb, high-fat ketogenic diet can accelerate weight loss, boost fat-burning, enhance brain power, and prevent diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s on the May 18 episode of the Dr. Oz Show. Dr. Oz’s guest was celebrity fitness expert Drew Manning, who said the ketogenic diet fuels weight loss by forcing the body to burn stored fat for fuel through a metabolic state called ketosis. In 2012, Manning intentionally gained 70 pounds to empathize with his obese clients, as Examiner has reported. Drew then lost all the weight with a ketogenic diet and now has the rippling six-pack abs he had before his weight gain. The ketogenic diet was first used to treat epileptic seizures in children in the 1920s and was later used to manage diabetes before the invention of injectable insulin. The ketogenic diet — which is a low carb high-fat, moderate-protein diet — was first popularized as a weight loss tool in the 1970s, when Dr. Robert Atkins (creator of the Atkins diet) put it on the map. Many celebrities, including Kim Kardashian and LeBron James, have recently used a high-fat, ketogenic-style diet to lose weight. While dietary fat has been demonized for the past 40 years as the cause of obesity and heart disease, scientists now say eating fat does not make you fat. The seismic shift in the health community’s attitudes about dietary fat was spotlighted in the June 2014 issue of Time magazine, which reversed its 40-year stance against saturated fat, as Examiner has reported. Since then, a growing body of scientific research suggests ketogenic-style diets are better than low-fat diets for weight loss and disease prevention. In addition to aiding weight loss, studies show the ketogenic diet can reverse type 2 diabetes and prevent Alzheimer’s beca Continue reading >>

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

Will I Lose Muscle On A Ketogenic Diet?

The ability to simultaneously gain muscle and lose fat is a rather controversial topic amongst those in the fitness industry; however, this seems to be the desired goal of anyone looking to optimize body composition. One of the biggest conundrums we face is that in order to shed body fat, we tend to cut calories so much that we lose muscle mass, and in order to build muscle mass, we tend to bring along some fat gain for the ride. These changes in body composition can happen for a number of different reasons, a few of which we will touch on in this article. In any case, the evidence is clear that a properly implemented ketogenic diet exhibits a protein sparing effect, which may allow one dieting to preserve more muscle mass than if he/she hadn’t been ketogenic. This means that we can ideally shed off that pesky lower abdominal fat, all the while keeping those prized muscles we have worked so hard to build. In this article we are going to discuss some of the mechanisms of fat loss and muscle maintenance on a ketogenic diet and why a ketogenic diet may be more ideal for attaining these goals than a traditional low fat diet. One particular piece of dietary advice that people tend to give is the “calories in, calories out,” hypothesis which indicates that it doesn’t matter what you eat or how you eat it, just as long as you eat less than you expend. This is true to a certain degree, but far too often we tend to simplify what both of those equations mean without taking into account other variables (e.g. fiber, thermogenic effect of protein, brown adipose tissue, etc.). If you put yourself in a caloric deficit, it is likely that you will experience weight loss; however, it is possible that some of this weight loss will not come strictly from body fat, and that some of Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic diets have become incredibly popular. Early research suggests this high-fat, very low-carb diet may benefit several health conditions. Although some of the evidence is from case studies and animal research, results from human controlled studies are also promising. Here are 15 health conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet. Epilepsy is a disease that causes seizures due to excessive brain activity. Anti-seizure medications are effective for some people with epilepsy. However, others don't respond to the drugs or can't tolerate their side effects. Of all the conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet, epilepsy has by far the most evidence supporting it. In fact, there are several dozen studies on the topic. Research shows that seizures typically improve in about 50% of epilepsy patients who follow the classic ketogenic diet. This is also known as a 4:1 ketogenic diet because it provides 4 times as much fat as protein and carbs combined (1, 2, 3). The modified Atkins diet (MAD) is based on a considerably less restrictive 1:1 ratio of fat to protein and carbs. It has been shown to be equally effective for seizure control in most adults and children older than two years of age (4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The ketogenic diet may also have benefits on the brain beyond seizure control. For example, when researchers examined the brain activity of children with epilepsy, they found improvements in various brain patterns in 65% of those following a ketogenic diet — regardless of whether they had fewer seizures (9). Ketogenic diets have been shown to reduce seizure frequency and severity in many children and adults with epilepsy who don't respond well to drug therapy. Metabolic syndrome, sometimes referred to as prediabetes, is characterized by insulin resistance. Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis, put simply, is when your body breaks down fat for energy. Ketosis is a preferred metabolic state for a number of reasons. First and foremost, people prefer ketosis for what some might consider superficial reasons. Burning fat leans out the body while preserving muscle mass. This is probably why so many professional athletes are increasingly going ketogenic. But ketosis is good for a lot more than simply looks or sports performance. The same reason it leans you out (lower blood sugar) also makes it preventative of major diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and many cancers. “Many chronic disease states can be improved or prevented by a well formulated ketogenic diet,” says Dominic D’Agostino, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of South Florida. But how do you get into ketosis? There are several approaches, and the most obvious, fasting, is said to be the most difficult. The principle is simple: When you stop eating, you’ll eventually start burning fat for energy. But for many people, even the thought of going without food is too much to bear. Another proven approach is eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet (LCHF). For decades, doctors have used high-fat diets to help treat epilepsy in children. But because our foodscape has so dramatically shifted over the last 50 years with sugar and refined carbohydrates at the center of most meals, high-fat diets are challenging to maintain. Today, the easiest way to experiment with ketosis is with supplements like KetoLogic BHB or KetoLogic Meal Replacement, which help elevate ketones to boost energy and concentration. Plus, they taste great. While KetoLogic products are a convenient source of energy for those on a low-carb diet, KetoLogic BHB is also a great-tasting product to boost your ketones, h Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis Diet May Be Key For Optimal Health

Nutritional Ketosis Diet May Be Key For Optimal Health

Metabolic dysfunction has gained a lot of attention in recent years, as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and Alzeimer’s continue to wreak havoc on human health. But what is the connection? An unhealthy diet — one rooted in excess sugars from processed foods and grains — is creating insulin and leptin resistance. Once such resistances are developed, the body holds onto fat, builds up inflammation, and suffers cellular damage. Weight and chronic health issues have become pressing concerns, but a life of discomfort, pain, and synthetic medications doesn’t have to be a reality. Could it be that you can set yourself free from such ailments and live a healthier life by optimizing your metabolic and mitochondrial function through proper food choices? Let’s explore. What Is Nutritional Ketosis? Nutritional ketosis is a state of health whereby the body is efficiently burning fat as its primary fuel source rather than glucose. A ketogenic diet involves eating a healthy high-fat, low-carb, and low- to moderate-protein diet. There is much research on the benefits of such a diet, including a two-week carefully controlled inpatient study, which found that a ketogenic diet could help control weight and blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. Entering Nutritional Ketosis The word “diet” can be extremely intimidating to people, as it suggests every food you love, and every way in which you live your life, must suddenly be uprooted. Instilling fear in becoming healthier is a great way to keep you from beginning lifestyle changes at all. However, if you take things slowly, you can gradually train your body to make important shifts rather than shock it — and your mind — into submission. To begin training your body to use fat for fuel, you must remove m Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

What is the ketogenic diet? The "classic" ketogenic diet is a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy. It is prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. It is usually used in children with seizures that do not respond to medications. It is stricter than the modified Atkins diet, requiring careful measurements of calories, fluids, and proteins. Foods are weighed and measured. The name ketogenic means that it produces ketones in the body. (keto = ketone; genic = producing) Ketones are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Usually the body uses carbohydrates (such as sugar, bread, pasta) for its fuel. Because the ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates, fats become the primary fuel instead. The body can work very well on ketones (and fats). Ketones are not dangerous. They can be detected in the urine, blood, and breath. Ketones are one of the more likely mechanisms of action of the diet, with higher ketone levels often leading to improved seizure control. However, there are many other theories for why the diet will work. Who will it help? Doctors usually recommend the ketogenic diet for children whose seizures have not responded to several different seizure medicines. The classic diet is usually not recommended for adults, mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow. However, the modified Atkins diet does work well. This also should be done with a good team of adult neurologists and dietitians. The ketogenic diet has been shown in many studies to be particularly helpful for some epilepsy conditions. These include infantile spasms, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, and GLUT-1 deficiency. Using a formula-only Continue reading >>

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

How Many Carbs Should I Eat To Prevent Ketosis?

When you’re on a low-carb diet, your body kicks into action, breaking down fats into ketone bodies to use for energy. This increase in ketones -- called ketosis -- is a normal adaptation to cutting carbs. In fact, the switch to ketosis is why low-carb diets work. Even though you could eat enough carbs to prevent ketosis, it's important to clarify why you want to avoid it. There's nothing unhealthy about ketosis, so you may just need to correct any misinformation to make the best decision for your weight-loss goals. Video of the Day Deal With Concerns Over Ketosis Ketosis is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is unfortunate -- ketosis is normal, while ketoacidosis is a dangerous condition related to type 1 diabetes. Most people on a low-carb diet tolerate ketosis without any problems. Then after the pounds are dropped, carb intake is gradually increased so you're out of ketosis by the time you reach the maintenance phase. If you decide to stay in an induction phase longer than the low-carb plan recommends, consult your doctor to be safe. People with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing ketoacidosis from lack of insulin. Due to the complex metabolism of diabetes, they end up with high levels of blood glucose and ketones, which upsets the body's normal acid-base balance. When that happens, ketosis becomes ketoacidosis, causing symptoms like thirst, frequent urination, dry mouth, nausea, belly pain, rapid breathing and fruity-smelling breath. If you have symptoms, contact your doctor immediately -- diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency. You may be wary about ketosis because you've heard about "ketosis flu." It's not really flu, but in the first few days or weeks of a low-carb diet, some people experience headaches, dizziness, fatigue, constipation or wea Continue reading >>

A Comprehensive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

A Comprehensive Guide To The Ketogenic Diet

If you’re wondering if the ketogenic diet is the best for weight loss, burning fat, building muscle, and increasing your health then this article is for you. The ketogenic diet is based on the concept of ketosis. Ketosis takes place when your body switches from relying mostly on glucose from carbohydrate for its energy to relying on ketones. Ketones are basically fatty energy molecules that are produced by the liver from fat under certain circumstances such as starving, fasting and very low carbohydrate consumption. In fact, the main premise of the ketogenic diet is high-fat and incredibly low-carb. It is designed solely to put your body into the metabolic state of ketosis. It is not a caloric starvation diet. It is carbohydrate starvation diet. Without getting too much into the history, it was initially introduced back in the early 1920’s by a guy by the name of Dr. Henry Geyelin as a treatment for epilepsy. What physicians and scientists had noticed since the beginning of time was that fasting actually prevented epileptic seizures. Fasting was shown to prevent inflammation in the brain, one of the primary causes of epilepsy. Anyway, along comes Dr. Geyelin and he wonders if it can be accomplished without fasting. Low and behold he discovered that restricting carbs and forcing the body into a state of ketosis actually accomplished the similar effect. Later scientists and physicians build upon his work and began to devise macro (protein, carbohydrate, fat) percentages. It was actually a guy by the name of Russel Wilder who worked for the Mayo Clinic who later coined the term ketogenic diet. Wilder’s colleague Mynie Peterman came up with the macro ratios of 1 gram of protein per kilogram of bodyweight, 10-15 grams of carbohydrate and the rest as fat. This is the ba Continue reading >>

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