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How Is Ketosis Prevented

Can Overeating Prevent Ketosis?

Can Overeating Prevent Ketosis?

I am trying to get into ketosis and am finding it very difficult I think because I am having microbinges at almost every meal (I have a long history of doing this). Is it possible that eating too much, even if it's spoonfuls of ghee, would prevent me from entering ketosis because of blood sugar spikes or something? also, does anyone have info on damage I could be doing to my body just from overeating...like is it stressing my body out to be in this constant overfed state? I am 5'4 112lbs and currently (over)eating at about 2000-2500cal/day, walking is my only exercise, and I have gained 5lbs in the past couple months since being more strict about eating a clean Paleo diet. I consume between 20-35g carbs/day and 35-60g protein, the rest is fat. Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Alzheimer’s?

There are always brand new diets promising unprecedented results and life-changing health. Some of them turn out to be really good, and some are later proved to be very unhealthy. It can be hard to know what to believe. But the ketogenic diet has been around a long time and has promising results. A ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, and low-carbohydrate diet aimed at achieving the highest functioning mind and body possible. Studies show a ketogenic diet can slow and even reverse symptoms of memory loss and cognitive impairment throughout all the dementia stages. So what exactly is a ketogenic diet? As said above, it’s a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carb diet that produces ketones – compounds the body can use to produce energy. In many studies ketones have been found to be neuroprotective, meaning they defend your brain from degenerating. In other words, a ketogenic diet is a great way to reverse Alzheimer’s or dementia naturally. As research shows, there is a strong link between blood sugar disorders and various stages of dementia, including memory loss and Alzheimer’s. The link between insulin resistance and diabetes is so high that Alzheimer’s has sometimes been called “type 3 diabetes”. The human body wasn’t designed to consume a diet so full of sweets, starchy foods, breads, and pastas. Underlying the accumulation of excessive body fat is a far more dangerous situation: the degeneration of our brains, which leads to memory loss, dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease. Because glucose and insulin mechanisms in the brain are so impaired by the time one enters into the dementia stages, a ketogenic diet can be a great natural cure for Alzheimer’s as it can slow or even reverse symptoms. This is because the brain is now burning ketones for Continue reading >>

Minimizing The Risk For Ketosis In Dairy Herds

Minimizing The Risk For Ketosis In Dairy Herds

En Español: Minimizando el Riesgo de Cetosis en el Ganado Lechero This article is part of our series of original articles on emerging featured topics. Please check here to see other articles in this series. Introduction Although most cases of ketosis occur in fresh dairy cows, feeding practices and cow health prepartum can predispose cows to experiencing ketosis after calving. Most cases of primary ketosis occur within the first 2 weeks of calving, and even most secondary ketosis (occurring after the onset of another disease) occurs within the first 30 to 60 days in milk. In general, less than 5% of the cows in a herd should experience clinical ketosis. However, some reports have indicated that the incidence of subclinical ketosis may affect 40% of cows, with the incidence rate varying widely among farms, and may be as high as 80% on individual farms. The major focus prepartum to reduce the risk for ketosis after calving is maintaining feed intake in late gestation and avoiding overconditioning cows during late lactation and the dry period. Cows should dry off and freshen at a body condition score (BCS) of 3.5. Cows with a BCS equal to or greater than 4.0 will likely have lower intake prepartum and be at higher risk for fatty liver and ketosis at and after calving. Recent work at the University of Minnesota indicates that cows with a BCS greater than 3.5 and producing over 16 lb of colostrum are at a higher risk for ketosis. Feeding programs for far-off and close-up cows should be designed to maintain intake during late gestation, i.e., minimizing the drop in intake during the last week of gestation, to reduce the risk for ketosis after calving. These prepartum diets should contain high-fiber forages and provide adequate but not excessive amounts of energy. A 20% or gr Continue reading >>

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

15 Health Conditions That May Benefit From A Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic diets have become incredibly popular. Early research suggests this high-fat, very low-carb diet may benefit several health conditions. Although some of the evidence is from case studies and animal research, results from human controlled studies are also promising. Here are 15 health conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet. Epilepsy is a disease that causes seizures due to excessive brain activity. Anti-seizure medications are effective for some people with epilepsy. However, others don't respond to the drugs or can't tolerate their side effects. Of all the conditions that may benefit from a ketogenic diet, epilepsy has by far the most evidence supporting it. In fact, there are several dozen studies on the topic. Research shows that seizures typically improve in about 50% of epilepsy patients who follow the classic ketogenic diet. This is also known as a 4:1 ketogenic diet because it provides 4 times as much fat as protein and carbs combined (1, 2, 3). The modified Atkins diet (MAD) is based on a considerably less restrictive 1:1 ratio of fat to protein and carbs. It has been shown to be equally effective for seizure control in most adults and children older than two years of age (4, 5, 6, 7, 8). The ketogenic diet may also have benefits on the brain beyond seizure control. For example, when researchers examined the brain activity of children with epilepsy, they found improvements in various brain patterns in 65% of those following a ketogenic diet — regardless of whether they had fewer seizures (9). Ketogenic diets have been shown to reduce seizure frequency and severity in many children and adults with epilepsy who don't respond well to drug therapy. Metabolic syndrome, sometimes referred to as prediabetes, is characterized by insulin resistance. Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Ketogenic Diet Benefits For Weight Loss, Fighting Disease & More

Unlike many fad diets that come and go with very limited rates of long-term success, the ketogenic diet (or keto diet) has been practiced for more than nine decades (since the 1920s) and is based upon a solid understanding of physiology and nutrition science. Rather than relying on counting calories, limiting portion sizes, resorting to extreme exercise or requiring lots of willpower (even in the face of drastically low energy levels), the ketogenic diet takes an entirely different approach to weight loss and health improvement. It works because it changes the very “fuel source” that the body uses to stay energized — namely, from burning glucose (or sugar) for energy to dietary fat and, critically, your own body fat after the stage of “ketosis” is reached. Meanwhile, beyond its outstanding potential to help people lose weight and burn off fat stores, research shows that the ketogenic diet helps to fight serious diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer’s. Table of Contents 1. What Is the Keto Diet? What Is Ketosis? How to Get Into Ketosis What Are the Stages of Ketosis? Does the Keto Diet Work for Women? 2. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet 3. What Is the Ketogenic Diet Plan? 5. Keto Side Effects and the Keto Flu What Is the Keto Diet? The ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet plan that was originally designed in the 1920s for patients with epilepsy by researchers working at Johns Hopkins Medical Center. (1) Researchers found that fasting — avoiding consumption of all foods for a brief period of time, including those that provide carbohydrates — helped reduce the amount of seizures patients suffered, in addition to having other positive effects on body fat, blood sugar, cholesterol and hunger levels. (4) Unfortunately, long-term fasting is not a feasible op Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

A Beginner’s Guide To The Ketogenic Diet: An Effective Way Of Optimizing Your Health

Many Americans suffer from various chronic diseases such as diabetes and obesity, and the main culprit is usually the food they eat. The standard American diet contains excessive amounts of protein and carbohydrates, neither of which is good for your health because it eventually causes you to develop insulin and leptin resistance. As a result, you gain excess weight, develop inflammation and become prone to cellular damage. To avoid this problem, significant changes in your diet are necessary, and the best way is inducing your body into a state of nutritional ketosis, a condition where your body burns fat as its primary fuel instead of sugar. In order to reach nutritional ketosis, you must follow a ketogenic diet. But what exactly is a ketogenic diet? This guide will tell you everything you need to know about a ketogenic diet – how you can apply it to your lifestyle and what positives you can reap from it. The Various Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a dietary approach that focuses on minimal carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein and high healthy fat consumption — the three keys to achieving nutritional ketosis. In fact, it’s what I recommend for most people who would like to optimize their health. There are many reasons why you should try a ketogenic diet. It can be very beneficial for people suffering from chronic conditions, or for people who would simply like to be healthier than their current state. You’ll be excited to know that a ketogenic diet can help with the following: • Weight loss If you’re trying to lose weight, then a ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to do it, because it helps access your body fat so that it can be shed. Obese people in particular can benefit from this method. In one study, obese test subjects were Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis, put simply, is when your body breaks down fat for energy. Ketosis is a preferred metabolic state for a number of reasons. First and foremost, people prefer ketosis for what some might consider superficial reasons. Burning fat leans out the body while preserving muscle mass. This is probably why so many professional athletes are increasingly going ketogenic. But ketosis is good for a lot more than simply looks or sports performance. The same reason it leans you out (lower blood sugar) also makes it preventative of major diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and many cancers. “Many chronic disease states can be improved or prevented by a well formulated ketogenic diet,” says Dominic D’Agostino, Ph.D., an associate professor at the University of South Florida. But how do you get into ketosis? There are several approaches, and the most obvious, fasting, is said to be the most difficult. The principle is simple: When you stop eating, you’ll eventually start burning fat for energy. But for many people, even the thought of going without food is too much to bear. Another proven approach is eating a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet (LCHF). For decades, doctors have used high-fat diets to help treat epilepsy in children. But because our foodscape has so dramatically shifted over the last 50 years with sugar and refined carbohydrates at the center of most meals, high-fat diets are challenging to maintain. Today, the easiest way to experiment with ketosis is with supplements like KetoLogic BHB or KetoLogic Meal Replacement, which help elevate ketones to boost energy and concentration. Plus, they taste great. While KetoLogic products are a convenient source of energy for those on a low-carb diet, KetoLogic BHB is also a great-tasting product to boost your ketones, h Continue reading >>

Nutritional Ketosis Diet May Be Key For Optimal Health

Nutritional Ketosis Diet May Be Key For Optimal Health

Metabolic dysfunction has gained a lot of attention in recent years, as obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and Alzeimer’s continue to wreak havoc on human health. But what is the connection? An unhealthy diet — one rooted in excess sugars from processed foods and grains — is creating insulin and leptin resistance. Once such resistances are developed, the body holds onto fat, builds up inflammation, and suffers cellular damage. Weight and chronic health issues have become pressing concerns, but a life of discomfort, pain, and synthetic medications doesn’t have to be a reality. Could it be that you can set yourself free from such ailments and live a healthier life by optimizing your metabolic and mitochondrial function through proper food choices? Let’s explore. What Is Nutritional Ketosis? Nutritional ketosis is a state of health whereby the body is efficiently burning fat as its primary fuel source rather than glucose. A ketogenic diet involves eating a healthy high-fat, low-carb, and low- to moderate-protein diet. There is much research on the benefits of such a diet, including a two-week carefully controlled inpatient study, which found that a ketogenic diet could help control weight and blood glucose concentrations in diabetic patients. Entering Nutritional Ketosis The word “diet” can be extremely intimidating to people, as it suggests every food you love, and every way in which you live your life, must suddenly be uprooted. Instilling fear in becoming healthier is a great way to keep you from beginning lifestyle changes at all. However, if you take things slowly, you can gradually train your body to make important shifts rather than shock it — and your mind — into submission. To begin training your body to use fat for fuel, you must remove m Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

What is the ketogenic diet? The "classic" ketogenic diet is a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet that helps to control seizures in some people with epilepsy. It is prescribed by a physician and carefully monitored by a dietitian. It is usually used in children with seizures that do not respond to medications. It is stricter than the modified Atkins diet, requiring careful measurements of calories, fluids, and proteins. Foods are weighed and measured. The name ketogenic means that it produces ketones in the body. (keto = ketone; genic = producing) Ketones are formed when the body uses fat for its source of energy. Usually the body uses carbohydrates (such as sugar, bread, pasta) for its fuel. Because the ketogenic diet is very low in carbohydrates, fats become the primary fuel instead. The body can work very well on ketones (and fats). Ketones are not dangerous. They can be detected in the urine, blood, and breath. Ketones are one of the more likely mechanisms of action of the diet, with higher ketone levels often leading to improved seizure control. However, there are many other theories for why the diet will work. Who will it help? Doctors usually recommend the ketogenic diet for children whose seizures have not responded to several different seizure medicines. The classic diet is usually not recommended for adults, mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow. However, the modified Atkins diet does work well. This also should be done with a good team of adult neurologists and dietitians. The ketogenic diet has been shown in many studies to be particularly helpful for some epilepsy conditions. These include infantile spasms, Rett syndrome, tuberous sclerosis complex, Dravet syndrome, Doose syndrome, and GLUT-1 deficiency. Using a formula-only Continue reading >>

Preventing Seizures With The Ketogenic Diet

Preventing Seizures With The Ketogenic Diet

Since the 1920s, doctors have known that a special diet may help control epilepsy seizures in children who don't respond to drug treatments. It’s called a ketogenic diet because it produces substances known as ketones in the urine, a sign that the body is burning fat. In fact, many of the metabolic changes associated with this epilepsy diet are similar to those that occur during starvation. No one knows why a diet like this controls seizures, but numerous studies have documented its effectiveness. Treating Seizures With the Ketogenic Diet Today, experts may recommend the ketogenic diet for children who have tried at least two kinds of medication without success, have had intolerable medication side effects, or have seizures that are very frequent or severe. For children who do not respond to other epilepsy treatments, “it’s worthwhile to try,” says Jacqueline French, MD, a professor of neurology at New York University School of Medicine in New York City. About two-thirds of those who try the ketogenic diet improve noticeably or even become seizure-free. Children who start the diet while taking medication usually must stay on the drugs, at least initially, although there is the possibility that they can reduce the dosage once the diet starts to have an effect. Eventually, some children can discontinue their epilepsy medication completely. Ketogenic Diet Specifics Basically, 80 to 90 percent of the calories in the diet come from high-fat foods, with protein making up most of the remaining calories, and a very small amount from carbohydrates. Total calories are restricted to about 75 percent of the recommended daily allowance for the patient’s age group. Before starting the ketogenic diet, the child fasts for 24 hours in the hospital under medical supervision. Th Continue reading >>

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

The Truth About Ketosis & Low-carb Diets, Backed By Science

A lot of people are confused by the term “ketosis.” You may read that it is a “dangerous state” for the body, and it does sound abnormal to be “in ketosis.” But ketosis merely means that our bodies are using fat for energy. Ketones (also called ketone bodies) are molecules generated during fat metabolism, whether from the fat in the almonds you just ate or fat you were carrying around your middle. When our bodies are breaking down fat for energy, most of it gets converted to energy, but ketones are also produced as part of the process. When people eat less carbohydrates, their bodies turn to fat for energy, so it makes sense that more ketones are generated. Some of those ketones (acetoacetate and ß-hydroxybutyrate) are used for energy; the heart muscle and kidneys, for example, prefer ketones to glucose. Most cells, including the brain cells, are able to use ketones for at least part of their energy. Is ketosis a bad thing? There is an assumption that if a body is burning a lot of fat for energy, it must not be getting “enough” glucose. However, there is no indication, from studying people on reduced carbohydrate diets, that this is the case (though there is usually a short period of adjustment, less than a week, in most cases). It takes about 72 hours to burn up all of the reserve glycogen (sugar loads). Although it’s true that our bodies can’t break fat down directly into glucose (though, interestingly, they easily use glucose to make fat), our bodies can convert some of the protein we eat into glucose. Indeed, this works well for people who don’t tolerate a lot of sugar, because this conversion happens slowly so it doesn’t spike blood glucose. What is the danger of ketosis? It is important that if you are following a ketogenic nutritional pro Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Alzheimer’s Disease

Ketosis For Alzheimer’s Disease

There is still so much about the brain and brain disorders that aren’t quite understood. Alzheimer’s is one of the biggest disorders that affects the lives of people we know every year, plaguing us in old age. This article will look at what exactly is Alzheimer’s disease, the connection between Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions, and what ketosis for Alzheimer’s disease can do in terms of potentially reducing the disease risk. What is Alzheimer’s Disease? Let’s start with some basic facts about Alzheimer’s disease: Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive, irreversible brain disorder and is the most common cause of dementia in older people. Alzheimer’s disease slowly destroys skills related to thinking and memory. Simple tasks become difficult to perform, and most Alzheimer’s symptoms first show up in a person’s mid-60s. A big feature of the disease is loss of connection between neurons in the brain, which send messages between all the different parts of the body, including the brain. Interesting fact: The disease is named after Dr. Alois Alzheimer, who observed a woman with symptoms of the disease in 1906 and examined her brain after she passed away. Dr. Alzheimer found the woman’s brain contained many unusual clumps and fiber tangles, which are still some of the main features of Alzheimer’s disease today. Currently, there is still no agreed-upon cure or prevention available that’s been found for Alzheimer’s disease. But what about what causes these symptoms? Causes of Alzheimer’s Just as there is currently no true cure, the true cause of Alzheimer’s disease is still unknown. Popular theory includes several possible lifestyle, genetic, and environmental causes for the disease. Metabolic dysfunction is often included as a key factor Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis: What Is Ketosis?

Ketosis is a normal metabolic process. When the body does not have enough glucose for energy, it burns stored fats instead; this results in a build-up of acids called ketones within the body. Some people encourage ketosis by following a diet called the ketogenic or low-carb diet. The aim of the diet is to try and burn unwanted fat by forcing the body to rely on fat for energy, rather than carbohydrates. Ketosis is also commonly observed in patients with diabetes, as the process can occur if the body does not have enough insulin or is not using insulin correctly. Problems associated with extreme levels of ketosis are more likely to develop in patients with type 1 diabetes compared with type 2 diabetes patients. Ketosis occurs when the body does not have sufficient access to its primary fuel source, glucose. Ketosis describes a condition where fat stores are broken down to produce energy, which also produces ketones, a type of acid. As ketone levels rise, the acidity of the blood also increases, leading to ketoacidosis, a serious condition that can prove fatal. People with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop ketoacidosis, for which emergency medical treatment is required to avoid or treat diabetic coma. Some people follow a ketogenic (low-carb) diet to try to lose weight by forcing the body to burn fat stores. What is ketosis? In normal circumstances, the body's cells use glucose as their primary form of energy. Glucose is typically derived from dietary carbohydrates, including: sugar - such as fruits and milk or yogurt starchy foods - such as bread and pasta The body breaks these down into simple sugars. Glucose can either be used to fuel the body or be stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. If there is not enough glucose available to meet energy demands, th Continue reading >>

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