diabetestalk.net

How Is Ketone Bodies Formed?

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

The human body primarily runs on glucose. When your body is low on glucose, or if you have diabetes and don’t have enough insulin to help your cells absorb the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones (chemically known as ketone bodies) are byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids. The breakdown of fat for fuel and the creation of ketones is a normal process for everyone. In a person without diabetes, insulin, glucagon, and other hormones prevent ketone levels in the blood from getting too high. However, people with diabetes are at risk for ketone buildup in their blood. If left untreated, people with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While rare, it’s possible for people with type 2 diabetes to experience DKA in certain circumstances as well. If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. These include: If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress to: a fruity breath odor stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. Testing your blood or urine to measure your ketone levels can all be done at home. At-home testing kits are available for both types of tests, although urine testing continues to be more common. Urine tests are available without a prescription at most drugstores, or you can buy them online. You should test your urine or blood for ketones when any of the following occurs: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL. You feel sick or nauseated, regardless of your blood sugar reading. To perform a urine test, you urinate into a clean container and dip the test strip into the urine. For a child who isn’t potty-trained, a pa Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

Ketones are a beneficial product of fat metabolism in the body. When carbohydrate intake is restricted, it lowers blood sugar and insulin levels. As insulin levels fall and energy is needed, fatty acids flow from the fat cells into the bloodstream and are taken up by various cells and metabolized in a process called beta-oxidation. The end result of beta-oxidation is a molecule called acetyl-coA, and as more fatty acids are released and metabolized, acetyl-coA levels in the cells rise. This causes a sort of metabolic “feedback loop” which triggers liver cells to shunt excess acetyl-Coa into ketogenesis, or the making of ketone bodies. Once created, the liver dumps the ketone bodies into the blood stream and they are taken up by skeletal and heart muscle cells at rates of availability. In addition, the brain begins to use ketones as an alternate fuel when blood levels are high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Testing Laboratory Microbiology - Air Quality - Mold Asbestos - Environmental - Lead emsl.com There are three major types of ketone bodies present in the human blood stream when the metabolic process of ketosis is dominant: Acetoacetate (AcAc) is created first β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) is created from acetoacetate Acetone is a spontaneously created side product of acetoacetate In times of starvation, or a low carbohydrate intake resulting in low insulin levels, ketone bodies supply up to 50% of the energy requirements for most body tissues, and up to 70% of the energy required by the brain. Glucose is the main source of fuel for neurons when the diet is high in carbohydrates. But when carbs are restricted, ketogenesis becomes the primary fuel process for most cells. During fasting or low carbohydrate intake, levels of ketone bodies in the blood stream can Continue reading >>

Regulation Of Ketone Body Metabolism And The Role Of Pparα

Regulation Of Ketone Body Metabolism And The Role Of Pparα

1. Introduction Adaptation to limited nutritional resources in the environment requires the development of mechanisms that enable temporal functioning in a state of energy deficiency at both systemic and cellular levels. Different molecular and cellular mechanisms have evolved allowing survival during nutrient insufficiency. Some rely on the decrease of metabolic rates, body temperature, or even shutting down most of the live functions during deep hibernation, aestivation or brumation. Other strategies require development of metabolic flexibility and effective fuel management. Peroxisome Proliferator Activated Receptors (PPARs) are important regulators of cellular responses to variable nutrient supply during both fed and fasted states. Acting as transcription factors, and directly modulated by fatty acids and their derivatives, PPARs induce transcription of the proper set of genes, encoding proteins and enzymes indispensable for lipid, amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism. In this review, we make an attempt to outline the regulation of ketone body synthesis and utilization in normal and transformed cells, as well as summarize the role of PPARα in these processes. 2. Ketogenesis and Ketolysis Metabolic adaptation to prolonged fasting in humans is based both on coordinated responses of vital organs, mainly liver, kidneys and muscles, and on restoring nutritional preferences at the cellular level. In the fed state, cells primarily rely on glucose metabolism, whereas during longer food deprivation blood glucose levels drop because glycogen reserves are only sufficient for less than a day. In such conditions, glucose is spared mainly for neurons, but also for erythrocytes and proliferating cells in bone marrow or those involved in tissue regeneration. The most important c Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

Excess ketones are dangerous for someone with diabetes... Low insulin, combined with relatively normal glucagon and epinephrine levels, causes fat to be released from fat cells, which then turns into ketones. Excess formation of ketones is dangerous and is a medical emergency In a person without diabetes, ketone production is the body’s normal adaptation to starvation. Blood sugar levels never get too high, because the production is regulated by just the right balance of insulin, glucagon and other hormones. However, in an individual with diabetes, dangerous and life-threatening levels of ketones can develop. What are ketones and why do I need to know about them? Ketones and ketoacids are alternative fuels for the body that are made when glucose is in short supply. They are made in the liver from the breakdown of fats. Ketones are formed when there is not enough sugar or glucose to supply the body’s fuel needs. This occurs overnight, and during dieting or fasting. During these periods, insulin levels are low, but glucagon and epinephrine levels are relatively normal. This combination of low insulin, and relatively normal glucagon and epinephrine levels causes fat to be released from the fat cells. The fats travel through the blood circulation to reach the liver where they are processed into ketone units. The ketone units then circulate back into the blood stream and are picked up by the muscle and other tissues to fuel your body’s metabolism. In a person without diabetes, ketone production is the body’s normal adaptation to starvation. Blood sugar levels never get too high, because the production is regulated by just the right balance of insulin, glucagon and other hormones. However, in an individual with diabetes, dangerous and life-threatening levels of ketone Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketone Bodies, And Ketoacidosis – An Excerpt From Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition

Ketosis, Ketone Bodies, And Ketoacidosis – An Excerpt From Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition

The following text is excerpted from Lipids (Chapter 8) of Modern Nutritional Diseases, 2nd Edition. Ketone Bodies and Ketosis: Ketones are organic chemicals in which an interior carbon in a molecule forms a double bond with an oxygen molecule. Acetone, a familiar chemical, is the smallest ketone possible. It is composed of three carbons, with the double bond to oxygen on the middle carbon. Biological ketone bodies include acetone, larger ketones, and biochemicals that can become ketones. The most important of the ketone bodies are hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate, both of which are formed from condensation of two acetyl CoA molecules. Acetone is formed from a nonenzymatic decarboxylation of acetoacetate. Ketone bodies are fuel molecules that can be used for energy by all organs of the body except the liver. The production of ketone bodies is a normal, natural, and important biochemical pathway in animal biochemistry (17, p. 577). Small quantities of ketone bodies are always present in the blood, with the quantity increasing as hours without food increase. During fasting or carbohydrate deprivation, larger amounts of ketone bodies are produced to provide the energy that is normally provided by glucose. Excessive levels of circulating ketone bodies can result in ketosis, a condition in which the quantity of circulating ketone bodies is greater than the quantity the organs and tissues of the body need for energy. People who go on extremely low-carbohydrate diets to lose a large excess of body fat usually go into a mild ketosis that moderates as weight is lost. There is no scientific evidence that a low-carbohydrate diet is capable of producing sufficient ketone bodies to be harmful. Excess ketone bodies are excreted by the kidneys and lungs. Exhaled acetone gives the brea Continue reading >>

Ketone Body Metabolism

Ketone Body Metabolism

Sort Scenario: Blood glucose levels decline due to starvation... Require: Tactic changes: Hormonal changes: Metabolic changes: Require: maintenance of blood glucose levels Tactic changes: - peripheral tissue glucose utilization + hepatic glucose production (gluconeogenesis) Hormonal changes: - insulin + glucagon + epinephrine and lipolytic hormones Metabolic changes: + lipolysis and ketogenesis for alternative fuels + hepatic beta oxidation to drive gluconeogenesis What substrates are required for gluconeogenesis to occur and how are these substrates replenished? Gluconeogenesis requires (1) C4 carbon sources and (2) high energy. -Carbon sources are replenished by glucogenic AA breakdown -Energy is replenished via beta oxidation of FA and oxidative phosphorylation -Acetyl CoA (produced by beta oxidation) promotes gluconeogenesis by activating pyruvate carboxylase (hormone required for gluconeogenesis) Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies

Ketone Bodies

The term “ketone bodies” refers primarily to two compounds: acetoacetate and β‐hydroxy‐butyrate, which are formed from acetyl‐CoA when the supply of TCA‐cycle intermediates is low, such as in periods of prolonged fasting. They can substitute for glucose in skeletal muscle, and, to some extent, in the brain. The first step in ketone body formation is the condensation of two molecules of acetyl‐CoA in a reverse of the thiolase reaction. The product, acetoacetyl‐CoA, accepts another acetyl group from acetyl‐CoA to form β‐hydroxy‐β‐hydroxymethylglutaryl‐CoA (HMG‐CoA). HMG‐CoA has several purposes: It serves as the initial compound for cholesterol synthesis or it can be cleaved to acetoacetate and acetyl‐CoA. Acetoacetate can be reduced to β‐hydroxybutyrate or can be exported directly to the bloodstream. Acetoacetate and β‐hydroxybutyrate circulate in the blood to provide energy to the tissues. Acetoacetate can also spontaneously decarboxylate to form acetone: Although acetone is a very minor product of normal metabolism, diabetics whose disease is not well‐managed often have high levels of ketone bodies in their circulation. The acetone that is formed from decarboxylation of acetoacetate is excreted through the lungs, causing characteristic “acetone breath.” Continue reading >>

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis, Ketones, And How It All Works

Ketosis is a process that the body does on an everyday basis, regardless of the number of carbs you eat. Your body adapts to what is put in it, processing different types of nutrients into the fuels that it needs. Proteins, fats, and carbs can all be processed for use. Eating a low carb, high fat diet just ramps up this process, which is a normal and safe chemical reaction. When you eat carbohydrate based foods or excess amounts of protein, your body will break this down into sugar – known as glucose. Why? Glucose is needed in the creation of ATP (an energy molecule), which is a fuel that is needed for the daily activities and maintenance inside our bodies. If you’ve ever used our keto calculator to determine your caloric needs, you will see that your body uses up quite a lot of calories. It’s true, our bodies use up much of the nutrients we intake just to maintain itself on a daily basis. If you eat enough food, there will likely be an excess of glucose that your body doesn’t need. There are two main things that happen to excess glucose if your body doesn’t need it: Glycogenesis. Excess glucose will be converted to glycogen and stored in your liver and muscles. Estimates show that only about half of your daily energy can be stored as glycogen. Lipogenesis. If there’s already enough glycogen in your muscles and liver, any extra glucose will be converted into fats and stored. So, what happens to you once your body has no more glucose or glycogen? Ketosis happens. When your body has no access to food, like when you are sleeping or when you are on a ketogenic diet, the body will burn fat and create molecules called ketones. We can thank our body’s ability to switch metabolic pathways for that. These ketones are created when the body breaks down fats, creating Continue reading >>

Utilization Of Ketone Bodies, Regulation And Clinical Significance Of Ketogenesis

Utilization Of Ketone Bodies, Regulation And Clinical Significance Of Ketogenesis

Ketone bodies are utilized by extra hepatic tissues via a series of cytosolic reactions that are essentially a reversal of ketone body synthesis; the ketones must be reconverted to acetyl Co A in the mitochondria (figure-1) Steps 1) Utilization of β-Hydroxy Butyrate Beta-hydroxybutyrate is first oxidized to acetoacetate with the production of one NADH (Figure-1, step-1). In tissues actively utilizing ketones for energy production, NAD+/NADH ratio is always higher so as to drive the β-hydroxybutyrate dehydrogenase catalyzed reaction in the direction of acetoacetate synthesis. Biological significance D (-)-3-Hydroxybutyrate is oxidized to produce acetoacetate as well as NADH for use in oxidative phosphorylation. D (-)-3-Hydroxybutyrate is the main ketone body excreted in urine. 2) Utilization of Acetoacetate a) Coenzyme A must be added to the acetoacetate. The thioester bond is a high energy bond, so ATP equivalents must be used. In this case the energy comes from a trans esterification of the CoASH from succinyl CoA to acetoacetate by Coenzyme A transferase (Figure-1, step-2), also called Succinyl co A: Acetoacetate co A transferase, also known as Thiophorase. The Succinyl CoA comes from the TCA cycle. This reaction bypasses the Succinyl-CoA synthetase step of the TCA cycle; hence there is no GTP formation at this step although it does not alter the amount of carbon in the cycle. Biological significance The liver has acetoacetate available to supply to other organs because it lacks this particular CoA transferase and that is the reason “Ketone bodies are synthesized in the liver but utilized in the peripheral tissues”. The latter enzyme is present at high levels in most tissues except the liver. Importantly, very low-level of enzyme expression in the liver allows t Continue reading >>

Role Of Glucose And Ketone Bodies In The Metabolic Control Of Experimental Brain Cancer

Role Of Glucose And Ketone Bodies In The Metabolic Control Of Experimental Brain Cancer

Brain tumours lack metabolic versatility and are dependent largely on glucose for energy. This contrasts with normal brain tissue that can derive energy from both glucose and ketone bodies. We examined for the first time the potential efficacy of dietary therapies that reduce plasma glucose and elevate ketone bodies in the CT-2A syngeneic malignant mouse astrocytoma. C57BL/6J mice were fed either a standard diet unrestricted (SD-UR), a ketogenic diet unrestricted (KD-UR), the SD restricted to 40% (SD-R), or the KD restricted to 40% of the control standard diet (KD-R). Body weights, tumour weights, plasma glucose, β-hydroxybutyrate (β-OHB), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) were measured 13 days after tumour implantation. CT-2A growth was rapid in both the SD-UR and KD-UR groups, but was significantly reduced in both the SD-R and KD-R groups by about 80%. The results indicate that plasma glucose predicts CT-2A growth and that growth is dependent more on the amount than on the origin of dietary calories. Also, restriction of either diet significantly reduced the plasma levels of IGF-1, a biomarker for angiogenesis and tumour progression. Owing to a dependence on plasma glucose, IGF-1 was also predictive of CT-2A growth. Ketone bodies are proposed to reduce stromal inflammatory activities, while providing normal brain cells with a nonglycolytic high-energy substrate. Our results in a mouse astrocytoma suggest that malignant brain tumours are potentially manageable with dietary therapies that reduce glucose and elevate ketone bodies. The long-term prognosis remains poor for most patients with malignant brain tumours despite advances in the molecular genetics of cancer and in brain imaging techniques (Shapiro, 1999). Surgical resection followed by radiation is the s Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies As A Fuel For The Brain During Starvation

Ketone Bodies As A Fuel For The Brain During Starvation

THE STATUS OF OUR KNOWLEDGE OF STARVATION AND BRAIN METABOLISM IN HUMANS WHEN I BEGAN MY RESEARCH This story begins in the early 1960s when the general level of knowledge about whole-body metabolism during human starvation was grossly deficient. This was partly caused by a lack of accurate and specific methods for measuring hormones and fuels in biological fluids, which became available about 1965.11 Rigidly designed protocols for studying human volunteers or obese patients, who underwent semi- or total starvation for prolonged periods of time, were not widely employed, and much of the published data regarding metabolic events during starvation were not readily accessible. To complicate matters further, a great deal of the available data was confusing because much of the supposition regarding mechanisms used by the body to survive prolonged periods of starvation was based upon information that was obtained from nonstandardized and often erroneous procedures for studying metabolism. For example, the rate of urinary nitrogen excretion during starvation was sometimes confounded by the consumption of carbohydrate during the studies. Today, students of biochemistry take for granted the fact that tissues of the human body have a hierarchy of fuel usage. They know that the brain, an organ devoted to using glucose, can switch to use ketone bodies during prolonged starvation (2–3 days), thus sparing glucose for other tissues (i.e. red blood cells must use glucose as a fuel; without mitochondria, they have no choice!). However, this fundamental insight into human metabolism was not recognized in the early 1960s, when my research in this area began. How this simple but fundamental fact that ketone bodies provide critical fuels for the brain was discovered and its implication for Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies

Ketone Bodies

Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia. Related to ketone bodies: ketosis ketone [ke´tōn] any compound containing the carbonyl group, C=O, and having hydrocarbon groups attached to the carbonyl carbon, i.e., the carbonyl group is within a chain of carbon atoms. ketone bodies the substances acetone, acetoacetic acid, and β-hydroxybutyric acid; except for acetone (which may arise spontaneously from acetoacetic acid), they are normal metabolic products of lipid and pyruvate within the liver, and are oxidized by muscles. Excessive production leads to urinary excretion of these bodies, as in diabetes mellitus; see also ketosis. Called also acetone bodies. Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved. ketone bodies two products of lipid pyruvate metabolism, beta-hydroxybutyric acid and aminoacetic acid, from which acetone may arise spontaneously. Ketone bodies are produced from acetyl-CoA in the liver and are oxidized by the muscles. Excessive production leads to their excretion in urine, as in diabetes mellitus. Also called acetone bodies. Ketones, Blood and Urine Synonym/acronym: Ketone bodies, acetoacetate, acetone. Common use To investigate diabetes as the cause of ketoacidosis and monitor therapeutic interventions. Specimen Serum (1 mL) collected from gold-, red-, or red/gray-top tube. Urine (5 mL), random or timed specimen, collected in a clean plastic collection container. Normal findings (Method: Colorimetric nitroprusside reaction) Negative. Description Ketone bodies refer to the three intermediate products of metabolism: acetone, acetoacetic acid, and β-hydroxybutyrate. Even though β-hydroxybutyrate Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Ketone Bodies: A Review Of Physiology, Pathophysiology And Application Of Monitoring To Diabetes.

Abstract Ketone bodies are produced by the liver and used peripherally as an energy source when glucose is not readily available. The two main ketone bodies are acetoacetate (AcAc) and 3-beta-hydroxybutyrate (3HB), while acetone is the third, and least abundant, ketone body. Ketones are always present in the blood and their levels increase during fasting and prolonged exercise. They are also found in the blood of neonates and pregnant women. Diabetes is the most common pathological cause of elevated blood ketones. In diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), high levels of ketones are produced in response to low insulin levels and high levels of counterregulatory hormones. In acute DKA, the ketone body ratio (3HB:AcAc) rises from normal (1:1) to as high as 10:1. In response to insulin therapy, 3HB levels commonly decrease long before AcAc levels. The frequently employed nitroprusside test only detects AcAc in blood and urine. This test is inconvenient, does not assess the best indicator of ketone body levels (3HB), provides only a semiquantitative assessment of ketone levels and is associated with false-positive results. Recently, inexpensive quantitative tests of 3HB levels have become available for use with small blood samples (5-25 microl). These tests offer new options for monitoring and treating diabetes and other states characterized by the abnormal metabolism of ketone bodies. Continue reading >>

Ketone Body Formation And Utilisation  Acetoacetate,  -hydroxy Butyrate And Acetone Are Collectively Called As Ketone Bodies.  The Process Of Formation.

Ketone Body Formation And Utilisation  Acetoacetate,  -hydroxy Butyrate And Acetone Are Collectively Called As Ketone Bodies.  The Process Of Formation.

Presentation on theme: "Ketone body formation and utilisation  Acetoacetate,  -hydroxy butyrate and acetone are collectively called as ketone bodies.  The process of formation."— Presentation transcript: 1 Ketone body formation and utilisation  Acetoacetate,  -hydroxy butyrate and acetone are collectively called as ketone bodies.  The process of formation of ketone bodies in the liver is called ketogenesis.  Blood level is usually less than 2 mg % in well-fed state.  Increased production of ketone bodies is known as ketosis.  High level of ketone bodies in blood are referred to as ketonemia  More ketone bodies in the urine is called as ketonuria.  Lungs mainly eliminate acetone. The acetyl CoA formed in fatty acid oxidation enters into TCA cycle only if fat and carbohydrate degradation are appropriately balanced 2 Conditions in which ketone body formation are Prolonged starvation: During starvation the carbohydrate level will be low. So the stored fat of the adipose tissue break down to free fatty acids. The free fatty acids formed enter the liver and undergoes  - oxidation to release acetyl CoA which cannot be utilized by the liver through TCA cycle due to lack of Oxaloacetate. In starvation TCA cycle is impaired due to the deficiency of oxaloacetate which is diverted to glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis). Therefore acetyl CoA converted to ketone bodies to meet the energy needs. 3 Uncontrolled diabetes mellitus: Because of the lack of insulin the carbohydrate metabolism is impaired The adipose tissue fat becomes the main source of energy and its degradation is generally accelerated. This results in the excessive production of acetyl CoA, leading to accumulation of acetyl CoA and its conversion to ketone bodies Feeding high fat die Continue reading >>

Ketone Bodies Formed In The Liver Are Exported To Other Organs

Ketone Bodies Formed In The Liver Are Exported To Other Organs

Ketone Bodies In human beings and most other mammals, acetyl-CoA formed in the liver during oxidation of fatty acids may enter the citric acid cycle (stage 2 of Fig. 16-7) or it may be converted to the "ketone bodies" acetoacetate, D-β-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone for export to other tissues. (The term "bodies" is a historical artifact; these compounds are soluble in blood and urine.) Acetone, produced in smaller quantities than the other ketone bodies, is exhaled. Acetoacetate and D-β-hydroxybutyrate are transported by the blood to the extrahepatic tissues, where they are oxidized via the citric acid cycle to provide much of the energy required by tissues such as skeletal and heart muscle and the renal cortex. The brain, which normally prefers glucose as a fuel, can adapt to the use of acetoacetate or D-β-hydroxybutyrate under starvation conditions, when glucose is unavailable. A major determinant of the pathway taken by acetyl-CoA in liver mitochondria is the availability of oxaloacetate to initiate entry of acetyl-CoA into the citric acid cycle. Under some circumstances (such as starvation) oxaloacetate is drawn out of the citric acid cycle for use in synthesizing glucose. When the oxaloacetate concentration is very low, little acetyl-CoA enters the cycle, and ketone body formation is favored. The production and export of ketone bodies from the liver to extrahepatic tissues allows continued oxidation of fatty acids in the liver when acetyl-CoA is not being oxidized via the citric acid cycle. Overproduction of ketone bodies can occur in conditions of severe starvation and in uncontrolled diabetes. The first step in formation of acetoacetate in the liver (Fig. 16-16) is the enzymatic condensation of two molecules of acetyl-CoA, catalyzed by thiolase; this is simply Continue reading >>

More in ketosis