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How Is Ketogenic Pronounced

Paleo Vs Keto: A Quick Comparison Between The Caveman Diet And The Ketogenic Diet

Paleo Vs Keto: A Quick Comparison Between The Caveman Diet And The Ketogenic Diet

If you are a diet and nutrition newbie, you can be excused for thinking that the paleo diet and the keto diets are pretty much the same thing. The names sound similar, they’re both low-carb, and they can both result in weight loss…tomayto, tomahto right? Well, no. A closer study of each will reveal that while there are some similarities, there are also pronounced differences that distinguish the paleo diet plan from keto. Today, we’re looking at both – the similarities and the differences. And just as there are some who say a true ketogenic diet is one wherein carb intake remains 5% of your total calories, hardcore paleo dieters please forgive me if I seem a little too lenient on what the paleo plan really looks like. What is the Paleo Diet? The meal plan for the paleo diet, or caveman diet, centers around eating the way early humans ate during the Paleolithic Era. In short, this means: lots of meat, eggs, nuts, seeds, and non-starchy vegetables. Paleo dieters avoid grains, dairy, alcohol, trans fats, and refined sugar. If the cavemen didn’t eat it, you don’t eat it. The idea behind paleo is that by adopting the same diet cavemen ate before the advent of agriculture (as we know it), paleo dieters can eliminate the risk of developing modern-day diseases like clogged arteries, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases. The cavemen pre-agriculture ancestors didn’t have abundant access to dairy (milk was for baby animals, not humans!) or grains, and instead they ate what they could hunt and gather: meat and plants. They didn’t have bags of refined sugar and chocolate to snack on, nor did they have granaries and flour mills to give them bread and grain-based foods. It’s thought that agriculture and industry rushed our digestive systems into places they were ne Continue reading >>

The Current Status Of The Ketogenic Diet In Psychiatry.

The Current Status Of The Ketogenic Diet In Psychiatry.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The ketogenic diet (KD) has been used in treatment-resistant epilepsy since the 1920s. It has been researched in a variety of neurological conditions in both animal models and human trials. The aim of this review is to clarify the potential role of KD in psychiatry. METHODS: Narrative review of electronic databases PubMED, PsychINFO, and Scopus. RESULTS: The search yielded 15 studies that related the use of KD in mental disorders including anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). These studies comprised nine animal models, four case studies, and two open-label studies in humans. In anxiety, exogenous ketone supplementation reduced anxiety-related behaviors in a rat model. In depression, KD significantly reduced depression-like behaviors in rat and mice models in two controlled studies. In bipolar disorder, one case study reported a reduction in symptomatology, while a second case study reported no improvement. In schizophrenia, an open-label study in female patients (n = 10) reported reduced symptoms after 2 weeks of KD, a single case study reported no improvement. In a brief report, 3 weeks of KD in a mouse model normalized pathological behaviors. In ASD, an open-label study in children (n = 30) reported no significant improvement; one case study reported a pronounced and sustained response to KD. In ASD, in four controlled animal studies, KD significantly reduced ASD-related behaviors in mice and rats. In ADHD, in one controlled trial of KD in dogs with comorbid epilepsy, both conditions significantly improved. CONCLUSION: Despite its long history in neurology, the role of KD in mental disorders is unclear. Half of the published studies are based on a Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle tissues to store excess glucose as a molecule called glycogen and also reduces glucose production by the liver. When blood sugar is low, the hormone glucagon (produced by alpha-cells in the pancreas) stimulate cells to break down glycogen into glucose that is subsequently released into the blood stream. In healthy people who do not have type II diabetes, these functions allow levels of blood glucose and insulin to stay in a normal range. What Is Insulin Resistance and Why Is It a Problem? Unfortunately, for many Americans and other peopl Continue reading >>

Ready To Tackle The Ketogenic Diet Head On With Community Support?

Ready To Tackle The Ketogenic Diet Head On With Community Support?

Would you feed your pets stuff that could damage their bodies? Of course not, and yet we do this to ourselves every single day. When trying to lose weight the first thing that you should look into is sugar because it is one of the most damaging things you can put in your body. You’re a Sugar-Burner Almost every diet finds a way to add sugar to your system. It doesn't have to be from cookies or cupcakes. It can be from breads, pastas, and even vegetables. Your body has become accustomed to running off of glucose (sugar broken down). That is why you have sugar cravings, afternoon fogginess, mood swings, and other things that you don't associate with sugar. The Ketogenic Diet works to break that cycle so that your body is no longer reliant on glucose. How? By lowering carb consumption, making sure you get enough protein, and increasing the fats that you eat. What Is the Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet. Yes, high fat. Contrary to what you've been taught over the years, fat isn't the problem, sugar is the problem. 60% of our brain is made up of fat and you like your brain don't you? The purpose of the ketogenic diet is to switch your body from being a sugar-burner to a fat-burner. At most, your body can hold 600 g of glucose (what sugar gets converted into). That is about 1.3 lbs of fuel that your body can use before it needs to find more. That's why you are always on the hunt for more cabs. Fortunately, your body can store an almost unlimited amount of fat. When you become keto-adapted your body stops burning glucose for energy and instead, burns fat. Check out what Erin had to say... Having a community of awesome people following along on the same journey as me helped me lose more weight than I had even hoped for. I l Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

It’s not uncommon for the ketogenic diet and the famous Atkin’s Diet of the 1990’s to get lumped into the same conversation as one and the same. But are they actually different, and is one healthier than the other? Which is more impactful over the long term? There are definitely differences between the two diets, and the real comparison might surprise you! But first, let’s step back and look at them individually. The Ketogenic Diet The ketogenic diet was founded all the way back in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the famous Mayo Clinic. The diet was initially used because it was discovered to be highly effective in treating epilepsy. The principles of the ketogenic diet are based on eating a specific percentage of macronutrients: high fats (60%), adequate protein (35%), and low carbohydrates (5%), to force the body to use what are called “ketone bodies” for energy. In the absence of carbohydrates for an extended period of time, our liver converts fats into fatty acids and ketone bodies, also just simply called “ketones.” Ketones can then be processed into ATP, which is the energy currency of the cells. Now, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood leads to a state known as nutritional ketosis. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet There are several ways the ketogenic diet can help the health and lifestyles of those who follow it. Here are some of the biggest advantages: Blood Sugar Stabilization The ketogenic diet actively helps to lower glucose levels and improve insulin resistance. Without having frequent carbohydrate intake, blood sugar levels can stabilize more rapidly. Trigger Fat Burning Ketogenic diets can also be very effective for fat loss because they ultimately reset your body’s “enzymatic machinery” to burn fat as its primary fuel source Continue reading >>

The Perks Of Fasting, With None Of The Work

The Perks Of Fasting, With None Of The Work

“If there’s a downside, it is kind of crazy tasting,” said Geoff Woo, the founder of HVMN, a Silicon Valley company that makes nootropics, or performance-enhancing supplements. We were in a conference room in The Atlantic’s office building, and he was bracing me for my trial run of his latest product. It was a small, clear vial labeled “Ketone,” a new type of energy drink his company is releasing this week. Its nutrition label says it contains 120 calories, but no carbs, no fat, and no protein. Instead, it’s all ketones, the chemical that Woo and his company are calling a “fourth food group.” He hopes the drink will allow people to reap the benefits of occasional fasting—high ketone levels inside the body—without actually having to not eat. I unscrewed the top and, college-days muscle memory kicking in, chugged it like a shot of Captain Morgan. It tasted like cough syrup that had been poured into a garbage bag and left in the sun. “Augh!” I cried. “I compare it to a combination of a liquor shot with nail-polish remover,” Woo said. Woo’s coworker, Brianna Stubbs, went to fetch me a glass of water. “We’ve done a lot of work to make it better,” she said. Within an hour, the drink was supposed to help improve my athletic performance by changing how my body burned energy during exercise. Some people also say it helps them feel more energetic and focused on their work. About 25 minutes after I drank Ketone, Woo and Stubbs pricked my finger to see if it was working. My blood sugar, which had verged on diabetic levels from some pineapple I had eaten that morning, was down to near-normal levels. Meanwhile, my ketones, which had been practically nonexistent before imbibing—measuring just 0.2 millimolar—had soared to 4.9. “It would have Continue reading >>

Cyclical Ketogenic Diet: An In-depth Look

Cyclical Ketogenic Diet: An In-depth Look

Instead of ingesting small amounts of carbohydrates around your workouts, the cyclical ketogenic diet devotes one to two FULL days of high carbohydrate consumption in order to fully refill muscle glycogen stores. This means that CKDs are not for beginners that are not able to perform the necessary amount or intensity of training. You must completely deplete glycogen stores each week in order to have a successful CKD. CKD is used for maximum muscle growth, but the downside is that you might gain some body fat. It’s easy to overeat, gain fat, and has extreme depletion workouts – so if you’re a beginner it is certainly NOT recommended. If you’re a beginner or intermediate trainer, then a Targeted Ketogenic Diet is recommended. The standard format for a cyclical ketogenic diet is 5-6 days of ketogenic dieting and 1-2 days of high carb eating. Others have also experimented with 2 week cycles, where 10-12 days are of ketogenic nature and 3-4 days are carb loading. The 2 week split has also had good results, but it doesn’t fit around everyone’s schedules as neatly. The primary goal here is to temporarily switch out of ketosis to refill muscle glycogen, in order to sustain training performance in the next cycle. If you are on a ketogenic diet for health reasons (hyperinsulinemia or hypertension), you may find the CKD unworkable as the hormonal response can trigger health symptoms that are being treated by a low carbohydrate diet. Since the goal of a CKD is to completely deplete muscle glycogen – a proper workout schedule is needed for optimal results. A good workout example would be: Monday/Tuesday – Full body split. Monday could be legs and abs, and Tuesday could be chest, back, and arms. Friday – Full body, high rep depletion workout. The amount of training Continue reading >>

Ketocademy

Ketocademy

In an attempt to relay much of what I have learned in my journey into the ketogenic lifestyle, I’ve compiled what I like to call the Ketocademy, a sort of ‘Keto A to Z’ resource for you to learn more…whether you’re starting from absolutely no knowledge of what ketosis even is, or you’re a keto nerd who wants to learn all the nitty gritty details of how it works, you should find it here! We’re just getting this started and built up, so check out what we have here to start with, and know that much more is soon to come (so keep checking back!) Let’s start with getting a basic understanding of key concepts and definitions, before diving into more detailed information the various topics. What Is Keto? Keto is short for a few different words, used interchangeably: ketosis, ketogenesis, and/or ketogenic (pronounced key-toe-jenik) Adhering to a ketogenic diet is a lifestyle that not only helps you reduce body fat and lose weight, but also improves your physical and mental health. A whole host of metabolic & inflammation related health issues arise from the traditional, high-carb, American diet, and a ketogenic diet helps one break away from that through ultra-low carbohydrate and high fat consumption. The core goal of the diet is to reduce our glycogen levels and increase our ketone levels. Glycogen is a kind of sugar that our bodies are able to use as an energy source…a quick and easy fuel source created by the intake of carbohydrates. …It’s a quick and easy source of fuel, but is glycogen the best fuel for the body? As it turns out, not so much (hold on, we’ll get into those details!). …But, you’ve always been taught that the body needs carbs – complex carbs, and lots of “heart-healthy” whole grains, right? So, what happens if you don’t eat Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

What This Dietitian Has To Say About The Ketogenic Diet Will Surprise You

What This Dietitian Has To Say About The Ketogenic Diet Will Surprise You

You'll lose weight, even though bacon is on the menu, for starters. This article initially appeared on news.com.au and has been republished here with permission. If you have any interest in the world of diet and nutrition chances are you would have seen reference to a ‘keto’, or low carb, high fat (LCHF) approach to diets and weight loss.Used clinically for many years, specifically in the area of epilepsy where it is used to help reduce seizures, ketogenic diets are also known for their relatively quick weight loss outcomes. Not a new area of nutrition but one that has become increasingly popular in recent years, the question is, ‘is a ketogenic diet the right diet for you?’ Ketogenic diets refer to diets that are particularly low in carbohydrates (ranging from 5-20%, or 20-50g of total carbohydrates and high in fats (up to 75% in total fat). This is as opposed to standard ‘diets’ which contain 30-50% carbohydrates and just 30% fat or less. Diets that are much lower in carbohydrate than the muscles and the brain typically need to function shift the body into a state known as ‘ketosis’ in which fat stores in the body are broken down into ketones which fuel the muscles and the brain in place of the carbohydrates when they are in limited supply. The result is enhanced fat burning and relatively quick weight loss as compared to a traditional dietary approaches. There is no evidence to show that keto diets are damaging to the body. In fact, with their superior weight loss and associated reductions in inflammation in the body, there are a number of benefits, particularly for individuals with high blood glucose levels, fatty liver and significant amounts of weight to lose. The primary issue with keto diets is that the total amount of carbohydrate consumed needs Continue reading >>

An Estimate Of The Ketogenic Diet In Bronchial Asthma☆

An Estimate Of The Ketogenic Diet In Bronchial Asthma☆

☆Read before the Tenth Annual Meeting of the Association for the Study of Allergy, New Orleans, May 8, 1932. IFN-γ orchestrates mesenchymal stem cell plasticity through the signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and 3 and mammalian target of rapamycin pathways View All Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

The Ketogenic Diet: Does It Live Up To The Hype? The Pros, The Cons, And The Facts About This Not-so-new Diet Craze.

If you believe the buzz, ketosis — whether via the almost-zero-carb ketogenic diet or via ketone supplements— can curb appetite, enhance performance, and cure nearly any health problem that ails you. Sound too good to be true? It probably is. Want to listen instead of read? Download the audio recording here… ++++ Wouldn’t it be awesome if butter and bacon were “health foods”? Maybe with a side of guacamole and some shredded cheese on top? “I’m doing this for my health,” you could purr virtuously, as you topped your delectably marbled, medium-rare steak with a fried egg. Well, many advocates of the ketogenic diet argue exactly that: By eating a lot of fat and close to zero carbohydrates you too can enjoy enhanced health, quality of life, performance, brain function, and abs you can grate that cheese on. So, in this article, we’ll explore: What are ketones, and what is ketosis? What, exactly, is a ketogenic diet? What evidence and scientific research supports the ketogenic diet? Do ketone supplements work? Is the ketogenic diet or ketone supplementation right for me? How to read this article If you’re just curious about ketogenic diets: Feel free to skim and learn whatever you like. If you want to change your body and/or health: You don’t need to know every detail. Just get the general idea. Check out our advice at the end. If you’re an athlete interested in performance: Pay special attention to the section on athletic performance. Check out our advice for athletes at the end. If you’re a fitness pro, or interested in geeking out with nutritional science: We’ve given you some “extra credit” material in sidebars throughout. Check out our advice for fitness pros at the end. It all started with the brain. If you’ve called Client Care at Pr Continue reading >>

Ketones – A Potential New Alzheimer’s Treatment

Ketones – A Potential New Alzheimer’s Treatment

by Women’s Brain Health Initiative: Decades of research have revealed that brain glucose absorption is impaired in individuals with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), even before symptoms of cognitive decline appear. Glucose, derived from ingested carbohydrates, is the primary fuel used by the brain. However, individuals with AD have a decreased ability to use the glucose that is available. Ketones – derived from fatty acids in the diet and body fat – are an alternative fuel source for the brain, and one that seems to work better in an Alzheimer’s brain than glucose. When the body uses ketones for energy, it is in a metabolic state referred to as ketosis (pronounced key-toe-sis). Ketosis can be induced in a few ways: By consuming a ketogenic diet (one that is extremely high in fat, extremely low in carbohydrates, with moderate amounts of protein, thereby minimizing the dietary sources of glucose); By adding MCT or ketone supplements to a regular diet; and During prolonged fasting. Ketogenic diets have been used since the 1920s to successfully treat symptoms of epilepsy, so it is not surprising that ketosis is now being explored as a potential treatment for other neurological disorders, including AD. Research conducted to date suggests that ketosis may indeed have beneficial effects in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or AD. KETONE AND DEMENTIA RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS A single dose of MCT improves memory in individuals with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease. A 2004 study by Reger et al., published in Neurobiology of Aging, involved 20 individuals with AD or mild cognitive impairment who consumed a drink containing emulsified medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) or a placebo.Medium chain triglycerides (MCT) are fatty acids of a particular length (i.e. mediu Continue reading >>

Pork Liver Larb Recipe (pronounced, Laab) | Tab Wan – Thai Recipe | Keto, Paleo, Gf

Pork Liver Larb Recipe (pronounced, Laab) | Tab Wan – Thai Recipe | Keto, Paleo, Gf

If you can’t stomach the thought of eating liver, then this Thai liver larb recipe is for you. If you can eat liver, but the pasty after-texture that sticks in your mouth ends up making you gag, then this Thai liver larb dish is for you. Liver packs so many nutrients that once you learn why you should have this superfood in your diet, you too will seek out ways to do just that. This image has all the ingredients. The only ingredient not pictured is the 20 grams of organic palm sugar, about the size of a ping-pong ball. The organic palm sugar can be replaced by a stevia tea we make by brewing fresh stevia leaves (I’ll show you how). This will make the liver larb dish even more low carb friendly. If you’re not going to use a stevia tea alternative, organic palm sugar is the way to go. It’s the lowest on the GI scale of all natural sugars. Not only is this a super healthy dish to eat each week, it’s super easy to make. And quick, too. The hardest it gets is slicing the liver. Step 1. Slice and dice the liver. Actually, don’t dice it. You can if you want, I’ve never done it that way. I always just slice. Step 2. Chop up the veggies. Before you start chopping, start the water boil and get a bowl ready for the sauce creation. Step 3. Mix the sauce ingredients together When you squeeze the limes, try to leave the seeds out. Seeds will contain the most lectins, something best to avoid if you can. To learn more about lectins, I highly suggest picking this book up, The Plant Paradox by Dr. Steven R. Gundry. Not to sidetrack this recipe post, but here’s a quick review of this book. I still consume lectins, they’re unavoidable, but this book changed how I eat and how I cook in many ways. Here’s an excerpt from his Amazon book listing page: Most of us have heard Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

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