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How Is Ketogenic Pronounced

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

Is The Ketogenic Diet Right For You? Nutritionists Weigh In

You may be hearing a lot about the ketogenic diet as a way to slim down while noshing on butter and heavy cream. This way of eating is suddenly hot among venture capitalists in Silicon Valley, who believe it will help them live longer and healthier, CNBC reports. Some praise the high-fat/ultra low-carb plan for helping them to lose weight and have energy all day long. Other advocates say it finally helped them to get control of their body. How does it work and could it help you? We asked Bonnie Taub-Dix, a registered dietitian nutritionist and author of “Read It Before You Eat It”; and Keri Glassman, nutritionist, registered dietitian and TODAY Tastemaker. To start with, both said they would never advise the ketogenic diet for weight loss. “Cutting out carbs is usually an invitation to overeat them at another point,” Taub-Dix said. “For a diet where you’re looking to lose weight, look good and feel good… I would not recommend a diet like this.” “For safe and effective weight loss, the carb reduction is too extreme,” Glassman added. RELATED: Read inspiring stories of ordinary people slimming down in TODAY's My Weight-Loss Journey Here’s what you need to know: What is the ketogenic diet? It’s a diet fine-tuned in the 1920s to help treat epilepsy. It does help to control seizures in some children, but it’s not recommended for adults “mostly because the restricted food choices make it hard to follow,” the Epilepsy Foundation says. The diet has just recently begun to be touted as a weight loss plan, Glassman noted. She described it as eating “mostly fat with a teeny bit of protein and carbs.” How does it work? Your body normally relies on carbohydrates for energy. It breaks them down into glucose, which is your main source of fuel. If that Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

The Keto Diet Is Gaining Popularity, But Is It Safe?

A new twist on extreme weight loss is catching on in some parts of the United States. It’s called the "keto diet." People promoting the diet say it uses the body’s own fat burning system to help people lose significant weight in as little as 10 days. It has also been known to help moderate the symptoms of children with epilepsy, although experts are not quite sure why it works. Proponents say the diet can produce quick weight loss and provide a person with more energy. However, critics say the diet is an unhealthy way to lose weight and in some instances it can be downright dangerous. Read More: What is the “Caveman Diet?” » What Is Ketosis? The “keto” diet is any extremely low- or no-carbohydrate diet that forces the body into a state of ketosis. Ketosis occurs when people eat a low- or no-carb diet and molecules called ketones build up in their bloodstream. Low carbohydrate levels cause blood sugar levels to drop and the body begins breaking down fat to use as energy. Ketosis is actually a mild form of ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis mostly affects people with type 1 diabetes. In fact, it is the leading cause of death of people with diabetes who are under 24 years of age. However, many experts say ketosis itself is not necessarily harmful. Some studies, in fact, suggest that a ketogenic diet is safe for significantly overweight or obese people. However, other clinical reviews point out that patients on low-carbohydrate diets regain some of their lost weight within a year. Where It’s Helpful The keto diet was created by Dr. Gianfranco Cappello, an associate professor of surgery at the Sapienza University in Rome, Italy. He claims great success among thousands of users. In his study, more than 19,000 dieters experienced significant, rapid weight loss, few side Continue reading >>

Ketocademy

Ketocademy

In an attempt to relay much of what I have learned in my journey into the ketogenic lifestyle, I’ve compiled what I like to call the Ketocademy, a sort of ‘Keto A to Z’ resource for you to learn more…whether you’re starting from absolutely no knowledge of what ketosis even is, or you’re a keto nerd who wants to learn all the nitty gritty details of how it works, you should find it here! We’re just getting this started and built up, so check out what we have here to start with, and know that much more is soon to come (so keep checking back!) Let’s start with getting a basic understanding of key concepts and definitions, before diving into more detailed information the various topics. What Is Keto? Keto is short for a few different words, used interchangeably: ketosis, ketogenesis, and/or ketogenic (pronounced key-toe-jenik) Adhering to a ketogenic diet is a lifestyle that not only helps you reduce body fat and lose weight, but also improves your physical and mental health. A whole host of metabolic & inflammation related health issues arise from the traditional, high-carb, American diet, and a ketogenic diet helps one break away from that through ultra-low carbohydrate and high fat consumption. The core goal of the diet is to reduce our glycogen levels and increase our ketone levels. Glycogen is a kind of sugar that our bodies are able to use as an energy source…a quick and easy fuel source created by the intake of carbohydrates. …It’s a quick and easy source of fuel, but is glycogen the best fuel for the body? As it turns out, not so much (hold on, we’ll get into those details!). …But, you’ve always been taught that the body needs carbs – complex carbs, and lots of “heart-healthy” whole grains, right? So, what happens if you don’t eat Continue reading >>

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

How To Know If The Ketogenic Diet Is Right For You

It’s almost a universally accepted fact that diets leave you hungry. After all, that rumbling tummy two hours after mealtime (not to mention, strict and time-consuming calorie counting) is the reason most New Year’s resolutions fail by February, right? But Dr. Jacob Wilson and Ryan Lowery, the authors of The Ketogenic Bible, say you don’t need to go hungry or count calories to lose weight. The ketogenic diet, also referred to as “keto,” is a dieting method gaining popularity from people with diabetes to CrossFitters. “The ketogenic diet induces ketosis, which is a state where your body is running primarily off of fat and ketones,” explains Wilson, instead of sugar from carbs. “That can occur through lowering your carbohydrates and having very high fat intake.” Specifically, the ketogenic diet targets about 80 percent of calories from fat, 15 percent from protein and 5 percent from carbohydrates. RELATED: Why You Should Eat More Fat and Less Sugar The Upside of Ketosis While this method may have gained popularity among athletes and other hard-core fitness buffs, they’re far from the only ones who will see benefits from this method. “When you implement a well-formulated proper ketogenic diet, you can see improvement in performance and body composition at the same time,” says Lowery. You’ll look leaner and shed fat, but you won’t feel sapped of energy like when you decrease calories. The bonus is you won’t experience the post-meal crash associated with a higher-carb diet, he says. Lowery also says that for most ketogenic diet newbies, there won’t be a need to count overall calories either. As long as you’re paying attention to your diet and inducing ketosis through high-fat and low-carb consumption, most dieters automatically hit a calorie Continue reading >>

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is The Keto Diet Safe? 10 Myth-busting Arguments For The Safety Of Ketosis

Is ketosis safe? The truth is that we can’t say for certain that it is 100% safe. Humans don’t understand everything under the branch of nutritional science and probably won’t for a very long time. As an individual, the only thing you can do is take a look at the research yourself and form your own conclusion. Personally, through the reading I’ve done and the experience I’ve had with the Keto diet, I’ve formed my own conclusion that ketosis is safe. Could I be wrong? Absolutely. But I could also be right. I’m willing to take that risk in order to follow a diet which could maximize longevity, well being and function. My personal conclusion shouldn’t matter to you though. You need to do your own research and come to your own conclusion. I’ve put together this post to organize all of the issues surrounding the safety of ketosis so that you can make your own decision. In trying to prove something to be safe there are two ways to go about it. Disprove the claims of danger Show evidence which may be correlated with safety This article will dispel the top 10 claims people make in an argument to label ketosis as dangerous. Like I said, the science on ketosis is still quite immature. The following data is not meant to 100% prove or disprove the safety of ketosis. It’s merely the information we have available today which can help us form a nutritional strategy we feel is best for ourselves. I’m not a doctor or a researcher. The following information is material I’ve collected in my attempt to feel confident following a Keto diet indefinitely. Most of it is sourced from doctors or authors although I have also included anecdotal accounts from experiences posted on message boards and Reddit. I know, much of the information here isn’t sourced directly from s Continue reading >>

5 Strategies To Overcome Keto Breath

5 Strategies To Overcome Keto Breath

5 Strategies to Overcome Keto Breath The ketogenic diet has absolutely exploded in popularity over the last few years and for good reason. The benefits of a low-carb, high-fat, moderate-protein diet are astounding and include improvements in inflammation, metabolism, brain function, and the list goes on. Because I often recommend this type of eating style, I have become well aware of some of the challenges that people face when making the switch and one of the biggest complaints I get is keto breath. Shortly after beginning a ketogenic or low-carb diet many people report a persistent breath odor or bad taste in the mouth. This is very common and fortunately it can be negated when you follow the right steps. This article goes over 5 strategies to overcome keto breath naturally. Causes of Keto-Breath A ketogenic diet has many great health benefits, including reducing inflammation and improving fat burning and brain function. While ketones have an incredible therapeutic impact in our body, they also cause a fruity breath. However, many times the cause of the bad breath is not the ketones…but excess protein or possibly poor oral hygiene or digestive distress. When it comes down to it, there are only two primary causes of bad breath that are directly related to a ketogenic eating style and they are: Ketones on the breath and over-consumption of protein. Breathing off Ketones: When we start burning fat as a primary fuel source over carbohydrates our bodies produce different byproducts as a result. The main byproduct of burning fat are the ketone compounds and, although these are what we want for energy, one type of ketone in particular (acetone) is released in the breath and may have a fruity odor in higher amounts (1). There are 2 ways to see if this is from ketones. The f Continue reading >>

10 Annoying Things Your Friends & Family Will Say About Your Low Carb Diet

10 Annoying Things Your Friends & Family Will Say About Your Low Carb Diet

Are there people in your life who pick fights with you about going keto / low carb? Are you about to go keto and worry what people will say? What, are we joining a new religion here, or just shopping in new grocery aisles?? When P first told me about keto three years ago, I had the same response as most people. 24/7 MEAT AND CHEESE DIET, GROSS! But I did my research. Lots, and lots of research. Lots of science. Lots of academic papers, lots of studies, lots of books and Harvard and Mayo Clinic and blah blah blah. I’m now a believer, and after now using keto in practice, I’m definitely on board. I love it. I feel good. Also, it’s not a meat and cheese diet, I eat SO many more veggies now than before. And like most things, when you’re doing something that makes you feel good, there will be people who want to throw wheat bread all over your parade. Since I’ve been talking to others lately who have been feeling harassed by their friends and family, I thought I’d put this little guide out there to share. And please feel free to add your most common annoying arguments in the comments. Annoying statement #1: Low carb diets are so bad for you. Ketogenic is a scientific term, it’s a way of eating that eliminates traditional carbohydrates. There are many ketogenic diets, often called “low carb” diets, and those are all just marketing terms and different formulas for the same thing. For example, Atkins and Paleo are both ketogenic diets, but people associate one as unhealthy and one as healthy because they market themselves in different ways and use different formulas. News flash, not all low carb diets are the same. Annoying statement #2: But your body needs carbohydrates for fuel! OK , so we do have carbohydrates (veggies, etc) but actually, our body wasn’t b Continue reading >>

The Keto Diet: Ketogenic Diet Review & What The Research Actually Says

The Keto Diet: Ketogenic Diet Review & What The Research Actually Says

Should you “go keto”? What are the benefits? Is it good for weight loss? Breaking it down in this ketogenic diet review. Follow my blog with Bloglovin The ketogenic diet has become increasingly popular. Devotees claim anything from extreme weight loss (like this PopSugar story) and increased body leanness, to improved mental stability and improved blood sugar. Well… is it true? Can you really lose loads of weight by eating heaps of bacon, cheese and MCT-oil infused coffee? Let’s dive in. Ketogenic Diet Review What is the ketogenic diet? The ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate (usually ≤20-50 net grams carb per day), very high fat diet (80-90% of total calories), with moderate protein (~1 g per kilogram body weight), that results in ketosis. Basically this translates to a lot of meat, heavy cream, cheese, butter, oils, and some very low carbohydrate, non-starchy vegetables (e.g. bok choy, cucumber, lettuce, zucchini, peppers, cauliflower, and just a few others). Breads, pastas, fruit, beans, legumes, milk or yogurt and most other vegetables are are off-limits. Historically, the ketogenic diet has been used in intractable seizure or epilepsy (AKA seizures that don’t respond to medication), especially in kids but also more recently in adults (1, 2). In the mainstream world, the ketogenic diet has picked up steam as a new health beacon, especially for weight loss. What does ketosis mean? Carbohydrate, or glucose, is your body’s favorite source of fuel. When the body’s in a state of ketosis, it has switched from using glucose as the primary fuel source to using fat as the primary fuel source. This only happens during periods of severe calorie restriction (including, but not only in, starvation) or severe carb restriction. During this process, the body w Continue reading >>

What Is Ketosis?

What Is Ketosis?

"Ketosis" is a word you'll probably see when you're looking for information on diabetes or weight loss. Is it a good thing or a bad thing? That depends. Ketosis is a normal metabolic process, something your body does to keep working. When it doesn't have enough carbohydrates from food for your cells to burn for energy, it burns fat instead. As part of this process, it makes ketones. If you're healthy and eating a balanced diet, your body controls how much fat it burns, and you don't normally make or use ketones. But when you cut way back on your calories or carbs, your body will switch to ketosis for energy. It can also happen after exercising for a long time and during pregnancy. For people with uncontrolled diabetes, ketosis is a sign of not using enough insulin. Ketosis can become dangerous when ketones build up. High levels lead to dehydration and change the chemical balance of your blood. Ketosis is a popular weight loss strategy. Low-carb eating plans include the first part of the Atkins diet and the Paleo diet, which stress proteins for fueling your body. In addition to helping you burn fat, ketosis can make you feel less hungry. It also helps you maintain muscle. For healthy people who don't have diabetes and aren't pregnant, ketosis usually kicks in after 3 or 4 days of eating less than 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. That's about 3 slices of bread, a cup of low-fat fruit yogurt, or two small bananas. You can start ketosis by fasting, too. Doctors may put children who have epilepsy on a ketogenic diet, a special high-fat, very low-carb and protein plan, because it might help prevent seizures. Adults with epilepsy sometimes eat modified Atkins diets. Some research suggests that ketogenic diets might help lower your risk of heart disease. Other studies show sp Continue reading >>

What This Dietitian Has To Say About The Ketogenic Diet Will Surprise You

What This Dietitian Has To Say About The Ketogenic Diet Will Surprise You

You'll lose weight, even though bacon is on the menu, for starters. This article initially appeared on news.com.au and has been republished here with permission. If you have any interest in the world of diet and nutrition chances are you would have seen reference to a ‘keto’, or low carb, high fat (LCHF) approach to diets and weight loss.Used clinically for many years, specifically in the area of epilepsy where it is used to help reduce seizures, ketogenic diets are also known for their relatively quick weight loss outcomes. Not a new area of nutrition but one that has become increasingly popular in recent years, the question is, ‘is a ketogenic diet the right diet for you?’ Ketogenic diets refer to diets that are particularly low in carbohydrates (ranging from 5-20%, or 20-50g of total carbohydrates and high in fats (up to 75% in total fat). This is as opposed to standard ‘diets’ which contain 30-50% carbohydrates and just 30% fat or less. Diets that are much lower in carbohydrate than the muscles and the brain typically need to function shift the body into a state known as ‘ketosis’ in which fat stores in the body are broken down into ketones which fuel the muscles and the brain in place of the carbohydrates when they are in limited supply. The result is enhanced fat burning and relatively quick weight loss as compared to a traditional dietary approaches. There is no evidence to show that keto diets are damaging to the body. In fact, with their superior weight loss and associated reductions in inflammation in the body, there are a number of benefits, particularly for individuals with high blood glucose levels, fatty liver and significant amounts of weight to lose. The primary issue with keto diets is that the total amount of carbohydrate consumed needs Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

It’s not uncommon for the ketogenic diet and the famous Atkin’s Diet of the 1990’s to get lumped into the same conversation as one and the same. But are they actually different, and is one healthier than the other? Which is more impactful over the long term? There are definitely differences between the two diets, and the real comparison might surprise you! But first, let’s step back and look at them individually. The Ketogenic Diet The ketogenic diet was founded all the way back in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the famous Mayo Clinic. The diet was initially used because it was discovered to be highly effective in treating epilepsy. The principles of the ketogenic diet are based on eating a specific percentage of macronutrients: high fats (60%), adequate protein (35%), and low carbohydrates (5%), to force the body to use what are called “ketone bodies” for energy. In the absence of carbohydrates for an extended period of time, our liver converts fats into fatty acids and ketone bodies, also just simply called “ketones.” Ketones can then be processed into ATP, which is the energy currency of the cells. Now, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood leads to a state known as nutritional ketosis. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet There are several ways the ketogenic diet can help the health and lifestyles of those who follow it. Here are some of the biggest advantages: Blood Sugar Stabilization The ketogenic diet actively helps to lower glucose levels and improve insulin resistance. Without having frequent carbohydrate intake, blood sugar levels can stabilize more rapidly. Trigger Fat Burning Ketogenic diets can also be very effective for fat loss because they ultimately reset your body’s “enzymatic machinery” to burn fat as its primary fuel source Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet For Beginners

Ketogenic Diet For Beginners

I was always an obese kid. One that would eat and drink the same things as my friends, but gain 10 lbs while they somehow stayed young and slim. Things were this way for many years, then one day I’d finally had enough - I was going to start eating healthy and lose weight. I thought I’d do this with the typical diet and exercise that everybody was preaching, but no matter how much I ran or how little I ate - the scale would never budge. Okay, I shouldn’t say never, because there were some times where it’d go down a little bit.. But like every other crash diet, it’d find its way back within a matter of weeks. This cycle continued until my early 20’s and right when I was about to give up, I came across a new diet. One that didn’t force me to starve myself or run a marathon to lose a few pounds, and 4 years later... I can say the ketogenic diet has honestly changed my life. Ketogenic Diet for Beginners: How This Diet Changed My Life I’ll get into the details throughout this article, but I like to start with the good stuff first. The first thing I really noticed was how much fat I was losing. Within 4 weeks I could see a noticeable difference in my body, and it wasn’t just in my face, arms, or legs - I was starting to lose belly fat as well. That was huge for me as no matter what I did, this was an area that would never budge - even when I was crash dieting. And on top of that, I was actually working out less. I knew this diet was going to cause some energy issues in the first few weeks, so instead of doing my daily jog or gym workout - I was just walking for an hour a day. In other words, things were going great... but I was still skeptical. I’d had a lot of quick success with every other diet I’d tried, but as I mentioned earlier, the weight always fo Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

The Ketogenic Diet And Insulin Resistance

We recently touched on how you can use the ketogenic diet to control symptoms of diabetes such as elevated glucose and triglycerides. In this article, we examine research showing the impact that the ketogenic diet has on levels of the hormone insulin, a key regulator of blood sugar in the body. What is Insulin’s Role in the Body? Before we look at the research, we need to know our main players. Insulin is a protein-based hormone produced by beta-cells located in the pancreas. The pancreas, which is located under the stomach, also produces enzymes that aid with digestion. Insulin’s primary purpose is to regulate the metabolism of fats and carbohydrates. The digestive system breaks down carbohydrates, such as sugars and starches, into a molecule called glucose. This compound can be used by cells to produce energy through a process called cellular respiration. Insulin allows cells in the body absorb glucose, ultimately lowering levels of glucose in the blood stream. After a meal is consumed, blood glucose levels increase and the pancreas responds by releasing insulin into the blood. Insulin assists fat, liver, and muscle cells absorb glucose from the blood, resulting in lower levels of blood glucose. Insulin stimulates liver and muscle tissues to store excess glucose as a molecule called glycogen and also reduces glucose production by the liver. When blood sugar is low, the hormone glucagon (produced by alpha-cells in the pancreas) stimulate cells to break down glycogen into glucose that is subsequently released into the blood stream. In healthy people who do not have type II diabetes, these functions allow levels of blood glucose and insulin to stay in a normal range. What Is Insulin Resistance and Why Is It a Problem? Unfortunately, for many Americans and other peopl Continue reading >>

Pork Liver Larb Recipe (pronounced, Laab) | Tab Wan – Thai Recipe | Keto, Paleo, Gf

Pork Liver Larb Recipe (pronounced, Laab) | Tab Wan – Thai Recipe | Keto, Paleo, Gf

If you can’t stomach the thought of eating liver, then this Thai liver larb recipe is for you. If you can eat liver, but the pasty after-texture that sticks in your mouth ends up making you gag, then this Thai liver larb dish is for you. Liver packs so many nutrients that once you learn why you should have this superfood in your diet, you too will seek out ways to do just that. This image has all the ingredients. The only ingredient not pictured is the 20 grams of organic palm sugar, about the size of a ping-pong ball. The organic palm sugar can be replaced by a stevia tea we make by brewing fresh stevia leaves (I’ll show you how). This will make the liver larb dish even more low carb friendly. If you’re not going to use a stevia tea alternative, organic palm sugar is the way to go. It’s the lowest on the GI scale of all natural sugars. Not only is this a super healthy dish to eat each week, it’s super easy to make. And quick, too. The hardest it gets is slicing the liver. Step 1. Slice and dice the liver. Actually, don’t dice it. You can if you want, I’ve never done it that way. I always just slice. Step 2. Chop up the veggies. Before you start chopping, start the water boil and get a bowl ready for the sauce creation. Step 3. Mix the sauce ingredients together When you squeeze the limes, try to leave the seeds out. Seeds will contain the most lectins, something best to avoid if you can. To learn more about lectins, I highly suggest picking this book up, The Plant Paradox by Dr. Steven R. Gundry. Not to sidetrack this recipe post, but here’s a quick review of this book. I still consume lectins, they’re unavoidable, but this book changed how I eat and how I cook in many ways. Here’s an excerpt from his Amazon book listing page: Most of us have heard Continue reading >>

Paleo Vs Keto: A Quick Comparison Between The Caveman Diet And The Ketogenic Diet

Paleo Vs Keto: A Quick Comparison Between The Caveman Diet And The Ketogenic Diet

If you are a diet and nutrition newbie, you can be excused for thinking that the paleo diet and the keto diets are pretty much the same thing. The names sound similar, they’re both low-carb, and they can both result in weight loss…tomayto, tomahto right? Well, no. A closer study of each will reveal that while there are some similarities, there are also pronounced differences that distinguish the paleo diet plan from keto. Today, we’re looking at both – the similarities and the differences. And just as there are some who say a true ketogenic diet is one wherein carb intake remains 5% of your total calories, hardcore paleo dieters please forgive me if I seem a little too lenient on what the paleo plan really looks like. What is the Paleo Diet? The meal plan for the paleo diet, or caveman diet, centers around eating the way early humans ate during the Paleolithic Era. In short, this means: lots of meat, eggs, nuts, seeds, and non-starchy vegetables. Paleo dieters avoid grains, dairy, alcohol, trans fats, and refined sugar. If the cavemen didn’t eat it, you don’t eat it. The idea behind paleo is that by adopting the same diet cavemen ate before the advent of agriculture (as we know it), paleo dieters can eliminate the risk of developing modern-day diseases like clogged arteries, diabetes, and other metabolic diseases. The cavemen pre-agriculture ancestors didn’t have abundant access to dairy (milk was for baby animals, not humans!) or grains, and instead they ate what they could hunt and gather: meat and plants. They didn’t have bags of refined sugar and chocolate to snack on, nor did they have granaries and flour mills to give them bread and grain-based foods. It’s thought that agriculture and industry rushed our digestive systems into places they were ne Continue reading >>

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