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How Is Ketogenic Different From Atkins

What Is The Difference Between Atkins And The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Difference Between Atkins And The Ketogenic Diet?

What Is The Atkins Diet? Developed in the 1970’s by Dr. Robert C. Atkins, the Atkins Program targets anyone whose objective is to lose weight, restore metabolic efficiency (shift from carbohydrate to fat burner), stabilize insulin, reduce inflammation, as well as prevent and manage cardio-metabolic disorders, including the infamous Type 2 Diabetes. The Atkins Program is restricted in carbohydrates and is “optimal” in protein consumption. Additionally, fats are to be consumed from the perspective, “Savor DON’T Smother”(1,2). How Do You Start an Atkins Diet? The Program is structured into 4 quantitative Phases (2). As an individual progresses throughout the 4 Phases of the Program, there is a slow and steady increase in carbohydrates in order to help identify one’s personal carbohydrate tolerance while simultaneously educating individuals on how to make Atkins a lifestyle rather than just a diet. The protein intake throughout all 4 Phases will also be individualized and can be dictated by a variety of factors including height and activity level. Typically, three, 4-6 ounce (men may exceed) servings of protein per day are suggested. If an individual is having difficulty losing weight during any of the phases, a closer monitoring, and perhaps a decrease in protein and/or “net” carbs is advised. Depending on how much weight loss needs to be achieved, in addition to pinpointing one’s carbohydrate tolerance, the amount of time spent within each of the Phases will vary among individuals. What is the Purpose of the Atkins Diet? Through implementation of this carbohydrate-restricted approach, and thus achievement of insulin stability, there is a metabolic switch in one’s energy substrates from carbohydrates to fats. Not only will this result in the utilizati Continue reading >>

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

What Are The Differences Between The Ketogenic, Atkins, And Paleo Diets?

“There are a lot of similarities between Paleolithic (Paleo) and ketogenic diets (KD), particularly when compared to the now discredited ‘Standard American’ low fat, high carbohydrate diet. As a result, people may reasonably assume that all low carb diets are pretty much equal in their nutrient contents and physiological benefits. Unfortunately, this is far from the truth, and the resultant confusion has distracted us from fully understanding how best to apply carbohydrate-restriction to improve individual well-being and function. The similarities between Paleo and keto cluster around what they exclude: all grains and grain products (refined and unrefined), peas and beans, and refined sugars. In addition, the paleo diet excludes all dairy (milk, cream, and cheese), whereas the ketogenic diet allows butter, full fat cream and natural cheeses. The differences between the Paleo diet and KD are many, including: Range of foods allowed Recommended amounts of protein Amounts and sources of carbohydrates allowed or recommended Type, quality, and quantity of science supporting diet safety and efficacy Most importantly, the source and consistency of fuel to supply brain energy needs – specifically the availability of ketones at adequate levels to replace glucose as the brain’s primary fuel” “This diagram points out the similarities between ketogenic and Paleo diets, especially when compared to the now discredited low fat diets of the past. But clearly the Paleo and well-formulated ketogenic diets nonetheless are different, with little overlap in their respective compositions. Thus the major metabolic difference between Paleo and KD is encompassed in the phrase ‘nutritional ketosis’. By definition, a ‘ketogenic diet’ allows your body to be in nutritional keto Continue reading >>

Keto Vs. Paleo Diets: What's The Difference?

Keto Vs. Paleo Diets: What's The Difference?

Both the Keto and the paleo diet share their low-carb DNA, but have been developed for vastly different purposes. Thanks to Robert Atkins, low-carb diets are incredibly popular, but two of these diets have been unfairly lumped together. The ketogenic and Paleolithic diets focus on some of the same basic principles, but differ greatly in outcome. The difference: What it Means to be Ketogenic It is important to note that historically the ketogenic diet is a tool for disease management, not weight loss. It is a common dietary intervention for conditions such as epilepsy, for example. The goal is to force the body into a state of ketosis— the process of the body burning stored fat. On this plan, you achieve ketosis through fasting, the reduction of carbohydrates and the increase of dietary fat. A 2004 study published in Experimental & Clinical Cardiology found that long-term adherence to a ketogenic diet may: Reduce body mass Lower blood LCD and glucose Increase the level of HDL or "good" cholesterol The incredible piece here is that this diet actually seems to treat epilepsy very well, but there is a catch; it's incredibly difficult to tolerate. According to WebMd, the diet prescribes that dieters to consume three calories of fat for every calorie of protein or carbohydrate. That's a lot of fat. WebMd explains: "A meal might include a small portion of chicken, a little bit of fruit, and a lot of fat, typically butter or cream. Frankly, it's a difficult diet to swallow. What is the Paleolithic Diet? The Paleo plan focuses more on eating meat under the assumption that early cave dwellers had limited access to grain and greens, and thus were "made" to eat a diet primarily composed of protein. Practitioners of this plan focus on getting energy from animal products that are h Continue reading >>

Atkins Vs Keto: Here's The Truth About Keto And Atkins

Atkins Vs Keto: Here's The Truth About Keto And Atkins

I'm going to be honest here. If you do a Google Trends search that compares the Keto Diet to Atkins, the Keto Diet is kicking Atkins' butt. In fact, the Atkins Diet itself has been losing traction over the past year and is sinking in interest, even without the competition between Atkins and Keto followers. Part of the reason is that Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. (the ANA) has been trying to improve the Old-School Atkins way of eating over the past few years by moving toward a more socially accepted low-glycemic diet, limiting the protein allowed on Atkins 20, and bringing in a higher-carb Atkins 40 to attract younger adults -- none of which works as well as the original, individualized low-carb diet does. With two out of every three Americans either overweight or obese today, reaching out to Millennials with mild insulin resistance isn't working as well as the ANA had hoped. The flesh-and-blood of the Atkins Diet are the baby boomers, but the ANA seems to have forgotten that. However, the popularity of the Keto Diet has only risen over the past year. More troublesome is that the number one result in Google search results for "Atkins vs Keto" is telling readers that the Atkins Diet fell out of popularity because: "people were getting sick, gaining weight over the long term, or increasing their blood lipid profile." Other claims included "heavy encouragement" to eat whatever you wanted whenever you wanted, as long as it was low in carbs, which has never been a part of the Atkins Diet. Supposedly, this low-carb free-for-all led to massive overeating, causing severe health problems, but in all of the decades that I have been involved in the low-carb movement, I have never seen that happen to anyone eating Atkins. The drop in popularity is more likely a result of the confusion t Continue reading >>

Ketogenic – Is This The New Atkins?

Ketogenic – Is This The New Atkins?

As America looks for an answer to obesity and type-2 Diabetes, the diet industry responded with Keto. Different from Atkins, Keto doesn’t place as much of a focus on protein. Keto predated Atkins in the 60’s but Atkins brought the low carb phenomenon into the public eye. See Dr. Oz and Dr. Axe discuss these diets. Dr. Axe really recommends this to people who have issues with insulin, it isn’t a diet he recommends to everyone. It is wise also to note, Dr. Oz reports on topics. He is not a nutritionist and so it would be wise to investigate if this diet accommodates your health needs. There are several versions of the ketogenic diet, including: Standard ketogenic diet: This is a very low-carb, moderate-protein and high-fat diet. It typically contains 75% fat, 20% protein and only 5% carbs. Cyclical ketogenic diet: This diet involves periods of higher-carb refeeds, such as 5 ketogenic days followed by 2 high-carb days. Targeted ketogenic diet: This diet allows you to add carbs around workouts. High-protein ketogenic diet: This is similar to a standard ketogenic diet, but includes more protein. The ratio is often 60% fat, 35% protein and 5% carbs.* Most people would focus on the standard ketogenic diet as that is the “gateway” keto diet. Like Atkins, it relies on Ketosis and your bodies’ ability to reach this state so that it begins to burn off weight. Ketones are small molecules your body produces because you are short on sugar (glucose). It’s imperative to stay in the state of Ketosis so your body continues to burn fuel throughout the process and you continue to lose weight. What can you eat: Fatty fish: Such as salmon, trout, tuna and mackerel. Eggs: Look for pastured or omega-3 whole eggs. (organic recommended) Butter and cream: Grass fed is preferred. Try Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet Vs Ketogenic Diet – What’s The Difference?

Atkins Diet Vs Ketogenic Diet – What’s The Difference?

Atkins Diet VS Ketogenic Diet Mostly whenever we want to start off a diet we just either start doing it very strictly or we just do not follow a certain regime regularly at all. The initial problem lies within the level of motivation and mental strength because with dieting comes a lot of sacrifice of all those mouth-watering delicious food that you previously used to take without giving it a second thought and now have to think 100 times before looking at it even. Besides lack of motivation, the second major dilemma of going on to a diet that most of the times we do not do proper research and just start cutting off meals directly which does more harm than good to our body. Before starting off a particular diet you need to identify a few things like your body type whether you are obese or chubby, which factors that you are taking in excess that are making you gain weight, whether your diet is more carb containing or more fats oriented. Identifying multiple similar kinds of factors is important because there are many types of diet plans which are different for different kinds of people. This is the purpose of this blog post, we would be discussing the difference between ketogenic and Atkin’s diet by comparing them via pros and cons; Atkin’s Diet: This diet is generally believed to be the induction phase of the ketogenic diet. It is usually perceived as low carb, high energy and high fat diet. This diet is usually adapted once sufficient amount of weight has been lost via keto diet plan. This diet plan is believed to not bring back the lost weight and keep the body in an equilibrium. However there are always two sides of a coin similarly, this diet plan has some pros and cons. Some of these are as follow; Pros: Better blood lipid levels: Following this diet has showed Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Vs Atkins Diet Which Is Better?

Ketogenic Diet Vs Atkins Diet Which Is Better?

If you compare the popularity of keto and Atkins diet, a keto diet is way more popular and steadily rising. An Atkins diet plan was super popular in the 1990s and early 2000s, but people are slowly starting to lose interest in its appeal. People tended to eat anything high in protein disregarding the long-term harmful effects of eating processed foods. Also, those who lost weight gained the weight back over the years. However, many people still look for info on the Atkins and LCHF diets. Sometimes even thinking they are the same thing or a similar method of eating. Of course, they are not! Here we will discuss the differences between Atkins vs. Keto. The Atkins Diet The Atkins Diet is often known as a high protein high-fat diet. You basically eat as much protein and fat as you want while avoiding high-carb foods. It works for many people for the main reason of keeping people full for longer. The Atkins diet consists of 4 different phases including: An Induction Phase Induction proceeds for 2 weeks. Its beginning period is where rapid weight loss happens and is mostly water weight. Balancing Your Diet The second phase is the balancing phase, and it’s all about finding the correct amount of carbs to eat while still losing weight. There are plenty of options when reintroducing carbs with snack bars and meal replacement drinks. Eating More Carbs The third phase is gradually increasing net carbs and fine-tuning your diet while maintaining weight loss. It allows you to reintroduce your favorite high carb fruits, veggies, whole grains, etc. Staying the Same Weight The final phase is maintenance where complex carbs and high-carb foods are allowed providing weight does not increase. Pros and Cons of an Atkins Diet The mainly positive of an Atkins Diet is the ability to lose we Continue reading >>

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

Dietary Showdown! Paleo Vs. Keto Vs. Atkins!

DIETARY SHOWDOWN! PALEO VS. KETO VS. ATKINS! Hey there Fit Farmers! As you know, our approach to nutrition and eating here on the farm is all about real food for the real world. Most dieting scenarios end in disaster due to the inability to keep up the restrictive measure of calories or carbs or some other ingredient involved, which is why our approach differs from most most of the mainstream nutritional plans and lifestyles. But what if your specific body chemistry actually responds really well to a particular nutritional plan? Today we’re going to talk specifically about Keto, Atkins and Paleo. Often lumped together under the heading of “low carb fad diets”, these eating methodologies actually have very significant differences. Is one superior? Is one right for your body chemistry? Can they be used as short term “boost measures” to kickstart better health, rest and weight loss? In today’s post we’ll take a deeper dive into each of these diet types and see if we can come up with some answers, so hang on tight! THE PALEO DIET The name of this diet is taken from the Paleolithic period of human development, in which cavemen first began to use stone tools and sharpened points to hunt with, and also began to control and use fire. Regardless of your views on history and anthropology, the theme of the diet is to only eat what foods were available to these ‘Paleolithic peoples’ as they roamed about hunting and gathering — primarily meat, eggs, fish, and fresh fruits and vegetables. This is done in the belief that these are the food sources that humans are best adapted to rather than the agricultural products and processed foods that came much later in our evolutionary span. Critics point out that (if you buy into the historical basis here) human digestive a Continue reading >>

The Battle Of The Keto: Modified Atkins Vs. Standard Keto

The Battle Of The Keto: Modified Atkins Vs. Standard Keto

The ketogenic diet has indeed gone a long way from being a prescription diet for epileptic patients. Now, weight loss dieters, bodybuilders, and athletes use keto diet to enhance their performance further and decrease carbohydrates on their food. But not everyone prefers the strictness of the ketogenic diet. After all, who wouldn’t love to have bagels or pasta alfredo for lunch? Thus, some prefer adopting the modified Atkins diet, a type of keto that is more liberal than the standard. Maybe you are one of the people who would like to try the keto diet, but don’t know where and how to start. Or perhaps you want to explore the options you have in maximizing fats as your primary energy source. Either way, we hope that this would help you decide which type of keto diet would work best for your current situation. For this article, we would compare the Modified Atkins diet (MAD) and the Standard Ketogenic Diet (SKD). Similarities Naturally, both MAD and SKD emphasizes high fat intake and ketosis as a way to provide energy to the body. And because not one food group can give all the nutrients you need, vitamin and mineral supplementation is necessary when doing either of the two diets. Differences based on the criteria The fat ratio Calories from SKD are divided into 70-80% for fat, 20-25% for protein, and 5-10% for carbohydrates. Some opt the more restrictive route, with little to no carbohydrates to ensure ketosis. On the other hand, MAD has none of these percentages, only ratio, which means 1 fat: 1 protein-carbohydrates. This would require some computing. To put things simply, carbohydrates in MAD ranges to only about 20-50 grams per day. The preparation For ketosis to start, SKD requires the individual to undergo a fasting period that could last from 3-10 days. This i Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

The Ketogenic Diet Vs The Atkins Diet: Is Ketosis Better Than Atkins?

It’s not uncommon for the ketogenic diet and the famous Atkin’s Diet of the 1990’s to get lumped into the same conversation as one and the same. But are they actually different, and is one healthier than the other? Which is more impactful over the long term? There are definitely differences between the two diets, and the real comparison might surprise you! But first, let’s step back and look at them individually. The Ketogenic Diet The ketogenic diet was founded all the way back in 1924 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the famous Mayo Clinic. The diet was initially used because it was discovered to be highly effective in treating epilepsy. The principles of the ketogenic diet are based on eating a specific percentage of macronutrients: high fats (60%), adequate protein (35%), and low carbohydrates (5%), to force the body to use what are called “ketone bodies” for energy. In the absence of carbohydrates for an extended period of time, our liver converts fats into fatty acids and ketone bodies, also just simply called “ketones.” Ketones can then be processed into ATP, which is the energy currency of the cells. Now, an elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood leads to a state known as nutritional ketosis. Benefits of the Ketogenic Diet There are several ways the ketogenic diet can help the health and lifestyles of those who follow it. Here are some of the biggest advantages: Blood Sugar Stabilization The ketogenic diet actively helps to lower glucose levels and improve insulin resistance. Without having frequent carbohydrate intake, blood sugar levels can stabilize more rapidly. Trigger Fat Burning Ketogenic diets can also be very effective for fat loss because they ultimately reset your body’s “enzymatic machinery” to burn fat as its primary fuel source Continue reading >>

Ain’t That Nutritional Ketosis Thing Just Another Way Of Saying Atkins?

Ain’t That Nutritional Ketosis Thing Just Another Way Of Saying Atkins?

If I had a dollar for every time I heard some variation of the title of this column, I’d be a very rich man. Ever since I started on my n=1 nutritional ketosis experiment in May 2012 (read my four 30-day update posts: Day 1-30, Day 31-60, Day 61-90 and Day 91-120), I have seen interest that is near-unprecedented in my eight years of blogging about low carbohydrate diet and health. It just goes to show you that despite the best efforts by the media and all the so-called health “experts” trying to discredit healthy low carb living, countless numbers of people who want to lose weight and attain optimal health still believe in its amazing benefits. There’s certainly something there that warrants a closer look for those who have been struggling in their nutritional health goals. Being In A Ketogenic State If you’ve been following a low carb lifestyle for any length of time, you probably already understand the importance of being in a ketogenic state, where your body switches from using carbohydrates to fat — both dietary and stored body fat — and ketone bodies as its primary fuel sources. The late, great Dr. Robert C. Atkins made this key concept the centerpiece of his bestselling books. Unfortunately, dietary ketosis has been severely maligned by Dr. Atkins detractors as somehow being a “dangerous” state. “Ketosis” has a mistaken negative association with the truly dangerous and potentially fatal “diabetic ketoacidosis” that most frequently occurs in people with Type 1 diabetes. I encourage you to go listen to my podcast with Mark Sisson from the “Mark’s Daily Apple” blog in Episode 5 of “Ask The Low-Carb Experts” where we take on this misconception about ketosis. Another problem with using the term “ketosis” alone, as Dr. Atkins did Continue reading >>

Just Like Atkins’ . . . Only Better

Just Like Atkins’ . . . Only Better

This question comes up with some regularity: Is the Wheat Belly lifestyle like the Atkins’ diet? Is Wheat Belly just another name for a low-carb diet? There are indeed some important areas of overlap. The Wheat Belly lifestyle, for instance, adheres to the concept that carbohydrates, not fats, are responsible for destructive health effects and weight gain. We also need to give Dr. Robert Atkins and his low-carb predecessors great credit for voicing their opinions during an age when low-carb was an heretical, against-the-mainstream concept, given the antics of Dr. Ancel Keys, Dr. Henry Blackburn, the US Department of Health and Human Services and others. Atkins, low-carb, and Wheat Belly all concur: carbs raise blood sugar, generate resistance to insulin, add to metabolic syndrome/type 2 diabetes, and add substantially to risk for heart disease, cancer, and dementia. Cutting dietary fat is unfounded, destructive, and wrong. No differences here. But we have the advantage of several decades of new information since Dr. Atkins’s book was first published in 1972, including exposure of the workings of agribusiness and geneticists and the evolving science behind issues such as bowel flora and endocrine disruption, none of which was known or fully appreciated until recently. So Wheat Belly takes the basic Atkins/low-carb arguments several steps further. These are not small steps, but crucial steps that can make the difference between having an autoimmune disease or not having an autoimmune disease, having fibromyalgia or not having fibromyalgia, being infertile or suffering multiple miscarriages or not being infertile and not having multiple miscarriages—big differences. Among the concepts that are unique to Wheat Belly but never articulated by Dr. Atkins or the low-carb Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto Vs Paleo Diets: 4 Huge Differences (+ Which Is Best)

Keto and Paleo are two of the most popular diets of the 21st century. But what’s the difference between them? Which one will help you lose weight? Which one will help you heal your health? A Quick Summary of The Differences Between Keto And Paleo: Focus on Ketone Levels: A Keto diet focuses on raising your body’s ketone levels by altering your food choices so you enter a metabolic state called nutritional ketosis. A Paleo diet doesn’t pay attention to ketone levels. Focus on Food Quality: A Paleo diet focuses strongly on choosing whole foods that are nutrient-dense, high-quality, and free from toxins. A healthy Keto diet should also include high quality food, but this isn’t the emphasis. Amount of Carbs: A Keto diet has a very low carbohydrate intake. While a Paleo diet is certainly lower in carbs than many other diets out there, it typically still has a higher carb intake than a Keto diet. Amount of Fat: A Keto diet puts far greater emphasis on increasing your fat intake than a Paleo diet. Although Paleo does encourage eating healthy fats, it’s not typically as high fat as a Keto diet. This is a very brief explanation of the differences between Keto and Paleo, so please keep reading to discover more about both diets. Want to figure out which diet is best for you? We’ll cover that below… The 4 Main Differences Between A Keto And Paleo Diet: Here’s a more detailed breakdown of the key differences between Keto and Paleo: Keto vs Paleo – Difference #1 – A Keto diet focuses on raising your ketone levels. The Keto diet has one main aim: raising your ketone levels so you reach nutritional ketosis. If you’re new to all this, then ketosis might be a bit confusing. So let me explain… What are ketones? Ketones (or ketone bodies) are naturally produced by y Continue reading >>

Keto Vs Atkins Diet

Keto Vs Atkins Diet

The Keto vs Atkins debate has been raging for years with neither able to establish a clear advantage in the eyes of the public. Both have their passionate advocates and equally ardent detractors so trying to find a definitive answer to which is better can be challenging. Much of the confusion regarding which low carb diet is better centered on the fact that there is a significant amount of overlap between the two diets. But while the overlay is real there are genuine differences as well. Below we’re going to take a close look at both the similarities and the differences between the diets. First a brief overview of each. The Atkins Diet is often called the "Atkins ketosis diet", which you eat as much fat and protein as possible while avoiding foods that are high in carbs. This process has been known to work for many people along with medical proof from proven professionals. The Atkins diet has been highly popularized and it consists of 4 different phases: The Keto diet (read about it in-depth here) was developed nearly a century ago. Like the Atkins diet that came after it (and borrowed from it) this diet relies on drastically reducing carbohydrate intake and entering ketosis where the body is burning fat for energy. There are several accepted variations of the diet: The following table presents a side by side comparison of known issues with the 2 diets so you can better understand the important ways in which they differ. Possible Issue Atkins Keto Carbohydrate Levels With Atkins this changes from phase to phase, starting with drastic reductions followed by gradual re-introduction. Fixed level: Approximately 10% of average consumption. Carbohydrate Monitoring Method Net carbohydrates Total carbohydrates Protein Intake Three 4 to 6 ounce servings of protein daily. Appro Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

How The Ketogenic Diet Works For Type 2 Diabetes

Special diets for type 2 diabetes often focus on weight loss, so it might seem crazy that a high-fat diet is an option. But the ketogenic (keto) diet, high in fat and low in carbs, can potentially change the way your body stores and uses energy, easing diabetes symptoms. With the keto diet, your body converts fat, instead of sugar, into energy. The diet was created in 1924 as a treatment for epilepsy, but the effects of this eating pattern are also being studied for type 2 diabetes. The ketogenic diet may improve blood glucose (sugar) levels while also reducing the need for insulin. However, the diet does come with risks, so make sure to discuss it with your doctor before making drastic dietary changes. Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight, so a high-fat diet can seem unhelpful. The goal of the ketogenic diet is to have the body use fat for energy instead of carbohydrates or glucose. A person on the keto diet gets most of their energy from fat, with very little of the diet coming from carbohydrates. The ketogenic diet doesn’t mean you should load up on saturated fats, though. Heart-healthy fats are the key to sustaining overall health. Some healthy foods that are commonly eaten in the ketogenic diet include: eggs fish such as salmon cottage cheese avocado olives and olive oil nuts and nut butters seeds The ketogenic diet has the potential to decrease blood glucose levels. Managing carbohydrate intake is often recommended for people with type 2 diabetes because carbohydrates turn to sugar and, in large quantities, can cause blood sugar spikes. If you already have high blood glucose, then eating too many carbs can be dangerous. By switching the focus to fat, some people experience reduced blood sugar. The Atkins diet is one of the most famous low-carb, high-p Continue reading >>

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