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How Is Glucose Stored As Fat In The Body?

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You Gotta Check This Website Out! http://healingideas.org/ Link to the Study - https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/comp... Recommended Supplements - Jarrow Formulas L-Carnitine, Supports Brain, Memory, Energy, Cardiovascular Health, 500 mg, 50 Caps http://amzn.to/2DzC13P L-Carnitine is an amino acid found in high concentrations in heart and liver tissues where; inside the cells (mitochondria); L-Carnitine helps transform fats into energy. L-Carnitine also facilitates the metabolism of carbohydrates and enhances ATP (i.e.; energy) production. L-Carnitine works synergistically with Co-Q10; an antioxidant and energy cofactor that is found in the inner membrane of the mitochondria.Keep out of the reach of children. Carnitine Fat Metabolism, Mitochondria, Muscles, Heart, Energy, Liver, Brain, Blood Cells, Membranes, Lungs, Pancreas, Gastrointestinal Carnitine is a popular amino acid with fitness enthusiasts and helps maintain lean body mass However, carnitine is actually more closely related to the family of B vitamins than amino acids Carnitine is also an alcohol. Thus, carnitine is an unusual amino acid and has different functions than most other amino acids, which are most usually emplo

Glucose - Storage Of Energy In Muscles Vs Fat Depos - Biology Stack Exchange

The regulation of metabolites and signals in general (glucose (Glc) or FFA in this case) and their selective uptake by cells, depends on the number (from few hundreds to many thousands) of receptors expressed and displayed to the surrounding environment, the type of receptors (what they can bind, and do as a result) and their properties. The regulation of glucose storage and use in muscle cells is determined largely by the dynamic energy state of the cell, which is can be described (to first approx at least) as the cellular equilibrium between ATP<-->ADP<-->AMP. The key here is to be aware that nothing is happening in isolation and the whole metabolism of the cell is one giant equilibrium. You make a change at one place that will result in proportional changes elsewhere to compensate. If you start exercising, that is using ATP rapidsly, suddenly AMP spikes, the increase in [AMP] results in the upregulation of key enzymes in Glycolytic and TCA pathways, which causes and increase in ATP producting. How much is made? Whenever possible always just enough enough to meet the demand (assuming cell has resources to supply it and manufacture it). Absolutely, in the same way, the energy sta Continue reading >>

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  1. SopranoKris

    Think about what is occurring physiologically in the body during each: acidosis is an abundance of H+. What is that going to do to the body? If it's respiratory acidosis, what is the body going to do naturally to correct it? (Hint: think too much CO2). If it's metabolic acidosis, elevated K+ can lead to seizures, coma or can even be fatal, for example diabetic ketoacidosis. The body has gained too much acid or lost too much base (e.g. diarrhea)
    If it's alkalosis, the body has lost too much acid or gained too much base (e.g. vomiting). Having too little K+ can cause cramping, weakness, etc.
    What other effects can you think of?

  2. EmxoRenee

    Thanks for your response!
    This is what I've been trying to do. I try to think about why the imbalance has happened, and what is causing it to help me determine signs and symptoms. I think where I get confused is because the body then tries to compensate through whichever system is not causing the imbalance.
    For example, with respiratory alkalosis. I know it can be caused by hyperventilation. But then my thought process is that the body would try to hypoventilate to hold onto some CO2 to gain acid and bring the ph back into balance. But I'm not sure if this is actually correct or not.
    I dont know if i just overthink it, or if I'm getting the different signs and symptoms mixed up. This topic just overwhelms me a bit!
    Thanks so much for your help! ☺

  3. Esme12

    Normal values:
    PH = 7.35 - 7.45
    C02 = 35 - 45
    HC03 = 21-26
    Respiratory acidosis = low ph and high C02
    hypoventilation (eg: COPD, narcs or sedatives, atelectasis)
    *Compensated by metabolic alkalosis (increased HC03)
    For example:
    ph 7.20 C02 60 HC03 24 (uncompensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.33 C02 55 HC03 29 (partially compensated respiratory acidosis)
    ph 7.37 C02 60 HC03 37 (compensated respiratory acidosis)
    Respiratory alkalosis : high ph and low C02
    hyperventilation (eg: anxiety, PE, pain, sepsis, brain injury)
    *Compensated by metabolic acidosis (decreased HC03)
    examples:
    ph 7.51 C02 26 HC03 25 (uncompensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.47 C02 32 HC03 20 (partially compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    ph 7.43 C02 30 HC03 19 (compensated respiratory alkalosis)
    Metabolic acidosis : low ph and low HC03
    diabetic ketoacidosis, starvation, severe diarrhea
    *Compensated by respiratory alkalosis (decreased C02)
    examples:
    ph 7.23 C02 36 HC03 14 (uncompensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.31 C02 30 HC03 17 (partially compensated metabolic acidosis)
    ph 7.38 C02 26 HC03 20 (compensated metabolic acidosis)
    Metabloic alkalosis = high ph and high HC03
    severe vomiting, potassium deficit, diuretics
    *Compensated by respiratory acidosis (increased C02)
    example:
    ph 7.54 C02 44 HC03 29 (uncompensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.50 C02 49 HC03 32 (partially compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    ph 7.44 C02 52 HC02 35 (compensated metabolic alkalosis)
    *Remember that compensation corrects the ph.
    Now a simple way to remember this......
    CO2 = acid, makes things acidic
    HCO3 = base, makes things alkalotic
    Remember ROME
    R-Respiratory
    O-Opposite
    M-Metabolic
    E-Equal
    Ok always look at the pH first...
    pH<7.35 = acidosis
    pH>7.45 = alkalosis
    Then, if the CO2 is high or low, then it is respiratory...If the HCO3 is high or low then it is metabolic. How you remember that is that the respiratory system is involved with CO2 (blowing air off or slowing RR), and the kidneys (metabolic) are involved with HCO3 (excreting or not excreting).
    Here is how you think thru it: pH = 7.25 CO2 = 40 HCO3 = 17
    Ok, first, the pH is low so think acidosis. CO2 is WNL. HCO3 is low. Draw arrows if it helps. The abnormal values are both low (think Equal). Metabolic imbalances are equal. So, this must be metabolic acidosis!
    Now, for compensation...If you have a metabolic imbalance, the respiratory system is going to try to compensate. Respiratory = CO2. If the CO2 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will decrease the CO2 because you want to get rid of the acid (CO2). In alkalosis, it will increase because you want to add more acid (CO2)
    If you have a respiratory imbalance, the kidneys will try to compensate. Kidneys = HCO3. If the HCO3 is normal in the ABG, then there is no compensation going on. Compensation in acidosis will increase HCO3 because you want to hold on to the base to make it more alkalotic. In alkalosis, it will decrease because you want to excrete the base to make it more acidic.

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Saturated fats, unsaturated fats, and trans fats Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/b... Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/b... Biology on Khan Academy: Life is beautiful! From atoms to cells, from genes to proteins, from populations to ecosystems, biology is the study of the fascinating and intricate systems that make life possible. Dive in to learn more about the many branches of biology and why they are exciting and important. Covers topics seen in a high school or first-year college biology course. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLear

How The Body Uses Carbohydrates, Proteins, And Fats

How the Body Uses Carbohydrates, Proteins, and Fats The human body is remarkably adept at making do with whatever type of food is available. Our ability to survive on a variety of diets has been a vital adaptation for a species that evolved under conditions where food sources were scarce and unpredictable. Imagine if you had to depend on successfully hunting a woolly mammoth or stumbling upon a berry bush for sustenance! Today, calories are mostly cheap and plentifulperhaps too much so. Understanding what the basic macronutrients have to offer can help us make better choices when it comes to our own diets. From the moment a bite of food enters the mouth, each morsel of nutrition within starts to be broken down for use by the body. So begins the process of metabolism, the series of chemical reactions that transform food into components that can be used for the body's basic processes. Proteins, carbohydrates , and fats move along intersecting sets of metabolic pathways that are unique to each major nutrient. Fundamentallyif all three nutrients are abundant in the dietcarbohydrates and fats will be used primarily for energy while proteins provide the raw materials for making hormones Continue reading >>

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  1. marktx

    Hi everyone, I'm preparing to start Ketoing. Doing my research, mentally preparing myself, etc etc.. Now I'm in need of ketone test strips.. I've found a couple of places that sell them online in Australia, but I'm not sure about the honesty or reliability of these sites. Can anyone suggest an online store in Australia to purchase these from? And from what I understand you need a prescription to purchase them in-store..
    Thanks for any help anyone can provide.

  2. Stingroo

    Honest opinion here: don't bother. They're going to be expensive for you, and the data they provide is minimal at best. You'll likely know when you enter ketosis either when you experience the breath in the morning, the excessive urinating in the first couple of days, or the flu (if you get the flu, don't forget to drink your broth).
    The sticks don't really tell you anything other than "Hey, you're peeing out excess ketones," but they don't even measure the important ones for ketosis.
    Anyway, good luck. That's my experienced two cents.

  3. Infernored2937

    Amazon? I don't use them anymore. But I get a lot of my keto stuff from there.

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What is GLYCOGEN? What does GLYCOGEN mean? GLYCOGEN meaning, definition & explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. Glycogen is a multibranched polysaccharide of glucose that serves as a form of energy storage in animals and fungi. The polysaccharide structure represents the main storage form of glucose in the body. In humans, glycogen is made and stored primarily in the cells of the liver and the muscles hydrated with three or four parts of water. Glycogen functions as the secondary long-term energy storage, with the primary energy stores being fats held in adipose tissue. Muscle glycogen is converted into glucose by muscle cells, and liver glycogen converts to glucose for use throughout the body including the central nervous system. Glycogen is the analogue of starch, a glucose polymer that functions as energy storage in plants. It has a structure similar to amylopectin (a component of starch), but is more extensively branched and compact than starch. Both are white powders in their dry state. Glycogen is found in the form of granules in the cytosol/cytoplasm in many cell types, and plays an important role in the g

Glycogen And Diabetes - Role, Storage, Release & Exercise

Glycogen is a stored form of glucose. It is a large multi-branched polymer of glucose which is accumulated in response to insulin and broken down into glucose in response to glucagon . Glycogen is mainly stored in the liver and the muscles and provides the body with a readily available source of energy if blood glucose levels decrease. Energy can be stored by the body in different forms. One form of stored energy is fat and glycogen is another. Fatty acids are more energy rich but glucose is the preferred energy source for the brain and glucose also can provide energy for cells in the absence of oxygen, for instance during anaerobic exercise. Glycogen is therefore useful for providing a readily available source of glucose for the body. In a healthy body, the pancreas will respond to higher levels of blood glucose , such as in response to eating, by releasing insulin which will lower blood glucose levels by prompting the liver and muscles to take up glucose from the blood and store it as glycogen. People with diabetes either do not make enough of their own insulin and/or their insulin does not work effectively enough. As a result, the pancreas may not be able to respond effectively Continue reading >>

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  1. Boykinbaby

    Has anyone done this? I was thinking of giving it a try, cutting my carb intake way back and getting them mostly through green veggies and less dense "starch" veggies and hardly any fruit. My girl is 9 months and still breastfeeding, solids not even enough to consider part of her nutrition yet. Of course I'll up my fat and protein consumption to compensate but advice, tips, ect are greatly appreciated

  2. Renee Lee

    For what purpose would you be consciously entering ketosis for a long period of time? What do you hope to accomplish?

  3. Bethany Lannon

    I'm ebf my 5-month old daughter & I'm also almost to my peak mileage weeks of my marathon training cycle. I have been limiting my starchy veg carbs and fruits, mostly due to wanting to lose fat/gain muscle and also thanks to a carb-phobia I'm still fighting. I'm not sure if its the high running mileage, low carbs (I usually get anywhere from 90-125 carbs per day), or a combination of the two factors but my daughter's weight gain has plummeted. She's still gaining, but lets just say that as of today, she's gained less than 4 lbs since birth, and she's 5 months old. They didn't tell me her weight %ile today, but at her 4-month checkup, it was down to 8.6%. And she only gained 6oz in the last month. So, I'm reluctantly increasing my carbs... I'm going to aim for consistently 150g carbs per day and see if that helps her.
    Obviously with your baby being older, you could get away with cutting carbs *as long as* you start implementing more solids into Baby's diet. My daughter has either butternut squash or avocado 2x per day after nursing, but she's going up to 3x per day as of today (if her weight isn't up more next month at her 6mo visit, they'll talk more about intervening at that point). So, if your baby's primary calories are only coming from you, I'd suggest either holding off on dropping the carbs or implementing more solids to baby's diet first.

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