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How Is Dka Fatal

Is It Normal To Wet Your Bed When You're 13?

Is It Normal To Wet Your Bed When You're 13?

It’s something abnormal at that age and therefore you’d see a doctor as it can be a symptom of an underlying disease. Also, if the doctors aren’t helping, Sleeping on your back may help. Your head can face any direction but the rest of the body has to face up properly. So far 28 men have tried my procedure and have all succeeded, and the best thing about it is that there is no limit to the amount of water you can take before sleeping. The only one woman who tried it didn’t succeed but there’s a very big possibility she changed her sleeping position. For the beginning, I’d strongly recommend recording yourself while sleeping. This will help you know if you changed position because I’ve seen people who’ve failed to stay on their back all through their sleep and not know it. I’d really love to hear from you after a week of trying as it’ll help me know more about my research. Get me on roymbscit[@]gmail[.]com Continue reading >>

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children and young adults carries significant morbidity and mortality relating to complications such as cerebral oedema. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of DKA. We present three cases of DKA complicated by AKI. Case 1: A 9-year-old girl presented with severe DKA at diagnosis. She was treated with intravenous fluids and insulin as per protocol. She had oliguria and haematuria 36 h after admission. She was hypertensive with evidence of enlarged kidneys on ultrasound (USS). She was transferred to the renal unit where she needed two cycles of hemodialysis before making full recovery. Case 2: A 14-year-old girl presented with severe DKA and altered consciousness at diagnosis. She developed oliguria 24 h after starting treatment for DKA. USS of abdomen showed enlarged kidneys. Her renal function improved with haemofiltration and recovered fully by 1 week. Case 3: 17-year-old girl with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes presented with severe DKA. She showed evidence of AKI with very high plasma creatinine, oliguria and low plasma phosphate. She was managed conservatively with individualised fluid plan and phosphate supplementation with recovery in 7 days. Conclusion: Patients with severe DKA can develop AKI due to a number of possible causes, hypovolaemia being the most likely primary cause. Appropriate management of hypovolemia and electrolyte disturbance in these patients can be very challenging. These cases highlight the importance of early recognition of AKI (rising plasma creatinine, oliguria, haematuria) and discussion with paediatric nephrologist to formulate individualised fluid therapy in order to prevent deterioration in renal function. It is uncertain if recent modification in fluid man Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats?

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Cats?

When I was working as a clinical ICU pharmacist, I saw DKA more than once. It’s not something you forget easily. Diabetic Ketoacidosis, medically abbreviated at KDA, is an acute (fast onset) life threatening situation that happens as a complication of poorly controlled diabetes. In a nutshell, when your body doesn’t have insulin, it can’t grab onto your glucose molecules (your body’s energy) to store it. Your body thinks it doesn’t have enough energy to go around, so it starts breaking down fat to survive. Fat breaks down into acidic “ketones” to use as energy. Basically, the blood becomes filled with ketones from fat breakdown and super high glucose levels from no insulin. Most importantly, this often results in very low blood pressure. This is why in an emergency situation, treatment is insulin (to normalize the glucose levels so the body can fix itself), and pressors (to bring up the blood pressure and avoid fatality). More often than not, the reason it happens is simply poor diabetic control caused by not taking the medications, namely insulin. I’ve seen a variety of reasons why DKA happens, including children. Unfortunately, many of these reasons are financial, which could easily be fixed with government healthcare (and would cost the government less), but that is for another time and place. DKA in a cat would be the same as KDA in a human, except in a cat. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Dogs

My dog is diabetic. He has been doing pretty well overall, but recently he became really ill. He stopped eating well, started drinking lots of water, and got really weak. His veterinarian said that he had a condition called “ketoacidosis,” and he had to spend several days in the hospital. I’m not sure I understand this disorder. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body to control blood sugar (glucose) levels. The body can’t use glucose properly without insulin, so blood glucose levels get very high, and the body creates ketone bodies as an emergency fuel source. When these are broken down, it creates byproducts that cause the body’s acid/base balance to shift, and the body becomes more acidic (acidosis), and it can’t maintain appropriate fluid balance. The electrolyte (mineral) balance becomes disrupted which can lead to abnormal heart rhythms and abnormal muscle function. If left untreated, diabetic ketoacidosis is fatal. How could this disorder have happened? If a diabetic dog undergoes a stress event of some kind, the body secretes stress hormones that interfere with appropriate insulin activity. Examples of stress events that can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis include infection, inflammation, and heart disease. What are the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis? The signs of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Excessive thirst/drinking Increased urination Lethargy Weakness Vomiting Increased respiratory rate Decreased appetite Weight loss (unplanned) with muscle wasting Dehydration Unkempt haircoat These same clinical signs can occur with other medical conditions, so it is important for your veterinarian to perform appropriate diagnostic tests to determine if diabetic ketoacidosis in truly the issue at hand Continue reading >>

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

Why Dka & Nutritional Ketosis Are Not The Same

There’s a very common misconception and general misunderstanding around ketones. Specifically, the misunderstandings lie in the areas of: ketones that are produced in low-carb diets of generally less than 50 grams of carbs per day, which is low enough to put a person in a state of “nutritional ketosis” ketones that are produced when a diabetic is in a state of “diabetic ketoacidosis” (DKA) and lastly, there are “starvation ketones” and “illness-induced ketones” The fact is they are very different. DKA is a dangerous state of ketosis that can easily land a diabetic in the hospital and is life-threatening. Meanwhile, “nutritional ketosis” is the result of a nutritional approach that both non-diabetics and diabetics can safely achieve through low-carb nutrition. Diabetic Ketoacidosis vs. Nutritional Ketosis Ryan Attar (soon to be Ryan Attar, ND) helps explain the science and actual human physiology behind these different types of ketone production. Ryan is currently studying to become a Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine in Connecticut and also pursuing a Masters Degree in Human Nutrition. He has interned under the supervision of the very well-known diabetes doc, Dr. Bernstein. Ryan explains: Diabetic Ketoacidosis: “Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), is a very dangerous state where an individual with uncontrolled diabetes is effectively starving due to lack of insulin. Insulin brings glucose into our cells and without it the body switches to ketones. Our brain can function off either glucose or fat and ketones. Ketones are a breakdown of fat and amino acids that can travel through the blood to various tissues to be utilized for fuel.” “In normal individuals, or those with well controlled diabetes, insulin acts to cancel the feedback loop and slow and sto Continue reading >>

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Complications Of Diabetes - Diabetic Ketoacidosis

- [Voiceover] Oftentimes we think of diabetes mellitus as a chronic disease that causes serious complications over a long period of time if it's not treated properly. However, the acute complications of diabetes mellitus are often the most serious, and can be potentially even life threatening. Let's discuss one of the acute complications of diabetes, known as diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA for short, which can occur in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Now recall that type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder. And as such, there's an autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas, which prevents the pancreas from producing and secreting insulin. Therefore, there is an absolute insulin deficiency in type 1 diabetes. But what exactly does this mean for the body? To get a better understanding, let's think about insulin requirements as a balancing act with energy needs. Now the goal here is to keep the balance in balance. As the energy requirements of the body go up, insulin is needed to take the glucose out of the blood and store it throughout the body. Normally in individuals without type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is able to produce enough insulin to keep up with any amount of energy requirement. But how does this change is someone has type 1 diabetes? Well since their pancreas cannot produces as much insulin, they have an absolute insulin deficiency. Now for day-to-day activities, this may not actually cause any problems, because the small amount of insulin that is produced is able to compensate and keep the balance in balance. However, over time, as type 1 diabetes worsens, and less insulin is able to be produced, then the balance becomes slightly unequal. And this results in the sub-acute or mild symptoms of type 1 diabetes such as fatigue, because the body isn Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Dogs

Studies show that female dogs (particularly non-spayed) are more prone to DKA, as are older canines. Diabetic ketoacidosis is best classified through the presence of ketones that exist in the liver, which are directly correlated to the lack of insulin being produced in the body. This is a very serious complication, requiring immediate veterinary intervention. Although a number of dogs can be affected mildly, the majority are very ill. Some dogs will not recover despite treatment, and concurrent disease has been documented in 70% of canines diagnosed with DKA. Diabetes with ketone bodies is also described in veterinary terms as diabetic ketoacidosis or DKA. It is a severe complication of diabetes mellitus. Excess ketone bodies result in acidosis and electrolyte abnormalities, which can lead to a crisis situation for your dog. If left in an untreated state, this condition can and will be fatal. Some dogs who are suffering from diabetic ketoacidosis may present as systemically well. Others will show severe illness. Symptoms may be seen as listed below: Change in appetite (either increase or decrease) Increased thirst Frequent urination Vomiting Abdominal pain Mental dullness Coughing Fatigue or weakness Weight loss Sometimes sweet smelling breath is evident Slow, deep respiration. There may also be other symptoms present that accompany diseases that can trigger DKA, such as hypothyroidism or Cushing’s disease. While some dogs may live fairly normal lives with this condition before it is diagnosed, most canines who become sick will do so within a week of the start of the illness. There are four influences that can bring on DKA: Fasting Insulin deficiency as a result of unknown and untreated diabetes, or insulin deficiency due to an underlying disease that in turn exacerba Continue reading >>

Potty Training: What Do I Do About My 5 Year Old Who Pees In His Pants Throughout The Day?

Potty Training: What Do I Do About My 5 Year Old Who Pees In His Pants Throughout The Day?

Hey, im really sorry to read that your son is having some problems with peeing. Let me tell you first a couple of things as to how I managed to get my daughter to pee in the bathroom and to get rid of diapers. There are a couple of authors you can start reading asap about free movement and the real timing of toddlers. This being sayd, what I did for MY toddler to have a good diaper to bathroom transition was, well NOTHING. I didn't rush into it, nor I pointed out how bad it was to pee or poop in her panties or sometimes in the bed. We let her own biological clock take care of business just by encouraging her and listening to her when she started with this transition. I believe first you should go back and see how did you and your son did this first steps in order to check if there was any rushing/anxiety involved... sometime we just dont see how we try to impose even from a loving side. Then, if you cant find anything, you should widen up the view and see what can be causing you little son to pee in his pants. If its nos medical, then its somewhat emotional. I read your question and I wonder how do you really point out that this behavior is "not ok". Remember, with kids, its not really about "Ok and not OK", they simply dont have this kind of separate lists at such a young age. As you also said, he realizes his pants are wet and he smiles... this is good, you want to avoid any emotional trauma. Instead of playing the "not ok" and the "several times i told him" just try to go down to his level, and really talk to him. You may find why is he really peeing his pants and you can both go and get a nice experience of it. You could also try the cooperative mode, asking him to please help you NOT pee in your pants, and you will help him. Also.. is your bathroom comfortable enou Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Explained

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Explained

Twitter Summary: DKA - a major complication of #diabetes – we describe what it is, symptoms, who’s at risk, prevention + treatment! One of the most notorious complications of diabetes is diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA. First described in the late 19th century, DKA represented something close to the ultimate diabetes emergency: In just 24 hours, people can experience an onset of severe symptoms, all leading to coma or death. But DKA also represents one of the great triumphs of the revolution in diabetes care over the last century. Before the discovery of insulin in 1920, DKA was almost invariably fatal, but the mortality rate for DKA dropped to below 30 percent within 10 years, and now fewer than 1 percent of those who develop DKA die from it, provided they get adequate care in time. Don’t skip over that last phrase, because it’s crucial: DKA is very treatable, but only as long as it’s diagnosed promptly and patients understand the risk. Table of Contents: What are the symptoms of DKA? Does DKA occur in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes? What Can Patients do to Prevent DKA? What is DKA? Insulin plays a critical role in the body’s functioning: it tells cells to absorb the glucose in the blood so that the body can use it for energy. When there’s no insulin to take that glucose out of the blood, high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) results. The body will also start burning fatty acids for energy, since it can’t get that energy from glucose. To make fatty acids usable for energy, the liver has to convert them into compounds known as ketones, and these ketones make the blood more acidic. DKA results when acid levels get too high in the blood. There are other issues too, as DKA also often leads to the overproduction and release of hormones like glucagon and adrenaline Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

The hallmark of diabetes is a raised plasma glucose resulting from an absolute or relative lack of insulin action. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Near-complete lack of insulin will result in diabetic ketoacidosis, which is therefore more characteristic of type 1 diabetes, whereas partial insulin deficiency will suppress hepatic ketogenesis but not hepatic glucose output, resulting in hyperglycaemia and dehydration, and culminating in the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. Hyperglycaemia is characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly in the previously undiagnosed, but it is the acidosis and the associated electrolyte disorders that make this a life-threatening condition. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Pathogenesis of DKA and HHS Insulin is a powerful anabolic hormone which helps nutrients to enter the cells, where these nutrients can be used either as fuel or as building blocks for cell growth and expansion. The complementary action of insulin is to antagonise the breakdown of fuel stores. Thus, the relea Continue reading >>

Cerebral Edema In Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Look Beyond Rehydration

Cerebral Edema In Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Look Beyond Rehydration

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Cerebral Edema in Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Look Beyond Rehydration Department of Pediatrics University of Florida Gainesville, Florida 32610 Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 85, Issue 2, 1 February 2000, Pages 509513, Andrew Muir; Cerebral Edema in Diabetic Ketoacidosis: A Look Beyond Rehydration, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 85, Issue 2, 1 February 2000, Pages 509513, INJUDICIOUS fluid resuscitation is frequently suggested as the cause of the cerebral edema that is the most common cause of mortality among pediatric patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) ( 1 ). The evidence, however, supports the hypothesis that neurological demise in DKA is a multifactorial process that cannot be reliably prevented by cautious rehydration protocols. Mortality and severe morbidity can, however, be reduced when healthcare providers watch vigilantly for and respond rapidly to the sentinel neurological signs and symptoms that precede, often by hours, the dramatic collapse that is typically described in these patients. Children being treated for DKA develop clinically important neurological compromise about 0.21.0% of the time ( 2 ). Subclinical neurological pathology, causing raised intracranial pressure, likely precedes the initiation of therapy in almost all cases of DKA ( 3 5 ). Intracranial hypertension has been considered to be aggravated by therapy of the DKA ( 4 , 6 , 7 ), but in keeping with the physicians perplexity about the problem, even this widely held tenet has recently been challenged ( 8 ). The pathogenic mechanism for this terrifying complication remains unknown. Hypothetical causes of cerebral edema in children with DKA m Continue reading >>

How Does A Diabetic Ketoacidosis State Differ From A Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State?

How Does A Diabetic Ketoacidosis State Differ From A Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic State?

A difficult question to answer, but try to put it in a simple way. Both are same but slightly differ. The root cause of DKA and HHS is lack of insulin effect, so the first key aim of treatment is insulin. While subcutaneous insulin may suffice in less severe cases, intravenous administration is to be preferred in more severe cases because severe dehydration and hypovolemia may interfere with the absorption of subcutaneous insulin. Use of insulin pumps must be carefully monitored by trained staff. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Electrolyte disturbances result from loss of water usually in excess of salt loss; hypovolaemia and severe intravascular dehydration will be accompanied by tachycardia and may give rise to thromboembolic complications (such as stroke or myocardial infarction), whereas cellular dehydration may ultimately cause the hyperosmolar coma. My Mother died on July 13th -2017 7.56 PM because of the same. Diabetic ketoacidosis is the characteristic metabolic emergency of t Continue reading >>

Fatal Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Antipsychotic Medication

Fatal Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Antipsychotic Medication

Abstract Hyperglycemia and new onset diabetes have been described with certain antipsychotic medications and some of the initial presentations are fatal diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). We report 17 deaths due to DKA in psychiatric patients treated with second generation antipsychotic medications. Death certificates and toxicology data were searched for DKA and hyperglycemia. We reviewed the medical examiner records which included the autopsy, toxicology, police, and medical examiner investigators' reports. The decedents ranged in age from 32 to 57 years (average 48 years). There were 15 men and two women. The immediate cause of death was DKA in all. The psychiatric disorders included: 10 schizophrenia, three bipolar/schizophrenia, two bipolar, and two major depression. The most frequent atypical antipsychotic medications found were quetiapine and olanzapine followed by risperidone. In 16 deaths, we considered the medication as primary or contributory to the cause of death. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious complications of untreated diabetes. In this complication, severely insufficient insulin levels in the body results into high blood sugar that leads to the production and buildup of ketones in the blood. These ketones are slightly acidic, and large amounts of them can lead to ketoacidosis. If remained untreated, the condition leads to diabetic coma and may be fatal. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) gets triggered by a stressful event on the body, such as an illness or severe lack of insulin. DKA is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. In some cases, identification of DKA is the first indication that a person has diabetes. Early Sluggish and extreme tiredness Fruity smell to breath (like acetone) Extreme thirst, despite large fluid intake Constant urination/bedwetting Extreme weight loss Presence of Oral Thrush or yeast infections that fail to go away Muscle wasting Agitation / Irritation / Aggression / Confusion Late At this stage, Diabetic ketoacidosis reaches a life-threatening level: Vomiting. Although this can be a sign of hyperglycemia and isn't always a late-stage sign, it can occur with or without ketoacidosis. Confusion Abdominal pain Loss of appetite Flu-like symptoms Unconsciousness (diabetic coma) Being lethargic and apathetic Extreme weakness Kussmaul breathing (air hunger). In this condition, patients breathe more deeply and/or more rapidly The major risk factors accelerating on set of diabetic ketoacidosis include the following: Diabetes mellitus: Type 1 diabetics are at a higher risk of DKA, because they must rely on outside insulin sources for survival. DKA can occur in patients with type 2, particularly in obese children. Age: DKA may occur at any age, but younger people below 19 years of age are more susceptib Continue reading >>

What Are The Most Important Things To Know Before Writing A Character Who Has Diabetes?

What Are The Most Important Things To Know Before Writing A Character Who Has Diabetes?

Writing as a type 1 diabetic ( not to be taken as medical opinion or advice): Whilst one would need to be careful of copyright: the scenes in the movie ‘Panic Room’ where Jodie Foster’s character as a mother of daughter played by Kirsten Stewart, shows the tension created when they fortify themselves in a panic room after criminals break into the house. The daughter who is diabetic has taken her insulin but has little food and is slipping into a state of low blood sugar.(hypoglycaemia or ‘hypo’). The best acted hypoglycaemic episode I have ever seen was by Julia Roberts in ‘Steel Magnolias’ - which opens with her playing the soon-to-be married daughter - someone who has had a long history of diabetes. In my 50 years as a diabetic the following has happened to me or are thoughts that I have had: ( and are not copyrighted !) we were carrying canoes down a mountain to the river below for a week long canoe trip through inhospitable terrain - the drum carrying my insulin and syringes/needles rolled down the mountain and was not found til the next day. Fortunately I had distributed spare kits to others before the descent. ( the glass vials containing the insulin were padded and put in an aluminium container. They survived the roll down the mountain intact inside the plastic drum. The drum did not fare quite as well). I once suffered from a severe hypo and needed some mouth to mouth resuscitation by my wife. Severe hypoglycaemia can cause brain damage. I became hypo once when body surfing but managed to stagger out onto the beach. i was in a hiking party with two of us being type 1 diabetics - the other diabetic was rather unstable with his control and sadly drowned in a waist-high river crossing during the trip. Exact reason for the accident unknown. An acquaint Continue reading >>

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