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How Fast Can Ketoacidosis Occur

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DKA diabetic ketoacidosis nursing management pathophysiology & treatment. DKA is a complication of diabetes mellitus and mainly affects type 1 diabetics. DKA management includes controlling hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acdidosis. Signs & Symptoms include polyuria, polydipsia, hyperglycemia greater than 300 mg/dL, Kussmaul breathing, acetone breath, and ketones in the urine. Typically DKA treatment includes: intravenous fluids, insulin therapy (IV regular insulin), and electrolyte replacement. This video details what the nurse needs to know for the NCLEX exam about diabetic ketoacidosis. I also touch on DKA vs HHS (diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic nonketotic syndrome (please see the other video for more details). Quiz on DKA: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Lecture Notes for this video: http://www.registerednursern.com/diab... Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c... Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-... Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nurs... Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Also see Pet Diabetes Wiki: Ketoacidosis A Ketone Primer by an FDMB user What are Ketones? Ketones or ketone bodies (acetone, acetoacetic acid, and beta-hydroxybutyric acid) are waste products of fatty acid breakdown in the body. This is the result of burning fat, rather than glucose, to fuel the body. The body tries to dispose of excess ketones as quickly as possible when they are present in the blood. The kidneys filter out ketones and excrete them into the urine. Should you care about ketones? YES! If they build up, they can lead to very serious energy problems in the body, resulting in diabetic ketoacidosis, a true medical emergency. If the condition is not reversed and other systemic stresses are present, ketones may continue to rise and a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may occur. This condition can progress very quickly and cause severe illness. It is potentially fatal even when treated. Recognition of DKA and rapid treatment by your veterinarian can save your cat's life. Signs of Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Drinking excessive amounts of water OR no water Excessive urination Diminished activity Not eating for over 12 hours Vomiting Lethargy and depression Weak Continue reading >>

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  1. lauraj

    Hiya, my son Ryan has had d since 6/08 but today is the first time i have had positive test for large ketones. He has had a bit of a fever for a couple of days and has had mainly high sugars.
    I am really worried tonight as i have never had a positive result like this. He is on Twice daily injections but i have given him a bit of extra Novorapid before bed and just wondered if anybody could help give me a clearer idea of what may happen? Thanks

  2. Lee

    I do not really understand the two shots a day theory, so I cannot helpout much with that - but I urge you to be in contact with your endo team!!!!
    Other then that, push non-carbed liquids - lots of them, and he will need extra insulin to clear up the ketones!

  3. lauraj

    Thanks, i rang them and they said to see how he goes through the night but i am still worried sick. I have been trying to get him to drink loads but he is tired so asleep now. I just hope the rest helps his blood sugar come down

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Hyperglycemic crises: Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic coma (HHNK) versus DKA. See DKA video here: https://youtu.be/r2tXTjb7EqU This video and similar images/videos are available for instant download licensing here https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/g... Voice by: Penelope Hammet Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia Hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or HHS, is another ACUTE and life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. It develops slower than DKA, typically in the course of several days, but has a much higher mortality rate. Like DKA, HHS is triggered when diabetic patients suffer from ADDITIONAL physiologic stress such as infections, other illness, INadequate diabetic treatment or certain drugs. Similar to DKA, the RISE in COUNTER-regulatory hormones is the major culprit. These hormones

Diagnosis And Treatment Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis And The Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State

Go to: Pathogenesis In both DKA and HHS, the underlying metabolic abnormality results from the combination of absolute or relative insulin deficiency and increased amounts of counterregulatory hormones. Glucose and lipid metabolism When insulin is deficient, the elevated levels of glucagon, catecholamines and cortisol will stimulate hepatic glucose production through increased glycogenolysis and enhanced gluconeogenesis4 (Fig. 1). Hypercortisolemia will result in increased proteolysis, thus providing amino acid precursors for gluconeogenesis. Low insulin and high catecholamine concentrations will reduce glucose uptake by peripheral tissues. The combination of elevated hepatic glucose production and decreased peripheral glucose use is the main pathogenic disturbance responsible for hyperglycemia in DKA and HHS. The hyperglycemia will lead to glycosuria, osmotic diuresis and dehydration. This will be associated with decreased kidney perfusion, particularly in HHS, that will result in decreased glucose clearance by the kidney and thus further exacerbation of the hyperglycemia. In DKA, the low insulin levels combined with increased levels of catecholamines, cortisol and growth hormone Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. lauraj

    Hiya, my son Ryan has had d since 6/08 but today is the first time i have had positive test for large ketones. He has had a bit of a fever for a couple of days and has had mainly high sugars.
    I am really worried tonight as i have never had a positive result like this. He is on Twice daily injections but i have given him a bit of extra Novorapid before bed and just wondered if anybody could help give me a clearer idea of what may happen? Thanks

  2. Lee

    I do not really understand the two shots a day theory, so I cannot helpout much with that - but I urge you to be in contact with your endo team!!!!
    Other then that, push non-carbed liquids - lots of them, and he will need extra insulin to clear up the ketones!

  3. lauraj

    Thanks, i rang them and they said to see how he goes through the night but i am still worried sick. I have been trying to get him to drink loads but he is tired so asleep now. I just hope the rest helps his blood sugar come down

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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In this video, Dr. Michael Agus discusses the risk factors, signs, symptoms, and treatment of cerebral edema in diabetic ketoacidosis. Please visit: www.openpediatrics.org OPENPediatrics is an interactive digital learning platform for healthcare clinicians sponsored by Boston Children's Hospital and in collaboration with the World Federation of Pediatric Intensive and Critical Care Societies. It is designed to promote the exchange of knowledge between healthcare providers around the world caring for critically ill children in all resource settings. The content includes internationally recognized experts teaching the full range of topics on the care of critically ill children. All content is peer-reviewed and open access-and thus at no expense to the user. For further information on how to enroll, please email: [email protected] Please note: OPENPediatrics does not support nor control any related videos in the sidebar, these are placed by Youtube. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Cerebral Edema.

Abstract Cerebral edema is the leading cause of death in children presenting in diabetic ketoacidosis and occurs in 0.2 to 1% of cases. The osmolar gradient caused by the high blood glucose results in water shift from the intracelluar fluid (ICF) to the extracellular fluid (ECF) space and contraction of cell volume. Correction with insulin and intravenous fluids can result in a rapid reduction in effective osmolarity, reversal of the fluid shift and the development of cerebral edema. The goals for treatment should be a combination of intravenous fluid and insulin that results in a gradual reduction of the effective osmolarity over a 36- to 48-hour period, thereby avoiding rapid expansion of the ICF compartment and brain swelling. Continue reading >>

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  1. ADJITATER

    DKA How long do I have

    What I want to know is if my pump runs out of insulin at 4 a.m. how long before DKA sets in. I will be getting more insulin in the morning. Will I survive.

  2. Stump86

    Even when a pump says empty it will usually still have a few units left (5-10U) so that may be enough to hold you over.
    DKA can occur in just a few hours of no insulin, but you will have IOB for at least 4 hours after your pump actually gets empty. If you are worried you should test for ketones every few hours to make sure they aren't building up. And be on the lookout for any symptoms.

  3. HarleyGuy

    I am on "earth" too, so maybe we are close. I have some to give you if we are close.

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