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How Does The Renal System Compensate For Respiratory Acidosis

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asth

How Does The Renal System Compensate For Conditions Of Respiratory Acidosis?

How does the renal system compensate for conditions of respiratory acidosis? a.) Excreting more HCO3- in urine and retaining more H+ b.) Excreting more H+ in urine and retaining more HCO3- Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: The kidneys compensate for respiratory acidosis by retaining HCO3-, and excreting hydrogen ions. Bicarbonate (HCO3-) is an alkaline substance, and helps to get the pH of blood back within a normal range. This is a slow process, but is the body's best defense mechanism against acidotic conditions. OK, form here on this is an edit of my previous statement. Furball gave you an inaccurate answer. When the body is in respiratory acidosis, and the respiratory system cannot fix the situation, the renal system tries to compensate for this acidosis. Look it up in any nursing/RT textbook. The kidneys retain HCO3- to try to balance the pH. This is the body's way of trying to maintain homeostasis. This is very basic nursing knowledge, and I see it in practice daily. If you need help with ABGs, feel free to email me :) Respiratory acidosis is caused by too much carbon dioxide in the body. For whatever reason, the respiratory system is impaired and can Continue reading >>

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  1. friedrice683

    How many carbs knocks you outa ketosis?

    On the average - how many carbs will knock an average individual out of ketosis. Just want to know.
    Just for knowing - like if one day I accidentally get hidden carbs in via something. Like are you out keto if you go above 30g a day - or is that just a daily guideline to keep you safely in keto?
    Thanks guys

  2. tinyman5000

    Originally Posted by friedrice683
    On the average - how many carbs will knock an average individual out of ketosis. Just want to know.
    Just for knowing - like if one day I accidentally get hidden carbs in via something. Like are you out keto if you go above 30g a day - or is that just a daily guideline to keep you safely in keto?
    Thanks guys

    depends how how much anaerobic activity you do on the day you go over

  3. unkept_

    Test waters, that's pretty much it.
    I used to freak out if I had more than 25g a day, but I found after testing waters, around 50g is my maximum threshold, spread out carbs of course .
    Also depends on bodyweight, muscle, metabolism, exercise, activity, and several other factors, so one size does not fit all.

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How Does The Renal System Compensate For Respiratory Acidosis?

How Does the Renal System Compensate for Respiratory Acidosis? The renal system compensates for respiratory acidosis by increasing the production of bicarbonate, according to the National Institutes of Health. This results in increased levels of bicarbonate in the blood and helps restore the body's natural pH level. Bicarbonate is an alkaline element produced by the body and is essential in maintaining a balanced pH level in the blood, according to Wikipedia. Bicarbonate works with water to create a buffering system that helps restore the blood to a normal pH level. Respiratory acidosis is a medical condition in which the lungs cannot remove all of the carbon dioxide the body produces, according to the National Institutes of Health. The excessive amount of carbon dioxide causes the blood to become too acidic. Causes of respiratory acidosis include asthma, extreme obesity and drugs that suppress breathing. There are two types of respiratory acidosis, according to the National Institutes of Health. Chronic respiratory acidosis occurs over an extended period of time and is easily regulated by the renal system. In this type of respiratory acidosis, carbon dioxide slowly increases, all Continue reading >>

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  1. kmjw02

    Hey all,
    So I have been on the program for 3 weeeks - have lost 10 lbs. I'm pretty happy with my success thus far.
    However, I am just finishing exams this weekend and then will be starting work full time for the summer on Monday. I haven't drank for almost a month and I know its going to very very difficult for me not to drink on Saturday when I go out with all of my friends to celebrate.
    I was wondering if anyone here has drank b4 Phase 1 was completed? How did it affect you?
    If anything, I will be drinking vodka sodas with lime - no sugary drinks.
    Thx!

  2. darbs7

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by kmjw02
    Hey all,
    So I have been on the program for 3 weeeks - have lost 10 lbs. I'm pretty happy with my success thus far.
    However, I am just finishing exams this weekend and then will be starting work full time for the summer on Monday. I haven't drank for almost a month and I know its going to very very difficult for me not to drink on Saturday when I go out with all of my friends to celebrate.
    I was wondering if anyone here has drank b4 Phase 1 was completed? How did it affect you?
    If anything, I will be drinking vodka sodas with lime - no sugary drinks.
    Thx!
    I am starting my 35th week on the program. I did not touch alcohol for 16 weeks (before the diet I drank weekly and more than once a week). I lost 52 pounds during those first few months.
    Since then I have had numerous planned cheat mostly centered around drinks and happy hour type foods.
    It takes about a week to recover from my planned cheats and get back into ketosis and losing again.
    If you drink just vodka with diet soda or just dry wine....I would think you could enjoy the night and not get out of ketosis (I have done this on many occasions), but if you make bad decisions while under the influence and knock yourself out of ketosis you might get frustrated.
    Personal recommendations...it is too soon to go off protocol at all. You don't have much weight to lose and if you give it about 5-7 more perfect weeks you will be at goal and done and happy you did not cheat.
    I didn't even leave my house for 2 months, because I didn't trust myself to make good decisions, but since then I have learned a ton and have come a long ways in the decision making process.
    Avoid the drinking this weekend and by Memorial Day you will be thrilled you did. good luck in your decision.

  3. ontariophotogal

    I personally haven't but have read that it can really mess with your results. This is just my 2 cents but for the amount of money we're putting into this program and the amount of physical and emotional sacrifice it takes to make it through the first couple of weeks, do you really want to mess with that? It will set you back at least a week, which means about 100.00 lost on the program itself, not to mention the cost of the alcohol and the mental cost of trying to get back OP. There will always be alcohol later and sacrifices have to be made in order to be successful. I KNOW it's not easy but it will be soooo worth it if you can resist the urge, I promise. Good luck with your decision

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Acidosis And Alkolosis

The normal pH value for the body fluids is between pH 7.35 and 7.45. When the pH value of body fluids is below 7.35, the condition is called acidosis, and when the pH is above 7.45, it is called alkalosis. Metabolism produces acidic products that lower the pH of the body fluids. For example, carbon dioxide is a by-product of metabolism, and carbon dioxide combines with water to form carbonic acid. Also, lactic acid is a product of anaerobic metabolism, protein metabolism produces phosphoric and sulfuric acids, and lipid metabolism produces fatty acids. These acidic substances must continuously be eliminated from the body to maintain pH homeostasis. Rapid elimination of acidic products of metabolism results in alkalosis, and the failure to eliminate acidic products of metabolism results in acidosis. The major effect of acidosis is depression of the central nervous system. When the pH of the blood falls below 7.35, the central nervous system malfunctions, and the individual becomes disoriented and possibly comatose as the condition worsens. A major effect of alkalosis is hyperexcitability of the nervous system. Peripheral nerves are affected first, resulting in spontaneous nervous s Continue reading >>

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  1. Injecto

    I can't seem to find anything that backs this up. I know that high BG will damage them over time (duh!!), but what about ketones?

  2. fgummett

    Ketone bodies are water-soluble compounds that are produced as by-products when fatty acids are broken down for energy. They are a vital source of energy during fasting -- such as overnight.
    The brain gets its energy from ketone bodies when insufficient glucose is available. In the event of low blood glucose, most other tissues have additional energy sources besides ketone bodies (such as fatty acids), but the brain does not.
    Remember that when you are not fasting, the body can use Amino Acids (from dietary Protein) to synthesize Glucose (Gluconeogenesis).
    Any production of Ketones is called ketogenesis, and this is necessary in small amounts. When even larger amounts of ketone bodies accumulate such that the blood's pH is lowered to dangerously acidic levels, this state is called ketoacidosis. This happens in untreated Type I diabetes (DKA).
    In short, the human body has evolved over the millennia to burn either Glucose or Fatty Acids -- think of these as the short-term fuel and longer-term reserve, respectively.
    So if it is normal to burn Fatty Acids and produce Ketones why would they be harmful unless they accumulate to dangerous levels? Yes I know... we always get the "dangerous levels" lecture but consider that BG can be toxic at high enough levels... that does not mean it is bad for us at any level

  3. REDLAN

    can we get the production of ketones correct??
    The primary cause of ketogenesis in the body is.....
    gluconeogenesis from dietary protein, when there is insufficient dietary glucose to fill the body needs, aka the ketogenic diet.
    The process of gluconeogenesis utilises a key component of the citric acid cycle (oxaloacetate), which blocks the oxidation of Acetyl CoA. Fatty acid (and glucose oxidation) require their conversion to Acetyl CoA. It is Acetyl CoA which is converted to ketone bodies and this process occurs pretty exclusively in the liver (also happens in the kidney)
    Normally oxidation of fatty acids does NOT produce ketone bodies, even during fasting overnight, as usually there are more than sufficient stores of glycogen.
    - starvation is an entirely different matter. Fasting for longer than a day or so can be sufficient for ketogenesis to start.
    Astrocytes in the brain can produce ketone bodies in response to hypoglycemia, but this will not provide adequate protection in the event of hypoglycemia caused by insulin overdose.
    The simple reason why ketogenesis as caused by a ketogenic diet is probably safe is because ketones only transiently rise in response to food, and the levels sustained should not be sufficient to disturb the body's buffer system.
    if however you spent long periods without food, or lacking insulin then that is a very different matter.
    I can't find anything definitive about ketones and kidney function - the only thing of note is an association with kidney stones for children on ketogenic diets to control epilepsy - but this could be due to the components of the diet (high protein) rather than ketones. There are no long term safety studies on ketogenic diets, but they are though to be safe (probably).
    Those on this forum on low carbohydrate diets 50g to 120g of carbs probably do not experience ketogenesis to any significant degree. Significant ketogenesis only occurs at <30g.

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