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How Does The Body Compensate For Respiratory Acidosis

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asth

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is an acid-base balance disturbance due to alveolar hypoventilation. Production of carbon dioxide occurs rapidly and failure of ventilation promptly increases the partial pressure of arterial carbon dioxide (PaCO2). [ 1 ] The normal reference range for PaCO2 is 35-45 mm Hg. Alveolar hypoventilation leads to an increased PaCO2 (ie, hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2, in turn, decreases the bicarbonate (HCO3)/PaCO2 ratio, thereby decreasing the pH. Hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis ensue when impairment in ventilation occurs and the removal of carbon dioxide by the respiratory system is less than the production of carbon dioxide in the tissues. Lung diseases that cause abnormalities in alveolar gas exchange do not typically result in alveolar hypoventilation. Often these diseases stimulate ventilation and hypocapnia due to reflex receptors and hypoxia. Hypercapnia typically occurs late in the disease process with severe pulmonary disease or when respiratory muscles fatigue. (See also Pediatric Respiratory Acidosis , Metabolic Acidosis , and Pediatric Metabolic Acidosis .) Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 Continue reading >>

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  1. dolphingurl

    What does keto breath smell like?

    So this is sort of an odd question, but what does keto breath smell like? My brother and mom have been making comments lately that my breath doesn't smell so great but I'm not sure if it's keto or just something I'm eating maybe.
    And if it is keto breath, does anyone have any suggestions on how to deal with it? What do you guys do? I'm just so worried lately whenever I go to have a conversation with someone that my breath smells horrendous...

  2. VitaminX

    Sounds like keto-breath to me! Some people say it resembles a metallic smell. In my case, I thought that it had more of a hamburger-meat smell. Either way, it's definately noticeable. Brushing often, using mouthwash and mints/gum are really the only ways to cope with it as far as I know.

  3. HighRevinSi

    I've never smelled it before, but you exhale or excrete acetone from the breakdown of acetoacetate (Ketone body)
    If you've ever smelled acetone it is very strong and will make you light-headed. I doubt the breath is anywhere close to that

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Anion gap usmle - anion gap metabolic acidosis normal anion gap metabolic acidosis

Acidosis And Alkolosis

The normal pH value for the body fluids is between pH 7.35 and 7.45. When the pH value of body fluids is below 7.35, the condition is called acidosis, and when the pH is above 7.45, it is called alkalosis. Metabolism produces acidic products that lower the pH of the body fluids. For example, carbon dioxide is a by-product of metabolism, and carbon dioxide combines with water to form carbonic acid. Also, lactic acid is a product of anaerobic metabolism, protein metabolism produces phosphoric and sulfuric acids, and lipid metabolism produces fatty acids. These acidic substances must continuously be eliminated from the body to maintain pH homeostasis. Rapid elimination of acidic products of metabolism results in alkalosis, and the failure to eliminate acidic products of metabolism results in acidosis. The major effect of acidosis is depression of the central nervous system. When the pH of the blood falls below 7.35, the central nervous system malfunctions, and the individual becomes disoriented and possibly comatose as the condition worsens. A major effect of alkalosis is hyperexcitability of the nervous system. Peripheral nerves are affected first, resulting in spontaneous nervous s Continue reading >>

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  1. bluequestions

    I've searched through the forum and still couldn't quite find a certain answer. I understand in the starvation state, body is depleted of glucose and glycogen supply, so it turns to fat for energy fuel. And because fatty acids can't cross the BBB, it has to go through oxidation to be broken down first. Meanwhile, in liver, OAA is depleted for gluconeogenesis so acetyl-CoA accumulates. I guess my question is that why can't acetyl-CoA be delivered to other tissues directly but must be converted into ketone bodies first, where they will be converted back anyway. Does it have to do with the way acetyl-CoA transports in blood? I also read somewhere the reason could be to free up the CoA for more beta oxidation in liver? Thanks!

  2. rafterman

    bluequestions said: ↑
    I've searched through the forum and still couldn't quite find a certain answer. I understand in the starvation state, body is depleted of glucose and glycogen supply, so it turns to fat for energy fuel. And because fatty acids can't cross the BBB, it has to go through oxidation to be broken down first. Meanwhile, in liver, OAA is depleted for gluconeogenesis so acetyl-CoA accumulates. I guess my question is that why can't acetyl-CoA be delivered to other tissues directly but must be converted into ketone bodies first, where they will be converted back anyway. Does it have to do with the way acetyl-CoA transports in blood? I also read somewhere the reason could be to free up the CoA for more beta oxidation in liver? Thanks! I'm not certain that this is the correct answer, but just what intuition is telling me, the acetyl group of acetyl-CoA is small, the Coenzyme A (CoA) group is gigantic with all kinds of nasty polar groups and charges i.e. not going through membrane.
    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/e9/Coenzym_A.svg/2000px-Coenzym_A.svg.png
    I would assume that this cannot cross a membrane without a carrier protein. The ketone bodies have carbonyls in them, which help with the crossing of membranes. Body probably does ketogenesis to allow the ketone bodies to flux out of the liver and into the blood.

  3. bluequestions

    Thank you!

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Acute Renal Response To Rapid Onset Respiratory Acidosis

Acute Renal Response to Rapid Onset Respiratory Acidosis Jayanth Ramadoss , Randolph H. Stewart , and Timothy A. Cudd Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology and Michael E. DeBakey Institute, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, 77843, USA Send correspondence to: Timothy A. Cudd, DVM, PhD, Department of Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, Hwy 60, Building VMA, Rm 332, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4466 Fax: 979-845-6544 [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Can J Physiol Pharmacol See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Renal strong ion compensation to chronic respiratory acidosis has been established but the nature of the response to acute respiratory acidosis is not well defined. We hypothesized that the response to acute respiratory acidosis in sheep is a rapid increase in the difference in renal fractional excretions of chloride and sodium (FeCl-FeNa). Inspired CO2 concentrations were increased for one hour to alter significantly PaCO2 and pHa from 32 1 mm Continue reading >>

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  1. [deleted]

    nuEvery other day I see a post about "Keto-flu" or someone passing out, getting dizzy or having low energy levels. Sometimes people complain of nausea but that is another thing all together.
    IF YOU WANT TO SKIP THE SCIENCE, JUST FOLLOW THE 2 RULES BELOW AND BE HAPPY*
    So let me explain to you what "Keto Flu" really is. Everybody that ends up on a Keto diet inevitably ends up cutting out a ton of processed food. With all the processed food, you end up cutting out most of your sodium intake. We have been told sodium is bad for us, just like saturated fat right? Not exactly, YOU ACTUALLY NEED MORE SALT THAN EVER UNDER A VERY LOW CARB DIET. When you cut back your carbs, you don't end up with blood sugar spikes every time you eat and digest food, because well, your not eating any sugar. As a result, your body doesn't need to elevate your circulating insulin levels to keep your blood sugar at normal levels. Normally, your kidneys tend to store and reuse a lot of sodium, under normal conditions. When your insulin levels are very low and stable, your kidneys through various horomonal mechanisms go into a diuretic type mode, excreting lots of sodium, potassium and water. The net effect is, if YOU DO NOT REPLACE YOUR SALT YOU GET LOW BLOOD PRESSURE. [1] Symptoms of low blood pressure include, dizziness, weakness and fatigue.
    Another aspect of Keto-flu can include the nausea and diarreah many new keto dieters sometimes experience. If you go from a high carb diet, straight to Keto in one giant leap. You are probably going to have a bad time. Let me go over some biology.
    When you eat foods, all your macro nutrients are broken down into their constituent parts such as simple sugars, amino acids, fiber and lipids. When you consume fat, various pancreatic enzymes and bile salts from your liver and gallbladder all work to break the fats/lipids down into cholesterol, triglycerides and other components. ***IT takes time for the liver, gall-bladder and pancreas to up-regulate the production of bile/enzymes in order to accommodate a large amount of fat. If you ingest a large amount of fat and your organs don't produce enough of these things to break it down, you can get very nauseated from undigested fat.
    Another thing that can happen with new keto-dieters is diarrhea. You may or may not know, there is a diverse world of bacteria, yeast and other microorganisms in your gut. Sometimes, they are beneficial and assist in digesting food, and sometimes they are simply taking advantage of a free meal. Every organism in your gut is constantly vying for space and nutrients in your gut, its like a world war 2 that never ends with some sides taking more territory than others. If your like most people and have taken rounds of antibiotics or consumed a standard american diet with tons of sugar/carbs and alcohol. It is like you just wiped England and France off the map and threw money and food out of helicopters to the German army. Basically, you probably messed up the balance of power, letting e. coli, H. pylori and Candida A. to start taking over where they shouldn't. This is called Gut Dysbiosis and is part of the reason Keto and Paleo can be so beneficial for auto-immune disorders. We now know 70% of our immune system is located in our gut ecosystem, and these gut bacteria have connections to our nervous system and can initiate cravings as if they were telling us to feed them with certain food.[2]
    What this means for Keto: Most these "bad" microorganisms overgrow because we ate too much sugar, drank too much booze or took a ton of antibiotics. When you stop eating carbs, you cause mass genocide in your gut as many sugar dependent microorganisms die by the billions from starvation. The rotting corpses of these microorganisms can release chemicals and initiate inflammation inside your gut. leaving you with a few days of diarrhea and nausea at the beginning of your keto experience.
    Let me lay down two rules of happy ketosis dieting. If you don't follow these rules, you probably won't be happy and it might sabotage your keto experience.
    RULE ONE! . Supplement with 1 TEASPOON of salt per day, whether you want to or not! (magnesium supplements can help also)
    Practical considerations: Easiest to dump a teaspoon of salt into heavily buttered vegetables.
    RULE TWO!. If your new to keto, reduce your carbs GRADUALLY to let your stomach and body adapt instead of being shocked into keto.
    Effects of insulin on renal sodium excretion. Gupta AK, Clark RV, Kirchner KA. Source Department of Medicine, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson 39216-4505.
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1730458
    Gut microbiota: next frontier in understanding human health and development of biotherapeutics Satya Prakash, Laetitia Rodes, Michael Coussa-Charley, and Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3156250/

  2. NilacTheGrim

    Brilliant post and the science seems solid based on what I've read as well. Very informative.

  3. Garainis

    And that`s why I felt so awful for the first two days... The day before starting keto I literally drank and ate everything I wanted with high carbs including a sixpack of coke and a lot of bread.
    Day 3 right now, feeling a lot better. It seems that my cardio exersises help to adjust too.

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