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How Does Ketosis Work

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Lose Weight By Achieving Optimal Ketosis

Do you want to lose weight? Here’s number 16 of my 18 best tips. All of the published tips can be found on the How to Lose Weight page. Before we get started, here’s a short recap of the tips so far: The first and most crucial piece of advice was to choose a low-carb diet. The next were eating when hungry, eating real food, eating only when hungry, measuring progress wisely, being persistent, avoiding fruit, beer and artificial sweeteners, review your medications, stressing less and sleeping more, eating less dairy and nut products, stocking up on vitamins and minerals, using intermittent fasting and finally, exercising smart. This is number sixteen: 16. Get into optimal ketosis Warning: Not recommended for type 1 diabetics, see below. We’ve now arrived at tip number 16. If you’re still having trouble losing weight, despite following the 15 pieces of advice listed above, it might be a good idea to bring out the heavy artillery: optimal ketosis. Many people stalling at weight plateaus while on a low carb diet have found optimal ketosis helpful. It’s what can melt the fat off once again. So how does this work? A quick run-through: The first tip was to eat low carb. This is because a low-carb diet lowers your levels of the fat-storing hormone insulin, allowing your fat deposits to shrink and release their stored energy. This tends to cause you to want to consume less calories than you expend – without hunger – and lose weight. Several of the tips mentioned above are about fine-tuning your diet to better this effect. Video course Do you know exactly how to eat a low-carb and high fat diet (LCHF)? This is required for ketosis. If not the easiest way is watching this high quality 11-minute video course on how to eat LCHF, and the most important things to think a Continue reading >>

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

Alright, here’s what the ketogenic diet (often referred to as “keto”) is and the basics of how to follow it. What is the ketogenic diet? For those who don’t know the ketogenic diet is a low-carb, high fat diet (LCHF) with many health benefits. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. The reduction in carbs puts your body into a metabolic state called ketosis. When this happens, your body becomes incredibly efficient at burning fat for energy. It also turns fat into ketones in the liver, which can supply energy for the brain. Benefits: Ketogenic diets generally cause massive reductions in blood sugar and insulin levels. This, along with the increased level of ketones provide the numerous cited health benefits. Ketogenic benefits include: Fighting diabetes Epilepsy control Alzheimer’s disease Certain cancers Cognitive performance High blood pressure control Satiety Weight/fat loss Reduced cholesterol levels The most obvious and commonly cited benefits is the decreased insulin levels. This is why fasting becomes a great solution to people’s type 2 diabetes, cushing’s disease and many other metabolic diseases. Fasting as well as the ketogenic diet increases insulin sensitivity, improves insulin resistance and allows your body to use the hormone insulin more effectively (which is important for fat loss). There are also four different classifications of the ketogenic diet. The standard ketogenic diet is accepted as reducing your carbohydrates intake to 5% carbs, with just enough protein (20%, let’s say) and the rest coming from fats. Inflammation is the root cause of so many of our ailments, which lower insulin levels decrease. Energy use: The basic principle around ketogenic diets is that our bodies first port of call f Continue reading >>

Which Foods Or Supplements Work To Promote Ketosis?

Which Foods Or Supplements Work To Promote Ketosis?

You’re starting to see exogenous ketone supplements hit the market, but it’s important to note that these supplements do not enhance the production of ketones in your body. It is simply a way of increasing the amount of ketones so to speak. The only two things that I am aware of that promote the production of ketones are coconut oil and MCT oil. Coconut oil contains MCT’s (medium chain triglycerides), but isn’t as potent as MCT oil. Some people, like myself, can’t handle MCT oil but are okay with coconut oil. Continue reading >>

How Does Ketosis Work?

How Does Ketosis Work?

The Keto Diet is a diet that focuses on eating foods high in fat, moderate in protein and low in carbs. The diet is said to help with rapid weight loss by forcing your body into a deprived state which gets it burning this fat for energy. Click to read more on the Keto Diet. You may have heard the word ‘Ketosis’ batted around when hearing about this diet too. But how does Ketosis work I hear you say and what on earth is Ketosis? When you are eating a diet rich in carbs or high in sugar, these carbs and sugars are your main source of energy and your body converts them into glucose. Any glucose leftover that has not been burnt is stored in the liver for when your body might need it as glycogen. Once this extra storage space has been taken up, anything that doesn’t fit into storage gets used as fat or tissue in the body. This over time adds to weight gain and fat around the body. When thinking about giving our body energy to function on a daily basis, carbs, although normally the main source of energy, are not the most effective ways of putting fuel into our bodies. Believe it or not, when some people lower their carb intake and increase their fats on a Keto diet, they actually feel like they have more energy and don’t feel sluggish and tired like they did when they were eating more carbs. When our bodies eat more fat on a Keto diet, it’s been proven that the energy provided is actually ‘better’. It can sometimes be hard to get our body to take this ‘better’ energy when we eat carbs, as when we eat more carbs than fat, our bodies take the easy route and go for glycogen over fat fuel as it takes less energy to burn carbs than fats and is therefore easier for the body. If however there is little to no glycogen in the body to be burnt, our bodies have no othe Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And 3 Main Effects Of Carb Restriction

Weight Loss And 3 Main Effects Of Carb Restriction

The ketogenic diet is not only a great weight loss tool, but it has been shown to improve many health conditions. It's any diet that causes ketones to be produced by the liver, shifting the body's metabolism away from glucose and towards fat utilisation. The keto diet is an effective weight loss tool, but it doesn't guarantee instant weight loss. It helps you reach your healthy goals in an easier way. There are three main effects of low-carb diets, including keto diets... Three Main Effects of Low-Carb Diets Satiety Effect = No Hunger Issues Firstly, you eat very sating and nutritious food that makes you less hungry and less likely to experience cravings. It's a fact that people naturally eat less on a low-carb diet. Protein and fat are the most sating macronutrients by far. Achieving satiety and natural appetite control are the most important effects of low-carb eating. Insulin, which is a hormone released when you eat carbs, affects your appetite and with more carbs, you'll experience more cravings. Also see Dr Briffa's article: Contrary to what some may say, fruit and veg not great for filling us up. Low-Carb Diets Are Better For Fat Loss Secondly, eating fat helps your body release fat and lose weight, while carbohydrates have the opposite effect. This has to do with how insulin affects your body and as you may know, insulin is mostly produced when you eat carbs. With decreased insulin levels, your body will use body fat for energy and you will lose weight. Finally, there are studies that appear to support the idea of a potential "metabolic advantage" of low-carb diets. This means that you could achieve weight loss at a higher level than the calorie intake would suggest. When ketones are made from the breakdown of fat in the liver, urinary ketones are excreted and m Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Anxiety?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Cause Anxiety?

Ordinarily no. However there’s some caveats which means “maybe” in some cases: Some of the side-effects can be really unpleasant and may cause some level of discomfort and (perhaps therefore) secondary anxiousness. Furthermore (agreeing with Doug here) if you push too hard for too long this might also cause a further stress response increasing cortisol etc which will feel fairly close to being anxious I suppose. One of my friends who originally joined me on my journey had a very rough time at one stage (including feeling anxiety), such that he basically eventually gave up the diet. Subsequently having learnt more and looking back with hindsight, we both agree and came to the conclusion that he was perhaps pushing too hard too fast for too long and that what he experienced was caused by this and likely a case of stress response, further exacerbated perhaps by real anxiety due to lingering doubts in the back of his head about the diet (he suspects). Bottom line, a ketogenic diet properly followed does not cause anxiety directly, but there may be some symptoms that either feel like you’re anxious, or cause you to feel perhaps secondary anxiety due to their presence in the beginning (first several weeks perhaps). Or you’re experiencing stress that’s close enough to feel like anxiety. (Perhaps the difference is moot.) Anyway, mostly these are due to loss of minerals and can be resolved by taking mineral supplements to compensate (bouillon mix highly recommended in the beginning, as well as possibly potassium and magnesium supplements, off the top of my head) and perhaps backing of slightly. I’m not really in favour of cyclical keto (cheating periodically), however if you run into trouble sustaining a really low carb level for too long, then there’s no shame i Continue reading >>

What This Dietitian Has To Say About The Ketogenic Diet Will Surprise You

What This Dietitian Has To Say About The Ketogenic Diet Will Surprise You

You'll lose weight, even though bacon is on the menu, for starters. This article initially appeared on news.com.au and has been republished here with permission. If you have any interest in the world of diet and nutrition chances are you would have seen reference to a ‘keto’, or low carb, high fat (LCHF) approach to diets and weight loss.Used clinically for many years, specifically in the area of epilepsy where it is used to help reduce seizures, ketogenic diets are also known for their relatively quick weight loss outcomes. Not a new area of nutrition but one that has become increasingly popular in recent years, the question is, ‘is a ketogenic diet the right diet for you?’ Ketogenic diets refer to diets that are particularly low in carbohydrates (ranging from 5-20%, or 20-50g of total carbohydrates and high in fats (up to 75% in total fat). This is as opposed to standard ‘diets’ which contain 30-50% carbohydrates and just 30% fat or less. Diets that are much lower in carbohydrate than the muscles and the brain typically need to function shift the body into a state known as ‘ketosis’ in which fat stores in the body are broken down into ketones which fuel the muscles and the brain in place of the carbohydrates when they are in limited supply. The result is enhanced fat burning and relatively quick weight loss as compared to a traditional dietary approaches. There is no evidence to show that keto diets are damaging to the body. In fact, with their superior weight loss and associated reductions in inflammation in the body, there are a number of benefits, particularly for individuals with high blood glucose levels, fatty liver and significant amounts of weight to lose. The primary issue with keto diets is that the total amount of carbohydrate consumed needs Continue reading >>

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

The Keto diet is not really a diet, but rather a lifestyle change. A Ketogenic diet is best described as a low carb, moderate protein, and high fat diet. This combination changes the way energy is used in the body. Fat is converted in the liver into fatty acids and ketone bodies. Another effect of the diet is that it lowers glucose levels and improves insulin resistance. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the occurrence of epileptic seizures. Ketogenic Diet Macros Typically, the ketogenic diet consists of only 30-50 grams of carbohydrates a day. High in fat Moderate Protein The beginning of a ketogenic diet can be challenging for some who are not used to eating a very low carbohydrate diet. You’ll probably experience a lack of energy and brain fog as your body is in the beginning stages of making a metabolic shift. This shift is simply your body beginning to use fat for fuel rather than glucose. Your brain and body actually prefers to run on keytones rather than glucose for energy. The goal here is to use the fat on your body as fuel rather than glucose (from sugar or carbs) to burn fat and for overall daily energy requirements. For a full explanation as the ketogenic diet, please see more at: Fastest Method to Burn Fat WITHOUT Exercise Continue reading >>

What Could Be A Good Paleo Diet For A 22 Year Old Vegetarian Indian Male?

What Could Be A Good Paleo Diet For A 22 Year Old Vegetarian Indian Male?

I'm a vegetarian (Gujarati) in a similar situation. From what I've read, researched, practiced and observed, here's my spot of advice. (This answer will be disjointed since I'm typing on the go here.) Fitness is 80% what goes in you (the food you eat) and 20% the energy you expend (workouts). Given that you currently follow a regular low-to-medium intensity cardio workout routine (I'm assuming you're not sprinting 4,000 metres), the best option would be to follow a low-carb diet, keeping carbs to less than 50g/day. This will put your body in a state of ketosis, where it burns ketones for energy instead of carbohydrates. To put this in perspective, let's back up a little to understand how the body works. Your body burns different sources of nutrients for the energy it needs in the following order of preference - carbs (including sugars), proteins and fats. Carbs, especially sugars are the easiest to burn, while fats take the most energy, time and effort. So when you eat something, the body immediately looks for the laziest option - sugar (this explains the transient 'sugar-high' you sometimes get). After this, the body prefers to burn proteins, and last of all come the fats. By the time it's the turn of the fats to be used, our diet ensures that we already have all the energy we need from Carbs and Proteins, and the Fats are left to rot in various parts of the body, undigested. I've come to understand that contrary to popular belief, it's not the fats that make us fat, but the carbs that we have WITH fats, that end up making us fat. So don't let the name 'fats' fool you. Humans had evolved to similar to what we are now, since about 200,000 years ago. Until approximately 10,000 years ago, we were basically hunter gatherers, running to catch prey and to save our asses and Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diets - What Are They? Do They Work?

Ketogenic Diets - What Are They? Do They Work?

What would you say if I told you that you could supercharge your energy levels with a switch to your diet? How about lose fat or bulk up using the same diet? Would you like to eat the foods that are considered taboo? Ketogenic Diets - What Are They? Do They Work? What would you say if I told you that you could supercharge your energy levels with a switch to your diet? How about lose fat or bulk up using the same diet? Would you like to eat the foods that are considered taboo? You know... The good foods, the ones with all the fats that really taste good. We are speaking of ketogenic diets (or keto for short). Countless books have been written on this very subject and yet the world does not understand the value of this diet. I keep hearing the same comments: "Man that diet is bad for you." "You will have excessive cholesterol and probably have a heart attack." Where does this come from? A common lack of knowledge! Most of the time we fear that which we don't understand, so we are here to shed some light on the subject and hopefully leave you with a better understanding about this diet. Fitnessman and I have decided it was time to "school" some of you on the effects and ease of this diet. This is the first time we have ever done anything like this together so it should prove to be interesting. Fitnessman is highly schooled on the subject of Ketogenic diets. He has a degree in nutrition and is a major contributor in the Bodybuilding.com forum. When Fitnessman talks we all stop and listen! On with the article... The Problem The most common problem today is what we eat. Modern man seems to have gotten so wrapped up in processing stuff that it actually became bad for us to eat. Many years ago man ate meat! This was his diet. He would kiss his family goodbye and go off in searc Continue reading >>

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

How Does The Ketogenic Diet Work?

Calorie Restriction and Ketogenic Diet Diminish Neuronal Excitability in Rat Dentate Gyrus In Vivo Bough KJ, Schwartzkroin PA, Rho JM Epilepsia 2003;44:752–760 PURPOSE: The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for intractable epilepsy. However, little is known about its underlying mechanisms. METHODS: In this study, in vivo extracellular field responses to angular bundle stimulation were recorded in the dentate gyrus of Sprague–Dawley rats fed one of three diets: ketogenic calorie-restricted (KCR), normal calorie-restricted (NCR), or normal ad libitum (NAL). Input/output curves and paired-pulse relations were used to assess network excitability. A maximal dentate activation (MDA) protocol was used to measure electrographic seizure threshold and duration. RESULTS: Animals fed calorie-restricted (CR) diets exhibited greater paired-pulse inhibition, an elevated MDA threshold, and an absence of spreading depression-like events compared with ad libitum–fed controls. In the MDA model of epileptogenesis, the rate of increase in electrographic seizure duration after repeated stimuli was markedly reduced in KCR-fed animals compared with NCR- and NAL-fed controls. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that CR, by itself, can be anticonvulsant, and treatment with a KCR diet may be both anticonvulsant and antiepileptogenic. Go to: PPrevious experimental studies in animal models have documented that a ketogenic diet is able to decrease susceptibility to seizures and retard the process of epileptogenesis. However, the cellular and molecular events responsible for either suppression of seizures or epileptogenesis are unknown. The study by Bough et al. addresses these issues in normal rats (38 days old) that were placed on a ketogenic diet for 1 month. Control rats received ei Continue reading >>

Metabolic Pathways: How The Body Uses Energy

Metabolic Pathways: How The Body Uses Energy

Metabolic pathways in the body determine how we utilize the macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins and fats) we eat, and ultimately what happens to the fuels that come from each macronutrient. It all depends on when the last meal was finished. If the body is in a "fasting or starvation" mode, energy pathways will behave differently than when food is available. Food is available! The macronutrients (carbohydrate, fats and protein) on your plate are broken down in separate metabolic pathways: Carbohydrates are broken down into glucose by various enzymes. Some are burned for immediate energy, but overall the level of glucose in the blood stream rises, which triggers an insulin release by the pancreas. The insulin acts to push glucose into the cells to be made into ATP, stored as glycogen or when in excess amounts, stored as fat droplets called triglycerides in the fat cells (adipose tissue). Fats are digested in the small intestine, and then packaged into lipoproteins for various functions (ever heard of LDL and HDL? ) Excess fat calories often end up as fat droplets in fat cells. When fats are used as an energy source, they are broken down in cellular mitochondria through a process called beta-oxidation. Proteins are broken down into individual amino acids and used in body cells to form new proteins or to join the amino acid pool, a sort of "cache" for these molecules. Amino acids that are in excess of the body's needs are converted by liver enzymes into keto acids and urea. Keto acids may be used as sources of energy, converted into glucose, or stored as fat. Urea is excreted from everyone’s body in sweat and urine. Body is "Fasting" Carbohydrate, fats and protein are metabolized in separate processes into a common product called acetyl-CoA. Acetyl-CoA is a major meta Continue reading >>

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

Does The Ketogenic Diet Work For Type 2 Diabetes?

You’ve probably seen dozens of headlines about the ketogenic diet by now, which has made its way into popular culture largely by celebrities and supermodels giving the long-standing fad diet a repeated stamp of approval. Is this the diet to follow if you have diabetes? Studies suggest the answer isn’t so simple. Some science shows its meal plan may be helpful, while other research, like one study published in September 2016 in Nutrients, highlights the importance of whole grains in the diets of people with diabetes — a restricted food category in the ketogenic diet. While the keto diet can offer many potential benefits for diabetes management, following it requires pretty serious commitment. So take a beat before you take the plunge — and consider these questions that can help you and your medical team determine if it’s right for you: How Does the Ketogenic Diet Work Exactly? There’s a good reason the ketogenic diet is also referred to as a low-carb, high-fat diet. Indeed, following the ketogenic diet means reducing carbohydrate intake to typically less than 50 grams (g) of carbohydrates per day, while increasing fat and protein intake, according to a review published in August 2013 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. To put that into perspective, an individual on an average, non-restricted diet can easily eat more carbohydrates than that in one typical meal — for instance, a turkey, cheese, and veggie sandwich on whole-grain bread with a small, 1 ounce (oz) bag of classic potato chips would come in at around 51 g of carbs. These dietary changes drive down insulin levels, eventually leading your body into a state of ketosis, during which it is burning fat rather than carbohydrates. What Are Some of the Potential Benefits of a Ketogenic Diet for Continue reading >>

Ketosis Fundamentals

Ketosis Fundamentals

What is ketosis? Ketosis is the physiological state where the concentration of ketone bodies in the blood is higher than normal. This is generally agreed to be at beta-hydroxybutyrate (BHB) concentrations greater than 0.5 mM. How to achieve ketosis? Ketosis occurs either as a result of increased fat oxidation, whilst fasting or following a strict ketosis diet plan (ENDOGENOUS ketosis), or after consuming a ketone supplement (EXOGENOUS ketosis). When in a state of ketosis the body can use ketones to provide a fuel for cellular respiration instead of its usual substrates: carbohydrate, fat or protein. Why does ketosis exist? Normally, the body breaks down carbohydrates, fat, and (sometimes) proteins to provide energy. When carbohydrate is consumed in the diet, some is used immediately to maintain blood glucose levels, and the rest is stored. The hormone that signals to cells to store carbohydrate is insulin. The liver stores carbohydrate as glycogen, this is broken down and released between meals to keep blood glucose levels constant. Muscles also store glycogen, when broken down this provides fuel for exercise. Most cells in the body can switch readily between using carbohydrates and fat as fuel. Fuel used depends on substrate availability, on the energy demands of the cell and other neural and hormonal signals. The brain is different as it is dependent on carbohydrates as a fuel source. This is because fats cannot easily cross the blood-brain barrier. The inability to make use of energy within fat poses a problem during periods where there is limited carbohydrate in the diet. If blood glucose levels fall to low, brain function declines. Relatively little energy is stored as carbohydrate (2,000 kCal) compared to fat (150,000 kCal). The body's store of carbohydrates runs Continue reading >>

How Long Does It Take For The Ketosis Diet To Work?

How Long Does It Take For The Ketosis Diet To Work?

When it comes to weight loss, everyone wants rapid results. A ketosis diet, better known as a ketogenic diet or low-carb diet, helps you lose weight by forcing your body to burn fat for energy instead of carbs, causing you to go into a state of ketosis. The rate of weight loss on a ketosis diet varies, and how long it takes to work depends on how much weight you need to lose, but you may be able to lose more than 12 pounds in a month. Video of the Day Your body's preferred source of fuel is glucose, which is derived from carbohydrates. When fasting, your body undergoes hormonal changes that stimulate the release of fat from your fat cells, where it is transported to the liver and made into ketones, which are then used for energy. The ketogenic diet is high in fat and protein and low in carbohydrates, which mimics fasting to produce ketones and the state of ketosis. How quickly you get into ketosis varies, but can happen in one to two days. When followed as advised, people on a ketogenic diet for weight loss lose weight and lose it quickly, according to dietitian Juliette Kellow. According to a 2008 study published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition," men who followed a ketogenic diet for four weeks lost an average of 12 pounds. The men in the study were able to eat fewer calories without feeling hungry or dissatisfied. It's important to note that this was a small, short-term study, and weight loss results may vary. The concern with losing weight too quickly is that you lose muscle and water rather than fat. Most health care professionals recommend a slow rate of weight loss of about 1 to 2 pounds a week. Losing water and muscle on a weight-loss diet may zap your energy levels and your motivation, and you may be more likely to regain the weight. While ketogen Continue reading >>

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