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How Does Ketosis Lower Blood Pressure

Ask Allison: What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

Ask Allison: What Is A Ketogenic Diet?

Q: What is a Ketogenic/Keto diet? A: A ketogenic (keto) diet is a very high fat, low carb, and moderate protein diet. It has many medical benefits for children with epilepsy, and some people follow a keto diet for its potential weight loss benefits. A keto diet results in ketosis—a state in which ketones, formed from fatty acids, are burned as the main energy source by the body and brain rather than glucose (glucose, or blood sugar, is the broken down, usable from of carbohydrates). Q: What is ketosis? A: Ketosis is the result of a ketogenic diet in which the body produces ketones for fuel instead of using glucose. While in ketosis the body switches to fat for almost all energy needs. Q: What are ketones? A: Ketones are an alternative fuel to blood sugar (glucose) for the body. There are three different ketones (or “ketone bodies”) used by the body for fuel (acetone, acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate). Ketones are produced in the liver from fat as a byproduct formed during the conversion of fatty acids to fuel. Q: What do you eat on a ketogenic diet? A: Someone following a ketogenic diet will consume moderate amounts of protein, high amounts of fat, and very low amounts carbohydrates (less than 50g/day); a rough macronutrient ratio would be 15-25% protein, 70%+ fat, and 10% carbs. This usually includes natural fats (butter, olive oil), meat, seafood, eggs, cheese, and primarily green vegetables. People on a keto diet will avoid sweet, sugary, and starchy foods such as potatoes, pasta, rice, and bread. Q: What’s the difference between keto and low carb? A: They are very similar; in most low carb diets, however protein is not restricted whereas for a keto diet protein is restricted to moderate amounts. Additionally, many low carb diets don’t require the majorit Continue reading >>

Eliminate Carbohydrates - Improve Health

Eliminate Carbohydrates - Improve Health

KETOGENIC LIFE Eliminate Carbohydrates - Improve Health This is our way of not having to say "I'm on a ketogenic diet". It's more than a diet. It's a simple lifestyle change that may save your life. Weight loss is one benefit of cutting carbs from your diet. Wish you could easily lose weight and improve health? The biggest challenge... Overcoming the misconception that carbohydrates are good for you! Short-acting, unstable, relatively low-energy carbohydrates are NOT the body's preferred source of energy. Most people think carbs are healthier than fats. Scientists were paid... To blame fat and cholesterol for coronary heart disease. Paid to hide the harmful effects of the high-carb diet! How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat (NY Times). This bad science set the stage for decades of bad public health policy. Continue reading >>

Should You Go Vegetarian To Control Your Blood Pressure?

Should You Go Vegetarian To Control Your Blood Pressure?

Hypertension (high blood pressure) increases your risk for a number of more serious health problems, including heart disease and stroke A recent meta-analysis found that removing meat from the diet led to blood pressure reductions similar to losing five kilos of body weight Compared to blood pressure drugs, a vegetarian diet was found to be about 50 percent as effective for lowering blood pressure Cutting out meat from your diet is NOT the only way to normalize your blood pressure. In fact, insulin resistance is a primary promoter of high blood pressure, which is the result of a diet too high in sugar, not protein When it comes to meat, two key factors that will determine the healthfulness of your diet are the quality of the meat, and the amount. Most people need to reduce their portions, and limit meat to organic grass-fed, pastured meats only By Dr. Mercola According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), high blood pressure is "the second greatest public health threat" in the US, and about half of all with hypertension have uncontrolled high blood pressure.1 This increases your risk for a number of more serious health problems, including heart disease and stroke. Interestingly, 16 million Americans who are on blood pressure medication still don't have their blood pressure under control—a fact that emphasizes the need for basic lifestyle changes in order to truly resolve this problem. Vegetarian Diet Lowers Blood Pressure A recent meta-analysis2, 3 suggests that a vegetarian diet may be part of the solution. Lead author Yoko Yokoyama told Reuters Health:4 "For many people, the only treatment has been medication, but that means costs and possible side effects. However, in order to make healthful food choices, people need guidance from scientific stu Continue reading >>

How Does Starvation Affect High Blood Pressure?

How Does Starvation Affect High Blood Pressure?

Starvation is a type of malnutrition, which is caused by being deprived of food or eating food that is inadequate for your body’s nutritional needs. Not eating for a day or longer will cause starvation. Starvation and malnutrition have long-term effects on blood pressure, including causing your blood pressure to elevate. Video of the Day High Blood Pressure High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a condition where your blood pressure is elevated to a level sufficient to cause you harm. The minimum blood pressure for hypertension to be diagnosed is 140/90 mmHg, MayoClinic.com explains. Generally both the systolic and diastolic pressure readings are important. However, it is typical for people over the age of 50 to have hypertensive systolic pressure even if their diastolic remains normal. Factors such as insufficient potassium and vitamin D in your diet elevate your risk of developing hypertension. Excessive stress will also cause your blood pressure to spike, albeit temporarily. Malnutrition and High Blood Pressure Starvation and malnutrition subject your body to both stress as well as potential potassium and vitamin D deficiencies. Your blood pressure is likely to increase as a result of these factors. A study featured in a 2004 issue of the “Nephron Clinical Practice” found that blood pressure increased in malnourished children, including those who recovered from malnutrition six years later. The study involved 172 impoverished children that were over the age of 2. Out of the 172 children who participated, 91 suffered from malnutrition, 20 had recovered from malnutrition and the remaining 61 were not malnourished. Blood pressure readings were taken from two of the three groups and compared against those of the group that was not malnourished. The results of the Continue reading >>

Low-fat Or Low-carbohydrate Diet: What's Best For Your Heart?

Low-fat Or Low-carbohydrate Diet: What's Best For Your Heart?

Recently I met with a patient who was in his early thirties. He had been treated for high blood pressure for almost a decade. He came to me because he was in atrial fibrillation and felt short of breath and noticed his heart was racing. We talked about his abnormal heart rhythm and that he was developing diseases that we typically see in older adults. I asked if his family also had abnormal heart rhythms or problems with their blood pressure. He said yes, but with each generation the problems were coming earlier. When I asked him why he thought this was happening, he said that everybody in his family struggles to maintain their weight and he was the biggest of all. He also said, "I am going to start on a diet and exercise." His wife said, "I am going to write that down and hold you to it." He then said, "I am committed. What diet is the best for me?" Comparing Diets for Heart Health I recently wrote about 50 years of diets to prevent heart disease. With these diet studies we learned that low-fat diets alone are not that helpful in preventing heart disease. A diet approach that is balanced is often optimal for long-term compliance and use. Recently, low-carbohydrate, or low-carb, diets have become very popular. In regular diets we consume a lot of carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are abundant in potatoes, breads, pastas, cereals, some dried fruits, and of course candies and sweets. In low-carb diets, these carbohydrate dense foods are replaced with low-carbohydrate foods such as apples, carrots, lentils, etc. In some diets, low-carbohydrate foods are replaced by protein-dense foods such as meats. As I discussed in my prior column about diets, low fat diets simply try to reduce total intake of daily fat to a certain percentage of the total diet (often less than 30 percent). I Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure & Your Diet

High Blood Pressure & Your Diet

One in four Americans have hypertension, according to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (Blackwell et al., 2014). Hypertension is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It can be modified by the foods you eat, making it important for those with the condition to follow a high blood pressure diet. How Blood Pressure Is Measured A blood pressure measurement is just what it sounds like: it is the amount of physical force the blood exerts upon vessel walls. The circulatory system is responsible for ensuring that blood travels down to the tips of the toes and still has enough force to return to the heart. Thus, the heart must be able to exert enough pressure to keep blood flowing the correct direction. A blood pressure measurement consists of two parts: systolic and diastolic pressure (American Heart Association 2015). Systolic blood pressure, the upper number in your blood pressure reading, is the amount of force your heart exerts when it beats. Diastolic blood pressure, the bottom number, is the pressure in the arteries as the heart refills with blood as it prepares to beat again. Systolic pressure is always higher than diastolic pressure. What Is High Blood Pressure? It is healthiest to keep blood pressure below 120/80 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury, the unit of measurement for blood pressure). People with systolic pressure between 120-139 or diastolic pressure between 80-89 are considered to be in the “prehypertension” range. Stage 1 hypertension, the lowest level of high blood pressure, is a systolic pressure of 140-159 or a diastolic pressure of 90-99. People with Stage 2 hypertension have a systolic pressure higher than 160 and a diastolic measurement higher than 100. When the blood pressure tops 180/110, a person is considered to be in hypert Continue reading >>

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores. This can be rectified by supplementing with a good electrolyte or increasing the sodium in your diet. However KETO//OS adds additional sodium to the formulation to counter-act this sodium depletion. The first signs of dehydration or too much caffeine are fatigue, headache, dizziness, dry mouth, swollen tongue, possible elevation of blood pressure, palpitations or muscle cramping. If this occurs, decrease your serving size of uncharged Keto//OS/Max, drink plenty of water throughout the day. If you experience any of these symptoms of dehydration, please discontinue the use of Keto//OS for 24-28hours and hydrate. Then, it is recommended that you use the uncharged version of Keto//OS 3.0/Max, start with a reduced servings the first few day, stay well hydrated and continue to monitor your blood pressure daily or as recommended by your health care physician. In addition, continue to monitor your potassium, magnesium, calcium and sodium level at your routine check ups with your physician. Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol

Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol

I recently got some blood work back and I wanted to share my results in hopes that it may offer some insight to others who may find themselves at the crossroads of the ketogenic diet and high cholesterol. I have been following a low-carb high-fat diet since July and generally speaking I have been really happy with how it has impacted my body composition, athletic performance, energy and blood sugar control. I’ve written an ebook about it (specifically in relation to type 1 diabetes) and I want to be fair and share the challenges that I’m having as well. What I am presenting here is in no way advice or even a solution that I have found for myself–but rather a question that I am working through. I’ve always had elevated cholesterol (last 10 years) and I’ve always prioritized my blood sugar management over cholesterol. Simply put, there are more questions about the risks of cholesterol than the risks of elevated blood sugar, so I focus on the “devil I know”. I got my bloodwork back and found that my total cholesterol is 383 with LDL at 292. My a1c was 6.5. Neither of these individually are what I am shooting for and both in combination are a bit more alarming. Being perfectly honest it feels like a massive failure to be back at this point of reevaluating everything again. It’s hard not to be governed by numbers but it’s not responsible to ignore them either. I declined statin medication and I was told to switch to a low fat diet high carb diet. My blood pressure was 104/84 and I typically have a resting pulse rate of about 60. I immediately did an internet search on the keto diet correlating to elevated cholesterol and found a whole lot of conjecture. There haven’t been conclusive tests done to evaluate the risk of elevated LDL while on a ketogenic diet Continue reading >>

Starting Low Carb Or Keto With High Blood Pressure - Diet Doctor

Starting Low Carb Or Keto With High Blood Pressure - Diet Doctor

So you have high blood pressure and you want to try a low-carb or keto diet? Congratulations! It may be the most effective thing for lowering your blood pressure naturally. 1 In some cases it may even normalize your blood pressure completely. 2 However, there are two minor potential problems. If youre on blood-pressure medication and start a low-carb diet theres a risk of getting low blood pressure. You may relatively quickly become too healthy for your current dosage of medication. 3 This blood-pressure lowering effect on low carb can happen within days, but it may also take months or even a year to reach full effect. 4 If you feel symptoms of low blood pressure, such as feeling weak, tired or dizzy, you should immediately check your blood pressure. If its low, e.g. below 120/80, you should contact your doctor to discuss if lowering or stopping your medication is appropriate for you. This is something most doctors should be able to handle. But if you need to find a doctor with good knowledge about the handling of medication on a low-carb diet, check out our low-carb doctors map and directory. When starting a low-carb diet we often recommend getting extra fluid and salt, perhaps in the form of bouillon especially during the first two weeks. The reason is to minimize early side effects that can otherwise be troublesome when starting low carb, e.g. headache . You should only take this bouillon if your blood pressure is well controlled, as it may increase blood pressure marginally. 5 If your blood pressure is high despite medication you should not take extra salt or bouillon. Doing so could raise the blood pressure even higher, and it is not wise to risk that. Any side effects will usually pass within a few days anyway, as your body switches from using glucose to fat as i Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Lower Blood Pressure

How To Eat To Lower Blood Pressure

Testimony of the Day Another wonderful testimonial posted on my new Forum. You can go HERE to share your story too! “I found Maria Emmerich in 2012. I was hooked! I signed up for Maria’s Email Support and Nutrition Planning package mid February 2013. Best investment I ever made! She helped me every step of the way to get things started and she really cares about you! I started in March and the first 7 days I dropped 16 pounds! I was shocked! Within the first month I dropped 23 pounds; my skin had cleared up and was looking great. I noticed my hair had stopped falling out, no more hair filled brushes! All my body pain/aches were gone and my mood swings had stabilized! I felt normal for the first time in my life! By June 7th I reached my first goal of 50 pounds lost which was reached 5 weeks and 2 days before dead line I set for this goal! And I did it without exercise. I feel great and I am ready for my next goal: 66 pounds , start exercising and able to jog a 5k by Christmas! It has been a real learning process and I have had my ups and downs but I know Maria will always be there for me. I have learned so much and still growing. I am one of those people that have to learn everything the hard way. I now know what slows and stops my weight loss. Maria told me it would happen if I ate this or that but I had to eat it and learn it for myself. I guess that’s just how I roll! Maria has been a real blessing in my life. Started 315 pounds as of July 7th 265 pounds” How to Eat to Lower Blood Pressure Are you on a high grain, low fat diet…like most American’s? If you are reading my blog…probably not, BUT if you know someone who has high blood pressure, how are they eating? Most people who are insulin resistant also have high blood pressure, and insulin resistance is Continue reading >>

Paleo & High Blood Pressure

Paleo & High Blood Pressure

A billion people worldwide including 79 million Americans (that’s one out of three adults over the age of 20) has high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension). Hypertension represents a real threat to public health since it is now the greatest mortality risk factor in both men and women and its prevalence is increasing. At the current rate, close to half of all adult Americans will have hypertension by 2030. This year alone, over 65,000 Americans will die of HBP complications. (1,2) Why has HBP reached such epidemic proportions? The conventional answer is that nobody knows. In fact, 95 percent of hypertension is considered “essential” meaning it has no known cause. It’s clear, however, that like other diseases of civilization such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and osteoporosis, our modern lifestyle plays a paramount role. It is extremely rare to find HBP in contemporary hunter-gatherer societies and like other chronic diseases of civilization, the rise of HBP follows our movement out of hunter-gatherer and pastoral lifestyles and into an increasingly high tech, urbanized world. We adapt enough to survive in this world, but do not thrive in it due to: Our processed food diets Exposure to environmental toxins both physical and psychological Inadequate sleep, sun, and exercise Disturbed circadian rhythms Weakened microbiome High blood pressure has genetic determinants, but is also very much a manifestation of a larger problem: our disconnect from nature and our traditional diet and lifestyles. (3,4,5) Current treatment recommendations for hypertension involve lifestyle modifications and medication. (6) However, all too often we rely on meds over lifestyle changes because, as we all know, change is hard. Friends, I’m here to tell you that taking the Paleo plunge is wor Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Tweet Ketogenic diets are very effective at achieving two common aims of diabetes control, lowering blood glucose levels and reducing weight What is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, considered to be when you eat a level of carbohydrate of around 30g of carbohydrates per day or below. This encourages the body to get its energy from burning body fat which produces an energy source known as ketones. The diet helps to lower the body's demand for insulin which has benefits for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Note that it is important that you speak to your doctor if you are considering following the diet as precautions may need to be taken before starting. How a ketogenic diet works On a ketogenic diet, blood glucose levels are kept at a low but healthy level which encourages the body to break down fat into a fuel source known as ketones. The process of breaking down or ‘burning’ body fat is known as ketosis. People on insulin will typically require smaller doses of insulin which leads to less risk of large dosing errors. The diet helps burn body fat and therefore has particular advantages for those looking to lose weight, including people with prediabetes or those otherwise at risk of type 2 diabetes. How to follow a ketogenic diet Based on the understanding that carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose the most, the primary goal of a ketogenic diet is to keep consumption lower than that of a traditional low carbohydrate diet with moderate protein and a very high fat content. This will determine the nutrient density of the ketogenic diet as well as how to follow it, as different foods will have different effects on insulin and blood sugar levels. Which foods to eat on a ketogenic diet There are a number of differen Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is a ketogenic diet safe for you? Is a ketogenic diet safe? Before you try this at home… First and foremost, if you pick up a copy of Jimmy Moore and Dr. Eric Westman’s excellent new book, Keto Clarity (which I highly recommend–see my review here) and feel (understandably) inspired to immediately embark on a ketogenic diet, I would caution anyone with a serious chronic health problem, especially anyone who is taking prescription medications, not to attempt a ketogenic diet on his/her own without medical supervision. Medications and Early Ketosis Even though I personally believe in the power of ketogenic diets to improve and even reverse many chronic illnesses, from diabetes to chronic fatigue to mood disorders, the diet does this by causing very real shifts in body chemistry that can have a major impact on medication dosages and side effects, especially during the first few weeks. Examples of problematic situations include sudden drops in blood pressure for those on blood pressure medications (such as Lasix, Lisinopril, and Atenolol), and sudden drops in blood sugar for those on diabetes medications (especially insulin). These changes in blood pressure and blood sugar are very positive and healthy, but the presence of medications can artificially intensify these effects and cause extreme and sometimes dangerous reactions unless your dosage is carefully monitored by you and your clinician in the first month or so. Another important example of a medicine that would require careful monitoring is Lithium, an antidepressant and mood stabilizing medicine. The ketogenic diet causes the body to let go of excess water during the first few days, which can cause Lithium to become more concentrated in the blood, potentially rising to uncomfortable or even toxic levels. These Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Lowers Blood Pressure: Fat For Fuel!!

Ketogenic Diet Lowers Blood Pressure: Fat For Fuel!!

Low Carb – High Fat Diets It wasn’t that long ago that low-carb diets were being targeted by medical professionals as unhealthy and detrimental to people’s health. The high fat intake in these diets was thought to be at the root of increased cholesterol and subsequent heart disease. However, in the last 15 years or so, due to a significant number of studies, the medical field has started to change its tune. Now it seems that low carb diets are seen to be amongst the most effective in dealing with a number of health conditions, including high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight loss and circulatory and other metabolic diseases. The Ketogenic Diet – what exactly is it? According to Dr Joseph Mercola, a highly respected Osteo-pathic physician and Alternative Health Advocate, the Ketogenic Diet is “An eating plan that’s low in sugar and net carbs (carbs without fiber), moderate in protein and high in healthy fats. A ketogenic diet helps you reach nutritional ketosis where your body burns fat for its primary fuel instead of cell-damaging carbs.” The body is designed to use fats more efficiently than carbohydrates with the result that by eating more healthy fats, less protein and carbs you will kick start the body’s metabolism to burn more fat and ketones. Ketones are substances which naturally occur in the body and are created in the liver. These are then the substances which are purposed to be turned into and used as energy. Additionally, this ketogenic process will also stimulate the mitochondria (the fuel producing elements of each cell) to produce optimal amounts of energy. This is certainly very beneficial to the body as a whole, and especially to the high energy-driven organs like the brain, heart and muscles. for more info click here How does this Continue reading >>

Low-carb More Effective In Lowering Blood Pressure Than Low-fat And Orlistat

Low-carb More Effective In Lowering Blood Pressure Than Low-fat And Orlistat

A study recently published in the Archives of Internal Medicine has demonstrated that a low-carb diet is more effective at lowering blood pressure than the weight–loss drug orlistat in concert with a low-fat diet. William S. Yancy, Jr., an associate professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center and the lead author of the study, answers our questions. Atkins: Dr. Yancy, where was the study conducted and how was it set up? Yancy: I'm a staff physician at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, where my team conducted the research, which lasted for a year and included 146 overweight participants. The Department of Veteran Affairs funded the study. The participants were recruited from the VA's outpatient clinics and had a range of health problems typically associated with obesity, including type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and arthritis. We wanted to do a head-to-head comparison of two popular weight-loss methods: a low-carbohydrate diet and the drug orlistat. Atkins: What was the low-carb protocol? Yancy: We started people on 20 grams of carbohydrate per day. When they were halfway to their goal (or had severe cravings), we advised them to add 5 grams to their daily intake each week in a stepwise manner and depending on how close they were to their goal. Atkins: How was this study different from earlier studies? Yancy: Other studies had already indicated that a low-carbohydrate diet and prescription-strength orlistat combined with a low-fat diet are effective weight-loss therapies. But the two common strategies had not been compared to each other, an important omission now that orlistat, marketed as Alli, is available over-the-counter. In addition, few studies provide data on these treatments, particularly the Continue reading >>

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