diabetestalk.net

How Does Ketosis Lower Blood Pressure

Journey Into Ketosis Part Ii

Journey Into Ketosis Part Ii

TL;DR This is a journal of my first month of ketosis. A quick recap of Part I: Ketosis is when your body metabolizes fat instead of sugar as its primary fuel source. To enter ketosis you must eat fewer than 50 grams of carbs per day for a minimum of two weeks, and ideally 60-80% of your diet is fat. You can measure blood ketones with over-the counter-tests. Ketones are the preferred fuel for organs like your brain, heart, and muscles. Ketosis is safe and all humans show improved blood lipid profiles, profound anti-inflammation, and weight loss with lean muscle mass preservation in ketosis, better than any other diet. May 2014: The Descent Of Insulin I had just returned from a two week long trip to Israel and Jordan. On the flight back I finished reading The Art And Science Of Low Carbohydrate Living, which answered all my questions about ketosis. (The Art and Science...Performance is a wonderful, short follow up, and Keto Clarity is on the to-read list.) I had been "paleo" for about five years, which for me meant avoiding grains and most sugars. I was not striving for high fat, and I still occasionally craved sugar. One way to know you've achieved ketosis is measuring blood levels of beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BOHB. It's the fuel your liver produces when it metabolizes fat. Your organs, especially your brain, consume it copiously. You can measure BOHB by pricking your finger with a Precision Xtra lance, bleeding on to a ketone test strip, inserting the strip into the Precision Xtra, and waiting. It will spit out your blood ketone density in milligrams of ketones per millimoler of blood. The (semi-arbitrarily) decided on level for a human to be in "nutritional ketosis" is a minimum of 0.5 mg/mmL. I was eating "low carb" for five years, so I figured this was easy, and I was Continue reading >>

How Does Starvation Affect High Blood Pressure?

How Does Starvation Affect High Blood Pressure?

Starvation is a type of malnutrition, which is caused by being deprived of food or eating food that is inadequate for your body’s nutritional needs. Not eating for a day or longer will cause starvation. Starvation and malnutrition have long-term effects on blood pressure, including causing your blood pressure to elevate. Video of the Day High Blood Pressure High blood pressure, or hypertension, is a condition where your blood pressure is elevated to a level sufficient to cause you harm. The minimum blood pressure for hypertension to be diagnosed is 140/90 mmHg, MayoClinic.com explains. Generally both the systolic and diastolic pressure readings are important. However, it is typical for people over the age of 50 to have hypertensive systolic pressure even if their diastolic remains normal. Factors such as insufficient potassium and vitamin D in your diet elevate your risk of developing hypertension. Excessive stress will also cause your blood pressure to spike, albeit temporarily. Malnutrition and High Blood Pressure Starvation and malnutrition subject your body to both stress as well as potential potassium and vitamin D deficiencies. Your blood pressure is likely to increase as a result of these factors. A study featured in a 2004 issue of the “Nephron Clinical Practice” found that blood pressure increased in malnourished children, including those who recovered from malnutrition six years later. The study involved 172 impoverished children that were over the age of 2. Out of the 172 children who participated, 91 suffered from malnutrition, 20 had recovered from malnutrition and the remaining 61 were not malnourished. Blood pressure readings were taken from two of the three groups and compared against those of the group that was not malnourished. The results of the Continue reading >>

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores. This can be rectified by supplementing with a good electrolyte or increasing the sodium in your diet. However KETO//OS adds additional sodium to the formulation to counter-act this sodium depletion. The first signs of dehydration or too much caffeine are fatigue, headache, dizziness, dry mouth, swollen tongue, possible elevation of blood pressure, palpitations or muscle cramping. If this occurs, decrease your serving size of uncharged Keto//OS/Max, drink plenty of water throughout the day. If you experience any of these symptoms of dehydration, please discontinue the use of Keto//OS for 24-28hours and hydrate. Then, it is recommended that you use the uncharged version of Keto//OS 3.0/Max, start with a reduced servings the first few day, stay well hydrated and continue to monitor your blood pressure daily or as recommended by your health care physician. In addition, continue to monitor your potassium, magnesium, calcium and sodium level at your routine check ups with your physician. Continue reading >>

Low Blood Pressure - Can It Get Too Low Eating Paleo/low Carb?

Low Blood Pressure - Can It Get Too Low Eating Paleo/low Carb?

I'm probably lucky to report that I have naturally low blood pressure (91/63), but the downside is that I get lightheaded nearly every time I stand up and often when doing simple tasks. I have recently begun doing Paleo in earnest and am enjoying all of the foods and the healthier lifestyle that comes from eating so healthily, especially in light of the serious issues I had on SAD. I understand Paleo nutrition lowers blood pressure, and I'm wondering whether I should be concerned about my blood pressure going too low the longer I eat this way. Have any of you lowered your blood pressure too much as a direct result of Paleo nutrition? I would hate to exacerbate my proneness to faintness. It's not fun. Continue reading >>

Can A Low Carb Diet Lower Blood Pressure?

Can A Low Carb Diet Lower Blood Pressure?

We previously looked at research suggesting that a well-planned, low-carb diet coupled with exercise can help you lower blood sugar, triglycerides, and body weight and also improve HDL cholesterol and insulin sensitivity. But what impact does ketogenic diet have on blood pressure? Recent research suggests that maintaining an optimal blood pressure is even more critical for your heart and overall health than previously thought. Read below to learn how cutting carbs and keto may be a good tool in maintaining a healthy blood pressure. What is Blood Pressure? Before looking at the research, we need to straighten out the sometimes intimidating terminology behind blood pressure. Blood pressure, often shortened as BP, is the pressure exerted by blood upon the walls of blood vessels. Typically, it refers to the pressure exerted upon arteries which are the vessels that carry blood away from the heart. As you might know, BP is usually expressed as one number over another. The top number, called systolic pressure, refers to the amount of pressure in your arteries when your heart contracts. This is the maximum pressure exerted upon the walls of the blood vessels. The bottom number, called diastolic pressure, indicates the pressure in your arteries between heart beats. This value is lower than the systolic pressure because the heart is exerting less force on the fluids against the artery walls. Both pressures are measured by the units “millimeters of mercury”, which is abbreviated as mm Hg. What is a Healthy Blood Pressure? According to the American Heart Association (AHA), the “standard” human blood pressure is 120/80 mm Hg. Healthy blood pressure is typically below these numbers. People with a systolic blood pressure between 120-139 mm Hg and a diastolic blood pressure bet Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure And The Low Carbohydrate Diet

High Blood Pressure And The Low Carbohydrate Diet

Hello, fellow low carbers. It’s nice to be back. I am now married, so you will notice a name change. I will now be able to add new articles to “The Nurse Is In” on a regular basis. There will be a new one every two weeks, so please keep those questions coming. I will be answering them individually, as well as taking a few of them and expanding them into articles. I decided to pick out a question on high blood pressure and the low carbohydrate diet for this article. The question has been asked several times by different people, and I think that it’s an important one. Can A Low Carbohydrate Diet Cause High Blood Pressure? There are many things that happen to your body to cause your blood pressure to increase. I have been asking this question of physicians that I know, and the consensus is that they feel that obesity is a much greater risk factor than any diet. They would prefer that their patients lost the weight on a low carbohydrate diet and just monitored their blood pressure to make sure that it did not get dangerously high. There was also a general consensus that they actually saw their patients’ blood pressures decrease when they followed a low carbohydrate regime. What About Salt? Standard medical advice has always been for people with high blood pressure to reduce their sodium intake. Why would blood pressure decrease when so many low carbers crave salty foods and increase their sodium intake? There is a fairly simple answer to this question. Excess salt consumption can cause excess fluid retention, which can lead to an increase in blood pressure. However, a low carbohydrate diet puts one into ketosis and is naturally diuretic. This helps to reduce the excess fluids in the body, thereby reducing the blood pressure. When your body does not have to pump th Continue reading >>

Keto And High Blood Pressure

Keto And High Blood Pressure

I agree with the others. If low sodium helps you then keto will probably help you. My husband and I live the Keto Lifestyle his A1C was a 6.2 and he is on cholesterol meds and high blood pressure meds. He just went to the doc and his A1C 5.8 blood pressure much lower and his cholesterol much lower! Even with the meds he ran high and now in normal range! They see him in 3 months and may try him off the meds! Doc said keep doing what he's doing ! I agree with the others. If low sodium helps you then keto will probably help you. I thought on keto you are supposed to up your sodium levels as well as potassium to prevent keto flu and to keep electrolytes balanced? which I read can raise blood pressure in some people Huh I never thought about that. Thank you guys for the insight! I'm on BP meds (verapamil) for my migraines and have been doing the stand up/get the spins thing. I'm not low low with the carb range (55 gross, 35 net, light purple) but it gives me something to take to my doctor to make sure I'm doing this right. Thanks!! I agree with the others. If low sodium helps you then keto will probably help you. I thought on keto you are supposed to up your sodium levels as well as potassium to prevent keto flu and to keep electrolytes balanced? which I read can raise blood pressure in some people Yes, but if high sodium levels are exacerbating a high BP condition, then keto is a good fit because it will lower your sodium levels. If sodium levels get too low, then the electrolyte imbalance (aka keto flu - I hate that term) will occur. You generally don't need to increase potassium and magnesium unless sodium has been low for a while. Its then that the body will leach out its K and Mg to use as electrolytes if Na is unavailable. I agree with the others. If low sodium helps Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

Diabetes & Ketogenic Diet: Can You Manage Your Diabetes On A Ketogenic Diet?

In this article we will cover what a Ketogenic diet is and if you can manage your diabetes while on this diet. Ketogenic diet for diabetics is a highly controversial topic, but we will break down everything here for you! As a Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE), I have to tell you from the start I will have a biased view here. Sorry, but I feel that I need to be completely honest right up front! I will however, present all the evidence that is available currently on the subject. As a CDE, I have been taught to follow the American Diabetes Association Dietary Guidelines for Americans which is low in carbohydrates, high in fiber, with fresh vegetables, fruits and whole grains. The Ketogenic Diet this article will be discussing is much lower in carbohydrates, in order to promote the state of nutritional ketosis, or the fat burning state for weight loss. What is a Ketogenic Diet? The Ketogenic Diet is a low carbohydrate diet, consisting initially of less than 20 carbohydrates per day. Not per meal, yes, you heard me correctly, per day. It is not for the faint of heart and yes I am writing from experience. Of course I have tried it! Hasn’t everybody in America at some point who has wanted to lose weight? Does it work you ask? Of course it does! The problem is how long can you keep it up? Your body uses the carbohydrates you eat for energy, so if we restrict how many carbohydrates we eat, the body has to get its fuel source from fat. A byproduct of this fat burning state are ketones which are produced; this is called nutritional ketosis. You can determine if you are in this fat burning state by purchasing urine ketone testing strips from your local pharmacy. The Ketogenic Diet with Diabetes Some precautions must be made clear; this diet is not appropriate for people with any Continue reading >>

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs

How You Can Have High Blood Sugar Without Carbs Can you have high blood sugar without carbs? Well, its important to look at common beliefs about high blood sugar first. High blood sugar is bad. Carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Therefore carbohydrates are bad. The theory is simple, and yet incredibly flawed. The truth is, you can have chronically high blood sugar even while religiously avoiding every starch and sugar in sight. Low-carb forums are littered with posts asking a very relevant question: Why is my blood sugar so high when Im not eating any carbs? The answer is simple, yet often overlooked. The Hormone that Raises Blood Sugar: No Carbohydrates Required If the body were an engine, glucose would be its fuel. Most people think glucose only comes from carbohydrates (sugar and starch), but protein can also be turned into glucose when there arent enough carbs around to do the job. This is called gluconeogenesis, and its performed by one of the major stress hormones cortisol. When you have high cortisol levels (from diet, lifestyle, etc.), the cortisol rapidly breaks down protein into glucose, which can raise blood sugar levels considerably. For some folks, this results in chronically high blood sugareven if they are on a low-carb diet. The trouble is, cortisol isnt just breaking down the protein you eat. Its doing something far more destructive. The body is quite a smart machine, and it has no problem taking detours to get energy if necessary. If your body isnt getting the energy it needs from your diet, it has a back-up source: its own tissue. It sounds kind of cannibalistic, eating your own lean body tissue for energy. I mean, I seriously doubt any one of you would relish cutting off a chunk of your leg for dinner. I know I wouldnt. But every time your body uses c Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol

Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol

I recently got some blood work back and I wanted to share my results in hopes that it may offer some insight to others who may find themselves at the crossroads of the ketogenic diet and high cholesterol. I have been following a low-carb high-fat diet since July and generally speaking I have been really happy with how it has impacted my body composition, athletic performance, energy and blood sugar control. I’ve written an ebook about it (specifically in relation to type 1 diabetes) and I want to be fair and share the challenges that I’m having as well. What I am presenting here is in no way advice or even a solution that I have found for myself–but rather a question that I am working through. I’ve always had elevated cholesterol (last 10 years) and I’ve always prioritized my blood sugar management over cholesterol. Simply put, there are more questions about the risks of cholesterol than the risks of elevated blood sugar, so I focus on the “devil I know”. I got my bloodwork back and found that my total cholesterol is 383 with LDL at 292. My a1c was 6.5. Neither of these individually are what I am shooting for and both in combination are a bit more alarming. Being perfectly honest it feels like a massive failure to be back at this point of reevaluating everything again. It’s hard not to be governed by numbers but it’s not responsible to ignore them either. I declined statin medication and I was told to switch to a low fat diet high carb diet. My blood pressure was 104/84 and I typically have a resting pulse rate of about 60. I immediately did an internet search on the keto diet correlating to elevated cholesterol and found a whole lot of conjecture. There haven’t been conclusive tests done to evaluate the risk of elevated LDL while on a ketogenic diet Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes-how Does It Help You With Diabetes?

Ketogenic Diet And Diabetes-how Does It Help You With Diabetes?

Ketogenic diet and weight loss What is the Ketogenic Diet? The ketogenic diet was actually developed in 1924, but was actually used as treatment for epilepsy. Most diets for type 2 diabetics are designed for weight loss and usually not by a high fat diet, but then again what diet isn’t created to lose weight, period? But what the ketogenic diet and diabetes will have in common is that because it is a low carb, high fat diet, there shows the potential to change the way your body uses and stores energy which have an end result of decreasing your diabetes symptoms. This particular diet also aids in reducing risk factors for epilepsy, stroke, Alzhemier’s disease, heart disease, and diabetes. With the ketogenic diet, your body enters ketosis, which is a metabolic state, and the body then uses ketone “bodies” for energy in lieu of glucose. These bodies are more of a constant source of energy than of glucose that gets its energy from carbohydrates. Let’s talk about fat here The truth is that too much fat is no good but I’m sure that you’re not surprised to hear that. Most but not all fats are essential for our health and are good for us. There’s more calories in in a gram of fat compared to carbohydrates and proteins, but they are the best of efficient energy available. Promoting consuming foods such as vegetables, fish, healthy fats and oils, and meats is what the keto diet is all about. This particular diet is one that you can support long term. And recent studies have shown that by eating a diet that consists of a high fat, low carb diet as opposed to a high carb, low fat diet resulted in: Reduced insulin resistance and reduced blood sugar levels, which can reverse prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Greatly reduced blood pressure which in turn also reduces the Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure. Get It Under Control With Atkins

High Blood Pressure. Get It Under Control With Atkins

High blood pressure is a serious health problem, one that you need to get under control as quickly as possible. If your blood pressure is in the high normal to Stage 1 hypertension range (131 to 159 over 85 to 99), weight loss and some other important lifestyle changes may well be enough to bring it down to safer levels. If your blood pressure is higher than that, you may need antihypertensive medication —but weight loss and lifestyle improvements can definitely still help. Step 1: Lose Weight Because obesity is the leading risk factor for hypertension, losing weight is the most important step you can take to lower your blood pressure—and improve other aspects of your health at the same time. You don't need to trim down a lot to start seeing the benefit. Losing just 10 pounds will have a positive effect; losing 10 percent of your body weight will be even better. As a general rule, your systolic blood pressure (the higher number) will drop one point for every pound you lose.1 In practical terms, that means losing just 10 pounds could lower your blood pressure from the high normal range (130 to 139 over 85 to 89) back to normal (130 over 85 or lower). As your blood pressure drops, so does your risk of a heart attack or stroke. The controlled carbohydrate approach to weight loss is particularly effective in helping your blood pressure. When you follow the Atkins Nutritional Approach™, you lose weight steadily and easily on a diet that's naturally high in nutrients such as potassium and magnesium that have been shown to help reduce blood pressure (see “Mineral Supplements for Hypertension,” below, for more on this). A controlled carb program also helps lower high blood sugar. And because high blood pressure and high blood sugar are very closely linked, you help im Continue reading >>

Dash Diet Lowers Inflammation And Blood Pressure

Dash Diet Lowers Inflammation And Blood Pressure

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is designed to reduce blood pressure and improve blood lipids. It’s typically low in fat and relatively high in carbs, but it’s not clear what role these macronutrients play in the diet’s effectiveness. For this reason, a group of researchers compared the effects of a higher-fat, lower-carb DASH diet to the conventional DASH diet. Their results were recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The DASH diet focuses on fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. The diet was designed after researchers noticed that high blood pressure was much less common in those who followed a plant-based diet, such as vegans and vegetarians, than in meat eaters (5, 6). This led researchers to design a diet that provided liberal amounts of the nutrients that appeared to protect people against high blood pressure. The result was the DASH diet, which is high in fruits and vegetables and contains some lean protein sources like chicken, fish and beans. The diet is low in red meat, salt, added sugars and fat. It’s thought that one of the main reasons people with high blood pressure can benefit from this diet is because it reduces the amount of salt they’re eating. The regular DASH diet program recommends that people eat no more than 2,300 mg of sodium per day (or 1 teaspoon), which is in line with most national guidelines. The lower-salt version recommends that people eat no more than 1,500 mg of sodium per day (or 3/4 of a teaspoon). Conclusion: The DASH diet was designed to reduce high blood pressure. It’s rich in fruits, vegetables and lean proteins, but it restricts red meat, salt, added sugars and fat. Background It is currently the world’s most popular diet aimed at lowering b Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Blood Pressure By Changing Your Diet

6 Ways To Lower Blood Pressure By Changing Your Diet

This is a guest post by Laura Schoenfeld, a Registered Dietitian with a Master’s degree in Public Health, and staff nutritionist and content manager for ChrisKresser.com. You can learn more about Laura by checking out her blog or visiting her on Facebook. High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is a serious and common condition that can lead to life-threatening diseases such as heart attack, stroke, heart or kidney failure, and more. While 1 in 3 American adults have high blood pressure, this condition only affects 3% or less of hunter-gatherer populations that are following a traditional diet and lifestyle. (1, 2) This would suggest that hypertension is a disease of poor lifestyle choices, and one that can be effectively treated using simple diet and behavior changes, as well as strategic use of herbal remedies. Blood pressure is measured by two numbers: the top number is the systolic pressure (when the heart is pumping blood) and the bottom number is the diastolic pressure (when the heart is at rest). A normal blood pressure number is below 120/80, prehypertension is diagnosed between 120/80 – 139/89, Stage 1 hypertension is between 140/90 – 159/99, and Stage 2 hypertension is blood pressure above 160/100. While most doctors prescribe drug treatment when a patient has reached the prehypertension stage, there is no evidence to support pharmaceutical treatment in these patients. (3) But this doesn’t mean hypertension shouldn’t be addressed. Much like high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure (even in the prehypertension stage) is a sure sign of other problems going on in the body. By addressing underlying issues with diet and lifestyle changes, you may be able to reduce your blood pressure without resorting to drug treatment. This article will address Continue reading >>

How Fat Lowers Your Blood Pressure

How Fat Lowers Your Blood Pressure

Hypertension (elevated blood pressure) is one of the triad symptoms of metabolic syndrome. Most of the hypertension that I see clinically is driven by insulin resistance as the underlying cause. I see this problem in a very large majority of the people in my office and I am seeing people younger and younger show up with continually increasing blood pressure. In medical school, we were taught to treat “borderline” or “slightly elevated blood pressure,” through “lifestyle changes” which was another way of saying exercise, caloric restriction & hold the salt. But most physicians today will tell you that exercise, salt & caloric restriction doesn’t work. When asked why the 34 year old male in my office suddenly has elevated blood pressure, the only explanation we had was it is a “genetic problem,” or “blood pressure naturally goes up as we get older,” or “you’ve been eating too much salt,” and they are started on blood pressure medication and sent on their way. But, as time went on, I found that I had to keep adding more and more blood pressure medication to control the continually rising blood pressure of the patients in my practice. Most of these people will have a progressive elevation in blood pressure over time, and these blood pressure (anti-hypertensive) medications are/were continually raised until the person is on four or five different blood pressure pills at maximal doses. Again, when questioned why, their genetics are blamed and that is the end of it. Or is it?! What shocked me was that when I took patients off of salt & caloric restriction, and placed them on low carbohydrate high fat diets (and yes, I gave them back their salt), their blood pressure normalized. I noticed that as their fasting insulin levels began to fall, their bloo Continue reading >>

More in ketosis