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How Does Ketosis Lower Blood Pressure

Ketogenic Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

Ketogenic Foods That Lower Blood Pressure

Fighting high blood pressure with the power of Ketogenic foods Before we provide a list of things to eat, it’s important that you understand what is desirable in foods that lower blood pressure: Sodium This important mineral does a lot for the body, regulating fluids and helping with electrical pulses. One of the drawbacks to sodium is that when the bloodstream has high quantities of sodium, it retains more water. This effectively increases the quantity of blood and thus raises pressure within the circulatory system. Much like a hose has added pressure when you open the faucet to full open. Processed foods contain the majority of sodium in the average American’s diet, so in order to reduce sodium quantity, either reduce the processed foods from your diet or start paying attention to the sodium quantities in them. Potassium This is the Yin to the Yang of Salt. Potassium balances out sodium in the system and helps the kidneys to excrete excess sodium from the blood. The typical US diet is overabundant in sodium and is lacking in potassium, which is part of the reason 90% of adult Americans will have hypertension in their lifetime. Magnesium and Calcium These two elements are complementary to each other and should be consumed in a 2:1 ratio Calcium:Magnesium. For the purposes of high blood pressure they work to help relax the muscle tissue around the blood vessels allowing the vessels to widen and reduce pressure in the system. A recent study of meta data concluded a significant correlation between Magnesium supplementation and modest decreases in hypertension. Ideally, you would try and eat your calcium sources in the mornings and your magnesium in the evening due to them competing for the same absorption channels. Flavonoids (BioFlavonoids) These are a kind of antiox Continue reading >>

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

Common Ketosis Side Effects And Treatments

There are many awesome benefits with come with adopting a low-carb ketogenic diet, such as weight loss, decreased cravings, and even possibly reduce diseases risks. That being said, it’s also good to talk about possible ketosis side effects so you know fully what to expect as you start this new health journey. Not everyone experiences side effects when starting a ketogenic diet, and thankfully, those who do don’t usually experience them for very long. It varies with the individual, but just to make sure all your bases are covered, we’re going to breaking down each possible side effect and go over ways to manage and alleviate them if needed. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 1 – Frequent Urination As your body burns through the stored glucose in your liver and muscles within the first day or two of starting a ketogenic diet, you’ll be releasing a lot of water in the process. Plus, your kidneys will start excreting excess sodium as the levels of your circulating insulin drop. Basically, you might notice yourself needing to pee more often throughout the day. But no worries; this side effect of ketosis takes care of itself once your body adjusts and is no longer burning through the extra glycogen. KETOSIS SIDE EFFECT 2 – Dizziness and Drowsiness As the body is getting rid of this excess water, it will also be eliminating minerals like potassium, magnesium, and sodium too. This can make you feel dizzy, lightheaded, and fatigued. Thankfully, this is also very avoidable; all it takes is a little preparation beforehand. Focus on eating foods that are rich in potassium, such as: Leafy greens (aim for at least two cups each day!) Broccoli Dairy Meat, poultry, and fish Avocados Add salt to your foods or use salty broth when cooking too. You can also dissolve about a teaspoon of regu Continue reading >>

Keto And High Blood Pressure

Keto And High Blood Pressure

I agree with the others. If low sodium helps you then keto will probably help you. My husband and I live the Keto Lifestyle his A1C was a 6.2 and he is on cholesterol meds and high blood pressure meds. He just went to the doc and his A1C 5.8 blood pressure much lower and his cholesterol much lower! Even with the meds he ran high and now in normal range! They see him in 3 months and may try him off the meds! Doc said keep doing what he's doing ! I agree with the others. If low sodium helps you then keto will probably help you. I thought on keto you are supposed to up your sodium levels as well as potassium to prevent keto flu and to keep electrolytes balanced? which I read can raise blood pressure in some people Huh I never thought about that. Thank you guys for the insight! I'm on BP meds (verapamil) for my migraines and have been doing the stand up/get the spins thing. I'm not low low with the carb range (55 gross, 35 net, light purple) but it gives me something to take to my doctor to make sure I'm doing this right. Thanks!! I agree with the others. If low sodium helps you then keto will probably help you. I thought on keto you are supposed to up your sodium levels as well as potassium to prevent keto flu and to keep electrolytes balanced? which I read can raise blood pressure in some people Yes, but if high sodium levels are exacerbating a high BP condition, then keto is a good fit because it will lower your sodium levels. If sodium levels get too low, then the electrolyte imbalance (aka keto flu - I hate that term) will occur. You generally don't need to increase potassium and magnesium unless sodium has been low for a while. Its then that the body will leach out its K and Mg to use as electrolytes if Na is unavailable. I agree with the others. If low sodium helps Continue reading >>

Starting Low Carb Or Keto With High Blood Pressure - Diet Doctor

Starting Low Carb Or Keto With High Blood Pressure - Diet Doctor

So you have high blood pressure and you want to try a low-carb or keto diet? Congratulations! It may be the most effective thing for lowering your blood pressure naturally. 1 In some cases it may even normalize your blood pressure completely. 2 However, there are two minor potential problems. If youre on blood-pressure medication and start a low-carb diet theres a risk of getting low blood pressure. You may relatively quickly become too healthy for your current dosage of medication. 3 This blood-pressure lowering effect on low carb can happen within days, but it may also take months or even a year to reach full effect. 4 If you feel symptoms of low blood pressure, such as feeling weak, tired or dizzy, you should immediately check your blood pressure. If its low, e.g. below 120/80, you should contact your doctor to discuss if lowering or stopping your medication is appropriate for you. This is something most doctors should be able to handle. But if you need to find a doctor with good knowledge about the handling of medication on a low-carb diet, check out our low-carb doctors map and directory. When starting a low-carb diet we often recommend getting extra fluid and salt, perhaps in the form of bouillon especially during the first two weeks. The reason is to minimize early side effects that can otherwise be troublesome when starting low carb, e.g. headache . You should only take this bouillon if your blood pressure is well controlled, as it may increase blood pressure marginally. 5 If your blood pressure is high despite medication you should not take extra salt or bouillon. Doing so could raise the blood pressure even higher, and it is not wise to risk that. Any side effects will usually pass within a few days anyway, as your body switches from using glucose to fat as i Continue reading >>

Paleo & High Blood Pressure

Paleo & High Blood Pressure

A billion people worldwide including 79 million Americans (that’s one out of three adults over the age of 20) has high blood pressure (HBP or hypertension). Hypertension represents a real threat to public health since it is now the greatest mortality risk factor in both men and women and its prevalence is increasing. At the current rate, close to half of all adult Americans will have hypertension by 2030. This year alone, over 65,000 Americans will die of HBP complications. (1,2) Why has HBP reached such epidemic proportions? The conventional answer is that nobody knows. In fact, 95 percent of hypertension is considered “essential” meaning it has no known cause. It’s clear, however, that like other diseases of civilization such as diabetes, Alzheimer’s, and osteoporosis, our modern lifestyle plays a paramount role. It is extremely rare to find HBP in contemporary hunter-gatherer societies and like other chronic diseases of civilization, the rise of HBP follows our movement out of hunter-gatherer and pastoral lifestyles and into an increasingly high tech, urbanized world. We adapt enough to survive in this world, but do not thrive in it due to: Our processed food diets Exposure to environmental toxins both physical and psychological Inadequate sleep, sun, and exercise Disturbed circadian rhythms Weakened microbiome High blood pressure has genetic determinants, but is also very much a manifestation of a larger problem: our disconnect from nature and our traditional diet and lifestyles. (3,4,5) Current treatment recommendations for hypertension involve lifestyle modifications and medication. (6) However, all too often we rely on meds over lifestyle changes because, as we all know, change is hard. Friends, I’m here to tell you that taking the Paleo plunge is wor Continue reading >>

7 Benefits Of A Keto Diet That You’ll Want In Your Life

7 Benefits Of A Keto Diet That You’ll Want In Your Life

When people hear about the ketogenic diet one of the first questions they ask is what’s so good about it? This is a good question to ask so in this post I’m going to show you the wonderful benefits of the keto diet. First things first it’s important to understand what the ketogenic diet actually is and what it’s all about. What Is Keto? The ketogenic diet is a low carb, moderate protein, and high-fat diet. The goal of the diet is to get your body into a metabolic state known as ketosis. What is ketosis? Ketosis occurs when your body has run out of its glycogen (basically sugar) stores so it needs to find another fuel source. When this occurs your liver begins to process fat into ketones which become your body’s main fuel source. So to recap fat -> ketones = energy. With that quick summary out of the way let’s explore the benefits of the ketogenic diet. Benefits of a Keto Diet Many other diets suffer from only having a single benefit and that is weight loss. The problem with this being the only benefit is that it becomes a lot easier to fall off the wagon. Keto has numerous benefits due to how it changes your body’s chemistry. Your body is much more efficient when it has ketones as a fuel source. 1. Weight Loss This, of course, is the main benefit that people look for. Because fat becomes a source of energy your body actively burns fat when it needs more energy instead of looking for glucose. But how does the actual process work? When your body enters ketosis, both your blood sugar and insulin levels drop. This actually gives the fat cells the ability to release the water they’ve been retaining and this is why initially, most people see a big drop in weight loss due to losing water. After that occurs the fat cells are small enough to enter the bloodstream Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet

Ketogenic Diet

Tweet Ketogenic diets are very effective at achieving two common aims of diabetes control, lowering blood glucose levels and reducing weight What is the ketogenic diet? A ketogenic diet is a very low-carb diet, considered to be when you eat a level of carbohydrate of around 30g of carbohydrates per day or below. This encourages the body to get its energy from burning body fat which produces an energy source known as ketones. The diet helps to lower the body's demand for insulin which has benefits for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Note that it is important that you speak to your doctor if you are considering following the diet as precautions may need to be taken before starting. How a ketogenic diet works On a ketogenic diet, blood glucose levels are kept at a low but healthy level which encourages the body to break down fat into a fuel source known as ketones. The process of breaking down or ‘burning’ body fat is known as ketosis. People on insulin will typically require smaller doses of insulin which leads to less risk of large dosing errors. The diet helps burn body fat and therefore has particular advantages for those looking to lose weight, including people with prediabetes or those otherwise at risk of type 2 diabetes. How to follow a ketogenic diet Based on the understanding that carbohydrate is the macronutrient that raises blood glucose the most, the primary goal of a ketogenic diet is to keep consumption lower than that of a traditional low carbohydrate diet with moderate protein and a very high fat content. This will determine the nutrient density of the ketogenic diet as well as how to follow it, as different foods will have different effects on insulin and blood sugar levels. Which foods to eat on a ketogenic diet There are a number of differen Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure. Get It Under Control With Atkins

High Blood Pressure. Get It Under Control With Atkins

High blood pressure is a serious health problem, one that you need to get under control as quickly as possible. If your blood pressure is in the high normal to Stage 1 hypertension range (131 to 159 over 85 to 99), weight loss and some other important lifestyle changes may well be enough to bring it down to safer levels. If your blood pressure is higher than that, you may need antihypertensive medication —but weight loss and lifestyle improvements can definitely still help. Step 1: Lose Weight Because obesity is the leading risk factor for hypertension, losing weight is the most important step you can take to lower your blood pressure—and improve other aspects of your health at the same time. You don't need to trim down a lot to start seeing the benefit. Losing just 10 pounds will have a positive effect; losing 10 percent of your body weight will be even better. As a general rule, your systolic blood pressure (the higher number) will drop one point for every pound you lose.1 In practical terms, that means losing just 10 pounds could lower your blood pressure from the high normal range (130 to 139 over 85 to 89) back to normal (130 over 85 or lower). As your blood pressure drops, so does your risk of a heart attack or stroke. The controlled carbohydrate approach to weight loss is particularly effective in helping your blood pressure. When you follow the Atkins Nutritional Approach™, you lose weight steadily and easily on a diet that's naturally high in nutrients such as potassium and magnesium that have been shown to help reduce blood pressure (see “Mineral Supplements for Hypertension,” below, for more on this). A controlled carb program also helps lower high blood sugar. And because high blood pressure and high blood sugar are very closely linked, you help im Continue reading >>

How To Normalize Your Blood Pressure

How To Normalize Your Blood Pressure

Elevated blood pressure is a common health issue today. Almost a third of U.S. adults have high blood pressure – perhaps you or someone in your family does? High blood pressure isn’t necessarily something you can feel, but it increases the risk of serious conditions such as strokes and heart attacks. The good news is that you can improve your blood pressure by way of simple lifestyle changes. The usual treatment for elevated blood pressure today is medication. This is often reasonable. But what if you could achieve perfect blood pressure without pills or side-effects – with improved health and weight as welcome side-bonuses, instead? The truth is that high blood pressure was extremely rare as recently as a few hundred years ago. Something in today’s environment is giving more and more people high blood pressure. What is it? Contents What is blood pressure? Five ways to lower your blood pressure What is blood pressure? Blood pressure is exactly what it sounds like: the pressure in your blood vessels. With a normal amount of blood, a healthy heart and healthy, elastic blood vessels, you’ll experience a normal blood pressure. Low blood pressure can make you feel dizzy, especially right when you stand up from having been seated. This is usually harmless and can be the result of dehydration or salt deficiency. Mildly or moderately elevated blood pressure will rarely give obvious symptoms (a light headache might occur sometimes). A very high blood pressure can give severe headaches, fatigue and nausea. High blood pressure is the result of an increased amount of liquid and salt in the blood, and also of the blood vessel walls being thicker and harder than normal. As high blood pressure often goes unnoticed, it’s common for people to live with it unawares for some t Continue reading >>

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Does Keto//os Effect Blood Pressure, Heart Rate Or Tachycardia?

Supplementing with KETO//OS or following a ketogenic diet can cause a slightly diuretic effect, and can deplete magnesium, potassium and sodium stores. This can be rectified by supplementing with a good electrolyte or increasing the sodium in your diet. However KETO//OS adds additional sodium to the formulation to counter-act this sodium depletion. The first signs of dehydration or too much caffeine are fatigue, headache, dizziness, dry mouth, swollen tongue, possible elevation of blood pressure, palpitations or muscle cramping. If this occurs, decrease your serving size of uncharged Keto//OS/Max, drink plenty of water throughout the day. If you experience any of these symptoms of dehydration, please discontinue the use of Keto//OS for 24-28hours and hydrate. Then, it is recommended that you use the uncharged version of Keto//OS 3.0/Max, start with a reduced servings the first few day, stay well hydrated and continue to monitor your blood pressure daily or as recommended by your health care physician. In addition, continue to monitor your potassium, magnesium, calcium and sodium level at your routine check ups with your physician. Continue reading >>

Can A Low-carb Diet Cause Low Blood Pressure?

Can A Low-carb Diet Cause Low Blood Pressure?

Blood pressure is the measurement of the force of blood against artery walls when the heart is beating and at rest. The systolic, or top number, measures the pressure during the heartbeat, while the diastolic, or bottom number, measures the pressure when the heart is at rest. High blood pressure affects about 80 million people in the United States, according to the American Heart Association. It doesn't cause any symptoms, but excess pressure against the artery walls causes them to stretch and weaken, which can lead to a heart attack or stroke. While there are a number of causes of high blood pressure, including genetics and age, factors such as poor food choices, inactivity and carrying excess weight may also increase your risk. Losing weight and making healthier food choices are part of the treatment plan for high blood pressure. Although the typical diet to manage blood pressure is high in fruits, veggies, whole grains and dairy foods, a low-carb diet might work to improve your numbers, too. Low-Carb Diet Basics The premise behind a low-carb diet is that it helps your body burn fat instead of storing it. While there are no set rules, many low-carb diets kick-start your weight loss by severely restricting your intake of carbs -- 20 to 50 grams a day -- during the early stages. This causes your body to go into a state of ketosis, burning fat instead of glucose to fuel your brain. Then, carbs are slowly added back in phases, depending on the low-carb plan you're following, to slow weight loss and help you find the right amount of carbs to maintain weight loss, which can be as high as 150 grams a day. In addition to helping you burn fat, low-carb diets suppress appetite, which helps cut calories, too. While low-carb diets offer a number of benefits for weight loss, they Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol

Ketogenic Diet And High Cholesterol

I recently got some blood work back and I wanted to share my results in hopes that it may offer some insight to others who may find themselves at the crossroads of the ketogenic diet and high cholesterol. I have been following a low-carb high-fat diet since July and generally speaking I have been really happy with how it has impacted my body composition, athletic performance, energy and blood sugar control. I’ve written an ebook about it (specifically in relation to type 1 diabetes) and I want to be fair and share the challenges that I’m having as well. What I am presenting here is in no way advice or even a solution that I have found for myself–but rather a question that I am working through. I’ve always had elevated cholesterol (last 10 years) and I’ve always prioritized my blood sugar management over cholesterol. Simply put, there are more questions about the risks of cholesterol than the risks of elevated blood sugar, so I focus on the “devil I know”. I got my bloodwork back and found that my total cholesterol is 383 with LDL at 292. My a1c was 6.5. Neither of these individually are what I am shooting for and both in combination are a bit more alarming. Being perfectly honest it feels like a massive failure to be back at this point of reevaluating everything again. It’s hard not to be governed by numbers but it’s not responsible to ignore them either. I declined statin medication and I was told to switch to a low fat diet high carb diet. My blood pressure was 104/84 and I typically have a resting pulse rate of about 60. I immediately did an internet search on the keto diet correlating to elevated cholesterol and found a whole lot of conjecture. There haven’t been conclusive tests done to evaluate the risk of elevated LDL while on a ketogenic diet Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure & Your Diet

High Blood Pressure & Your Diet

One in four Americans have hypertension, according to the 2012 National Health Interview Survey (Blackwell et al., 2014). Hypertension is a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It can be modified by the foods you eat, making it important for those with the condition to follow a high blood pressure diet. How Blood Pressure Is Measured A blood pressure measurement is just what it sounds like: it is the amount of physical force the blood exerts upon vessel walls. The circulatory system is responsible for ensuring that blood travels down to the tips of the toes and still has enough force to return to the heart. Thus, the heart must be able to exert enough pressure to keep blood flowing the correct direction. A blood pressure measurement consists of two parts: systolic and diastolic pressure (American Heart Association 2015). Systolic blood pressure, the upper number in your blood pressure reading, is the amount of force your heart exerts when it beats. Diastolic blood pressure, the bottom number, is the pressure in the arteries as the heart refills with blood as it prepares to beat again. Systolic pressure is always higher than diastolic pressure. What Is High Blood Pressure? It is healthiest to keep blood pressure below 120/80 mm Hg (millimeters of mercury, the unit of measurement for blood pressure). People with systolic pressure between 120-139 or diastolic pressure between 80-89 are considered to be in the “prehypertension” range. Stage 1 hypertension, the lowest level of high blood pressure, is a systolic pressure of 140-159 or a diastolic pressure of 90-99. People with Stage 2 hypertension have a systolic pressure higher than 160 and a diastolic measurement higher than 100. When the blood pressure tops 180/110, a person is considered to be in hypert Continue reading >>

Dash Diet Lowers Inflammation And Blood Pressure

Dash Diet Lowers Inflammation And Blood Pressure

DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension. The DASH diet is designed to reduce blood pressure and improve blood lipids. It’s typically low in fat and relatively high in carbs, but it’s not clear what role these macronutrients play in the diet’s effectiveness. For this reason, a group of researchers compared the effects of a higher-fat, lower-carb DASH diet to the conventional DASH diet. Their results were recently published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The DASH diet focuses on fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean meats. The diet was designed after researchers noticed that high blood pressure was much less common in those who followed a plant-based diet, such as vegans and vegetarians, than in meat eaters (5, 6). This led researchers to design a diet that provided liberal amounts of the nutrients that appeared to protect people against high blood pressure. The result was the DASH diet, which is high in fruits and vegetables and contains some lean protein sources like chicken, fish and beans. The diet is low in red meat, salt, added sugars and fat. It’s thought that one of the main reasons people with high blood pressure can benefit from this diet is because it reduces the amount of salt they’re eating. The regular DASH diet program recommends that people eat no more than 2,300 mg of sodium per day (or 1 teaspoon), which is in line with most national guidelines. The lower-salt version recommends that people eat no more than 1,500 mg of sodium per day (or 3/4 of a teaspoon). Conclusion: The DASH diet was designed to reduce high blood pressure. It’s rich in fruits, vegetables and lean proteins, but it restricts red meat, salt, added sugars and fat. Background It is currently the world’s most popular diet aimed at lowering b Continue reading >>

Low-carb Diet Lowers Blood Pressure

Low-carb Diet Lowers Blood Pressure

Jan. 25, 2010 -- A low-carbohydrate diet may have health benefits that go beyond weight loss. A new study shows that a low-carbohydrate diet was equally good as the weight loss drug orlistat (the active ingredient in Alli and Xenical) at helping overweight and obese people lose weight, but people who followed the low-carb diet also experienced a healthy drop in their blood pressure levels. "I expected the weight loss to be considerable with both therapies but we were surprised to see blood pressure improve so much more with the low-carbohydrate diet than with orlistat," researcher William S. Yancy, Jr., MD, an associate professor of medicine at Duke University Medical Center, says in a news release. "If people have high blood pressure and a weight problem, a low-carbohydrate diet might be a better option than a weight loss medication." Researchers say studies have already shown that the two weight loss methods are effective at promoting weight loss, but it's the first time the health effects of each have been compared head to head. "It's important to know you can try a diet instead of medication and get the same weight loss results with fewer costs and potentially fewer side effects," Yancy says. In the study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, 146 obese or overweight adults were randomly divided into two groups. Many of the participants also had chronic health problems, such as high blood pressure or diabetes. The first group was advised to follow a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet consisting of less than 20 grams of carbohydrates per day, and the second group received the weight loss drug orlistat three times a day, plus counseling in following a low-fat diet (less than 30% of daily calories from fat) at group meetings over 48 weeks. The results showed we Continue reading >>

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