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How Does Ketosis Affect The Body?

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Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will tak Continue reading >>

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  1. W. Prins

    My experience pretty much mirrors Aarons and I also agree with Teymur. By and large I can get by with less sleep than before and when I do sleep I seem to benefit more from it, which is to say I seem to recover more quickly. In the very early days I had stints where I had some sleep disruptions of various kinds (not being able to get to sleep when I wanted to and so on) but resolved itself in time.

  2. Aaron Goold

    I agree with Jbs. This is just an n=1 answer, but I need less sleep after being in ketosis for at least a week. I used to need 9 hours of sleep. Now I can get 6-7 and feel fine. However, sometimes I wake in the middle of the night and cannot fall back asleep. I've heard from Dave Asprey (Bulletproof guy) that this is common with ketosis. He suggests having some quality carbs before bed. I tried, but haven't noticed a difference. The weird part is, some weeks I'll get only 5-6 hours a night due to work/stress/etc. I'll be tired the first 10-15 minutes, then feel fine all the way until bed. I still prefer to get 7-8 hrs, but now I'm not dying when I don't get it.
    Update: Wanted to add, I also practice intermittent fasting. Not sure how much that also affects sleep/ketosis, but something to consider in my response.

  3. Teymur Mammadov

    Not sure what you mean by sleep “architecture” - I’m going to assume you mean sleep patters (possibly?). Some people who go extremely low-carb (ketosis may have different degrees, you can be considered to be in ketosis with both 0.7 mMol and 4 mMol, but they are, obviously, very different levels of ketones) or no-carb often report sleep pattern disruptions - but individual reactions may vary. If that is an issue, it is recommended to consume low amount of healthy carbs at night before sleep (that’s one of the reasons I personally prefer consuming my carbs - however low - at night) - not so much as to take you out of ketosis, but enough to not interfere with your sleep.

    If you really meant to ask how ketosis affects sleep requirements - I would tend to agree with other writers: typically you might see a reduction in the need to sleep as you get more into ketosis and the associated lifestyle. I do personally consider that moderate ketosis is healthier than the so-called “balanced diet” - and healthier bodies need lees sleep. This effect, however, is not something that happens immediately. It requires you to become generally keto-adapted and make this a lifestyle. In other words - do not expect that by slipping into ketosis first time you would suddenly wake up refreshed after 5 hours of sleep :)

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Click Here to Subscribe: http://Bit.ly/ThomasVid Website: http://ThomasDeLauer.com Massive Discount on Locally Sourced Grassfed Beef Right to Your Door: https://www.farmfoodsmarket.com/disco... How Fasting Burns Fat: Activate Fat Burning Enzymes- Thomas DeLauer Norepinephrine and Epinephrine: Adrenaline is released from the adrenal cortex & goes through the bloodstream to affect numerous tissues in the body. Noradrenaline is released from the nerve terminals and is the main neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nerves in the cardiovascular system. These two play a primary role in the breakdown of fat by binding to the beta-1 and 2 receptors in the body, which increases cAMP levels which in turn increases fat breakdown. The nervous system sends norepinephrine to the fat cells, making them break down body fat into free fatty acids that can be burned for energy (1,2) Hormone Sensitive Lipase: Fasting increases the activation of hormone sensitive lipase Activating hormone sensitive lipase initiates lipolysis, the breaking down of triacylglycerols into free fatty acids and glycerol (3) Glucagon: Fasting also increases glucagon levels, which breaks down fat - glucagon is a hormone that acts directly opposite to insulin (the pancreas secretes it in an effort to raise blood sugar levels) While insulin stores carbs and builds fat, glucagon is responsible for breaking down stored carbs and fats and releasing them so your body can use them for energy (4) How They All Work Together: The only site for regulation of fatty acid oxidation is at the level of hormone-sensitive lipase in adipose tissue. Under fasting conditions, with minimal insulin in the blood, glucagon promotes formation of the active form of hormone-sensitive lipase. When epinephrine is present, it further actives hormone-sensitive lipase, increasing the hydrolysis of triglycerides to produce free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol. The glycerol is carried to the liver, where it enters gluconeogenesis, while the FFA are carried on serum albumin to the tissues where they are catabolized for energy. The liver uses some of the energy from fat mobilization to support gluconeogenesis (5) Additional: Ketone Production: Burn Fat Instead of Sugar- Fasting shifts your metabolism from burning sugar to burning fat - begins to break down triglycerides in the form of ketones. References: 1) Zauner C , et al. (n.d.). Resting energy expenditure in short-term starvation is increased as a result of an increase in serum norepinephrine. - PubMed - NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1... 2) Jensen MD , et al. (n.d.). Lipolysis during fasting. Decreased suppression by insulin and increased stimulation by epinephrine. - PubMed - NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3... 3) Sztalryd C and Kraemer FB. (n.d.). Regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase during fasting. - PubMed - NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8... 4) Marliss EB , et al. (n.d.). Glucagon levels and metabolic effects in fasting man. - PubMed - NCBI. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5... 5) Hormone-sensitive lipase - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/... 6) Adrenalin and Noradrenalin The 'Dynamic Duo? (2015, April 9). Retrieved from https://thefatlossmanifesto.com/adren...

What Does Fasting Actually Accomplish? I Want To Know How It Burns Fat Or How It Affects The Metabolism, That Sort Of Thing.

On the first day of fasting, the body burns stored sugar for energy. Those reserves will not last very long, since we only store about 100 g of glucose as glycogen in the liver, which will be depleted in the first 18 to 24 hours. The body will start using muscle tissue in order to make glucose from amino acids. This will also end shortly because it would be a bad idea for the body to eat up all the muscles in order to survive (the heart is a muscle!) Glycerol will then be produced from adipose tissue, but not sufficiently to meet the body’s needs. Note that the brain absolutely needs to receive glucose continuously to function. On the third day, the body will maximize the breakdown of fats and the liver will start producing ketones to supply the energy for the central nervous system. This is a natural survival mechanism called ketosis or protein sparing. Weight Loss can be impressive, but different from one person to another. During this process, blood levels of cholesterol and uric acid tend to increase. This is because the body it stirring up stored toxic waste materials and expelling them into the bloodstream to be eliminated from the body. This can provoke symptoms like heada Continue reading >>

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  1. W. Prins

    My experience pretty much mirrors Aarons and I also agree with Teymur. By and large I can get by with less sleep than before and when I do sleep I seem to benefit more from it, which is to say I seem to recover more quickly. In the very early days I had stints where I had some sleep disruptions of various kinds (not being able to get to sleep when I wanted to and so on) but resolved itself in time.

  2. Aaron Goold

    I agree with Jbs. This is just an n=1 answer, but I need less sleep after being in ketosis for at least a week. I used to need 9 hours of sleep. Now I can get 6-7 and feel fine. However, sometimes I wake in the middle of the night and cannot fall back asleep. I've heard from Dave Asprey (Bulletproof guy) that this is common with ketosis. He suggests having some quality carbs before bed. I tried, but haven't noticed a difference. The weird part is, some weeks I'll get only 5-6 hours a night due to work/stress/etc. I'll be tired the first 10-15 minutes, then feel fine all the way until bed. I still prefer to get 7-8 hrs, but now I'm not dying when I don't get it.
    Update: Wanted to add, I also practice intermittent fasting. Not sure how much that also affects sleep/ketosis, but something to consider in my response.

  3. Teymur Mammadov

    Not sure what you mean by sleep “architecture” - I’m going to assume you mean sleep patters (possibly?). Some people who go extremely low-carb (ketosis may have different degrees, you can be considered to be in ketosis with both 0.7 mMol and 4 mMol, but they are, obviously, very different levels of ketones) or no-carb often report sleep pattern disruptions - but individual reactions may vary. If that is an issue, it is recommended to consume low amount of healthy carbs at night before sleep (that’s one of the reasons I personally prefer consuming my carbs - however low - at night) - not so much as to take you out of ketosis, but enough to not interfere with your sleep.

    If you really meant to ask how ketosis affects sleep requirements - I would tend to agree with other writers: typically you might see a reduction in the need to sleep as you get more into ketosis and the associated lifestyle. I do personally consider that moderate ketosis is healthier than the so-called “balanced diet” - and healthier bodies need lees sleep. This effect, however, is not something that happens immediately. It requires you to become generally keto-adapted and make this a lifestyle. In other words - do not expect that by slipping into ketosis first time you would suddenly wake up refreshed after 5 hours of sleep :)

  4. -> Continue reading
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In this video I discuss what is stress, why is stress bad, and what causes stress. I also cover how stress is bad, how to deal with stress, and stress management. Transcript What is stress? Whats up dudes, and whats up ladies, Bryan here and in this video we are going to look at stress. What is it, what causes it, and what can we do about it? So, Lets roll. Stress hormones Stress is your body's way of reacting to any kind of demand or threat. When the body feels stress, your hypothalamus, a tiny region in your brain, signals your adrenal glands, located atop your kidneys, to release a surge of hormones, which include adrenaline and cortisol, into the bloodstream. As these hormones are released, the liver is triggered to produce more blood sugar, which gives you an energy kick, breathing becomes more rapid, and heart beat and blood pressure rise. If the stress is caused by physical danger, these chemicals can be beneficial, as they give you more energy and strength, and also speed up your reaction time and enhance your focus. But, if the stress is caused by something emotional, it can be harmful, because there is no outlet for this extra energy and strength. Once the source of the stress has passed, hormone levels return to normal as do heart rate and blood pressure, and other systems also return to normal. Recent stress statistics show the top 7 causes of stress in the US to be job pressure, relationships, money, health related, poor nutrition, media overload, and sleep issues. All of these are of the emotional kind, not the physical danger kind that can be beneficial. 77% of people REGULARLY experience PHYSICAL symptoms caused by stress, 54% of people say stress has caused them to fight with people close to them, and 30% of people say they are always or often under stress at work…wow! So, how does all of this stress effect our bodies? Long term activation of the stress-response system can cause major problems including… • Anxiety • Depression • Digestive problems • Headaches • Heart disease • Sleep problems • Weight gain • Memory and concentration impairment It is vital to learn how to deal with stressors in your life. Some things you can do to manage stress include… Getting regular exercise, which can act as a distraction and also causes the release of endorphins that boost your mood. Eat a healthy diet that includes fruits and vegetables which provide vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that can help maintain proper bodily functions. Make consistent time in your schedule for relaxation and fun, such as going to a yoga class, listening to music, take a walk or work in your garden. Build relationships and friendships with people who have more positive attitudes. Cut down on caffeine, sugar, energy drinks, and alcohol. The effects of these are only short term. Make sure you get enough good quality sleep. If all else fails, seek professional help. Bottom line. As you can see by the statistics, stress is a huge problem in society. A big part of being healthy is being happy. If stress is a big problem in your life, do something about it now, don’t let it erode your health. Other sources... http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/artic... http://www.webmd.com/balance/stress-m... http://www.statisticbrain.com/stress-...

How Does Stress Affect The Body?

Like many other things in life , it depends upon the intensity and duration of stress and the status of person (perception of stress and reaction towards it). If someone takes stress positively, stress might be a good thing, we call it “eustress”. On the other hand, if we allow stress to impact negatively, we call it “distress”. I am assuming that you are curious to know about the effects of distress on the body. Stress causes wide range of biological changes in body, increased production of cortisol (aka stress hormone) being one of the major effect. Cortisol in turn leads to various changes which helps to cope up the stress, but when chronically elevated, it causes lots of harm. Especially chronic psychological stress affects almost all organ system of body negatively. To name few, it causes memory impairment (see How does stress affect memory?) , decreases threshold for physical illness, deteriorates cardiovascular status, causes psychological problems such as depression and anxiety creating a vicious loop, increases the risk for metabolic diseases (e.g., diabetes), and so.on. The following picture summarizes those effects comprehensively - Now we have some idea about th Continue reading >>

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  1. W. Prins

    My experience pretty much mirrors Aarons and I also agree with Teymur. By and large I can get by with less sleep than before and when I do sleep I seem to benefit more from it, which is to say I seem to recover more quickly. In the very early days I had stints where I had some sleep disruptions of various kinds (not being able to get to sleep when I wanted to and so on) but resolved itself in time.

  2. Aaron Goold

    I agree with Jbs. This is just an n=1 answer, but I need less sleep after being in ketosis for at least a week. I used to need 9 hours of sleep. Now I can get 6-7 and feel fine. However, sometimes I wake in the middle of the night and cannot fall back asleep. I've heard from Dave Asprey (Bulletproof guy) that this is common with ketosis. He suggests having some quality carbs before bed. I tried, but haven't noticed a difference. The weird part is, some weeks I'll get only 5-6 hours a night due to work/stress/etc. I'll be tired the first 10-15 minutes, then feel fine all the way until bed. I still prefer to get 7-8 hrs, but now I'm not dying when I don't get it.
    Update: Wanted to add, I also practice intermittent fasting. Not sure how much that also affects sleep/ketosis, but something to consider in my response.

  3. Teymur Mammadov

    Not sure what you mean by sleep “architecture” - I’m going to assume you mean sleep patters (possibly?). Some people who go extremely low-carb (ketosis may have different degrees, you can be considered to be in ketosis with both 0.7 mMol and 4 mMol, but they are, obviously, very different levels of ketones) or no-carb often report sleep pattern disruptions - but individual reactions may vary. If that is an issue, it is recommended to consume low amount of healthy carbs at night before sleep (that’s one of the reasons I personally prefer consuming my carbs - however low - at night) - not so much as to take you out of ketosis, but enough to not interfere with your sleep.

    If you really meant to ask how ketosis affects sleep requirements - I would tend to agree with other writers: typically you might see a reduction in the need to sleep as you get more into ketosis and the associated lifestyle. I do personally consider that moderate ketosis is healthier than the so-called “balanced diet” - and healthier bodies need lees sleep. This effect, however, is not something that happens immediately. It requires you to become generally keto-adapted and make this a lifestyle. In other words - do not expect that by slipping into ketosis first time you would suddenly wake up refreshed after 5 hours of sleep :)

  4. -> Continue reading
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