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How Does Ketosis Affect Menstruation

Have You Lost Your Period To A Low Carb Diet?

Have You Lost Your Period To A Low Carb Diet?

A few weeks ago, I tweeted my concern about a low carb diet for young women. Apparently, my tweet was offensive to some people (men). They explained to me that it’s purely “anecdotal.” There is no known mechanism, they said, so it must not really be happening. Except it is really happening. Ask anyone who works with young menstruating women. Or not menstruating, as the case may be. True, we don’t know the exact mechanism. That’s because no researcher has yet asked the question: What does a very low carb diet do to periods? Until we have the answer, we can only surmise. I surmise that for some women inadequate starch signals the hypothalamus that there’s not enough food to reproduce. It may be via the hormone leptin. It may be via the microbiome. It is an adaptive starvation response, and may also be why a low carb diet can cause hair loss. [For an update and a possible mechanism, please see my 2016 post Are You Eating Enough to Get a Period?] In contrast, some women do well on a low-carb diet. They may even regain the periods they’d lost on a high-carb diet (see insulin-resistant PCOS discussion below). It comes down to this: There are different individuals in the world, with different glycemic responses. There are also different carbohydrates. For example, there is sugar and there is wheat, and they are two worst carbohydrates. Sugar is the worst carb Sugar is bad for health and for period health. High-dose fructose causes insulin resistance and inflammation and is more inflammatory than the long glucose chains of starch. That’s why some researchers have called for a ‘fructose index‘. I discuss fructose in my insulin resistance post, my PCOS post, and Chapter 6 of my book. Whole fruit is okay, but none of us should be eating desserts, sweet drinks, Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Therapy

Ketogenic Diet Therapy

If you have been diagnosed with epilepsy, physicians of the Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center may utilize a ketogenic diet therapy to help control the number of seizures you experience, when traditional medical or surgical procedures prove unsuccessful. What Does Ketogenic Diet Therapy Involve? Developed in 1921, physicians discovered that patients who fasted had fewer seizures. Since prolonged fasting is not practical, the concept of the diet is to "trick" the brain into reacting as though fasting was still in progress with dietary modification. The dietary modification "trick" relies upon forcing the body to convert fat to ketones. Ketones, in turn, are used by the brain as an energy source when its normal fuel, glucose, is unavailable. The ketogenic diet makes glucose unavailable to the brain by restricting access to the carbohydrate foods. Possible Side Effects of Ketogenic Diet Therapy Like all treatments for epilepsy, the ketogenic diet has side effects which may or may not affect a particular individual. Some side effects can be easily managed if caught early; knowing what to look for can make a difference. A common side effect is constipation. Some ketogenic diet plans restrict fluid and lead to significant problems with dehydration, kidney stones and gallstones, but that has not been a great difficulty for Jefferson patients – we do not restrict fluid. Women on the diet may have irregular menstrual cycles. If you are family planning, it is not recommended that you follow the ketogenic diet. There have been reports of decreased bone density on the diet, and a DEXA scan or bone density scan will be performed while you are on the diet. There are also concerns about the possibility of elevation in cholesterol and lipids; lipid levels will be followed closel Continue reading >>

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be On A Ketogenic Diet

When Not To Be on a Ketogenic Diet A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted or keto adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. This nutrition plan has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce inflammation. It also improves cellular healing and mitochondrial biogenesis which supports stronger and healthier cells. All of this leads to reduced risk of chronic disease as well as improved muscle development and fat metabolism (1, 2). Where Ketosis Can Be Extremely Beneficial There are certain cases, where I typically recommend a ketogenic diet as the research appears to support that ketosis significantly improves the functionality of these individuals. Overweight or Obese Neurodegenerative Conditions such as dementia, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Most Cancers but especially those of the brain, nervous system and blood (leukemia) Chronic Pain Seizure Disorders Non-Elite athletes or individuals looking for higher mental & physical performance The final one is the area that I and many others who have pursued a state of ketosis fall into. At this point in my life, I have no chronic diseases, I feel great 99% of the time, but I am always looking to improve my productivity and performance. I have found being in mild-ketosis to be one of the best ways to improve my energy, mental acuity, creativity, physical strength and overall life performance. There is no one diet that works perfectly for everyone. Ketosis has the potential to benefit everyone, but under unique circumstances it would not be warranted. Here are a list of special cases where long-term st Continue reading >>

Absence Of Periods On Low Carb With If

Absence Of Periods On Low Carb With If

Can a low-carb diet combined with intermittent fasting result in an abscence of periods? And if so, what do you do? Get the answer to this and other questions – could dairy be a problem in PCOS? – in this week’s Q&A with the fertility specialist Dr. Fox: Loss of period Almost five months ago I started LCHF due to insulin resistance and PCOS. I lost about 40 pounds (18 kg), and feeling great. But, after two months of regular periods (31-35 days), I simply lost them. The last was on March 26th. This is now my third missed period. When I look back, it seems to me that perhaps I shouldn’t have done IF, (i didn’t fast first two months, and then I had my periods). Now my doctor has put me on progesterone to induce periods, and gave me cyclo-progynova to restore hormonal balance. What has happened doctor Fox? The last ultrasound showed that my endometrium is very thin (before was great). Though, my right ovary had no cysts. Can these hormonal pills harm my health? I am also taking glucophage xr 1000mg a day. I’ve also noticed increased hair loss… Thanks in advance, P.S Keep up the good work!!! Thanks for every advice, lecture, interview! Ivana Dr. Fox: That overall is a hard question. My best guess and it is a guess, is that you may have an underlying hypothalamic dysfunction, maybe due to prior exercise, or eating disorders, hypoglycemia, sleep apnea etc, that has predisposed you to be very sensitive to physiologic stress. The IF if not done during a time of absolute ketoadaptation, could produce such a stress signal that then could have shut off the signals from the hypothalamus to the pituitary and hence decreased the FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) signal to the ovary. This could explain your scenario and would be the most likely thing we would see. Evalua Continue reading >>

Will A Keto Diet Mess With Your Period?

Will A Keto Diet Mess With Your Period?

The diet trend of the moment may make your period disappear. When it comes to periods, I consider myself luckymine shows up each month like clockwork; no need for tracking apps or a flag on my G-cal. But a few months ago my regularly scheduled programming went dark. I went through possible reasons for the ghosting: pregnant? Not a chance. Birth control? Used every time. Meds? Nothing new there. Then it hit me: The only change was my diet. Id been test-driving the ketogenic dietthe trendy but oh-so-restrictive eating plan that has people pumped over its ability to burn through body fat by seriously restricting carbohydrates in favor of meals packed with healthy high-fat foods. By limiting carbs, you drain your bodys main source of fuel, which forces your body to use fuel from fat, or ketones, as a substitute source of energy, says Ariane Hundt , a clinical nutritionist in New York City. The radical shift can produce crazy results: I lost 11 pounds and 3 percent body fat in a month. Thats not necessarily a dangerous amount of weight to drop, but its certainly more than the recommended one to two pounds per week, and that alone could explain why I skipped my period, says Rekha Kumar , M.D., an endocrinologist specializing in weight control at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York City. When you lose weight quickly, your body registers the loss as a threat, and any system deemed unnecessary for survival begins to shut down to conserve resources. For women, the baby-making machine is typically first to go. But thats not the only way rapid weight loss might affect your period. If you do one extreme thing to your body, theres likely other downstream effects on important hormones, Dr. Kumar says. Losing weight fast creates a state of stress in your body, which can trigger your ad Continue reading >>

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Ketosis Late Menstrual Cycle

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Ketosis Late Menstrual Cycle

Ketosis describes a state of increased ketone bodies in the blood stream. Ketone bodies are generated from the breakdown of lipids (fat) when there are low levels of blood sugar or cells are not able to absorb the blood sugar present, as in diabetic ketoacidosis. Some diets which limit carbohydrates cause low blood sugar and may also result in ketosis. Ketone bodies disrupt the acidity of blood and when dangerously elevated can overwhelm the buffering ability of the body and ...Read more Continue reading >>

Keto And The Menstrual Cycle: Is There Reason To Worry?

Keto And The Menstrual Cycle: Is There Reason To Worry?

Keto and the Menstrual Cycle: Is There Reason To Worry? It seems every keto for women forum abounds with stories about menstrual cycles gone wild in the first few months of keto. Irregular cycles, breakthrough bleeding, and periods lasting much longer than normal are common complaints. Sometimes these stories are cited as evidence that keto isnt good for women, at least not premenopausal women, and that we need carbs for healthy hormones. Yet, many women dont notice any changes in their menstrual cycles at all, while others report improvement in PMS symptoms and cycle regularity from the get-go. What gives? Why do some womens cycles apparently become wacky when they start keto, while others feel like keto is the key to period bliss? Can keto mess up the menstrual cycle? We know that dietwhat and how much we eatcan profoundly affect our hormones. This is true for both women and men. One of the reasons people are so excited about ketogenic diets is specifically because keto shows promise for helping to regulate hormones and improve cellular sensitivity to hormones such as insulin and leptin . At the same time, womens hormones are especially sensitive not only to dietary changes but also to downstream effects such as body fat loss. Furthermore, one of the ways womens bodies respond to stressors is by turning down the dial on our reproductive systems. Its reasonable to hypothesize, then, that women might have a tougher time adapting to or sustaining a ketogenic diet. Keto can be stressful depending on ones approach, and that might negatively impact womens reproductive health. But do the data actually bear that out, or is so-called keto period more misplaced hype than genuine fact? Note that throughout this post, Im going to use the term reproductive health to refer to all Continue reading >>

Females, Carbohydrates, And Hormones

Females, Carbohydrates, And Hormones

Oh, carbohydrates. Just like politics and religion, discussion on this macronutrient is not dinner table material. There are many strong opinions on just how many carbohydrates are “safe” to consume. Some advocate “high” carb, others prescribe a “moderate” amount, others “low” or even “very low”. And to mystify things further, what’s considered a low amount of carbohydrates to some, may be considered too high for others. Even the scientific literature doesn’t seem to agree on a common definition. See how it can get confusing? The purpose of this post isn’t to tell you which way is better. In fact, that is a decision you may never make. What works for some people, won’t work for others. What works for you now, may not work for you next week. If something is working for you, great! Right now, I want to explore one piece on the topic of carbohydrates that isn’t discussed often in this community. I bring up this topic because I personally struggled with finding the “right” amount of carbohydrates for my body. I want to make sure others don’t have to go through what I did. In the past, I’ve done damage to myself by going too low (almost on accident) and I want to stop you before it’s too late. If you’re in the same boat as I was, I’m hoping this will be an aha! moment for you. When I first started with my Paleo lifestyle, I realized just how amazing I felt going lower carb (probably in the range of 100 grams a day). The problem was, I was also doing high intensity workouts (kickboxing, interval training) multiple times per week. At first, I felt great. I was recovering like a champ, my sleep was perfect, I had a very stable, positive mood, and even though I knew I would probably benefit from more carbohydrates, I stubbornly went on Continue reading >>

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

Adverse Reactions To Ketogenic Diets: Caution Advised

As the ketogenic diet gains popularity, it’s important to have a balanced discussion regarding the merits of this diet. Let me emphasize right out of the gate that this is not a diet without merits (excuse the double negative); in fact, it has significant therapeutic potential for some clinical pathologies. However, it is also a diet with inherent risk, as evidenced by the extensive list of adverse reactions reported in the scientific literature—and this has not yet been a thorough enough part of the public discussion on ketogenic diets. The AIP Lecture Series is a 6-week video-based, self-directed online course that will teach you the scientific foundation for the diet and lifestyle tenets of the Autoimmune Protocol. This is the first of a series of articles discussing various facets of a ketogenic diet with an inclination toward balancing the discussion of the pros and cons of this high-fat, low-carb, low/moderate-protein diet. My interest in this topic stems from concerns I have over its general applicability and safety, simultaneous with its growing popularity. I feel a moral and social obligation to share what I understand of these diets, from my perspective as a medical researcher. The dangers of a ketogenic diet was, in fact, the topic of my keynote presentation at Paleo F(x) this year (links to video will be provided once available). This series of articles will share the extensive research that I did in preparation for this presentation, including all of the topics covered during my talk as well as several topics that I didn’t have time to discuss (also see the free PDF Literature Review at the bottom of this post). For every anecdotal story of someone who has regained their health with a ketogenic diet, there’s a counterpoint story of someone who derai Continue reading >>

Keto And Menstruation: Can Keto Affect A Womans Period?

Keto And Menstruation: Can Keto Affect A Womans Period?

Keto and Menstruation: Can Keto Affect a Womans Period? Hip2Keto may earn a small commission via affiliate links in this post. Read our full disclosure policy here . Click to share on SMS (Opens in new window) Diet, weight, and stress all contribute to changes in hormones in both women and men. However, due to womens reproductive systems, they often experience greater hormonal side-effects when it comes to diet and weight changes. For this reason, youll find several keto forums, websites, and books specifically targeted to women and keto. Nutrition greatly affects how our bodies perform and function, so changes in menstruation when going keto shouldnt be a surprise. However, some women experience changes in their period more than others. Is there a reason to worry?This really can depend on several factors, but overall, a healthy, well-formulated keto diet appears to help rather than hinder a womans reproductive health (a.k.a. your period and hormones). A womans menstrual cycle consists of 4 different phases with significant hormone changes in each phase. A typical menstrual cycle averages 28 days, give or take a week. Menstrual phase: day 1 is the first day of your period and lasts ~3-7 days. Follicular phase: overlaps with menstrual phase from day 1 and lasts ~ 16 days on average. Ovulation phase (a.k.a. baby-making phase): starts ~ day 14, right smack in the middle of the menstrual cycle and lasts ~ 24 hours. Luteal phase (a.k.a. PMS phase): lasts ~ 14 days after ovulation phase. A few of the hormones affected by menstruation, diet, and stress include the luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), estradiol, progesterone, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Within each phase, several hormones are affected, resulting in both physical and emotion Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Ketogenic Diet And Menopause

Menopause can be very difficult on a number of levels. Although each woman's experience is different, many find that they gain fat, lose muscle tone, and struggle with hot flashes, insomnia, and mood swings during this time. In this article, I'll discuss how a low-carb or keto diet combined with other lifestyle strategies may help you manage some of the physical, mental, and emotional symptoms of menopause. What is the Menopause Transition? Although a woman technically reaches menopause when she has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, symptoms related to perimenopause – the time where hormonal changes begin - can start much earlier. In addition, they may last for several years after this point, and new symptoms may develop within the first few years after menopause. The average age of onset for perimenopause is 46, and it typically lasts about 7 years. However, a woman may start perimenopause anytime between her mid-30s and mid-50s, and the transition can last from 4 to 14 years (1). The day after a woman has gone 12 months without a menstrual period, she is considered postmenopausal. During and after the menopause transition, as many as 34 symptoms may occur. The most common ones include: Hot flashes and night sweats Weight gain, especially around the middle Insomnia Vaginal dryness Mood swings Fatigue Poor memory, ie, “brain fog” Interestingly, while some women find that their symptoms are more severe during perimenopause, others report that their symptoms intensify after they are postmenopausal. Hormone Fluctuations and Insulin Resistance During Menopause During a woman's reproductive years, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) causes the release of an egg from one of her ovaries approximately every 28 days and stimulates ovarian production of estrogen. Af Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Affect Women’s Hormones?

Does A Ketogenic Diet Affect Women’s Hormones?

Does a ketogenic diet affect women’s hormones? Yes—you can count on your nutrition to affect your hormones. Does it ruin or destroy your hormones? No. The unfortunate part is that if women rely on hearsay and don’t source better information about ketosis and their hormones, they lose out on the benefits of ketosis, especially those who suffer from PCOS, endometriosis, and uterine fibroids. Women with these conditions can benefit significantly from the ketogenic diet. [1] In this post we’ll discuss the ketogenic diet’s impact on your thyroid and the HPA axis, then look at ways to evaluate your hormones, how you feel, and what adjustments to make. The Ketogenic Diet and Your Thyroid Is ketosis bad for your thyroid? No. Let’s break it down: It’s true that low-carb diets (like the ketogenic diet) and calorie restriction lowers T3, the thyroid marker hormone. [3] [4] T3 make your cells use more energy. Because of its function, scientists have hypothesized that “a reduction in T3 hormone may increase lifespan by conserving energy and reducing free-radical production.” [4] Together with T4, these hormones regulate your metabolism, heart rate and body temperature. Most of T3 binds to protein and some free T3 circulates in your blood. But a lowered T3 doesn’t mean you get thyroid dysfunction or hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism is often a case of high levels of TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone) and low levels of free T4. The pituitary gland tries to get your thyroid gland to produce T4: high levels of TSH. But the thyroid isn’t responding: low levels of T4. When T3 is reduced, the thyroid is called “euthyroid.” A normal thyroid. For a more in-depth look at what a low-carb diet does to T3, T4 and TSH levels, read Dr. Anthony’s article on ketosis and women Continue reading >>

Menstruation And Ketone Level

Menstruation And Ketone Level

I recently got a ketonix meter and todays readings were quite a bit lower than the previous couple days with not much difference in diet. Is there any correlation between menstruation and ketone reading? My period should be starting anytime Ok I will just say I began keto on Jan 1st. I have had some weird wacky things going on with my period. My first period was very long. 10+ days. My second was more normal except I had horrible pms, in a really bad mood for a couple of days. This month no pms or cramps, but a very heavy start, but a normal length. I think my hormones are just trying to regulate. I read somewhere that our fat cells store estrogen, so if we are burning fat we are releasing all that estrogen. Don't know if that's true or not. Also I have seborrheic dermatitis, and I have never had a flare up like the one I have now. Oddly enough this diet is supposed to improve seborrheic dermatitis. I'm hoping my body is just taking time to adjust. Physically I have so much more energy than I used to. I no longer get tired and sluggish in the afternoons. Badmojomnthis is exactly what Im researching tounderstand! Ive been doingKeto & IF for 2 weeks. By day 3 my strips were dark purple. Starting weight 163, now 155. So 8 lbs in 2 weeks (doesnt sound that good to me for Keto?!). All of a sudden today I realized I not only haventlost anyweight in 5 days BUT my strips are now showing light pink!! Which freaked me out. I thought I must have did something wrong but I have been very strict with my keto diet and not cheated atall??? So after reading all your comments, here is my reasoning and resulting questioning... Normally, when in our period even just before, our progesterone level is unbalanced, and will make you pack on water . So you're there wondering how come you don't Continue reading >>

Why You Could Have No Period On The Keto Diet - Insider

Why You Could Have No Period On The Keto Diet - Insider

Being on a keto diet can stop your period. Since the keto diet cuts out carbs, calories, and some nutrient-dense foods, it can cause issues like irregular periods. The keto diet can also mess with leptin and luteinizing hormones associated with your period. However, other factors (blood, health, and mental health) can also stop your period. Its best to discuss this topic with a medical professional before giving the keto diet a try on your own. Although many believe that the keto diet can improve cholesterol levels and induce weight loss, the lack of carbs and calories encouraged on this diet plan can have major impacts on the body. A persons menstrual cycle is definitely something that can be affected by the diet, especially since the lack of nutrient-dense foods can lead to an abnormal cycle. "Nutrient deficiencies could contribute to an abnormal menstrual cycle, and following a diet that cuts out a major macro-nutrient could create gaps in a woman's nutrition, said registered dietitian Crystal C. Karges, MS, RDN, IBCLC . As women, we need both adequate calories and nutrients to function normally and to maintain a regular menstrual cycle. To see how else the keto diet can affect your period, we spoke to experts on the subject to help you understand what kind of impacts the low-carb and high-fat eating plan can have on your body. Below are some crucial points they recommend keeping in mind. Lack of carbs on the keto diet can spell out issues for ovulation and menstruation Lack of carbs can lead to problems with ovulation and menstruation. Menstrual issues are not at all specific to the keto diet, but the thing which makes keto females more susceptible to such conditions is the near-lack of carbohydrates, said Caleb Backe, personal trainer and wellness expert . Keto is Continue reading >>

The Effects Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet On The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study

The Effects Of A Low-carbohydrate, Ketogenic Diet On The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: A Pilot Study

Go to: Methods Subjects were recruited from the Raleigh/Durham/Chapel Hill areas in North Carolina through a community PCOS support group and by word of mouth. After meeting initial eligibility criteria by phone, including replying "yes" to the question, "Have you been told by your health care provider that you have PCOS?," subjects were asked to attend a screening visit for a medical history and physical exam. Informed consent approved by the local Institutional Review Board was obtained. Baseline blood tests were also performed at the screening visit. There were no monetary incentives for participation. Inclusion/exclusion criteria The inclusion criteria were age 18–45 years, diagnosis suggestive of PCOS based on history of chronic anovulation and/or hyperandrogenemia, no other serious medical condition requiring medical supervision, body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 27 kg/m2, willingness to use acceptable contraception, and a desire to lose weight. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy, nursing or positive pregnancy test during screening period, and rapid progression of hyperandrogenic signs and symptoms. Intervention Subjects received an intensive group education program during monthly group meetings held every other week throughout the 6-month study period. During the first group meeting, subjects were instructed on both the rationale and implementation of the dietary intervention via use of a LCKD diet book and handouts containing suggestions on choice of appropriate foods.[18] Subjects were then instructed to begin the diet the following day. During follow-up group meetings, study outcome measures were obtained, and continued dietary counseling, adjustment of individual medications, supportive counseling, sharing of food choices, and review of urin Continue reading >>

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