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How Does Ketosis Affect Blood Tests

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

My Health Markers After 10 Years On A Low-carb, High-fat Diet

My Health Markers After 10 Years On A Low-carb, High-fat Diet

I should have been dead a long time ago, according to some people. But I feel as healthy as ever. In 2006 I started eating an LCHF diet – low carb and high fat – in other words a keto diet. I’ve now been on it for ten years, so it was time for the big checkup. What has happened to me during these years? Here are the results from my repeated blood work: Background I’m basically healthy. But as a 44-year old dad to two small children, with some sleep deprivation and little time for exercise, and who regularly works 60-hour weeks, this is probably the time when my health should start to fail. If LCHF doesn’t save me. I’ve eaten an LCHF diet for ten years, at times very strict, at other times less strict. Plenty of butter, eggs, meat and heavy cream – and vegetables. For the last two years I’ve also done intermittent fasting, 16:8, on most weekdays (I skip breakfast). Very occasionally I also do one or two full days of fasting. Results Here’s a summary of my results. The recent test results are in the colored columns. Numbers converted to US units to the right. The wild rumors about how dangerous LCHF is long term don’t get validated in my blood work. After ten years on LCHF they are excellent, just as when I started. There simply aren’t any big changes during these years. Many things are typical and the trends are also confirmed in studies on low-carb diets: Low triglycerides (good) Excellent HDL cholesterol levels Nice ApoB/AI ratio A low fasting blood sugar and a low HbA1c (good) Very low insulin levels, measured as C-peptide (probably excellent) Low IGF-1 levels (probably great) A normal weight and a normal waist circumference A low normal blood pressure (excellent) To summarize, all problems associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Go to: Abstract Although various studies have examined the short-term effects of a ketogenic diet in reducing weight in obese patients, its long-term effects on various physical and biochemical parameters are not known. To determine the effects of a 24-week ketogenic diet (consisting of 30 g carbohydrate, 1 g/kg body weight protein, 20% saturated fat, and 80% polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat) in obese patients. In the present study, 83 obese patients (39 men and 44 women) with a body mass index greater than 35 kg/m2, and high glucose and cholesterol levels were selected. The body weight, body mass index, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, urea and creatinine levels were determined before and after the administration of the ketogenic diet. Changes in these parameters were monitored after eight, 16 and 24 weeks of treatment. The weight and body mass index of the patients decreased significantly (P<0.0001). The level of total cholesterol decreased from week 1 to week 24. HDL cholesterol levels significantly increased, whereas LDL cholesterol levels significantly decreased after treatment. The level of triglycerides decreased significantly following 24 weeks of treatment. The level of blood glucose significantly decreased. The changes in the level of urea and creatinine were not statistically significant. The present study shows the beneficial effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. It significantly reduced the body weight and body mass index of the patients. Furthermore, it decreased the level of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose, and increased the level of HDL cholesterol. Administering a ketogenic diet for a relatively longer period of time did Continue reading >>

How Does A Ketogenic Diet Affect You? Part 1 Of A 3 Part Series

How Does A Ketogenic Diet Affect You? Part 1 Of A 3 Part Series

by Katie Mark If you could tap into your approximately 40,000 calories of stored fat during endurance exercise instead of relying on your 2,000 calorie storage of carbohydrate fuel, would you do it? LeBron James did it by switching to a ketogenic diet. But for those of us who aren’t athletes, can the ketogenic diet positively impact our health? The controversial ketogenic diet A ketogenic diet is a diet high in fats and very low in carbohydrates (less than 50 grams of carbs per day) and causes the body to start burning fat instead of carbohydrates by breaking down fat into molecules called ketones. As we saw in last month’s article, “The Basics of the Ketogenic Diet,” the diet was developed to help treat seizures in children who suffered from epilepsy. Believe it or not, the brain, usually dependent on glucose from food, can also run using ketones. When you transition to a ketogenic diet, there is a period of time in which your body adapts to the change. Under normal circumstances, skeletal muscle will burn ketones for energy, but as “keto-adaptation” occurs, the muscles switch to burning fatty acids instead. This increases blood ketone levels and allows more ketones to supply energy to the brain. The change in energy sources makes keto-adaptation a gradual process taking at two weeks instead of a few days. Today some nutritionists believe the ketogenic diet can be a valuable method for improving some health “biomarkers,” or signs of health your body creates. By examining these biomarkers, effects of the ketogenic diet can be measured. In this part one of the three-part series on “How Does a Ketogenic Diet Affect YOU” we will look at what ketosis does for fasting glucose and insulin. The ketogenic diet does what to my fasting glucose and insulin? Whe Continue reading >>

What To Do If A Low-carb Diet Raises Your Cholesterol

What To Do If A Low-carb Diet Raises Your Cholesterol

Low-carb and ketogenic diets are incredibly healthy. They have clear, potentially life-saving benefits for some of the world's most serious diseases. This includes obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, epilepsy and numerous others. The most common heart disease risk factors tend to improve greatly, for most people (1, 2, 3). According to these improvements, low-carb diets should reduce the risk of heart disease. But even if these risk factors improve on average, there can be individuals within those averages that experience improvements, and others who see negative effects. There appears to be a small subset of people who experience increased cholesterol levels on a low-carb diet, especially a ketogenic diet or a very high fat version of paleo. This includes increases in Total and LDL cholesterol... as well as increases in advanced (and much more important) markers like LDL particle number. Of course, most of these "risk factors" were established in the context of a high-carb, high-calorie Western diet and we don't know if they have the same effects on a healthy low-carb diet that reduces inflammation and oxidative stress. However... it is better to be safe than sorry and I think that these individuals should take some measures to get their levels down, especially those who have a family history of heart disease. Fortunately, you don't need to go on a low-fat diet, eat veggie oils or take statins to get your levels down. Some simple adjustments will do just fine and you will still be able to reap all the metabolic benefits of eating low-carb. Interpreting cholesterol numbers can be fairly complicated. Most people are familiar with Total, HDL and LDL cholesterol. People with high HDL (the "good") have a low risk of heart disease, while people with high LDL (the " Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Wrong and outdated health information often causes worry about the healthiness of the ketogenic diet. One of the biggest concerns is: does a ketogenic diet change your lipid profile? In order to tackle and address these concerns, we’ll be covering what lipid profile means, why it’s included in myths about the ketogenic diet and why you don’t need to worry about most of what you’ve been told. Lipids and the Ketogenic Diet The main purpose of the ketogenic diet today is to provide a measurable state of metabolism through nutritional ketosis. There are many benefits of ketosis, including weight loss, better mental clarity, and more energy. These benefits make the ketogenic diet enticing, but what about how it affects lipids in the body? To understand this, let’s discuss what lipids are and the beliefs surrounding them and the keto diet. What is a Lipid Profile? A lipid profile is the measure of fats and fatty substances (lipids) that your body uses as energy. These are usually measured via a lipid panel of blood tests meant to look for any irregularities in your lipid amounts. Lipids include: Triglycerides Cholesterol High-density lipoprotein (HDL, often know as “good,” cholesterol) Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, often known as “bad,” cholesterol) The ketogenic diet raises some concerns around the diet negatively affecting one’s lipid profile and increasing their risks of diseases related to high cholesterol or triglycerides. Let’s take a look at these concerns. Myths About Fat and Cholesterol Below are some of the myths when it comes to the ketogenic diet and lipid profiles. We’re used to hearing many of these due to bad or old science — and we all know the internet is rampant with poor (and sometimes harmful) information. Myth: Cholesterol is bad Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways to Measure Your Ketones A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. Research has demonstrated that this nutrition plan improves insulin sensitivity and reduces inflammation throughout the body. This leads to greater fat metabolism and muscle development as well as a reduced risk of chronic disease. (1, 2). I get asked all the time how to measure the state of ketosis. There are several major ways and we will discuss those in this article. Measuring Your Ketones There are three types of ketone bodies: Acetone, Acetoacetate and Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB). Each of these three can be tested as acetone is a ketone released through the breath, acetoacetate is a ketone released through urine and BHB is (although not technically a ketone it acts like a ketone) in the blood stream and used by the cells for energy. 1. Blood Ketone Meter This measures BHB and is considered to be the most accurate way to measure ketone bodies. These have the ability to determine the ketone level in your blood precisely but they are also pricey and invasive. Personally, I freak out every time I have to prick my finger!! The Precision Xtra blood glucose and ketone meter is a good buy at $28-$30. The expensive part is the ketone test strips here which can cost $4 each. If you are looking at testing yourself every day it is going to cost you $120 a month and the $30 meter. Here is a starter kit you can get on Amazon Most people will enter into a light nutritional ketosis (between 0.5-1.0 mmol/L on the meter) within two or three days. It typically takes Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Your Blood Test Results: A Basic Guide

Your Blood Test Results: A Basic Guide

You’ve gotten your blood test results back, but you have no idea what they mean. Here’s a short overview (from a ketogenic perspective) on how to translate the numbers, and what they mean. The information in the table below will help you sort out the numbers and figure out what you need to address in terms of your health. Note on Blood Test Results for Cholesterol Cholesterol is actually a waxy alcohol, not a fat. You know that wax doesn’t mix with water, so in order to move cholesterol through the watery medium of blood, the body has to package cholesterol in a "carrier" protein shell called a lipoprotein. You’ve probably heard of these lipoproteins; some are named HDL, others LDL, and also VLDL. All of these names mean the same thing really; they are all just parts of cholesterol in different packages. The Numbers... Test Ref Range Explanation Total Cholesterol 100-199 mg/dL This is the total number of cholesterol particles in your blood. It doesn’t mean much unless it is extremely high or extremely low. Total cholesterol levels have never been scientifically correlated with heart disease. Uneducated physicians and dietitians will tell you that this blood test result must be below 199 mg/dL for good heart health but this is not true. See Dr. Uffe Ravnskov’s book "Fat and Cholesterol are Good For You! or Dr. Malcolm McKendrick's book "The Great Cholesterol Con." Also, read this paper. HDL-C >39 mg/dL This is your total HDL (High Density Lipoprotein) level. HDL is called the “good” cholesterol because it picks up the cholesterol in your cells and takes them back to the liver. Higher HDL levels (above 39 mg/dL) indicate a healthier heart. HDL levels above 60 mg/dL are optimal. Eating more saturated fat and protein and cutting carbohydrates raises HDL. Rai Continue reading >>

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

What Everybody Ought To Know About Ketosis

Recently I wanted to explore the world of Ketosis. I thought I knew a little bit about ketosis, but after doing some research I soon realised how wrong I was. 3 months later, after reading numerous books, listening to countless podcasts and experimenting with various diets I know have a sound understanding of ketosis. This resource is built as a reference guide for those looking to explore the fascinating world of ketosis. It is a resource that I wish I had 3 months ago. As you will soon see, a lot of the content below is not mine, instead I have linked to referenced to experts who have a greater understanding of this topic than I ever will. I hope this helps and if there is something that I have missed please leave a comment below so that I can update this. Also, as this is a rather long document, I have split it into various sections. You can click the headline below to be sent straight to the section that interests you. For those that are really time poor I have created a useful ketosis cheat sheet guide. This guide covers all the essential information you should know about ketosis. It can be downloaded HERE. Alternatively, if you're looking for a natural and sustainable way to improve health and lose weight head to this page - What is Ketosis? What Are The Benefits from being in Ketosis? Isn’t Ketosis Dangerous? Ketoacidosis vs Ketosis What Is The Difference Between a Low Carb Diet and a Ketogenic Diet? Types of Ketosis: The Difference Between Nutritional, Therapeutic & MCT Ketogenic Diets Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe? Long Term Effects Thyroid and Ketosis - What You May Want To Know What is a Typical Diet/Macro Breakdown for a Ketogenic Diet? Do I Need to Eat Carbs? What do I Eat On a Ketogenic Diet? What Do I Avoid Eating on a Ketogenic Diet? Protein Consumption a Continue reading >>

Blood Tests On Low Carb / Keto Diets Simplified

Blood Tests On Low Carb / Keto Diets Simplified

The lazy health nut’s guide to getting the most out of the least amount of blood letting possible. Disclaimer This is not medical advice, it is just the collation of the latest information we have on what’s actually useful to get tested for, and what it means in general. Seek out advice of doctors and specialists to interpret your own results, armed with the best information you can get. Shortcuts Overview One of the big problems with being conscious about your health and undertaking a low carb or even ketogenic regime is that you can start obsessing about plasma/lipid biomarkers etc, especially if you’re new to all this and still worried about silly little things like cholesterol etc. So the point of the information presented here is to simplify as much as possible for the average healthy’ish person who doesn’t want to stress about all the gazillions of tests and biomarkers that are specific to a limited subset of health maladies, but just wants a basic overview of the tests that tell you most of what you want to know. Most tests aren’t particularly telling on their own, but taken together several biomarkers are an indicator of where things are at, and if you are trying to diagnose a specific issue, you’ll need to research what other tests and results are of use to your situation. What we have identified here are the basic tests available from a regular lipid panel which by themselves can tell you fairly reliably where things are at for your overall health, and if you’re so inclined can investigate further with more complicated and expensive diagnostics. HbA1c Glycation/CVD/diabetes Triglycerides LDL particle density (CVD risk) ALT Fatty liver disease GGT Liver function Urate Kidney function Troponin Heart muscle damage The useful basic tests to get HbA Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

A common misconception is that because ketogenic diets are high in fat, they must increase cholesterol in your body and clog your arteries. However, much of the recent research shines light on how low-carb diets can optimize your cholesterol levels and in fact improve your heart health. Here we show the most up-to-date research on how different types of cholesterol impact the body and how the ketogenic diet can be a useful tool in maintaining a robust cardiovascular system. Cutting through the Fat: What are Lipids and Cholesterol? Before we can examine the research, we need to understand the roles fat, cholesterol, and carrier molecules called lipoproteins play in the body. Fats, also known as lipids, are a diverse group of molecules with a “non-polar” characteristic that repels water. This means that you if you put a fat such as oil or grease in water they will not mix. In the human body, fats are most commonly found in the bloodstream in one of two forms. The first is triglycerides, a fatty acid that stores energy for later use. These long molecules can be broken down into other fatty acids and glycerol to create fuel for the body. Glycerol can further be broken down into forms of glucose. Elevated levels of triglycerides in your blood can increase your risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular illnesses, and other life-threatening diseases. [1] The other important class of lipids in the body is a waxy substance called cholesterol. These molecules have a variety of functions in your body such as building hormones including estrogen and testosterone, maintaining the integrity of cell membranes, and aiding in the absorption of vitamins. Your body produces all the cholesterol you need through the liver and other body cells. Cholesterol is also obtained by consuming Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Go to: Methods The KetoPerformance study with its before-and-after comparison design was registered at germanctr.de as DRKS00009605 and took place from February to June 2016. Exclusion criteria included underweight, obesity, kidney stones, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and any fatty acid-metabolism disorders. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Commission of the Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg (494/14) and all subjects signed a written consent form. Twelve of the 42 subjects from the KetoPerformance study could be recruited for the present substudy. Experimental design and dietary intervention The experimental intervention consisted of a KD without caloric restriction lasting 6 weeks with a previous preparation period including detailed instructions during teaching classes and individual counselling by a dietitian. The subjects were free to follow a KD according to their personal preferences but were advised to reach a ratio by weight of approximately 1.8:1 fat to carbohydrate and protein combined, yielding a diet with 80, 15, and 5 % of total energy intake from fat, protein and carbohydrate, respectively. During the KD intervention's sixth week, our substudy subjects were instructed to measure urine and blood ketone concentrations at regular intervals in as close proximity as possible during a 24-h period from 07:00 to 07:00 in the morning. During the day (07:00 till 22:00) blood and urinary ketones were measured every full hour and every three hours, respectively. During the night, blood and urinary ketones were measured once at 03:00. In total blood and urine and ketones were measured 18 and 8 times, respectively, and were recorded in a table sheet. Subjects were asked to drink 400 ml of water every 3 h during the day to ensure sufficient urination and to Continue reading >>

Cholesterol And The Ketogenic Diet

Cholesterol And The Ketogenic Diet

Does the Keto Diet Raise Cholesterol? The ketogenic, or keto, diet is an eating plan based on high fat intake, adequate levels of protein and very low intake of carbohydrates. It is designed to change the way the body sources energy, forcing it to burn fats as energy, rather than glucose obtained from carbohydrates. Developed as a treatment for epilepsy in 1924, the keto diet is still used today to control the disorder. It is also used in the treatment of other medical issues, and has become very popular for weight loss. Given the high intake of fats, questions have been raised about cholesterol and the ketogenic diet, a concern that we'll look into here in detail. About The Ketogenic Diet A typical Ketogenic Diet plan involves getting most calories from fat (70-90%), a small amount from protein and very minimal carbohydrate intake. The high fat, low carbohydrate makeup of the diet is designed to mimic the fasting state, stimulating a metabolic state called ketosis. This is a state in which the lack of sufficient carbohydrates in the diet forces it to turn to fat as a fuel source. In order to use those fats, the liver includes High Fat Foods with few Carbohydratesconverts them into fatty acids and ketones, and the ketones then replace glucose as the body's main source of energy. The ketogenic diet was first developed by Dr. Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic to control epilepsy. It is still considered a very effective treatment for reducing seizures in patients who suffer the disorder. While it has been largely replaced by anticonvulsant drugs today, it is still used to treat patients with drug-resistant seizure disorders. According to the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, there is strong medical evidence that the keto diet is also beneficial for weight loss, impro Continue reading >>

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