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How Does Ketosis Affect Blood Tests

Cholesterol And The Ketogenic Diet

Cholesterol And The Ketogenic Diet

Does the Keto Diet Raise Cholesterol? The ketogenic, or keto, diet is an eating plan based on high fat intake, adequate levels of protein and very low intake of carbohydrates. It is designed to change the way the body sources energy, forcing it to burn fats as energy, rather than glucose obtained from carbohydrates. Developed as a treatment for epilepsy in 1924, the keto diet is still used today to control the disorder. It is also used in the treatment of other medical issues, and has become very popular for weight loss. Given the high intake of fats, questions have been raised about cholesterol and the ketogenic diet, a concern that we'll look into here in detail. About The Ketogenic Diet A typical Ketogenic Diet plan involves getting most calories from fat (70-90%), a small amount from protein and very minimal carbohydrate intake. The high fat, low carbohydrate makeup of the diet is designed to mimic the fasting state, stimulating a metabolic state called ketosis. This is a state in which the lack of sufficient carbohydrates in the diet forces it to turn to fat as a fuel source. In order to use those fats, the liver includes High Fat Foods with few Carbohydratesconverts them into fatty acids and ketones, and the ketones then replace glucose as the body's main source of energy. The ketogenic diet was first developed by Dr. Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic to control epilepsy. It is still considered a very effective treatment for reducing seizures in patients who suffer the disorder. While it has been largely replaced by anticonvulsant drugs today, it is still used to treat patients with drug-resistant seizure disorders. According to the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, there is strong medical evidence that the keto diet is also beneficial for weight loss, impro Continue reading >>

What Blood Tests Should You Get When Starting A Ketogenic Diet?

What Blood Tests Should You Get When Starting A Ketogenic Diet?

I have gotten this question asked to me many times over in the Ketogenic Training room and I have resisted posting this for a few reasons. The most important reason is that I truly believe that most of us do not need any tests to safely start this way of eating. You are going to start giving your body what it needs to thrive and I don’t want anyone hesitating to start eating a healthy diet because they are waiting on a blood test. However, it is pretty cool to see how this way of eating looks on an objective test result page. I still remember the time I got a test back and every single number was in range for the first time in my life. My Metabolic syndrome had disappeared, my A1C was down, and my blood lipids were all in the right place. It was such a huge confirmation that I was on the right track. 3 years later and 200 lbs lighter, I know I’ve found the way that works. In order to organize these tests into a way that will be most helpful for everyone, I am going to list this in multiple sections with the most important tests that you should really consider doing at the top and the less important ones at the bottom. Almost all of these tests can be ordered without a doctor’s visit through Life Extension and more information about these tests and more can be found at Lab Tests Online. Most Important Tests for Newcomers to the Ketogenic Diet This is a more comprehensive cholesterol test than the standard Lipid profile you will usually get from the doctor. Instead of just telling you the total HDL, LDL, and Triglyceride numbers, it breaks out the total particle counts for those lipids. This way you can see how much of your LDL articles are the small dense LDL particles that have been shown to lead to Cardiovascular disease. This test can be taken once a year. An LD Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways To Measure Your Ketones

5 Ways to Measure Your Ketones A ketogenic diet is a very low carbohydrate, moderate protein and high fat based nutrition plan. A ketogenic diet trains the individual’s metabolism to run off of fatty acids or ketone bodies. This is called fat adapted, when the body has adapted to run off of fatty acids/ketones at rest. Research has demonstrated that this nutrition plan improves insulin sensitivity and reduces inflammation throughout the body. This leads to greater fat metabolism and muscle development as well as a reduced risk of chronic disease. (1, 2). I get asked all the time how to measure the state of ketosis. There are several major ways and we will discuss those in this article. Measuring Your Ketones There are three types of ketone bodies: Acetone, Acetoacetate and Beta-Hydroxybutryate (BHB). Each of these three can be tested as acetone is a ketone released through the breath, acetoacetate is a ketone released through urine and BHB is (although not technically a ketone it acts like a ketone) in the blood stream and used by the cells for energy. 1. Blood Ketone Meter This measures BHB and is considered to be the most accurate way to measure ketone bodies. These have the ability to determine the ketone level in your blood precisely but they are also pricey and invasive. Personally, I freak out every time I have to prick my finger!! The Precision Xtra blood glucose and ketone meter is a good buy at $28-$30. The expensive part is the ketone test strips here which can cost $4 each. If you are looking at testing yourself every day it is going to cost you $120 a month and the $30 meter. Here is a starter kit you can get on Amazon Most people will enter into a light nutritional ketosis (between 0.5-1.0 mmol/L on the meter) within two or three days. It typically takes Continue reading >>

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

Optimal Ketone And Blood Sugar Levels For Ketosis

A low carb helps reduce blood sugars and insulin levels and helps with the management of many of the diseases of modern civilisation (e.g. diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s). We become insulin resistant when our body fat can’t store any more energy. Excess energy is then stored in the liver, pancreas, heart, brain and other organs that are more insulin sensitive. We also see increased levels of energy in our blood in the form of glucose, fat and elevated ketone. Endogenous ketosis occurs when we eat less food than we need. Our insulin and blood sugar levels decrease and ketones rise to supply the energy we need. Exogenous ketosis occurs when we eat lots fat and/or take exogenous ketones. Blood ketones rise, but our insulin levels will also rise because we have an excess of energy coming from our diet. Most of the good things associated with ketosis occur due to endogenous ketosis. Most people following a ketogenic diet over the long term have ketone values lower than what some people consider to be “optimal ketosis”. If your goal is blood sugar control, longevity or weight loss then endogenous ketosis with lower blood sugars and lower ketones is likely a better place to be than chasing higher blood ketones. I have seen a lot of interest and confusion recently from people following a ketogenic about ideal ketone and blood sugar levels. In an effort to try to clear this up, this article reviews blood ketone (BHB), breath ketone (acetone) and blood sugar data from a large number of people who are following a low carb or ketogenic diet to understand what “normal” and “optimal” look like. Many people initiate a low carb diet to manage their blood glucose levels, insulin resistance or diabetes. As shown in the chart below, Continue reading >>

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Long-term Effects Of A Ketogenic Diet In Obese Patients

Go to: Abstract Although various studies have examined the short-term effects of a ketogenic diet in reducing weight in obese patients, its long-term effects on various physical and biochemical parameters are not known. To determine the effects of a 24-week ketogenic diet (consisting of 30 g carbohydrate, 1 g/kg body weight protein, 20% saturated fat, and 80% polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fat) in obese patients. In the present study, 83 obese patients (39 men and 44 women) with a body mass index greater than 35 kg/m2, and high glucose and cholesterol levels were selected. The body weight, body mass index, total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting blood sugar, urea and creatinine levels were determined before and after the administration of the ketogenic diet. Changes in these parameters were monitored after eight, 16 and 24 weeks of treatment. The weight and body mass index of the patients decreased significantly (P<0.0001). The level of total cholesterol decreased from week 1 to week 24. HDL cholesterol levels significantly increased, whereas LDL cholesterol levels significantly decreased after treatment. The level of triglycerides decreased significantly following 24 weeks of treatment. The level of blood glucose significantly decreased. The changes in the level of urea and creatinine were not statistically significant. The present study shows the beneficial effects of a long-term ketogenic diet. It significantly reduced the body weight and body mass index of the patients. Furthermore, it decreased the level of triglycerides, LDL cholesterol and blood glucose, and increased the level of HDL cholesterol. Administering a ketogenic diet for a relatively longer period of time did Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet And Blood Test Results….cholesterol, Triglycerides, Hdl, Ldl, And More

Ketogenic Diet And Blood Test Results….cholesterol, Triglycerides, Hdl, Ldl, And More

Ketogenic diet and blood test results….cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, LDL, and more Why Publish My Blood Results? In my attempt to be totally and completely transparent with all of you regarding the effects of the ketogenic diet on my health, I decided to publish my blood test results. A lot of people are very secretive with regards to their health, and that is TOTALLY fine, It is their business and only their business. However, I truly believe in the ketogenic diet as a healthy alternative to current dieting protocols that are used today. I believe I would be doing a disservice to all of you if I was not totally and completely up-front with how my body reacts to this diet. There has been a lot of science coming out lately that illustrates the benefits a ketogenic diet can have towards short term AND long term health. New studies are coming out daily that indicate the keto diet could limit the negative effects of glioblastoma brain cancer, Alzheimers, diabetes, and a smorgasbord of other ailments. But isn’t a high fat diet the fastest way to develop heart disease? No! At least not from what I have been able to discover thus far. If you are sucking down Big Macs full of carbs and trans fat, you aren’t helping yourself. However, if you decrease carbohydrate intake and consume HEALTHY fats, your body adapts (it is pretty smart you know) and begins using that fat for fuel. If your body is using the fat as the primary fuel supply, blood triglycerides aren’t just floating around clogging all of your arteries…..they are being USED! Disclaimer: These are MY test results. I am not a doctor and I cannot guarantee similar results for anybody else. This is simply an illustration of my health after following the ketogenic diet for nearly two years. Compare these results Continue reading >>

Effect Of Lchf On Blood Test Results Plus Ketogenic Diets Plus Coconut Oil

Effect Of Lchf On Blood Test Results Plus Ketogenic Diets Plus Coconut Oil

I have been thinking about this whole LCHF movement and some of the passionate advocates of this style of eating, and I continue to be bewildered as to why they are SO passionate about spreading the LCHF word? Perhaps their own personal experience has been so overwhelmingly powerful that they feel no option but to help others to experience the same? Or is it to challenge the exisiting dietary guidelines and advocate for change (not that too many people actually follow the current dietary guidelines anyway)? Or is it to promote the next diet book they have at the publishers, just about ready to hit the shelves. You know what, I am really not sure, and there are probably different incentives depending on the individual. The wide range of characters promoting LCHF makes things even more confusing – some scientists, doctors and dietitians are gunning for it, and so too celebrities, chefs, and everyday Australians. Interestingly, Australia is the number one country at present where the LCHF message seems to be getting air time. Apparently in the US and other countries, there is no such interest, and LCHF may just be viewed as another fad diet. Jimmy Moore, a speaker at LC Downunder seminars is from the US and he was congratulating Australia on their interest and uptake of LCHF (and for supporting his livelihood via purchasing his books and other resources). So are we just all being sucked in, when other countries don’t seem to give two hoots about LCHF, or are followers on the crest of the next wave of nutrition truth…….. My curiosity about why LCHF supporters are so passionate extends to Associate Professor Ken Sikaris. His name may sound familiar to you if you live in Victoria and received a blood test report in the last ten years or so - his name may have been pri Continue reading >>

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Ketosis & Measuring Ketones

Generally, ketone concentrations are lower in the morning and higher in the evening. Whatever time you pick to measure ketone levels, make sure to keep it consistent. Also, do not measure your ketone levels right after exercise. Ketone levels tend to be lower while your glucose levels higher so you won't get representative numbers. Keep in mind there are daily fluctuations caused by changes in hormone levels. Don't get discouraged! Another aspect that affects the level of ketones is the amount of fat in your diet. Some of you may show higher concentration of ketones after a high-fat meal. Coconut oil contains MCTs that will help you boost ketones. To easily increase your fat intake on a ketogenic diet, try fat bombs - snacks with at least 80% fat content. Ketone levels tend to be higher after extensive aerobic exercise as your body depletes glycogen stores. Exercise may help you get into ketosis faster. ketogenic "fruity" breath is not pleasant for most people. To avoid this, drink a lot of water, mint tea and make sure you eat foods rich in electrolytes. Avoid too many chewing gums and mints, as it may put you out of ketosis; there may be hidden carbs affecting your blood sugar. Increase your electrolyte intake, especially potassium. You are likely going to lose some sodium and potassium when switching to the keto diet. Finally, if you find it hard to lose weight on a ketogenic diet, there may be plenty other reasons than the level of ketone bodies: Not Losing Weight on Low-Carb Ketogenic Diet? Don’t Give Up and Read Further. Continue reading >>

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Does A Ketogenic Diet Change Your Lipid Profile

Wrong and outdated health information often causes worry about the healthiness of the ketogenic diet. One of the biggest concerns is: does a ketogenic diet change your lipid profile? In order to tackle and address these concerns, we’ll be covering what lipid profile means, why it’s included in myths about the ketogenic diet and why you don’t need to worry about most of what you’ve been told. Lipids and the Ketogenic Diet The main purpose of the ketogenic diet today is to provide a measurable state of metabolism through nutritional ketosis. There are many benefits of ketosis, including weight loss, better mental clarity, and more energy. These benefits make the ketogenic diet enticing, but what about how it affects lipids in the body? To understand this, let’s discuss what lipids are and the beliefs surrounding them and the keto diet. What is a Lipid Profile? A lipid profile is the measure of fats and fatty substances (lipids) that your body uses as energy. These are usually measured via a lipid panel of blood tests meant to look for any irregularities in your lipid amounts. Lipids include: Triglycerides Cholesterol High-density lipoprotein (HDL, often know as “good,” cholesterol) Low-density lipoprotein (LDL, often known as “bad,” cholesterol) The ketogenic diet raises some concerns around the diet negatively affecting one’s lipid profile and increasing their risks of diseases related to high cholesterol or triglycerides. Let’s take a look at these concerns. Myths About Fat and Cholesterol Below are some of the myths when it comes to the ketogenic diet and lipid profiles. We’re used to hearing many of these due to bad or old science — and we all know the internet is rampant with poor (and sometimes harmful) information. Myth: Cholesterol is bad Continue reading >>

My Health Markers After 10 Years On A Low-carb, High-fat Diet

My Health Markers After 10 Years On A Low-carb, High-fat Diet

I should have been dead a long time ago, according to some people. But I feel as healthy as ever. In 2006 I started eating an LCHF diet – low carb and high fat – in other words a keto diet. I’ve now been on it for ten years, so it was time for the big checkup. What has happened to me during these years? Here are the results from my repeated blood work: Background I’m basically healthy. But as a 44-year old dad to two small children, with some sleep deprivation and little time for exercise, and who regularly works 60-hour weeks, this is probably the time when my health should start to fail. If LCHF doesn’t save me. I’ve eaten an LCHF diet for ten years, at times very strict, at other times less strict. Plenty of butter, eggs, meat and heavy cream – and vegetables. For the last two years I’ve also done intermittent fasting, 16:8, on most weekdays (I skip breakfast). Very occasionally I also do one or two full days of fasting. Results Here’s a summary of my results. The recent test results are in the colored columns. Numbers converted to US units to the right. The wild rumors about how dangerous LCHF is long term don’t get validated in my blood work. After ten years on LCHF they are excellent, just as when I started. There simply aren’t any big changes during these years. Many things are typical and the trends are also confirmed in studies on low-carb diets: Low triglycerides (good) Excellent HDL cholesterol levels Nice ApoB/AI ratio A low fasting blood sugar and a low HbA1c (good) Very low insulin levels, measured as C-peptide (probably excellent) Low IGF-1 levels (probably great) A normal weight and a normal waist circumference A low normal blood pressure (excellent) To summarize, all problems associated with the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabet Continue reading >>

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Monitoring For Compliance With A Ketogenic Diet: What Is The Best Time Of Day To Test For Urinary Ketosis?

Go to: Methods The KetoPerformance study with its before-and-after comparison design was registered at germanctr.de as DRKS00009605 and took place from February to June 2016. Exclusion criteria included underweight, obesity, kidney stones, pregnancy, diabetes mellitus and any fatty acid-metabolism disorders. The study protocol was approved by the Ethics Commission of the Albert-Ludwig University Freiburg (494/14) and all subjects signed a written consent form. Twelve of the 42 subjects from the KetoPerformance study could be recruited for the present substudy. Experimental design and dietary intervention The experimental intervention consisted of a KD without caloric restriction lasting 6 weeks with a previous preparation period including detailed instructions during teaching classes and individual counselling by a dietitian. The subjects were free to follow a KD according to their personal preferences but were advised to reach a ratio by weight of approximately 1.8:1 fat to carbohydrate and protein combined, yielding a diet with 80, 15, and 5 % of total energy intake from fat, protein and carbohydrate, respectively. During the KD intervention's sixth week, our substudy subjects were instructed to measure urine and blood ketone concentrations at regular intervals in as close proximity as possible during a 24-h period from 07:00 to 07:00 in the morning. During the day (07:00 till 22:00) blood and urinary ketones were measured every full hour and every three hours, respectively. During the night, blood and urinary ketones were measured once at 03:00. In total blood and urine and ketones were measured 18 and 8 times, respectively, and were recorded in a table sheet. Subjects were asked to drink 400 ml of water every 3 h during the day to ensure sufficient urination and to Continue reading >>

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

The Ketogenic Diet And Cholesterol

A common misconception is that because ketogenic diets are high in fat, they must increase cholesterol in your body and clog your arteries. However, much of the recent research shines light on how low-carb diets can optimize your cholesterol levels and in fact improve your heart health. Here we show the most up-to-date research on how different types of cholesterol impact the body and how the ketogenic diet can be a useful tool in maintaining a robust cardiovascular system. Cutting through the Fat: What are Lipids and Cholesterol? Before we can examine the research, we need to understand the roles fat, cholesterol, and carrier molecules called lipoproteins play in the body. Fats, also known as lipids, are a diverse group of molecules with a “non-polar” characteristic that repels water. This means that you if you put a fat such as oil or grease in water they will not mix. In the human body, fats are most commonly found in the bloodstream in one of two forms. The first is triglycerides, a fatty acid that stores energy for later use. These long molecules can be broken down into other fatty acids and glycerol to create fuel for the body. Glycerol can further be broken down into forms of glucose. Elevated levels of triglycerides in your blood can increase your risk of developing diabetes, cardiovascular illnesses, and other life-threatening diseases. [1] The other important class of lipids in the body is a waxy substance called cholesterol. These molecules have a variety of functions in your body such as building hormones including estrogen and testosterone, maintaining the integrity of cell membranes, and aiding in the absorption of vitamins. Your body produces all the cholesterol you need through the liver and other body cells. Cholesterol is also obtained by consuming Continue reading >>

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 5 – Ketogenic Diet Blood Tests

Ketosis For Cancer: Week 5 – Ketogenic Diet Blood Tests

My deep ketosis experiment went down in flames this week, but not before I had my blood drawn. I share my ketogenic diet blood tests with you as compared to results from a year ago. So, even though hunger eventually got the best of me, I learned a lot in the process, and hope you did too! Links to my moderate ketosis experiment are provided if you’d like to see what a more successful approach looks like. Note: this post was originally published on Aug 1, 2013. It was edited to streamline content and improve graphics, then re-posted in June 2016, therefore some older comments may pertain to content that was removed during revision. This post is part of a series describing my attempt to follow Dr. Seyfried’s dietary recommendations for cancer. To start at the beginning, please go to the first post: Seyfried’s Ketogenic Cancer Diet: My Fasting Jump-Start to Ketosis. OH THE HUMANITY… It was the best of times, it was the worst of times… Call me Ishmael… Oh, wait, that last one is completely irrelevant… Before I begin my sorry tale, let me reassure you that I’m feeling much better now. And I have some very interesting lab test results to report. But the previous Thursday was a terrible, horrible, no good, very bad day. It started off with my posting about my unhappy fourth week on my modified version of Dr. Seyfried’s ketogenic diet. Here’s my data from that Thursday morning: (Food not included because I didn’t keep track.) So off I went to my primary care center, in my fasting state, with my blood sugar at 81 and my ketones at 5.2 (too high to be comfortable), hoping to be back home within an hour or so to eat breakfast and get ready for work. After having my blood drawn, I discovered that my doctor had not been willing to order all of the tests I reque Continue reading >>

Keto Blood Work Results: Before And After

Keto Blood Work Results: Before And After

A string of videos I posted on Instagram Stories, highlighting the changes I’ve seen in blood work from before keto to now (3 years later). Part of the process of moving into the RV has been scanning all documents and images so that they take up less space in our life. I came across a stack of blood work from before I was keto to a couple of weeks ago and thought it would be fun to share the results with you. The following video was created on Instagram Stories a couple of weeks ago. In it, it highlights the changes I’ve experienced since going keto July 2014. It’s so cool to see that my body continues to heal and adjust the longer I eat this way. Resources… Many of you have been asking… Where did you get your testing done? I went to my regular ol’ doctor’s office and requested a bundle of testing. Testing bundles vary from provider to provider. If you want a list of the specific tests that I recommend, check out chapter 16 in Fat Fueled What kind of blood test did you ask for? Total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL and LDL cholesterol, free T3 and T4, estradiol, and vitamin B12 are the tests mentioned in this video, but I was tested for oodles more than that— You can find the entire list in chapter 16 of Fat Fueled How do your test results translate to US values? If my test results are not in your preferred unit of measurement, this conversion tool should help you interpret things Continue reading >>

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

Low-carbers Beware The Breathalyzer

A recent article in the International Journal of Obesity should give low-carbers cause for a little alarm. Here is what happened to a man in Sweden on a low-carb diet: We report a case of a 59-year-old man, body mass index 26.6 kg/m2, who began a weight reduction program, partly because of knee pains but also because he was a glider pilot where weight is important. He used a Swedish textbook on obesity treatment written by S Rössner together with the commonly used Swedish VLCD [very low calorie diet] Nutrilett (Cederroths, Stockholm, Sweden), 5 packets/day for 3 weeks, which is an approved standard regimen. This treatment resulted in a weight loss of 7 kg. During dieting, the man discovered that an alcohol ignition interlock device, installed in an official company car, indicated that he had consumed alcohol and the vehicle failed to start. This was confusing because the man was a life-long teetotaller and was therefore both surprised and upset by the result. As he had been supervising private aviation he had access to a second breath-alcohol analyzer, which indicated a simultaneous BAC ranging from 0.01 to 0.02 g/100 ml. A VLCD diet (very-low-calorie diet, a protein-sparing modified fast) contains mainly protein along with a small amount of carbohydrate and very few calories, usually fewer than 1000 per day. Just about anyone going on one of these diets will soon be in producing ketone bodies at a pretty high rate. But the same goes for a more traditional low-carb diet as well. If carbs are kept at a low level, ketosis will occur. In fact, it’s desired. Ketone bodies are water-soluble products of fat metabolism. The body has three ways of dealing with ketones: it can burn them for energy (which it does with great success), it can release them in the urine (which is Continue reading >>

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