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How Does Ketoacidosis Kill You

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Kill You? – When Does Diabetes Kill

When Does Diabetes Kill The fear experience of diabetic ketoacidosis the truth behind my encounter with what is dka? Diabetes daily. In respiratory distress and it is what can kill, according to holly brewer, ms rd cde how the diabetic ketoacidosis you check. Diabetes mellitus How long does diabetes take to kill you if it is not treated? . Doc james (talk email contributions) 02 44, 16 July 2009 (utc). Most body cells mainly burn sugar (glucose) for energy. November 19, 2009 dka occurs when there is insufficient insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. In emergency care with the dangers of severe hypoglycemia why is diabetes so dangerous can you manage your diet with ketogenic? . This can happen if you have type 2 diabetes, ketoacidosis is rare, but you may experience very high failure to reach the site of infection fast enough to gobble and kill bacteria. Illness and diabetes research and wellness foundation. The problem comes when you have diabetes and insufficient insulin to move glucose from your bloodstream into the body's cells. August 30, 2016 is a serious condition that will cause you to violently ill can kill. Diabetic ketoacidosis diabetes self management. Myths of diabetic ketoacidosis (dka) r. How diabetic ketoacidosis kills you for a moment bothered me when I read about a strange guy who has her husband (55) newly diagnosed with adult onset diabetes are happy to be sneaky and see their partner slowly himself; I rebelled against from the age of 12 until I met mr at the age of 17, November 2, 2015 myth # 1 we should get abgs instead vbgs in dkaso do literature review meet two studies that specifically 13 of 2010 patients type 1 hypoglycemia frequent episodes can not only ruin, Continue reading >>

Why Isnt Ketoacidosis A Problem For Lc And Vlc Paleo-eaters?

Why Isnt Ketoacidosis A Problem For Lc And Vlc Paleo-eaters?

I'm sitting in a lecture about nutrition and metabolism for people with diabetes. The instructor keeps insisting that if you are metabolizing ketones for any length of time, it will result in ketoacidosis, and eventually kill you. I've not heard anything about LC and VLC paleo eaters having problems with ketoacidosis, but I'm not sure how we avoid it while primarily metabolizing ketone bodies. I understand that people with diabetes have more issues to work with, and are metabolically deranged, but how do people with normal metabolisms avoid acidosis issues? Can anyone please shed some light on this for me? I googled around and haven't found explanation. Continue reading >>

Confusing Ketosis With Ketoacidosis

Confusing Ketosis With Ketoacidosis

Confusing Ketosis with Ketoacidosis Confusing Ketosis with Ketoacidosis – Nutrition professionals often say low-carb diets, and a very low-glycemic diet like that of the Roman Diet, cause ketoacidosis, a medical emergency that can kill you. This is completely false. They are confusing the words “ketosis” and “ketoacidosis” – which are vastly different. Ketosis does happen on low-carb diets and when following the Roman Diet, ahich is very low-glycemic and low in insulin demand. When the body is not getting the usual amount of carbohydrates typical in the western lifestyle, it releases fats from the fat tissues, which go to the liver and are turned into ketone bodies. Ketones are molecules that can cross the blood-brain barrier and provide energy for the brain when it isn’t receiving enough glucose. This is the body’s natural response to low-carb or very low-glycemic intake. This is NOT to be confused with ketoacidosis, which is something that only happens in uncontrolled diabetes, mainly uncontrolled type 1 diabetes. It involves the bloodstream being flooded with both glucose and ketone bodies in extremely large amounts. Ketoacidosis is dangerous, that is true. But that simply has nothing to do with low-carb or very low-glycemic diets. It has to do with better management of blood glucose levels, primarily with type 1 diabetes. In nutritional ketosis, or keto-adaptation, as long as sufficient insulin is present, there is no such risk of ketoacidosis. Interestingly enough, nutritional ketosis can actually help make blood sugar control more manageable! The metabolic state of ketosis has been proven to be therapeutic in many ways. It can help with epilepsy, brain cancer and type 2 diabetes, to name a few. (1-3) Stories of type 1 diabetics following ketogenic Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Can Diabetes Kill You?

Diabetic ketoacidosis is no ifs ands or buts apparently the most basic issues of diabetes. signs can find you shockingly, moving closer in unequivocally 24 hours or an incredible arrangement significantly less. without diabetic ketoacidosis cure, you will fall straightforwardly into a condition of numbness and pass on. “reliably that the grown-up isn’t managed is one other minute nearer to failing miserably,” says Joel Zonszein, MD, educator of medicines at Albert Einstein foundation of remedy in colossal apple city. Diabetic ketoacidosis happens when your body doesn’t make middle of the road insulin. Diabetic ketoacidosis by and large effects people with class 1 diabetes, everything considered there’s besides class 2 diabetes ketoacidosis. without insulin, sugar can’t be secured in your cells for use as imperativeness and functions as much as your blood in its place. Your fabricate needs to go to a decrease afresh up control structure: fats. inside the strategies for isolating fat for control, your body releases unsaturated fats and acids suggested as ketones. Ketones are a choice number of imperativeness for the physical make-up, and fundamentally having them in your blood isn’t essentially unseemly. That is generally known as ketosis, and it might apparently flip up once you go on a low-carb eating regimen and even consequent to fasting in a lone day. “when I put individuals on a controlled suppers plan, I can get a gage of how energetically they’re looking for after it by strategy for the proximity of ketones inside the pee,” says Gerald Bernstein, MD, an endocrinologist and facilitator of the Friedman Diabetes programming at Lenox Hill restorative establishment in ny city. associated: The Ketogenic eating up routine must be would becould genuine Continue reading >>

High Alert: The Emergency Complications Of Diabetes

High Alert: The Emergency Complications Of Diabetes

Diabetes has become such a chronic long-term condition that it’s easy to forget about the serious acute complications that can arise, which can lead to a coma or death if not treated. There are only two types of emergencies – having very high glucose and having a very low glucose. The warning signs of an looming coma range from a mild headache to hallucinations.. If not identified or treated both types of emergencies can lead to serious irreversible complications including brain damage, kidney failure and death. When your glucose is very very high The fundamental issue in diabetes is raised blood glucose levels. Medically this is called hyperglycaemia. When glucose rises very rapidly or to very high levels, it can result in a diabetic ketoacidotic coma or a hyperglycaemic coma. Diabetic ketoacidotic coma This happens in type 1 diabetes and the high risk people include children and teens. A person can go into a ketoacidotic coma within a few hours. A person in a ketoacidotic crisis presents with: a complete lack of insulin in the body very high glucose levels dehydration break down of muscle abnormal potassium, sodium and other electrolyte levels. Causes of ketoacidotic crisis or coma A person who hasn’t been diagnosed with diabetes as yet Missing an insulin dose Illness such as gastroenteritis, nausea and vomiting Not adjusting insulin when glucose is high What to look out for if you suspect you may be going into a ketoacidotic crisis or coma Shortness of breath Fruity smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Severe fatigue Abdominal pain and headache Thirst Passing urine more often. Danger signs to watch out for Slurred speech Blurred vision Reduced concentration Coma. What you must do if yoususpect you may be going into a ketoacidotic crisis or coma Get to a casualty Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetes Complications In Dogs And Cats: Diabetes Ketoacidosis (dka)

Unfortunately, we veterinarians are seeing an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This is likely due to the growing prevalence of obesity (secondary to inactive lifestyle, a high carbohydrate diet, lack of exercise, etc.). So, if you just had a dog or cat diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, what do you do? First, we encourage you to take a look at these articles for an explanation of the disease: Diabetes Mellitus (Sugar Diabetes) in Dogs Once you have a basic understanding of diabetes mellitus (or if you already had one), this article will teach you about life-threatening complications that can occur as a result of the disease; specifically, I discuss a life-threatening condition called diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) so that you know how to help prevent it! What is DKA? When diabetes goes undiagnosed, or when it is difficult to control or regulate, the complication of DKA can occur. DKA develops because the body is so lacking in insulin that the sugar can’t get into the cells -- resulting in cell starvation. Cell starvation causes the body to start breaking down fat in an attempt to provide energy (or a fuel source) to the body. Unfortunately, these fat breakdown products, called “ketones,” are also poisonous to the body. Symptoms of DKA Clinical signs of DKA include the following: Weakness Not moving (in cats, hanging out by the water bowl) Not eating to complete anorexia Large urinary clumps in the litter box (my guideline? If it’s bigger than a tennis ball, it’s abnormal) Weight loss (most commonly over the back), despite an overweight body condition Excessively dry or oily skin coat Abnormal breath (typically a sweet “ketotic” odor) In severe cases DKA can also result in more significant signs: Abnormal breathing pattern Jaundice Ab Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a frightening term for any diabetic. This condition can rapidly kill a diabetic if treatment is not administered immediately. Ketoacidosis can occur in any person for a number of reasons such as alcoholism or starvation, but diabetic ketoacidosis is only found in diabetics, primarily uncontrolled type 1 diabetics. Often times a diabetic is first diagnosed with diabetes when rushed to the ER in severe ketoacidosis. In general ketoacidosis is when the body produces too much ketones, it breaks down fatty acids and these build up in the blood and quite literally the blood becomes toxic and poisonous making the body deathly ill. The build up of acetone in the blood is marked by a sweet almost fruity smell on the breath and sometimes in the sweat. Exactly what causes ketoacidosis in diabetics? When a diabetic is uncontrolled and their blood sugar runs too high over an extended length of time the body recognizes that it is being starved for insulin, so it begins to breakdown fat for energy. This breakdown of fat causes acid to build up in the blood and this leads to ketoacidosis. Oftentimes diabetic ketoacidosis is triggered by illness and/or dehydration. If you are diabetic and have, say, a cold or the flu and your blood sugar has been running higher for a while, you are at high risk of developing ketoacidosis. Always drink plenty of water to avoid becoming dehydrated and ending up sick. Hydration is good for everyone, especially diabetics. What are the symptoms of ketoacidosis? Frequent urination, unquenchable thirst/dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, muscle aches/cramps, dehydration, fruity smell on the breath, high blood sugar, shortness of breath (an uncontrollable fast, shallow breathing). Before the early 1900’s diabetic ketoacidosis was the e Continue reading >>

Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Kills – Please Share

Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes Kills – Please Share

In 2014, 1 in 6 children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes were admitted to hospital with a potentially life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) which can occur if a Type 1 diabetes diagnosis is delayed. The purpose of Diabetes Ireland’s Type 1 Diabetes Awareness Campaign is two-fold. The first is to encourage GPs to consider Type 1 diabetes first, as a potential diagnosis when a child presents feeling generally unwell by performing a simple finger prick glucose test to lead to prompt diagnosis. A delay in diagnosis usually means repeated visits to the GP and can result in diabetes ketoacidosis (DKA) which is potentially fatal. And secondly, to raise awareness among the general population of Type 1 Diabetes signs and symptoms (The 4T’s; Toilet, Thirsty, Tired and Thinner) which can attack completely at random. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when I was 20 years old, I have no family history and my lifestyle was quite healthy. I cycled to college and I ate relatively healthy for a student with no money. *** A healthy lifestyle or not having a family history of diabetes does not protect you from Type 1 Diabetes. Sometimes, there is no rhyme or reason. The following are just a few of the tragic stories that have made news headlines; – 2015 Kycie Terry in Utah – 2013 in North Carolina, 14-month-old Reegan died as a result of her diabetes going undetected. You might be fooled into thinking that we are protected in Ireland and that these cases only happen in other countries. But, seriously, how can we be different? If this post has stirred something in you and you want to do something to create more awareness of Type 1 Diabetes, please share this post or share the facebook post from Diabetes Ireland‘s Facebook page to whatever social media pla Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis - What?

Ketoacidosis - What?

Ketoacidosis. I'm sure if you have a diabetic dog, or are diabetic yourself, you've heard of this disease. Diabetic ketoacidosis develops when there is not enough insulin, which normally helps sugar move into cells to be used as energy. Without insulin, the body begins to breaks down fat as an alternate energy source. Breaking down fat in this way produces toxins called ketones, leading to diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can kill. Seriously. Signs include excessive thirst (indicative of high blood sugar), frequent urination (obviously if you are drinking a lot, you will pee a lot!), nausea and vomiting, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, weakness or fatigue, shortness of breath, fruity-scented breath (yes, really!), and confusion. Buzz started throwing up Saturday night around midnight and continued for the next 12 hours. It was really frightening - at first it was his dinner, then clear fluid, then yellow fluid, then there was blood. Around noon on Sunday, he fell asleep and stayed asleep for 4 straight hours. When he woke up, we fed him a small (very small, actually) amount of his low-residue wet food with some boiled chicken and once we knew he could hold that down, we let him have some water. We had already given him some subcutaneous fluids, so he was only slightly dehydrated, but he just had this insatiable thirst that we actually had to take the water away or we were afraid his gut would explode. We finally got in touch with the vet (why do our dogs always seem to get sick on a Sunday, the ONE day that neither of our vets work!?!) who figured out it was ketoacidosis (or maybe even a pancreatitis attack - but most likely ketoacidosis because his blood sugar has been very hard to control the past few weeks, with it being unsually high all. the. time.). There's n Continue reading >>

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Drunk Versus Diabetes: How Can You Tell?

Dispatch calls your EMS unit to the side of a roadway, where police officers have detained a driver on suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol intoxication. You find the female driver handcuffed in the back seat of a police cruiser. She is screaming profanities and hitting her head against the side window. An officer tells you that she was weaving in and out of traffic at highway speed, and it took several minutes to pull her over. She was noncooperative and it took several officers to subdue her. She sustained a laceration to her head, which the officers want you to evaluate. The woman continues to swear at you as you open the car door. You note that she is diaphoretic and breathing heavily. You can smell what appears to be the sour, boozy smell of alcohol, even though you are not close to her. You can see that the small laceration near the hairline on her right forehead has already stopped bleeding. Her speech is slurred and she appears to be in no mood to be evaluated. The police officers are ready to take her down to the station to be processed for driving under the influence. Sound familiar? It should — this is a scene that is played out often in EMS systems. While it may seem initially that these incidents are not medical in nature, they really deserve close attention by the EMS personnel. In this article we will focus on the challenges of evaluating a patient who is intoxicated versus a patient who is experiencing an acute diabetic emergency. There have been numerous instances where EMS providers have exposed themselves to serious liability secondary to medical negligence. Let's take a closer look. Diabetes Diabetes is a serious disease that affects nearly 29 million people in the United States [1]. Advances in diabetic care have resulted in an impr Continue reading >>

Can You Die From Diabetes Type 2 And How To Prevent It?

Can You Die From Diabetes Type 2 And How To Prevent It?

Can you Die from Diabetes Type 2 and How to Prevent It? Diabetes is a serious disease that is usually life-long. According to the World Health Organization, diabetes mellitus type 2 is a form of a metabolic disease that is characterized by elevated blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes is around 20 times more common than type 1 diabetes, and around 90% of all diabetic people can be assigned to the type 2 category. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a complication of diabetes that is a serious complication. Can diabetes kill you? If you have this complication, it is potentially life-threatening. Diabetic ketoacidosis develops when the boy produces high levels of ketones (blood acids). When you cannot produce adequate insulin, the body breaks down fat to use as fuel. That breakdown eventually leads to a buildup of ketones, which leads to ketoacidosis. Causes and Symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis Insulin is a necessary hormone that comes from a pancreatic gland. This hormone lowers the sugar level in the bloodstream. Glucose comes from food and your liver. When levels of glucose are high, there is a risk for diabetic ketoacidosis. Experts believe that genetics, lifestyle, and environment contribute to the development of diabetes type 2. The symptoms and signs of dying from diabetes and diabetic ketoacidosis are the first indications of having this disease for many people. They include: Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Shortness of breath Excessive thirst Weakness/fatigue Confusion Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes Positive antibody tests in older people suggest that type 2 diabetes is not a uniform condition and that in around 10% of cases, an autoimmune disease may be the cause of diabetes. While you can’t change your genes, you can do some things to prevent type Continue reading >>

Transcript: Dr. Joseph Aloi On Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Glucommander Software

Transcript: Dr. Joseph Aloi On Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Glucommander Software

This interview is also available as a video: click here to view. Dr. Joseph Aloi, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC. Steve: This is Steve Freed with Diabetes in Control and we’re here at AACE 2016 and we have with us a special guest who’s been working on some unique projects that we’d like to share with you. Maybe you can start off and tell us a little bit about your background, where you’re at and what kind of practice you have. Dr. Aloi: I’ve been in academic medicine for the last 25 years. I worked in three hospital systems. I started at the University of Virginia and then migrated to Eastern Virginia Medical School, which a lot of the data we’re presenting came through that relationship. And most recently I’m now at Wake Forest where I’m chief of the endocrine section there. But I’ve been working in the area of in-patient glycemic management for about the last 10 years. Steve: Because I noticed on one of your posters that you’re using this new software, fairly new software, to help treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Dr. Aloi: Correct. Steve: How does that work? Dr. Aloi: Patients coming in with diabetic ketoacidosis generally are treated with IV insulin. That’s standard of care. There are some other models for that. And what we were doing at Eastern Virginia Medical School was looking at treating patients coming in with Glucommander, which is a computer dosing algorithm for IV insulin and we had good experience with using Glucommander both in decreasing length of stay and decreasing rates of hypoglycemia. So we had a small group of information and then we combined that with looking at other medical centers. We partnered with Emory, Atlantic Diabetic Consultants, Sentara Healthcare system and then we were able to pull out almost 2, Continue reading >>

Pumper's Voice

Pumper's Voice

Pumping Pitfalls Avoiding and dealing with pump-related problems For anyone who uses an insulin pump, there are bound to be occasional problems. For some, problems may be as rare as a Chicago Cubs’ World Series victory; for others they may occur as often as a Hollywood scandal. Insulin pumps, being mechanical devices, are subject to mishaps that can result in interruptions or irregularities in insulin delivery or action. When too little insulin is being infused into your body, high blood sugar will occur. When absorption is inconsistent, highs and lows can occur. And if no insulin is being delivered, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can occur in just a few hours. Fending Off DKA DKA is a serious condition that will make you very ill and can kill you. The primary cause of DKA is a lack of working insulin in the body, accompanied by dehydration. When you are using an insulin pump, there is no long-acting insulin present in your body. Any interruption in insulin delivery can result in a sharp rise in blood sugar and ketone production can start as soon as three hours after the last bit of insulin was infused. The most important step in preventing ketoacidosis is early detection of the problem. You accomplish this by checking for ketones with any unusually high blood sugar levels. Everyone on a pump should be prepared to test for ketones and you can do this by way of a urine dipstick (ketostix or ketodiastix) or a fingerstick blood sample (Precion Xtra meter from Abbott). Positive ketones are indicated by either of the following: • Urine testing that indicates small, moderate or large levels of ketones (³15 mg/dl) • Blood testing that indicates the presence of b-Hydroxybutyrate (³.6 mmol/l) If your ketone test shows negative or trace amounts, your high blood sugar is prob Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

​This article is written for type 2 diabetics who need help coming down from a very high blood sugar during a single, isolated high blood sugar event. If you want to try an stabilize your baseline, consider signing up for my Baseline Blood Sugar Challenge course. ​THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR REAL MEDICAL ADVICE. If you're a type 2 diabetic and your blood sugar is high right now (greater than 300mg/dL for at least 6 hours), the first thing you should do is call your doctor. So, if you haven't called anyone for help yet, please stop reading this article and call your doctor. If your doctor is able to help, then you need not read on. Also, if you are having symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, stop reading this article and go to the hospital immediately. Diabetic Ketoacidosis can kill you if left untreated. But. If you're in a situation where your blood sugar has been high for an extended period of time, you could perhaps consider taking the following steps to solve your blood sugar problem. Disclaimer: This is friendly, non-medical advice from a random diabetic person you don't even know, which is a very (very) poor substitute for real, actual medical advice. Use at your own risk. First, you should try and lower your blood sugar without injectable insulin by completing the following steps: 1. Check your blood sugar. Write down the time and your blood sugar level. 2. Drink water (this doesn't actually lower blood sugar, but it helps flush sugar and ketones from your body, if you have them). Continue drinking water, but please don't make yourself sick. 3. Move. As in, walk. Walk around the block or walk in place or haul your ass up and down the stairs for 30-60 minutes. Walking helps your cells become less insulin resistant, which is what you need right now. Do N Continue reading >>

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