diabetestalk.net

How Does Ketoacidosis Cause Hypotension

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Vomiting?

How Does Diabetic Ketoacidosis Cause Vomiting?

DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body’s cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can’t get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn’t available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body’s metabolic processes aren’t able to function as well. A higher level of ketones also affects levels of sugar and electrolytes in the body. As ketones accumulate in the blood, more ketones will be passed in the urine, taking sodium and potassium salts out with them. Over time, levels of sodium and potassium salts in the body become depleted, which can cause nausea and vomiting. The result is a vicious cycle. The most important prevention strategies are to monitor blood glucose levels routinely, keep blood glucose levels controlled (e.g., Continue reading >>

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells with an alternative energy source, the body breaks down adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids (FFAs) into the bloodstream. The liver subsequently converts FFAs to triglycerides and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies (i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid, b-hydroxybutyric acid) can be used as energy by the tissues when there is a lack of glucose or nutritional intake.1,2 The breakdown of fat, combined with the body's inability to use glucose, causes many pets with diabetes to present with weight loss, despite having a ravenous appetite. If diabetes is undiagnosed or uncontrolled, a series of metab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketocacidosis (DKA) is a medical emegency caused by insufficient levels of insulin and increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones such as glucagon, epinephrine, and cortisol. This leads to significant, potentially life-threatening metabolic abnormalities, including hyperglycemia, anion gap metabolic acidosis, hyperketonemia, ketonuria. The Case of Rachel R Rachel is a 34 year-old woman with type I diabetes. She has poor control of her sugars during the best of days, and she has not been counting her dietary intake or monitoring her blood glucose over the past two days, as she has been ill with a bad cold. She feels increasingly unwell and comes to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, and blurred vision. What are the symptoms of DKA? How is it diagnosed? How do you treat someone like Rachel? return to top Causes and Risk Factors DKA is more common in Type 1 DM than type II, due to complete insulin deficiency and counter-regulatory hormones. It is precipitated by the 7 I’s: infection (pneumonia, UTI) insulin nonadherence/insufficiency (as can occur with pregnancy) initial presentation with DMI ischemia/infarct (myocardial, stroke, gut) inflammation (pancreatitis, cholecystitis) iatrogenic (glucocorticoids, dieuretics, surgery) intoxication (alcohol, atypical antipsychotics, cocaine) return to top Pathophysiology Insufficient insulin levels lead to a change in metabolism. An increase in fatty acid oxidation leads to ketones such as acetone, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and aceto-acetate. This, in turn, leads to an anion gap metabolic acidosis. Acidemia leads to a shift of potassium from cells into the extra-cellular space. Increased glucose production in liver leads to hyperglycemia and osmotic diuresis, with glycosuria and ketonuria. Dehyd Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Ketoacidosis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Ketoacidosis: A Complication Of Diabetes

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition that can occur as a complication of diabetes. People with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) have high blood sugar levels and a build-up of chemicals called ketones in the body that makes the blood more acidic than usual. Diabetic ketoacidosis can develop when there isn’t enough insulin in the body for it to use sugars for energy, so it starts to use fat as a fuel instead. When fat is broken down to make energy, ketones are made in the body as a by-product. Ketones are harmful to the body, and diabetic ketoacidosis can be life-threatening. Fortunately, treatment is available and is usually successful. Symptoms Ketoacidosis usually develops gradually over hours or days. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis may include: excessive thirst; increased urination; tiredness or weakness; a flushed appearance, with hot dry skin; nausea and vomiting; dehydration; restlessness, discomfort and agitation; fruity or acetone smelling breath (like nail polish remover); abdominal pain; deep or rapid breathing; low blood pressure (hypotension) due to dehydration; and confusion and coma. See your doctor as soon as possible or seek emergency treatment if you develop symptoms of ketoacidosis. Who is at risk of diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 diabetes. It rarely affects people with type 2 diabetes. DKA may be the first indication that a person has type 1 diabetes. It can also affect people with known diabetes who are not getting enough insulin to meet their needs, either due to insufficient insulin or increased needs. Ketoacidosis most often happens when people with diabetes: do not get enough insulin due to missed or incorrect doses of insulin or problems with their insulin pump; have an infection or illne Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Your body needs a constant source of energy. When you have plenty of insulin, your body cells can get all the energy they need from glucose. If you don't have enough insulin in your blood, your liver is programmed to manufacture emergency fuels. These fuels, made from fat, are called ketones (or keto acids). In a pinch, ketones can give you energy. However, if your body stays dependent on ketones for energy for too long, you soon will become ill. Ketones are acidic chemicals that are toxic at high concentrations. In diabetic ketoacidosis, ketones build up in the blood, seriously altering the normal chemistry of the blood and interfering with the function of multiple organs. They make the blood acidic, which causes vomiting and abdominal pain. If the acid level of the blood becomes extreme, ketoacidosis can cause falling blood pressure, coma and death. Ketoacidosis is always accompanied by dehydration, which is caused by high Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abbas E. Kitabchi, PhD., MD., FACP, FACE Professor of Medicine & Molecular Sciences and Maston K. Callison Professor in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism UT Health Science Center, 920 Madison Ave., 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Aidar R. Gosmanov, M.D., Ph.D., D.M.Sc. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Avenue, Suite 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Clinical Recognition Omission of insulin and infection are the two most common precipitants of DKA. Non-compliance may account for up to 44% of DKA presentations; while infection is less frequently observed in DKA patients. Acute medical illnesses involving the cardiovascular system (myocardial infarction, stroke, acute thrombosis) and gastrointestinal tract (bleeding, pancreatitis), diseases of endocrine axis (acromegaly, Cushing`s syndrome, hyperthyroidism) and impaired thermo-regulation or recent surgical procedures can contribute to the development of DKA by causing dehydration, increase in insulin counter-regulatory hormones, and worsening of peripheral insulin resistance. Medications such as diuretics, beta-blockers, corticosteroids, second-generation anti-psychotics, and/or anti-convulsants may affect carbohydrate metabolism and volume status and, therefore, could precipitateDKA. Other factors: psychological problems, eating disorders, insulin pump malfunction, and drug abuse. It is now recognized that new onset T2DM can manifest with DKA. These patients are obese, mostly African Americans or Hispanics and have undiagnosed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin action. A recent report suggests that cocaine abuse is an independent risk factor associated with DKA recurrence. Pathophysiology In Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

DKA is an acute complication of diabetes mellitus (usually type 1 diabetes) characterized by hyperglycemia, ketonuria, acidosis, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency prevents glucose from being used for energy, forcing the body to metabolize fat for fuel. Free fatty acids, released from the metabolism of fat, are converted to ketone bodies in the liver. Increase in the secretion of glucagon, catecholamines, growth hormone, and cortisol, in response to the hyperglycemia caused by insulin deficiency, accelerates the development of DKA. Osmotic diuresis caused by hyperglycemia creates a shift in electrolytes, with losses in potassium, sodium, phosphate, and water. Serum glucose level is usually elevated over 300 mg/dL; may be as high as 1,000 mg/dL. Serum bicarbonate and pH are decreased due to metabolic acidosis, and partial pressure of carbon dioxide is decreased as a respiratory compensation mechanism. Serum sodium and potassium levels may be low, normal, or high due to fluid shifts and dehydration, despite total body depletion. Urine glucose is present in high concentration and specific gravity is increased, reflecting osmotic diuresis and dehydration. Observe for cardiac changes reflecting dehydration, metabolic acidosis, and electrolyte imbalance- hypotension; tachycardia; weak pulse; electrocardiographic changes, including elevated P wave, flattened T wave or inverted, prolonged QT interval. Administer replacement electrolytes and insulin as ordered. Flush the entire I.V. infusion set with solution containing insulin and discard the first 50 mL because plastic bags and tubing may absorb some insulin and the initial solution may contain decreased concentration of insulin. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

In Brief Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) are two acute complications of diabetes that can result in increased morbidity and mortality if not efficiently and effectively treated. Mortality rates are 2–5% for DKA and 15% for HHS, and mortality is usually a consequence of the underlying precipitating cause(s) rather than a result of the metabolic changes of hyperglycemia. Effective standardized treatment protocols, as well as prompt identification and treatment of the precipitating cause, are important factors affecting outcome. The two most common life-threatening complications of diabetes mellitus include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS). Although there are important differences in their pathogenesis, the basic underlying mechanism for both disorders is a reduction in the net effective concentration of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. DKA is reported to be responsible for more than 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the United States1 and accounts for 4–9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes.1 The incidence of HHS is lower than DKA and accounts for <1% of all primary diabetic admissions.1 Most patients with DKA have type 1 diabetes; however, patients with type 2 diabetes are also at risk during the catabolic stress of acute illness.2 Contrary to popular belief, DKA is more common in adults than in children.1 In community-based studies, more than 40% of African-American patients with DKA were >40 years of age and more than 2 Continue reading >>

Sodium Bicarbonate And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Sodium Bicarbonate And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

OVERVIEW The correction of the acidaemia in DKA is achieved by correcting the underlying pathophysiology with fluid replacement and insulin The role of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as a therapy for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is controversial Different sources have different values for the cut off pH which requires treatment, and other sources advise against NaHCO3 use in DKA completely — there is no consensus RATIONALE Reasons proposed for use of sodium bicarbonate in DKA: treatment of severe acidaemia, which causes catecholamine resistance and myocardial depression treatment of severe hyperkalemia replacement of bicarbonate loss from Renal or GI tract — theoretical potential for giving HCO3- with renal wasting of HCO3- or GI loss if delta ratio is <1 (as is usual for DKA) ketoacids lost in urine (hence delta ratio <1) cannot be converted into HCO3- DISADVANTAGES Side effects of sodium bicarbonate Worsening of intracellular acidaemia hypernatraemia (1mmol of Na+ for every 1mmol of HCO3-) hyperosmolality (cause arterial vasodilation and hypotension) volume overload rebound or ‘overshoot’ alkalosis hypokalaemia ionised hypocalcaemia impaired oxygen unloading due to left shift of the oxyhaemoglobin dissociation curve removal of acidotic inhibition of glycolysis by increased activity of PFK CSF acidosis hypercapnia (CO2 readily passes intracellularly and worsens intracellular acidosis) severe tissue necrosis if extravasation takes place bicarbonate increases lactate production by: — increasing the activity of the rate limiting enzyme phosphofructokinase and removal of acidotic inhibition of glycolysis — shifts Hb-O2 dissociation curve, increased oxygen affinity of haemoglobin and thereby decreases oxygen delivery to tissues EVIDENCE A 2011 systematic review by C Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself with sugar and other fuels. Foods we eat are broken down by the body, and much of what we eat becomes glucose (a type of sugar), which enters the bloodstream. Insulin helps glucose to pass from the bloodstream into body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin normally is made by the pancreas, but people with type 1 diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) don't produce enough insulin and must inject it daily. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Poisoning-related Hypotension

Poisoning-related Hypotension

Introduction Hypotension is a frequently encountered problem in patients with poisoning or drug overdose. Toxicological causes of hypotension are usually due to a drug’s or toxin’s ability to induce one or more of the following: decrease cardiac contractility; decrease peripheral vasculature resistance; decrease intravascular volume; or depress the central nervous system. Yet, determining the specific cause of hypotension is often complex as its medical differential is vast. While medications are commonly implicated as a direct cause of hypotension, a fall in blood pressure may be associated with other coexisting medical conditions. An understanding of the pharmacologic effects of drugs and knowledge of the patient’s underlying medical conditions are crucial for the effective management of hypotension. Hypotension is frequently seen in the overdose population. During 2004, hypotension was present in over 20% of all cases reported to poison centers across California. In 2003, the American Association of Poison Control Centers (AAPCC) reported 12,710 cases of hypotension associated with tricyclic antidepressant poisoning; 15,350 cases from beta-receptor antagonist poisoning; 9,650 cases from calcium antagonist poisoning; and 2,850 cases from cardiac glycoside intoxication. Case presentation A 46 year-old man with a history of diabetes, hypertension, and ethanol abuse was brought to the emergency department after being found with decreased responsiveness. He had become increasingly despondent after losing his job. His medications were unknown. His blood pressure was 85/62 mm Hg, and the heart rate was 55 beats/min. The blood glucose was elevated at 250 mg/dL without evidence of ketoacidosis. He had an ethanol level of 180 mg/dL. An electrocardiogram showed sinus brad Continue reading >>

Postural Hypotension

Postural Hypotension

Tweet Postural hypotension is lower than normal blood pressure more commonly seen in the elderly and in some patients with conditions such as diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Postural hypotension, also referred to orthostatic hypotension, can cause people to feel dizzy or light-headed upon standing. What is postural hypotension? Postural or orthostatic hypotension is defined as a fall in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a typical BP reading) by 20mmHg or more after changing position or posture, typically from lying to standing. Such a drop in blood pressure after changing posture can reduce the flow of blood to your brain, causing dizzy spells and in some cases loss of consciousness and falls. How is it linked to diabetes? When you stand up, the build-up of blood in your legs causes blood pressure to decrease as there's less blood circulating back to your heart to pump. The body naturally counteracts this by increasing your heart rate so that more blood is pumped around the body to help stabilise blood pressure. Postural hypotension occurs when something interrupts this natural response, such as dehydration, which is a common problem for people with less well controlled diabetes as a result of frequent urination. Diabetes can also damage the nerves supplying your blood vessels, which in turn can lead to a drop in blood pressure upon standing up or any other sudden movements where your blood vessels may find it hard to adjust. What else can cause postural hypotension? In addition to diabetes, postural hypotension can be bought on by the following conditions: Anaemia Heart problems Hypovolaemia (severe blood and fluid loss) Parkinson’s disease Postural hypotension can also be caused by various medications, including antidepressants, diuretics (water medicatio Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

More in ketosis