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How Does Ketoacidosis Cause Hypotension

Hypertension Despite Dehydration During Severe Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Hypertension Despite Dehydration During Severe Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may result in both dehydration and cerebral edema but these processes may have opposing effects on blood pressure. We examined the relationship between dehydration and blood pressure in pediatric DKA. DKA (venous pH < 7.3, glucose > 300 mg/dL, HCO3 < 15 meq/l and urinary ketosis). Dehydration was calculated as percent body weight lost at admission compared to discharge. Hypertension (systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure percentile ≥ 95%ile) was defined based on 2004 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute nomograms and hypotension was defined as systolic blood pressure < 70 + 2 [age] Thirty-three patients (median 10.9 years; range 10 months - 17 years) were included. Fifty-eight percent of patients (19/33) had hypertension on admission prior to treatment and 82% had hypertension during the first 6 hours of admission. None had admission hypotension. Hypertension forty-eight hours after treatment and weeks after discharge was common (28% and 19%, respectively). Based on weight gained by discharge, 27% of patients had mild, 61% had moderate, and 12% presented with severe dehydration. Keywords: blood pressure, diabetes, pediatric, hypertension Go to: INTRODUCTION Dehydration from fluid loss secondary to glycosuria is a central feature of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (1-3). Dehydration can theoretically lead to hypovolemia and systemic hypotension. However, there is a paucity of information on blood pressure in DKA. Many patients (15-67%) evaluated for new onset type 1 diabetes mellitus present with the constellation of dehydration, hyperglycemia and acidosis consistent with DKA (1-3). Dehydration, coupled with systemic hypotension may result in decreased cerebral perfusion and cerebral ischemia (4). Thus, in DKA, both dehyd Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

DKA is an acute complication of diabetes mellitus (usually type 1 diabetes) characterized by hyperglycemia, ketonuria, acidosis, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency prevents glucose from being used for energy, forcing the body to metabolize fat for fuel. Free fatty acids, released from the metabolism of fat, are converted to ketone bodies in the liver. Increase in the secretion of glucagon, catecholamines, growth hormone, and cortisol, in response to the hyperglycemia caused by insulin deficiency, accelerates the development of DKA. Osmotic diuresis caused by hyperglycemia creates a shift in electrolytes, with losses in potassium, sodium, phosphate, and water. Serum glucose level is usually elevated over 300 mg/dL; may be as high as 1,000 mg/dL. Serum bicarbonate and pH are decreased due to metabolic acidosis, and partial pressure of carbon dioxide is decreased as a respiratory compensation mechanism. Serum sodium and potassium levels may be low, normal, or high due to fluid shifts and dehydration, despite total body depletion. Urine glucose is present in high concentration and specific gravity is increased, reflecting osmotic diuresis and dehydration. Observe for cardiac changes reflecting dehydration, metabolic acidosis, and electrolyte imbalance- hypotension; tachycardia; weak pulse; electrocardiographic changes, including elevated P wave, flattened T wave or inverted, prolonged QT interval. Administer replacement electrolytes and insulin as ordered. Flush the entire I.V. infusion set with solution containing insulin and discard the first 50 mL because plastic bags and tubing may absorb some insulin and the initial solution may contain decreased concentration of insulin. Continue reading >>

Low Blood Pressure And Nausea Or Vomiting

Low Blood Pressure And Nausea Or Vomiting

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms low blood pressure and nausea or vomiting including Low blood pressure (hypotension), Food poisoning, and Drug overdose. There are 64 conditions associated with low blood pressure and nausea or vomiting. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Low blood pressure (hypotension) Low blood pressure, or hypotension, can make you feel lightheaded and dizzy Food poisoning Food poisoning can cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, fever, chills, and weakness. Drug overdose A drug overdose can be fatal and causes sleepiness, confusion, coma, vomiting, and other symptoms. Narcotic abuse Narcotic abuse can cause fatigue, shallow breathing, anxiety, euphoria, vomiting, confusion, and constipation. Dehydration (Children) Dehydration, or not getting enough fluid, causes dry and sticky mouth, tearless crying, and more in children. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Gastroenteritis Gastroenteritis is inflammation of the stomach and intestine that causes diarrhea and vomiting. Constipation (child) Constipation is having less than three bowel movements a week, causing hard stools, abdominal pain and more. Constipation (adult) Constipation is having less than three bowel movements a week, causing hard stools, abdominal pain and more. Generalized anxiety disorder Generalized anxiety disorder is a condition in which a person has nearly constant anxiety. Panic attack When someone has a panic attack, that pers Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

In Brief Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) are two acute complications of diabetes that can result in increased morbidity and mortality if not efficiently and effectively treated. Mortality rates are 2–5% for DKA and 15% for HHS, and mortality is usually a consequence of the underlying precipitating cause(s) rather than a result of the metabolic changes of hyperglycemia. Effective standardized treatment protocols, as well as prompt identification and treatment of the precipitating cause, are important factors affecting outcome. The two most common life-threatening complications of diabetes mellitus include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS). Although there are important differences in their pathogenesis, the basic underlying mechanism for both disorders is a reduction in the net effective concentration of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. DKA is reported to be responsible for more than 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the United States1 and accounts for 4–9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes.1 The incidence of HHS is lower than DKA and accounts for <1% of all primary diabetic admissions.1 Most patients with DKA have type 1 diabetes; however, patients with type 2 diabetes are also at risk during the catabolic stress of acute illness.2 Contrary to popular belief, DKA is more common in adults than in children.1 In community-based studies, more than 40% of African-American patients with DKA were >40 years of age and more than 2 Continue reading >>

Hypovolemic And Hemorrhagic Shock

Hypovolemic And Hemorrhagic Shock

A A A Shock (cont.) Hypovolemic Shock There needs to be enough red blood cells and water in the blood for the heart to push the fluids around within the blood vessels. When the body becomes dehydrated, there may be enough red blood cells, but the total volume of fluid is decreased, and pressure within the system decreases. Cardiac output is the amount of blood that the heart can pump out in one minute. It is calculated as the stroke volume (how much blood each heart beat can push out) multiplied by the heart rate (how fast the heart beats each minute). If there is less blood in the system to be pumped, the heart speeds up to try to keep its output steady. Water makes up 90% of blood. If the body becomes dehydrated because water is lost or fluid intake is inadequate, the body tries to maintain cardiac output by making the heart beat faster. But as the fluid losses mount, the body's compensation mechanisms fail, and shock may ensue. Hypovolemic (hypo=low + volemic=volume) shock due to water loss can be the endpoint of many illnesses, but the common element is the lack of fluid within the body. Gastroenteritis can cause significant water loss from vomiting and diarrhea, and is a common cause of death in third world countries. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke is caused by excessive water loss through sweating as the body tries to cool itself. Patients with infections can lose significant amounts of water from sweating. People with diabetes who have diabetic ketoacidosis lose significant water because of because of elevated blood sugar that cause excess water to be excreted in the urine. Ultimately in hypovolemic shock, the patient cannot replace the amount of fluid that was lost by drinking enough water, and the body is unable to maintain blood pressure and cardiac output. I Continue reading >>

Possible Side Effects Of Farxiga

Possible Side Effects Of Farxiga

FARXIGA can cause serious side effects, including: See the What is the most important information I should know about FARXIGA? section. Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure The most common side effects of FARXIGA (far-SEE-guh) include: Vaginal yeast infections and yeast infections of the penis Stuffy or runny nose and sore throat Changes in urination, including urgent need to urinate more often, in larger amounts, or at night These are not all the possible side effects of FARXIGA. For more information, please read the Medication Guide; ask your healthcare provider or pharmacist. Call your healthcare provider for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells with an alternative energy source, the body breaks down adipocytes, releasing free fatty acids (FFAs) into the bloodstream. The liver subsequently converts FFAs to triglycerides and ketone bodies. These ketone bodies (i.e., acetone, acetoacetic acid, b-hydroxybutyric acid) can be used as energy by the tissues when there is a lack of glucose or nutritional intake.1,2 The breakdown of fat, combined with the body's inability to use glucose, causes many pets with diabetes to present with weight loss, despite having a ravenous appetite. If diabetes is undiagnosed or uncontrolled, a series of metab Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Evaluation And Treatment

Diabetic ketoacidosis is characterized by a serum glucose level greater than 250 mg per dL, a pH less than 7.3, a serum bicarbonate level less than 18 mEq per L, an elevated serum ketone level, and dehydration. Insulin deficiency is the main precipitating factor. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur in persons of all ages, with 14 percent of cases occurring in persons older than 70 years, 23 percent in persons 51 to 70 years of age, 27 percent in persons 30 to 50 years of age, and 36 percent in persons younger than 30 years. The case fatality rate is 1 to 5 percent. About one-third of all cases are in persons without a history of diabetes mellitus. Common symptoms include polyuria with polydipsia (98 percent), weight loss (81 percent), fatigue (62 percent), dyspnea (57 percent), vomiting (46 percent), preceding febrile illness (40 percent), abdominal pain (32 percent), and polyphagia (23 percent). Measurement of A1C, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum glucose, electrolytes, pH, and serum ketones; complete blood count; urinalysis; electrocardiography; and calculation of anion gap and osmolar gap can differentiate diabetic ketoacidosis from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, gastroenteritis, starvation ketosis, and other metabolic syndromes, and can assist in diagnosing comorbid conditions. Appropriate treatment includes administering intravenous fluids and insulin, and monitoring glucose and electrolyte levels. Cerebral edema is a rare but severe complication that occurs predominantly in children. Physicians should recognize the signs of diabetic ketoacidosis for prompt diagnosis, and identify early symptoms to prevent it. Patient education should include information on how to adjust insulin during times of illness and how to monitor glucose and ketone levels, as well as i Continue reading >>

The Dangers In Bulimia Are Real - This Illness Can Kill!

The Dangers In Bulimia Are Real - This Illness Can Kill!

People often overlook the dangers in bulimia. They think that because bulimics are often within a healthy weight range, that it's a 'safe' eating disorder. The truth could not be more different... I was bulimic for over 10 years. The illness ravaged my body and I knew that it was close to killing me. But thankfully, I got help and I recovered... Too many people don't seek help for their bulimia and suffer from it for years on end, sometimes for many decades. Too often, bulimia kills. To help you realize the dangers in bulimia, I've listed the 10 most worrying ones below. TOP 10 Terrifying Dangers in Bulimia Please click on the links below to jump to that part of the 'dangers in bulimia' page, or just scroll down. Suicide Ketoacidosis Malnutrition and then see... Seizures or Fits If you suffer from bulimia you have an increased risk of having seizures or fits. The seizures may be caused by dehydration, hyperglycemia or ketoacidosis. Seizures are one of the serious dangers in bulimia because they can cause brain damage. Electrolyte Imbalance Electrolytes are important chemicals in your body. Having the right balance of electrolytes is essential for your nerves, muscles and organs to work properly. Electrolyte imbalances are caused by a mix of dehydration and the loss of potassium and sodium. This can be caused by excessive vomiting or laxative abuse. Bulimics often develop electrolyte abnormalities... Which can lead to sudden cardiac arrest and death. Because of the stress that electrolyte imbalances place on the organs - this is one of the most deadly dangers in bulimia. When I was bulimic, my electrolyte balance was so messed up that my heartbeat became very irregular. I am lucky that bulimia didn't kill me. Terri Schiavo had a heart attack, which was caused by a massiv Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: Acute Complications

Diabetes Update: Acute Complications

"Diabetes update: Acute complications" CE credit is no longer available for this article. Originally posted April 2001 MARJORIE CYPRESS, MS, C-ANP, CDE MARJORIE CYPRESS is a nurse practitioner and certified diabetes educator for Lovelace Health Systems, Albuquerque, N.M. Series Editor: Carolyn Robertson, RN, MSN, CDE KEY WORDS: acute complications, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, ketosis Critically high or low blood sugar in a patient with diabetes is a medical emergency. You'll need to be able to quickly identify and know how to manage the acute complications of diabetes to help a patient avoid a tragic outcome. Here's how. Jump to: Choose article section... Emergency treatment of acute complications of diabetes demands quick recognition of the problem and immediate intervention. High blood sugar can progress to diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in Type 1 diabetics, and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state (HHS) in those with Type 2. But every diabetic patient taking a hypoglycemic agent is at risk for hypoglycemia, the most common—and most feared—complication. Here we'll review the pathophysiology behind DKA, HHS, and hypoglycemia; provide assessments that help distinguish one complication from another; and discuss emergency treatments and nursing strategies that can prevent a potentially fatal outcome. Too much sugar, too little insulin DKA, often referred to as diabetic coma, occurs when there's a profound lack of insulin in the body. Without insulin, the body can't use glucose for fuel. Cells starve as sugar accumulates. The blood becomes thick with sugar, which promotes osmotic diuresis. As the body loses water, the excess sugar spills into the urine, taking important electrolytes with it. Patients become thirsty and Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

When Blood Pressure Is Too Low

Talk around blood pressure typically centers on what to do if blood pressure is too high. We know that high blood pressure is more common in people with diabetes than people without diabetes. We also know that uncontrolled high blood pressure is a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and kidney disease. The American Diabetes Association recommends a blood pressure goal of less than 140/80 for most people with diabetes. But what if your blood pressure is too low? Is it cause for concern? And what do you do about it? Low blood pressure defined Low blood pressure is also known as “hypotension.” You might be thinking that low blood pressure is a good thing, especially if yours tends to run on the high side. But the reality is that low blood pressure can be a serious condition for some people. For people without diabetes, the American Heart Association recommends a blood pressure of less than 120 over 80 (written as 120/80). Low blood pressure is generally defined as a blood pressure of less than 90/60. If your blood pressure tends to hover in that area without any symptoms, then there’s likely no cause for concern. But if symptoms occur, that’s a signal that something is amiss. Symptoms of low blood pressure Low blood pressure may be a sign that there’s an underlying medical condition, especially if your blood pressure drops suddenly or if you have the following symptoms: • Dizziness or lightheadedness • Fainting • Fast or irregular heartbeat • Feeling weak • Feeling confused • Lack of concentration • Blurred vision • Cold, clammy skin • Nausea • Rapid, shallow breathing • Depression • Dehydration That’s quite a list. Some of the above symptoms can occur if you have, say, the flu, a stomach bug, or have been outside for a long time in h Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a medical emergency that typically occurs as a complication of type 1 diabetes. It can occur in people with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes or in diabetics with: decreased insulin intake intercurrent illness stress of any form (e.g.infection, surgery, MI) Pathophysiology The pathophysiology (see image) of diabetic ketoacidosis must be considered to help understand its presentation and the necessary management. There are 3 main biochemical features: hyperglycaemia hyperketonaemia metabolic acidosis Firstly, lack of insulin causes glucose to remain in the blood rather than be transferred into cells for utilisation. The body therefore responds as if it were in starvation and hepatic glucose production becomes increased. Osmotic diuresis occurs as a consequence of this glucose rich blood being filtered by the kidneys. Glucose is normally reabsorbed by the proximal tubule but in DKA the amount of glucose filtered exceeds the renal threshold for reabsorbtion. The presence of glucose in the tubules causes water retention in the lumen, thus increasing urine output and decreasing reabsorption into the body, leading to dehydration and electrolyte depletion. Secondly, an absence of insulin together with elevated stress hormones such as catecholamines, leads to lipolysis, resulting in numerous free fatty acids available for hepatic ketogenesis. Consequently, there is increased ketone body formation by fatty acid oxidation in the liver, leading to an elevated level in the blood. These ketones give a distinct smell to the urine and breath. Thirdly, the ketone bodies lower the pH of the blood resulting in metabolic acidosis. This causes nausea and vomiting resulting in further dehydration. The body compensates for the acidosis by hyperventilation (Kussmals respira Continue reading >>

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Alcoholic Ketoacidosis

Workup When a chronic alcoholic presents with signs of AKA, the clinician should carefully evaluate the patient, obtain a history, perform a physical exam, and order the appropriate laboratory tests. Laboratory tests and results A comprehensive metabolic profile will allow the medical team to determine the overall clinical picture of the patient. This includes measurement of serum electrolytes, glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, lipase, amylase, and plasma osmolality. Also, urinalysis is helpful to detect ketones. Another useful tool is the blood alcohol level [8]. Finally, critically ill patients with positive ketones must have an analysis of their arterial blood gas (ABG) and serum lactate levels. With regards to expected findings, all patients demonstrate ketonuria and a majority display ketonemia. Also common are electrolyte imbalances such as hypokalemia, hyponatremia, hypophosphatemia, and hypomagnesemia. Additionally, the serum glucose may range from low to modest elevation while another abnormality is an increased osmolar gap (secondary to increased acetone and possibly ethanol). Most importantly, AKA is typically characterized by a high anion gap metabolic acidosis, which may be complicated by metabolic alkalosis secondary to concurrent vomiting. In cases where the pH is normal, the increased anion gap is an indicator of ketoacidosis. If there is a normal gap, this is the result of the excretion of ketoacid ions. Additionally, lactic acidosis is observed in more than 50% of cases due to hypoperfusion [9]. Differential diagnoses Differentials include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA),however, the absence of hyperglycemia excludes this. Pancreatitis may also present similar to AKA and should be ruled out. If alcohol intoxication is not conclusive, serum me Continue reading >>

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