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How Does Ketoacidosis Cause Hypokalemia

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Producing Extreme Hyperkalemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes On Hemodialysis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Producing Extreme Hyperkalemia In A Patient With Type 1 Diabetes On Hemodialysis

Hodaka Yamada1, Shunsuke Funazaki1, Masafumi Kakei1, Kazuo Hara1 and San-e Ishikawa2[1] Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Jichi Medical University Saitama Medical Center, Saitama, Japan [2] Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, Nasushiobara, Japan Summary Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a critical complication of type 1 diabetes associated with water and electrolyte disorders. Here, we report a case of DKA with extreme hyperkalemia (9.0 mEq/L) in a patient with type 1 diabetes on hemodialysis. He had a left frontal cerebral infarction resulting in inability to manage his continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pump. Electrocardiography showed typical changes of hyperkalemia, including absent P waves, prolonged QRS interval and tented T waves. There was no evidence of total body water deficit. After starting insulin and rapid hemodialysis, the serum potassium level was normalized. Although DKA may present with hypokalemia, rapid hemodialysis may be necessary to resolve severe hyperkalemia in a patient with renal failure. Patients with type 1 diabetes on hemodialysis may develop ketoacidosis because of discontinuation of insulin treatment. Patients on hemodialysis who develop ketoacidosis may have hyperkalemia because of anuria. Absolute insulin deficit alters potassium distribution between the intracellular and extracellular space, and anuria abolishes urinary excretion of potassium. Rapid hemodialysis along with intensive insulin therapy can improve hyperkalemia, while fluid infusions may worsen heart failure in patients with ketoacidosis who routinely require hemodialysis. Background Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a very common endocrinology emergency. It is usually associated with severe circulatory Continue reading >>

Hypokalemia And The Heart

Hypokalemia And The Heart

An article from the E-Journal of the ESC Council for Cardiology Practice Practicing cardiologists must keep potassium levels within normal limits in all their cardiac patients. Unrecognised hypokalemia is a leading cause of iatrogenic mortality among cardiac patients who have an inherent risk for arrhythmias and who frequently use medications that increase the risks of hypokalemia and/or arrhythmia. Symptomatic or severe hypokalemia should be corrected with a solution of intravenous potassium: 10-40 mEq infused over 2-3 h (infusion rate should not to exceed 40 mEq/h). In less urgent situations, oral supplementation is preferred and safer: 50-100 mEq/d divided two-four times per day. Long-term treatment should be based on the recognition of the hypokalemia cause. Hypokalemia and the heart Potassium is the most abundant intracellular cation and is necessary for maintaining a normal charge difference between intracellular and extracellular space. Potassium homeostasis is important for normal cellular function and is regulated by ion-exchange pumps (primarily cellular, membrane-bound, sodium-potassium ATPase pumps). Derangements of potassium regulation often lead to neuromuscular, gastrointestinal and cardiac rhythm abnormalities. The normal level of plasma potassium is 3,8 – 5,1 mmol/l. The deviations to both extremes (hypo- and hyperkalemia) are related to the risk of cardiac arrhythmias. Potassium levels below 3,0 mmol/l cause significant Q-T interval prolongation with subsequent risk of torsade des pointes, ventricular fibrillation and sudden cardiac death. Potassium levels above 6,0 mmol/l cause peaked T waves, wider QRS komplexes and may result in bradycardia, asystole and sudden death. Hyperkalemia is most frequently caused by renal failure (frequently a trigger is Continue reading >>

Causes And Evaluation Of Hyperkalemia In Adults

Causes And Evaluation Of Hyperkalemia In Adults

INTRODUCTION Hyperkalemia is a common clinical problem. Potassium enters the body via oral intake or intravenous infusion, is largely stored in the cells, and is then excreted in the urine. The major causes of hyperkalemia are increased potassium release from the cells and, most often, reduced urinary potassium excretion (table 1). This topic will review the causes and evaluation of hyperkalemia. The clinical manifestations, treatment, and prevention of hyperkalemia, as well as a detailed discussion of hypoaldosteronism (an important cause of hyperkalemia), are presented elsewhere. (See "Clinical manifestations of hyperkalemia in adults" and "Treatment and prevention of hyperkalemia in adults" and "Etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoaldosteronism (type 4 RTA)".) BRIEF REVIEW OF POTASSIUM PHYSIOLOGY An understanding of potassium physiology is helpful when approaching patients with hyperkalemia. Total body potassium stores are approximately 3000 meq or more (50 to 75 meq/kg body weight) [1]. In contrast to sodium, which is the major cation in the extracellular fluid and has a much lower concentration in the cells, potassium is primarily an intracellular cation, with the cells containing approximately 98 percent of body potassium. The intracellular potassium concentration is approximately 140 meq/L compared with 4 to 5 meq/L in the extracellular fluid. The difference in distribution of the two cations is maintained by the Na-K-ATPase pump in the cell membrane, which pumps sodium out of and potassium into the cell in a 3:2 ratio. The ratio of the potassium concentrations in the cells and the extracellular fluid is the major determinant of the resting membrane potential across the cell membrane, which sets the stage for the generation of the action potential that is e Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Hyperkalemia (high Blood Potassium)

Hyperkalemia (high Blood Potassium)

How does hyperkalemia affect the body? Potassium is critical for the normal functioning of the muscles, heart, and nerves. It plays an important role in controlling activity of smooth muscle (such as the muscle found in the digestive tract) and skeletal muscle (muscles of the extremities and torso), as well as the muscles of the heart. It is also important for normal transmission of electrical signals throughout the nervous system within the body. Normal blood levels of potassium are critical for maintaining normal heart electrical rhythm. Both low blood potassium levels (hypokalemia) and high blood potassium levels (hyperkalemia) can lead to abnormal heart rhythms. The most important clinical effect of hyperkalemia is related to electrical rhythm of the heart. While mild hyperkalemia probably has a limited effect on the heart, moderate hyperkalemia can produce EKG changes (EKG is a reading of theelectrical activity of the heart muscles), and severe hyperkalemia can cause suppression of electrical activity of the heart and can cause the heart to stop beating. Another important effect of hyperkalemia is interference with functioning of the skeletal muscles. Hyperkalemic periodic paralysis is a rare inherited disorder in which patients can develop sudden onset of hyperkalemia which in turn causes muscle paralysis. The reason for the muscle paralysis is not clearly understood, but it is probably due to hyperkalemia suppressing the electrical activity of the muscle. Common electrolytes that are measured by doctors with blood testing include sodium, potassium, chloride, and bicarbonate. The functions and normal range values for these electrolytes are described below. Hypokalemia, or decreased potassium, can arise due to kidney diseases; excessive losses due to heavy sweating Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Snap Shot A 12 year old boy, previously healthy, is admitted to the hospital after 2 days of polyuria, polyphagia, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. Vital signs are: Temp 37C, BP 103/63 mmHg, HR 112, RR 30. Physical exam shows a lethargic boy. Labs are notable for WBC 16,000, Glucose 534, K 5.9, pH 7.13, PCO2 is 20 mmHg, PO2 is 90 mmHg. Introduction Complication of type I diabetes result of ↓ insulin, ↑ glucagon, growth hormone, catecholamine Precipitated by infections drugs (steroids, thiazide diuretics) noncompliance pancreatitis undiagnosed DM Presentation Symptoms abdominal pain vomiting Physical exam Kussmaul respiration increased tidal volume and rate as a result of metabolic acidosis fruity, acetone odor severe hypovolemia coma Evaluation Serology blood glucose levels > 250 mg/dL due to ↑ gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis arterial pH < 7.3 ↑ anion gap due to ketoacidosis, lactic acidosis ↓ HCO3- consumed in an attempt to buffer the increased acid hyponatremia dilutional hyponatremia glucose acts as an osmotic agent and draws water from ICF to ECF hyperkalemia acidosis results in ICF/ECF exchange of H+ for K+ moderate ketonuria and ketonemia due to ↑ lipolysis β-hydroxybutyrate > acetoacetate β-hydroxybutyrate not detected with normal ketone body tests hypertriglyceridemia due to ↓ in capillary lipoprotein lipase activity activated by insulin leukocytosis due to stress-induced cortisol release H2PO4- is increased in urine, as it is titratable acid used to buffer the excess H+ that is being excreted Treatment Fluids Insulin with glucose must prevent resultant hypokalemia and hypophosphatemia labs may show pseudo-hyperkalemia prior to administartion of fluid and insulin due to transcellular shift of potassium out of the cells to balance the H+ be Continue reading >>

Hypokalemia

Hypokalemia

Hypokalemia is when blood’s potassium levels are too low. Potassium is an important electrolyte for nerve and muscle cell functioning, especially for muscle cells in the heart. Your kidneys control your body’s potassium levels, allowing for excess potassium to leave the body through urine or sweat. Hypokalemia is also called: hypokalemic syndrome low potassium syndrome hypopotassemia syndrome Mild hypokalemia doesn’t cause symptoms. In some cases, low potassium levels can lead to arrhythmia, or abnormal heart rhythms, as well as severe muscle weakness. But these symptoms typically reverse after treatment. Learn what it means to have hypokalemia and how to treat this condition. Mild hypokalemia usually shows no signs or symptoms. In fact, symptoms generally don’t appear until your potassium levels are extremely low. A normal level of potassium is 3.6–5.2 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Being aware of hypokalemia symptoms can help. Call your doctor if you are experiencing these symptoms: weakness fatigue constipation muscle cramping palpitations Levels below 3.6 are considered low, and anything below 2.5 mmol/L is life-threateningly low, according to the Mayo Clinic. At these levels, there may be signs and symptoms of: paralysis respiratory failure breakdown of muscle tissue ileus (lazy bowels) In more severe cases, abnormal rhythms may occur. This is most common in people who take digitalis medications (digoxin) or have irregular heart rhythm conditions such as: tachycardia (heartbeat too fast) bradycardia (heartbeat too slow) premature heartbeats Other symptoms include loss of appetite, nausea, and vomiting. You can lose too much potassium through urine, sweat, or bowel movements. Inadequate potassium intake and low magnesium levels can result in hypokalemia. M Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

Hyperglycemic Crisis: Regaining Control

CE credit is no longer available for this article. Expired July 2005 Originally posted April 2004 VERONICA CRUMP, RN, BSN VERONICA CRUMP is a nurse on the surgical unit of Morristown Memorial Hospital in Morristown, N.J. She's also a subacute care nurse in the hospital's rehabilitation division. KEY WORDS: hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS), diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), hepatic glucose production, proteolysis, hepatic gluconeogenesis, ketone bodies, metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, hypokalemia When a patient presents with markedly high blood glucose levels, the consequences can be fatal. Here's how to get your patient through the crisis. Edith Schafer, age 71, has just been admitted to your ICU with pneumonia, which she developed at home. She has a history of Type 2 diabetes. In addition to a temperature of 102° F (38.9° C), she has rapid, shallow breathing and dry, flushed skin. Her blood pressure is 96/70 mm Hg, and she's so lethargic that she's unable to keep her eyes open. Her lab results show a serum glucose level of 900 mg/dL. In addition to the pneumonia, Mrs. Schafer is suffering from hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS). Severe hyperglycemia is a complication of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It can indicate HHS or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), another life-threatening condition. HHS tends to occur in patients with Type 2 diabetes, like Mrs. Schafer, while Type 1 diabetics are more likely to develop DKA. However, DKA can occur in Type 2 diabetes as well.1 HHS and DKA can be set off by infection, stress, missed medication, and other causes. In Mrs. Schafer's case, the trigger was pneumonia, a common cause of hyperglycemia in patients with diabetes. No matter what the cause, though, a case of HHS or DKA can turn deadly if not caught in time. The m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abbas E. Kitabchi, PhD., MD., FACP, FACE Professor of Medicine & Molecular Sciences and Maston K. Callison Professor in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism UT Health Science Center, 920 Madison Ave., 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Aidar R. Gosmanov, M.D., Ph.D., D.M.Sc. Assistant Professor of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, 920 Madison Avenue, Suite 300A, Memphis, TN 38163 Clinical Recognition Omission of insulin and infection are the two most common precipitants of DKA. Non-compliance may account for up to 44% of DKA presentations; while infection is less frequently observed in DKA patients. Acute medical illnesses involving the cardiovascular system (myocardial infarction, stroke, acute thrombosis) and gastrointestinal tract (bleeding, pancreatitis), diseases of endocrine axis (acromegaly, Cushing`s syndrome, hyperthyroidism) and impaired thermo-regulation or recent surgical procedures can contribute to the development of DKA by causing dehydration, increase in insulin counter-regulatory hormones, and worsening of peripheral insulin resistance. Medications such as diuretics, beta-blockers, corticosteroids, second-generation anti-psychotics, and/or anti-convulsants may affect carbohydrate metabolism and volume status and, therefore, could precipitateDKA. Other factors: psychological problems, eating disorders, insulin pump malfunction, and drug abuse. It is now recognized that new onset T2DM can manifest with DKA. These patients are obese, mostly African Americans or Hispanics and have undiagnosed hyperglycemia, impaired insulin secretion, and insulin action. A recent report suggests that cocaine abuse is an independent risk factor associated with DKA recurrence. Pathophysiology In Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycaemic Hyperosmolar State

The hallmark of diabetes is a raised plasma glucose resulting from an absolute or relative lack of insulin action. Untreated, this can lead to two distinct yet overlapping life-threatening emergencies. Near-complete lack of insulin will result in diabetic ketoacidosis, which is therefore more characteristic of type 1 diabetes, whereas partial insulin deficiency will suppress hepatic ketogenesis but not hepatic glucose output, resulting in hyperglycaemia and dehydration, and culminating in the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state. Hyperglycaemia is characteristic of diabetic ketoacidosis, particularly in the previously undiagnosed, but it is the acidosis and the associated electrolyte disorders that make this a life-threatening condition. Hyperglycaemia is the dominant feature of the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state, causing severe polyuria and fluid loss and leading to cellular dehydration. Progression from uncontrolled diabetes to a metabolic emergency may result from unrecognised diabetes, sometimes aggravated by glucose containing drinks, or metabolic stress due to infection or intercurrent illness and associated with increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones. Since diabetic ketoacidosis and the hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar state have a similar underlying pathophysiology the principles of treatment are similar (but not identical), and the conditions may be considered two extremes of a spectrum of disease, with individual patients often showing aspects of both. Pathogenesis of DKA and HHS Insulin is a powerful anabolic hormone which helps nutrients to enter the cells, where these nutrients can be used either as fuel or as building blocks for cell growth and expansion. The complementary action of insulin is to antagonise the breakdown of fuel stores. Thus, the relea Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia & Low Potassium

Hyperglycemia & Low Potassium

Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, is a potentially serious health condition affecting individuals with diabetes. Hyperglycemia can trigger a severe depletion of potassium, a mineral that serves many critical functions in the human body. Carefully follow medical advice for diabetes management including dietary restrictions and medication to minimize the impact of hyperglycemia and the potential for total body potassium depletion. Video of the Day Potassium is a necessary dietary mineral which must be consumed daily, as it is easily soluble and flushes out in the urine, according to Dr. Elson M. Haas of Periodic Paralysis International. Potassium is the primary mineral found inside of human body cells, while sodium is the primary mineral found outside the body cells. Potassium and sodium must be maintained in careful balance. Potassium is plentiful in fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains, but is easily lost in the cooking process. Consuming an excess of sodium in relation to potassium can lead to high blood pressure and other negative health consequences. Hyperglycemia, or high serum glucose levels, happens occasionally in nearly all diabetics but must be carefully monitored and corrected as it may lead to serious complications like diabetic ketoacidosis and diabetic coma, according to the MayoClinic.com. In addition to high blood glucose levels, symptoms of hyperglycemia include frequent urination and increased thirst. Hyperglycemia results from too little insulin or inefficient insulin use and may also occur due to stress or illness, according to the American Diabetes Association. Low Potassium Effects Potassium deficiency can be caused by dietary insufficiency, chronic illness, heavy sweating, or the prolonged use of diuretics or laxatives, according to Dr. Elso Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

In Brief Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) are two acute complications of diabetes that can result in increased morbidity and mortality if not efficiently and effectively treated. Mortality rates are 2–5% for DKA and 15% for HHS, and mortality is usually a consequence of the underlying precipitating cause(s) rather than a result of the metabolic changes of hyperglycemia. Effective standardized treatment protocols, as well as prompt identification and treatment of the precipitating cause, are important factors affecting outcome. The two most common life-threatening complications of diabetes mellitus include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS). Although there are important differences in their pathogenesis, the basic underlying mechanism for both disorders is a reduction in the net effective concentration of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. DKA is reported to be responsible for more than 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the United States1 and accounts for 4–9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes.1 The incidence of HHS is lower than DKA and accounts for <1% of all primary diabetic admissions.1 Most patients with DKA have type 1 diabetes; however, patients with type 2 diabetes are also at risk during the catabolic stress of acute illness.2 Contrary to popular belief, DKA is more common in adults than in children.1 In community-based studies, more than 40% of African-American patients with DKA were >40 years of age and more than 2 Continue reading >>

Hypokalemia And Hyperkalemia

Hypokalemia And Hyperkalemia

Sort Adrenal causes of hyperkalemia? Adrenal gland is important in secreting hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone. Aldosterone causes the kidneys to retain sodium and fluid while excreting potassium in the urine. Therefore diseases of the adrenal gland, such as Addison's disease, that lead to decreased aldosterone secretion can decrease kidney excretion of potassium, resulting in body retention of potassium, and hence hyperkalemia. How trauma leads to hyperkalemia Another cause of hyperkalemia is tissue destruction, dying cells release potassium into the blood circulation. Examples of tissue destruction causing hyperkalemia include: trauma, burns, surgery, hemolysis (disintegration of red blood cells), massive lysis of tumor cells, and rhabdomyolysis (a condition involving destruction of muscle cells that is sometimes associated with muscle injury, alcoholism, or drug abuse). What is role of potassium binders (Sodium polystyrene suffocate: SPS) SPS exchanges sodium for potassium and binds it in the gut, primarily in the large intestine, decreasing the total body potassium level by approximately 0.5-1 mEq/L. Multiple doses are usually necessary. Onset of action ranges from 2 to 24 hours after oral administration and is even longer after rectal administration. The duration of action is 4-6 hours. Do not use SPS as a first-line therapy for severe life-threatening hyperkalemia; use it in the second stage of therapy. Continue reading >>

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