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How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Kidneys

Medications And Kidney Complications, Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Medications And Kidney Complications, Symptoms Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Your kidneys are two organs located on either side of your backbone just above your waist. They remove waste and excess fluid from the blood, maintain the balance of salt and minerals in the blood, and help regulate blood pressure, among other functions. 1 If damaged, they can cause you to have health issues. Acute Renal Injury A sudden loss of kidney function can be caused by: lack of blood flow to the kidneys, direct damage to the kidneys, or blockage of urine from the kidneys. Common causes of these losses of function may include: traumatic injury, dehydration, severe systemic infection (sepsis), damage from drugs/toxins or pregnancy complications. 2 Chronic Kidney Disease When kidney damage and decreased function lasts longer than three months, it is called chronic kidney disease (CKD). CKD can be dangerous, as you may not have any symptoms until after the kidney damage, which may or may not be able to be repaired, has occurred. High blood pressure and diabetes (types 1 and 2) are the most common causes of CKD. 3 Causes of Chronic Kidney Disease There are also other causes of CKD. These can include: Immune system conditions (e.g., lupus) Long-term viral illnesses (HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B, hepatitis C) Pyelonephritis (urinary tract infections within the kidneys) Inflammation in the kidney’s filters (glomeruli) Polycystic kidney disease (fluid-filled cysts form in the kidneys) Congenital defects (malformations present at birth) Toxins, chemicals Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms People with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes have high levels of sugar (glucose) building up and circulating in the blood. This high blood sugar can cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and nerve damage, among other complications. 5 You may have no type 2 diabetes symptoms, or symptoms ma Continue reading >>

Kidneys (nephropathy)

Kidneys (nephropathy)

Kidney disease can happen to anyone but it is much more common in people with diabetes and people with high blood pressure. Kidney disease in diabetes develops very slowly, over many years. It is most common in people who have had the condition for over 20 years. About one in three people with diabetes might go on to develop kidney disease, although, as treatments improve, fewer people are affected. What is kidney disease? The kidneys regulate the amount of fluid and various salts in the body, helping to control blood pressure. They also release several hormones. Kidney disease (or nephropathy to give it its proper name) is when the kidneys start to fail. If the kidneys start to fail they cannot carry out their jobs so well. In the very early stages there are usually no symptoms and you may not feel unwell, this can mean there are changes in blood pressure and in the fluid balance of the body. This can lead to swelling, especially in the feet and ankles. As kidney disease progresses, the kidneys become less and less efficient and the person can become very ill. This happens as a result of the build up of waste products in the blood, which the body cannot get rid of. Kidney disease can be a very serious condition. Why are people with diabetes more at risk? Kidney disease is caused by damage to small blood vessels. This damage can cause the vessels to become leaky or, in some cases, to stop working, making the kidneys work less efficiently. Keeping blood glucose levels as near normal as possible can greatly reduce the risk of kidney disease developing as well as other diabetes complications. It is also very important to keep blood pressure controlled. How does my doctor check for kidney disease? As part of your annual health care review you should have a blood and urine t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbidity and mortality. It should be diagnosed promptly and managed intensively. DKA is characterised by hyperglycaemia, acidosis and ketonaemia:[1] Ketonaemia (3 mmol/L and over), or significant ketonuria (more than 2+ on standard urine sticks). Blood glucose over 11 mmol/L or known diabetes mellitus (the degree of hyperglycaemia is not a reliable indicator of DKA and the blood glucose may rarely be normal or only slightly elevated in DKA). Bicarbonate below 15 mmol/L and/or venous pH less than 7.3. However, hyperglycaemia may not always be present and low blood ketone levels (<3 mmol/L) do not always exclude DKA.[2] Epidemiology DKA is normally seen in people with type 1 diabetes. Data from the UK National Diabetes Audit show a crude one-year incidence of 3.6% among people with type 1 diabetes. In the UK nearly 4% of people with type 1 diabetes experience DKA each year. About 6% of cases of DKA occur in adults newly presenting with type 1 diabetes. About 8% of episodes occur in hospital patients who did not primarily present with DKA.[2] However, DKA may also occur in people with type 2 diabetes, although people with type 2 diabetes are much more likely to have a hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes tends to be more common in older, overweight, non-white people with type 2 diabetes, and DKA may be their Continue reading >>

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Acute Kidney Injury As A Severe Complication Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Background: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in children and young adults carries significant morbidity and mortality relating to complications such as cerebral oedema. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of DKA. We present three cases of DKA complicated by AKI. Case 1: A 9-year-old girl presented with severe DKA at diagnosis. She was treated with intravenous fluids and insulin as per protocol. She had oliguria and haematuria 36 h after admission. She was hypertensive with evidence of enlarged kidneys on ultrasound (USS). She was transferred to the renal unit where she needed two cycles of hemodialysis before making full recovery. Case 2: A 14-year-old girl presented with severe DKA and altered consciousness at diagnosis. She developed oliguria 24 h after starting treatment for DKA. USS of abdomen showed enlarged kidneys. Her renal function improved with haemofiltration and recovered fully by 1 week. Case 3: A 17-year-old girl with poorly controlled type 1 diabetes presented with severe DKA. She showed evidence of AKI with very high plasma creatinine, oliguria and low plasma phosphate. She was managed conservatively with individualised fluid plan and phosphate supplementation with recovery in 7 days. Conclusion: Patients with severe DKA can develop AKI due to a number of possible causes, hypovolaemia being the most likely primary cause. Appropriate management of hypovolemia and electrolyte disturbance in these patients can be very challenging. These cases highlight the importance of early recognition of AKI (rising plasma creatinine, oliguria, and haematuria) and discussion with paediatric nephrologist to formulate individualised fluid therapy in order to prevent deterioration in renal function. It is uncertain if recent modification in flu Continue reading >>

I’ll See Your Ketoacidosis And Raise You A Renal Failure

I’ll See Your Ketoacidosis And Raise You A Renal Failure

A while back I posted on a paper that appeared in The Lancet about an obese woman who came to the emergency room with gastroenteritis and was misdiagnosed as being in diabetic ketoacidosis (a life-threatening disorder). She was misdiagnosed because the pinheads covering the ER couldn’t get past the fact that she had been on a low-carb diet. At the time I posted on this travesty I noted that this Lancet paper would from here on out be waved in the face of anyone who was following or advocated a low-carb diet as proof that such a diet is dangerous and can cause diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Well, now we’ve got an answer. Next time someone tells you that it has been proven that low-carb diets are dangerous and can cause ketoacidosis, you can resort to poker terminology and reply that you’ll see their ketoacidosis and raise them a renal failure. A few days ago I got wind of a paper published a few years ago that can be used as a counterpoint to the above mentioned idiotic paper in The Lancet that has given low-carbers such a bad time. This paper, published in the journal Renal Failure in 1998, is, like the other paper, a case report. The short version is as follows: An obese young man arrived comatose in the emergency room. In an effort to lose weight he had been consuming a high-carbohydrate canned beverage as his sole source of nutrition for the two weeks prior. His blood sugar–at about 20 times normal–was extremely elevated and led to a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. The physicians on staff treated the patient appropriately, and he, over the next 20 hours or so, regained consciousness as his blood sugar levels and other lab parameters began to normalize. During a lab analysis 22 hours after admission the doctors found the patient to be breaking down and rel Continue reading >>

How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Human Brain?

How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Human Brain?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is the body’s emergency reaction to glucose starvation in the absence of insulin. It is a disastrous reaction — in general, it makes things worse rather than better, and starts a vicious cycle of blood acidity, rising blood glucose, dehydration, and blood hyperosmolality (high concentration of dissolved stuff) that can be hard to break. One of the hardest-hit organs in DKA is the brain, due to the dehydration and acidic blood entering that sensitive organ. Severe DKA may lead to brain swelling (edema) which is life-threatening. But recent studies have shown that even a short, apparently fully-recovered stint of DKA leads to measurable brain injury. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life–threatening consequence of diabetes. DKA occurs when there is a lack of insulin in the body causing hyperglycemia. As a result of the inability of glucose to enter the cells, the body must find other means to obtain energy. As such, fat breakdown occurs resulting in the accumulation of fatty acids. The fatty acids are metabolized to ketones that cause the blood to become acidotic (pH less than7.3). Because glucose remains in the blood, there is an increase in thirst and drinking to eliminate the solute load of glucose, which also results in increased urination (polyuria and polydipsia). Thus, the combination of increased serum acidity, weight loss, polyuria, and polydipsia may lead to extreme dehydration, coma, or brain damage. Without a doubt, the most severe acute complication of DKA is cerebral edema. Many cases of new onset type 1 diabetes present DKA (15-70 percent depending on age and geographic region, according to multiple studies), hence the importance of an early diagnosis of diabetes in order to avoid potential consequences. Much research is be Continue reading >>

Bladder & Kidneys

Bladder & Kidneys

Kidney and bladder damage is a complication of diabetes. People with diabetes are at risk of bladder and kidney infections, kidney failure and dialysis Maintaining good blood glucose control and keeping your blood pressure at a healthy level will reduce this risk Annual kidney health checks are recommended Kidney Disease Kidney disease occurs when the nephrons inside your kidneys, which act as blood filters, are damaged. This leads to the build up of waste and fluids inside the body. If kidney disease is not diagnosed, it can lead to serious complications including kidney failure, which requires dialysis or a kidney transplant to keep you alive. Kidney disease and diabetes Each kidney contains up to one million nephrons, the filtering units of the kidneys. Inside a nephron is a tiny set of looping blood vessels called the glomerulus. Diabetes can damage the kidney filters, leading to diabetic kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy. If kidney disease is found early, medication, dietary and lifestyle changes can increase the life of your kidneys and keep you feeling your best for as long as possible. Symptoms In some cases diabetic kidney disease causes the kidney filters to become blocked and stop working, which results in kidney failure. Symptoms of kidney failure may be general and can include: changes in the amount and number of times urine is passed blood in the urine tiredness loss of appetite difficulty sleeping headaches lack of concentration shortness of breath nausea and vomiting Controlling blood sugar levels can slow down the development of diabetic kidney disease. Kidney health check It is very important that diabetic kidney disease is detected early as treatment can help to increase the life of the kidneys. Your health care team can give you practical advic Continue reading >>

Incidence And Characteristics Of Acute Kidney Injury In Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Incidence And Characteristics Of Acute Kidney Injury In Severe Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Acute kidney injury is a classical complication of diabetic ketoacidosis. However, to the best of our knowledge, no study has reported the incidence and characteristics of acute kidney injury since the consensus definition was issued. Retrospective study of all cases of severe diabetic ketoacidosis hospitalised consecutively in a medical surgical tertiary ICU during 10 years. Patients were dichotomised in with AKI and without AKI on admission according to the RIFLE classification. Clinical and biological parameters were compared in these populations. Risk factors of presenting AKI on admission were searched for. Results Ninety-four patients were included in the study. According to the RIFLE criteria, 47 patients (50%) presented acute kidney injury on admission; most of them were in the risk class (51%). At 12 and 24 hours, the percentage of AKI patients decreased to 26% and 27% respectively. During the first 24 hours, 3 patients needed renal replacement therapy. Acute renal failure on admission was associated with a more advanced age, SAPS 2 and more severe biological impairments. Treatments were not different between groups except for insulin infusion. Logistic regression found 3 risk factors of presenting AKI on admission: age (odds ratio 1.060 [1.020–1.100], p<0.01), blood glucose (odds ratio 1.101 [1.039–1.166], p<0.01) and serum protein (odds ratio 0.928 [0.865–0.997], p = 0.04). Acute kidney injury is frequently associated with severe diabetic ketoacidosis on admission in ICU. Most of the time, this AKI is transient and characterised by a volume-responsiveness to fluid infusion used in DKA treatment. Age, blood glucose and serum protein are associated to the occurrence of AKI on ICU admission. Figures Citation: Orban J-C, Maizière E-M, Ghaddab A, V Continue reading >>

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

Does Ketosis Cause Kidney Damage?

The ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketotic, and only for a brief portion of the program. It has not been associated with kidney damage or disease in individuals who have normally functioning kidneys. Concerns regarding undue stress on the kidneys are often aimed at very low carbohydrate, very high protein ketogenic diets. Few studies have shown any actual damage, however. (Note: Although the Weight Loss portion of the ‘Lean for Life’ program is mildly ketogenic, it is not considered to be exceptionally “high protein” for most individuals.) Dietary ketosis is among the most maligned and misunderstood concepts in nutrition medicine. Particularly among researchers who don’t actually treat patients, ketosis (the presence of ketone bodies in the urine) is often confused with ketoacidosis, which is a life-threatening build-up of ketone bodies due to muscle wasting and dehydration as in states of shock or uncontrolled Type 1 diabetes. In the Type 1 diabetic, the absence of insulin leads to a toxic build-up of blood glucose and an extreme break-down of fat and muscle tissue. This condition doesn’t occur in individuals who have even a small amount of insulin, whether from natural production or artificially administered. Whereas patients in ketoacidosis are closely monitored in Intensive Care Units, individuals in ketosis are amongst the healthy, active population. Dietary ketosis is a natural adjustment to the body’s reduced intake of carbohydrates as the body shifts its primary source of energy from carbohydrates to stored fat. The presence of insulin keeps ketone production in check so that a mild, beneficial ketosis is achieved. Blood glucose levels are stabilized within a normal range and there is no break-down of healthy muscle tissue. It would be diffi Continue reading >>

The Impact Of Hyperglycemic Emergencies On The Kidney And Liver

The Impact Of Hyperglycemic Emergencies On The Kidney And Liver

Copyright © 2013 Feng Bai et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Studies on the alterations of liver and kidney function parameters in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetic ketosis (DK) were limited. Participants with DKA, DK, non-DK, and healthy controls were enrolled in the current study. Parameters of liver and kidney function were measured and evaluated. The patients with DKA had higher levels of plasma glucose, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), uric acid, and creatinine but lower levels of transferases and protein compared with the other three groups ( for all). The patients with DK had higher levels of plasma glucose and HbA1c but lower levels of glutamyl transpeptidase and protein compared with the non-DK and control groups (). Prealbumin levels were significantly reduced in the severe DKA patients compared with the mild/moderate DKA patients. Serum prealbumin levels were correlated with albumin levels (, ), HCO3 (, ), and arterial pH (, ) in the DKA patients. A diagnostic analysis showed that lower prealbumin levels significantly reflected the presence of hyperglycemic emergencies (). Liver and kidney function parameters deteriorated, especially in DKA. Prealbumin levels can be of value in detecting the presence of hyperglycemic crisis. This clinical trial is registered with ChiCTR-OCH-12003077. 1. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and diabetic ketosis (DK) are common and serious complications of diabetes mellitus. DKA most often occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, increasing evidence indicates that DKA and DK are also common features of ketosis-pr Continue reading >>

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Severe Acute Renal Failure In A Patient With Diabetic Ketoacidosis

1 King Khalid National Guard Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada, Canada 2 Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Canada Click here for correspondence address and email Acute renal failure (ARF) is a rare but potentially fatal complication of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Early recognition and aggressive treatment of ARF during DKA may improve the prognosis of these patients. We present a case report of a 12 year old female admitted to the hospital with severe DKA as the 1s t manifestation of her diabetes mellitus. She presented with severe metabolic acidosis, hypophosphatemia, and oliguric ARF. In addition, rhabdomyolysis was noted during the course of DKA which probably contributed to the ARF. Management of DKA and renal replacement therapy resulted in quick recovery of renal function. We suggest that early initiation of renal replacement therapy for patients with DKA developing ARF may improve the potentially poor outcome of patients with ARF associated with DKA. How to cite this article: Al-Matrafi J, Vethamuthu J, Feber J. Severe acute renal failure in a patient with diabetic ketoacidosis. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2009;20:831-4 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs in 10 to 70% of children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM1) and has a significant risk of mortality, mostly due to cerebral edema. [1] Other potential complications of DKA include hypokalemia, hypophosphatemia, hypoglycemia, intracerebral and peripheral venous thrombosis, mucormycosis, rhabdomyolysis, acute pancreatitis, acute renal failure (ARF) and sepsis. The development of ARF with rhabdomyolysis is a rare but potentially lethal diso Continue reading >>

The Link Between Diabetes & Kidney Disease

The Link Between Diabetes & Kidney Disease

How can diabetes affect the kidneys? People with diabetes need to watch their glucose levels and blood pressure, as over time high blood glucose levels and blood pressure can damage the tiny blood vessels in the filters of the kidneys. At this early stage, this damage causes small amounts of protein to be passed in the urine which is known as microalbumin. In a later stage, so much protein can be lost from the blood that water moves into the body tissues and causes swelling. After a number of years, the kidney filters can fail completely. Wouldn't I know if I had kidney damage? Not necessarily - there is actually a high chance you wouldn't know at all. There are no warning signs for chronic kidney disease and you could lose up to 90 per cent of your kidney function before you felt unwell. How can I find out if my kidneys are affected? Chronic kidney disease is common in people who have diabetes. The only way to know if you are affected is to have a yearly kidney health check by your doctor or diabetes specialist. The doctor or specialist will order a blood and urine test and will also check your blood pressure to determine if you have any signs of kidney damage. Although there is no cure for chronic kidney disease, early detection and treatment is extremely important to slow or halt the progression of the disease. If chronic kidney disease is not detected and treated early, kidney function may continue to worsen, progressing to end stage kidney disease. In order to survive, people with end stage kidney disease may need to have dialysis or a kidney transplant. Kidney disease can also worsen other serious diabetes complications such as eye disease, nerve damage and cardiovascular disease. For further information about your risk of developing chronic kidney disease talk to Continue reading >>

Ketones

Ketones

By-products formed when the body breaks down fat for energy. When the body is starved of glucose or, as in the case of Type 1 diabetes, does not have enough insulin to use the glucose that is in the bloodstream, it begins breaking down fat reserves for energy. Unlike glucose, which “burns clean,” the breakdown of fat creates potentially toxic by-products called ketones, which accumulate in the blood. An excessive amount of ketones in the blood is called ketosis. When the kidneys filter ketones into the urine, the condition is called ketonuria and can be detected by urine ketone tests. If enough ketones accumulate in the blood, they can cause a potentially life-threatening chemical imbalance known as ketoacidosis. The symptoms of ketoacidosis include nausea, vomiting, tiredness, frequent urination, and a fruity odor to the breath. Anyone with symptoms of ketoacidosis should seek medical help immediately. Ketoacidosis is often what causes people to first be diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes: Beta cells in the pancreas stop making enough insulin, thus preventing body cells from getting energy in the form of glucose. The body responds by burning fats for fuel, creating an excess of ketones in the blood. As dehydration also sets in, the person develops ketoacidosis. The nausea and vomiting that accompany ketoacidosis are sometimes mistaken for the symptoms of a bad flu. People with diabetes, particularly those with Type 1 diabetes, are at increased risk of ketoacidosis when they are sick. The stress of illness tends to raise blood glucose levels. But since illness often decreases a person’s appetite, resulting in less food intake than usual, some people mistakenly decrease their insulin dosages. In fact, increased amounts of insulin are often needed when a person is sick. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Rapid, deep breathing. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. Confusion. Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some test strips nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high. When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through your vein and closely watching certain chemicals in your blood (electrolyt Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes caused by a lack of insulin in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when the body is unable to use blood sugar (glucose) because there isn't enough insulin. Instead, it breaks down fat as an alternative source of fuel. This causes a build-up of a by-product called ketones. Most cases of diabetic ketoacidosis occur in people with type 1 diabetes, although it can also be a complication of type 2 diabetes. Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: passing large amounts of urine feeling very thirsty vomiting abdominal pain Seek immediate medical assistance if you have any of these symptoms and your blood sugar levels are high. Read more about the symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis. Who is affected by diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a relatively common complication in people with diabetes, particularly children and younger adults who have type 1 diabetes. Younger children under four years of age are thought to be most at risk. In about 1 in 4 cases, diabetic ketoacidosis develops in people who were previously unaware they had type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis accounts for around half of all diabetes-related hospital admissions in people with type 1 diabetes. Diabetic ketoacidosis triggers These include: infections and other illnesses not keeping up with recommended insulin injections Read more about potential causes of diabetic ketoacidosis. Diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis This is a relatively straightforward process. Blood tests can be used to check your glucose levels and any chemical imbalances, such as low levels of potassium. Urine tests can be used to estimate the number of ketones in your body. Blood and urine tests can also be used to check for an underlying infec Continue reading >>

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