diabetestalk.net

How Does Ketoacidosis Affect Blood Ph

Share on facebook

Hey Everyone!! Welcome back to my channel. In this video, I am sharing with you the correct way of making lemon water. ENJOY!! If you are new to my channel a BIG VIRTUAL HUG to you and WELCOME to the family. Thanks for watching! DON'T FORGET TO LIKE, COMMENT AND SHARE! Thanks for SUBSCRIBING and SUPPORTING! Watch - Rice Water + Green Tea video here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dUOyF... Watch one of my Free Your Mind Video here / https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jgj6k... Watch My Homemade Cleansing Milk Video Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pC1pa... Thank you all for your constant support. Love you guys. Thank you for watching!! XOX CONNECT WITH ME!!!! INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/_khichi/ Please like my FACEBOOK PAGE @Khichi Beauty TWITTER khichi287 SNAPCHAT khichix FACEBOOK @ Khichi Beauty Business Inquires Please EMAIL [email protected] Disclosure: All thoughts and opinions are my own. Disclaimer : The information provided on this video is for general purposes only and should not be considered as professional advice. I am not a licensed professional so make sure to consult with your professional consultant in case you need to.

How Does Drinking Lemon Water Every Morning Affect Your Blood Ph?

It doesn’t. Nothing you eat or drink can affect your blood pH unless your kidneys aren’t working properly. One of their main functions is to always keep your blood pH at 7.35 (slightly alkaline). It can, however, affect your urine pH. If you eat/drink more alkalinizing things your bodily waste will be more alkaline. Lemon water is good for you because it stimulates your digestive system and generally cleanses. If you’re interested in it because of the alkalinity/acidity affect of foods, yes, it is good to drink it for an alkaline affect (it is alkaline when broken down inside the body even though it’s acidic outside). But again, it can’t change your blood pH. It can only take some stress of your kidneys so they don’t have to process so much acidic waste. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Colin Gerber

    There have been studies done on this, one done by Alperin et al. found the following results:
    In the upright posture, venous outflow is considerably less pulsatile (57%) and occurs predominantly through the vertebral plexus, while in the supine posture venous outflow occurs predominantly through the internal jugular veins. A slightly lower tCBF (12%), a considerably smaller CSF volume oscillating between the cranium and the spinal canal (48%), and a much larger ICC (2.8-fold) with a corresponding decrease in the MRI-derived ICP values were measured in the sitting position. [1]
    There are MRI machines that work while sitting up:
    Or laying down:
    [1]http://www.uic.edu/labs/pimlab/r...

  2. Ravi Tej

    Its all a play of the 'Gravity'.
    Veins in the legs are enveloped by the skeletal muscles there, and when they are actively contracting this squeezes the veins of its blood in a 'heart-ward' direction. You may ask why couldn't the blood flow the other way, thanks for the 'valves' that are interspersed along the length of this venous channel which prevents this from happening. This is the principle of 'the muscle pump' and it is important so much so that the soleus muscle (the main bulk of your calf) is called the 'second-heart' as it too literally pumps the blood.
    And now coming to what is that that causes the changes in cerebral perfusion with posture:
    [A word of caution: The cerebral perfusion is governed by auto-regulatory phenomenon, wherein the cerebral blood flow remains rather constant even with quite a change in blood pressure and a gross deviation from the normal of the blood pressure is needed to change it. And in fact, only in rare cases does this postural changes causes a syncope (Orthostatic hypotension) ,that too, with an added deficit of the sympathetic reflexes (reflex vasoconstriction)]

    In the supine position, since all of the body is at the same level, it is of the impression that there is no net differential effect of gravity on different parts of the body. And thus there is no active role of gravity in deciding the blood flow, and the other factors which control blood flow comes to play.

    While in standing position and that too in a 'static stance' for long, due to gravity, the blood (venous) pools in the lower limbs, and thus there is less blood that reaches the heart (less venous return) and consequently heart pumps less blood as whatever heart does is just pump the quantity it has been filled before systole (preload). There is a decrease in blood pressure and thus a 'relatively' decreased blood perfusion. As I mentioned earlier too, there are regulatory mechanisms that maintains a constant cerebral perfusion in the face of a changing blood pressure. As the fMRI is quite sensitive a test, it can rather be that it does recognise this slight 'relative' change of the flow. But surely, the transient fall in BP, can be recorded, though this transient fall is quickly compensated by sympathetic activation.
    Its an accepted fact that in cases of orthostatic hypotension, the syncope (caused by cerebral hypoperfusion) is caused in patients of a sympathetic defecit (or decreased activity) when in the standing posture, where the decreased blood pressure remains uncompensated and a fall in BP below a critical level does with a decrease in cerebral perfusion for a few seconds and due to this hypoxic condition syncope occurs. And ironically, when the person falls of syncope, the gravity component is canceled and he regains his consciousness due to corrected cerbral flow, thus this can too be taken as a proof of the effect of posture on cerebral perfusion.

  3. Sohan

    To know about Blood flow in very important for a man . To maintain your blood flow you have to exercise regularly.You should improve your blood flow for a good health.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

What is BLOOD PLASMA? What does BLOOD PLASMA mean? BLOOD PLASMA meaning, definition & explanation. Blood plasma is the pale straw (yellow) coloured liquid component of blood that normally holds the blood cells in whole blood in suspension; this makes plasma the extracellular matrix of blood cells. It makes up about 55% of the body's total blood volume. It is the intravascular fluid part of extracellular fluid (all body fluid outside of cells). It is mostly water (up to 95% by volume), and contains dissolved proteins (6–8%) (i.e.—serum albumins, globulins, and fibrinogen), glucose, clotting factors, electrolytes (Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, HCO3-, Cl-, etc.), hormones, and carbon dioxide (plasma being the main medium for excretory product transportation). Plasma also serves as the protein reserve of the human body. It plays a vital role in an intravascular osmotic effect that keeps electrolytes in balanced form and protects the body from infection and other blood disorders. Blood plasma is prepared by spinning a tube of fresh blood containing an anticoagulant in a centrifuge until the blood cells fall to the bottom of the tube. The blood plasma is then poured or drawn off. Blood plasma has

The Influence Of Ketoacids On Plasma Creatinine Assays In Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Abstract Abstract. Kemperman FAW, Weber JA, Gorgels J, van Zanten AP, Krediet RT, Arisz L (University of Amsterdam and Slotervaart Hospital, Amsterdam, The Netherlands). The influence of ketoacids on plasma creatinine assays in diabetic ketoacidosis. J Intern Med 2000; 248: 513–519. Objective. Analysis of the interference of ketoacids on various routine plasma creatinine assays during a clinical episode of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Design. Observational study. Blood samples were drawn before, during and after standard in-hospital treatment. Plasma creatinine was measured with two dissimilar enzymatic assays (creatininase PAP + and creatinine iminohydrolase Serapak), a kinetic alkaline picrate method (Jaffé) and a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) procedure. Acetoacetate and β-hydroxybutyrate were analysed by enzymatic methods. Setting. Department of Medicine, University Hospital. Subjects. Nine patients who experienced 10 episodes of DKA. Main outcome measures. Agreement of the routine plasma creatinine assays with HPLC and analysis of possible interferents. Results. At presentation, the Jaffé assay gave falsely high values of plasma creatinine (median 99 µmol Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Colin Gerber

    There have been studies done on this, one done by Alperin et al. found the following results:
    In the upright posture, venous outflow is considerably less pulsatile (57%) and occurs predominantly through the vertebral plexus, while in the supine posture venous outflow occurs predominantly through the internal jugular veins. A slightly lower tCBF (12%), a considerably smaller CSF volume oscillating between the cranium and the spinal canal (48%), and a much larger ICC (2.8-fold) with a corresponding decrease in the MRI-derived ICP values were measured in the sitting position. [1]
    There are MRI machines that work while sitting up:
    Or laying down:
    [1]http://www.uic.edu/labs/pimlab/r...

  2. Ravi Tej

    Its all a play of the 'Gravity'.
    Veins in the legs are enveloped by the skeletal muscles there, and when they are actively contracting this squeezes the veins of its blood in a 'heart-ward' direction. You may ask why couldn't the blood flow the other way, thanks for the 'valves' that are interspersed along the length of this venous channel which prevents this from happening. This is the principle of 'the muscle pump' and it is important so much so that the soleus muscle (the main bulk of your calf) is called the 'second-heart' as it too literally pumps the blood.
    And now coming to what is that that causes the changes in cerebral perfusion with posture:
    [A word of caution: The cerebral perfusion is governed by auto-regulatory phenomenon, wherein the cerebral blood flow remains rather constant even with quite a change in blood pressure and a gross deviation from the normal of the blood pressure is needed to change it. And in fact, only in rare cases does this postural changes causes a syncope (Orthostatic hypotension) ,that too, with an added deficit of the sympathetic reflexes (reflex vasoconstriction)]

    In the supine position, since all of the body is at the same level, it is of the impression that there is no net differential effect of gravity on different parts of the body. And thus there is no active role of gravity in deciding the blood flow, and the other factors which control blood flow comes to play.

    While in standing position and that too in a 'static stance' for long, due to gravity, the blood (venous) pools in the lower limbs, and thus there is less blood that reaches the heart (less venous return) and consequently heart pumps less blood as whatever heart does is just pump the quantity it has been filled before systole (preload). There is a decrease in blood pressure and thus a 'relatively' decreased blood perfusion. As I mentioned earlier too, there are regulatory mechanisms that maintains a constant cerebral perfusion in the face of a changing blood pressure. As the fMRI is quite sensitive a test, it can rather be that it does recognise this slight 'relative' change of the flow. But surely, the transient fall in BP, can be recorded, though this transient fall is quickly compensated by sympathetic activation.
    Its an accepted fact that in cases of orthostatic hypotension, the syncope (caused by cerebral hypoperfusion) is caused in patients of a sympathetic defecit (or decreased activity) when in the standing posture, where the decreased blood pressure remains uncompensated and a fall in BP below a critical level does with a decrease in cerebral perfusion for a few seconds and due to this hypoxic condition syncope occurs. And ironically, when the person falls of syncope, the gravity component is canceled and he regains his consciousness due to corrected cerbral flow, thus this can too be taken as a proof of the effect of posture on cerebral perfusion.

  3. Sohan

    To know about Blood flow in very important for a man . To maintain your blood flow you have to exercise regularly.You should improve your blood flow for a good health.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Dr. Rasha Kelej, Chief Executive Officer, CEO Merck Foundation welcome speech at Merck Africa Luminary which aims to Raise Quality of Healthcare in Africa. More than 200 African healthcare providers from more than 20 African countries attend Merck Africa Luminary to benefit from several medical education sessions NAIROBI, Kenya, November 16, 2015/APO (African Press Organization)/ -- More than 200 African healthcare providers from more than 20 African countries attend Merck Africa Luminary to benefit from several medical education sessions Merck celebrates 80 year Seven Seas anniversary Merck announces the start of Merck Africa Diabetes Days with the aim to provide 300,000 people with free diabetes screening and education in 2016 Merck (MerckGroup.com), a leading science and technology company, today kicked off its second Merck Africa Luminary for the first time in Kenya. During the inauguration of this years Merck Africa Luminary, Karl Ludwig Kley, Chairman of Executive Board and CEO of Merck emphasized, We are pleased to engage with Kenya Ministry of Health and Government of Nairobi to improve access to better healthcare as part of our commitment to the social and economic deve

Merck And The Merck Manuals

Acidosis is caused by an overproduction of acid in the blood or an excessive loss of bicarbonate from the blood (metabolic acidosis) or by a buildup of carbon dioxide in the blood that results from poor lung function or depressed breathing (respiratory acidosis). If an increase in acid overwhelms the body's acid-base control systems, the blood will become acidic. As blood pH drops (becomes more acidic), the parts of the brain that regulate breathing are stimulated to produce faster and deeper breathing (respiratory compensation). Breathing faster and deeper increases the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled. The kidneys also try to compensate by excreting more acid in the urine. However, both mechanisms can be overwhelmed if the body continues to produce too much acid, leading to severe acidosis and eventually heart problems and coma. The acidity or alkalinity of any solution, including blood, is indicated on the pH scale. Metabolic acidosis develops when the amount of acid in the body is increased through ingestion of a substance that is, or can be broken down (metabolized) to, an acid—such as wood alcohol (methanol), antifreeze (ethylene glycol), or large doses of aspirin (acetylsa Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Colin Gerber

    There have been studies done on this, one done by Alperin et al. found the following results:
    In the upright posture, venous outflow is considerably less pulsatile (57%) and occurs predominantly through the vertebral plexus, while in the supine posture venous outflow occurs predominantly through the internal jugular veins. A slightly lower tCBF (12%), a considerably smaller CSF volume oscillating between the cranium and the spinal canal (48%), and a much larger ICC (2.8-fold) with a corresponding decrease in the MRI-derived ICP values were measured in the sitting position. [1]
    There are MRI machines that work while sitting up:
    Or laying down:
    [1]http://www.uic.edu/labs/pimlab/r...

  2. Ravi Tej

    Its all a play of the 'Gravity'.
    Veins in the legs are enveloped by the skeletal muscles there, and when they are actively contracting this squeezes the veins of its blood in a 'heart-ward' direction. You may ask why couldn't the blood flow the other way, thanks for the 'valves' that are interspersed along the length of this venous channel which prevents this from happening. This is the principle of 'the muscle pump' and it is important so much so that the soleus muscle (the main bulk of your calf) is called the 'second-heart' as it too literally pumps the blood.
    And now coming to what is that that causes the changes in cerebral perfusion with posture:
    [A word of caution: The cerebral perfusion is governed by auto-regulatory phenomenon, wherein the cerebral blood flow remains rather constant even with quite a change in blood pressure and a gross deviation from the normal of the blood pressure is needed to change it. And in fact, only in rare cases does this postural changes causes a syncope (Orthostatic hypotension) ,that too, with an added deficit of the sympathetic reflexes (reflex vasoconstriction)]

    In the supine position, since all of the body is at the same level, it is of the impression that there is no net differential effect of gravity on different parts of the body. And thus there is no active role of gravity in deciding the blood flow, and the other factors which control blood flow comes to play.

    While in standing position and that too in a 'static stance' for long, due to gravity, the blood (venous) pools in the lower limbs, and thus there is less blood that reaches the heart (less venous return) and consequently heart pumps less blood as whatever heart does is just pump the quantity it has been filled before systole (preload). There is a decrease in blood pressure and thus a 'relatively' decreased blood perfusion. As I mentioned earlier too, there are regulatory mechanisms that maintains a constant cerebral perfusion in the face of a changing blood pressure. As the fMRI is quite sensitive a test, it can rather be that it does recognise this slight 'relative' change of the flow. But surely, the transient fall in BP, can be recorded, though this transient fall is quickly compensated by sympathetic activation.
    Its an accepted fact that in cases of orthostatic hypotension, the syncope (caused by cerebral hypoperfusion) is caused in patients of a sympathetic defecit (or decreased activity) when in the standing posture, where the decreased blood pressure remains uncompensated and a fall in BP below a critical level does with a decrease in cerebral perfusion for a few seconds and due to this hypoxic condition syncope occurs. And ironically, when the person falls of syncope, the gravity component is canceled and he regains his consciousness due to corrected cerbral flow, thus this can too be taken as a proof of the effect of posture on cerebral perfusion.

  3. Sohan

    To know about Blood flow in very important for a man . To maintain your blood flow you have to exercise regularly.You should improve your blood flow for a good health.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Body

    The most commonly used theory is the affection of serotonin levels which is a neurotransmitter in the brain and other parts of the body also know as the “happiness hormone”. Scientists are not sure if depression causes the drop of serotonin levels OR the drop of serotonin levels causes the depression. But obviously everyone's cause of depression might lead the psychiatrist to pin point the biological causation thus prescribing treatment which ...

    ketosis Jan 3, 2018
  • What Does Ketoacidosis Affect

    Well, the nose knows! It can pick up space: Brain mechanisms for extracting spatial information from smell. Forty years ago, von Békésy demonstrated that the spatial source of an odorant is determined by comparing input across nostrils... found nostril-specific responses in primary olfactory cortex that were predictive of the accuracy of left versus right localization. Additionally, left versus right localization preferentially engaged a portio ...

    ketosis Apr 27, 2018
  • How Does Ketoacidosis Affect Breathing

    What Is It? Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially fatal complication of diabetes that occurs when you have much less insulin than your body needs. This problem causes the blood to become acidic and the body to become dangerously dehydrated. Diabetic ketoacidosis can occur when diabetes is not treated adequately, or it can occur during times of serious sickness. To understand this illness, you need to understand the way your body powers itself wi ...

    ketosis Jan 5, 2018
  • How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Brain

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the impact of new-onset diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) during childhood on brain morphology and function. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Patients aged 6–18 years with and without DKA at diagnosis were studied at four time points: <48 h, 5 days, 28 days, and 6 months postdiagnosis. Patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy with cognitive assessment at each time point. Relationships between clinical c ...

    ketosis Jan 20, 2018
  • How Does Ketoacidosis Affect Blood Ph

    Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find the Pre-diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance) article more useful, or one of our other health articles. See also the separate Childhood Ketoacidosis article. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a medical emergency with a significant morbi ...

    ketosis Jan 12, 2018
  • How Does Ketoacidosis Affect The Kidneys

    How can diabetes affect the kidneys? People with diabetes need to watch their glucose levels and blood pressure, as over time high blood glucose levels and blood pressure can damage the tiny blood vessels in the filters of the kidneys. At this early stage, this damage causes small amounts of protein to be passed in the urine which is known as microalbumin. In a later stage, so much protein can be lost from the blood that water moves into the body ...

    ketosis Jan 5, 2018

Popular Articles

More in ketosis