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How Does Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis

Understanding Sglt2 Inhibitors' Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Understanding Sglt2 Inhibitors' Diabetic Ketoacidosis Risk

Deepali Dixit, PharmD, BCPS, is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy and a Clinical Critical Care Pharmacist in the Medical Intensive Care Unit at Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital. Dr. Dixit has been involved in multiple committees and in leadership positions in regional and national pharmacy and organizations. Dr. Dixit's research interests include sedation and delirium in the critically ill, infectious disease, alcohol withdrawal syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and patient safety. This article was collaboratively written with Shannon Anthony, PharmD Candidate. In May 2015, the FDA issued a warning about the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis while using SGLT2 inhibitors. That December, the FDA updated the drugs’ labels to include warnings about developing ketoacidosis even with near-normal blood glucose levels.1 SGLT2 inhibitors lower blood glucose levels by decreasing renal glucose reabsorption, which increases urinary glucose excretion.2 Three drugs in this class are currently available in the United States: canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance).1 These medications are approved for managing type 2 diabetes, although they’re increasingly used off-label to treat type 1 diabetes (T1D), and trials are currently being conducted to evaluate their efficacy for this potential indication.3 Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) develops most frequently in T1D patients secondary to omission or decreased dosage of insulin, acute illness, or a recent surgical procedure.4 The typical clinical presentation includes hyperglycemia (>250mg/dL), anion-gap acidosis, and elevated plasma and urine ketones.3 Early diagnosis and management of ketoacidosis is vital. The cornerstone DKA treatment Continue reading >>

Fda: Diabetes Drug Invokana Can Cause Too Much Acid In Blood

Fda: Diabetes Drug Invokana Can Cause Too Much Acid In Blood

This article was updated to include study data showing risk for type I diabetes patients. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that a new class of Type 2 diabetes drugs, including Johnson & Johnson’s blockbuster Invokana, may cause a serious condition that can lead to hospitalization. J&J’s Invokana (canagliflozin) works by causing blood sugar to leave the body through urine and is the most popular medication in a class of Type 2 diabetes drugs called SGLT2 inhibitors. According to the FDA’s warning, the drugs can cause a condition called ketoacidosis that happens when the body produces too many acids called ketones. Warning symptoms of the condition include nausea, vomiting, difficulty breathing, confusion, abdominal pain and unusual fatigue or sleepiness. The FDA urges patients who are taking SGLT2s and are suffering from these symptoms to seek medical attention immediately. So far, the FDA said it received about 20 cases of ketoacidosis and all of these patients had to go to the hospital for treatment of the condition. Most patients took the drug for about 2 weeks before symptoms showed up. Other medications in the class include AstraZeneca’s Farxiga and Xigduo, Jardiance and Glyxambi from Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim. J&J also combines the active ingredient in Invokana with metformin and markets it as Invokamet. “We are continuing to investigate this safety issue and will determine whether changes are needed in the prescribing information for this class of drugs,” the FDA said in its announcement. Invokana A Blockbuster for J&J The FDA first approved Invokana as the first SGLT2 drug in March 2013. Since then, it has become a cash cow for J&J and its Janssen Pharmaceuticals unit. In the first quarter of 2015, the drug already brought in $278 mi Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors May Predispose To Ketoacidosis

Sglt2 Inhibitors May Predispose To Ketoacidosis

SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch (S.I.T., J.E.B., K.I.R.), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892; Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Nutrition (S.I.T.), Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201 Address all correspondence and requests for reprints to: Simeon I. Taylor, MD, PhD, Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Mail Stop 1453, 9000 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20892. Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch (S.I.T., J.E.B., K.I.R.), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892; Search for other works by this author on: Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Obesity Branch (S.I.T., J.E.B., K.I.R.), National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892; Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 100, Issue 8, 1 August 2015, Pages 28492852, Simeon I. Taylor, Jenny E. Blau, Kristina I. Rother; SGLT2 Inhibitors May Predispose to Ketoacidosis, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 100, Issue 8, 1 August 2015, Pages 28492852, Sodium glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are antidiabetic drugs that increase urinary excretion of glucose, thereby improving glycemic control and promoting weight loss. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that these drugs increase the risk of di Continue reading >>

Do Sglt2 Inhibitors Like Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis?

Do Sglt2 Inhibitors Like Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis?

In an announcement released May 15, the FDA called attention to 20 case reports it had received between March 2013 and June 6, 2014 of 20 persons, most with type 2 diabetes, who had been treated with Sodium-glucose Cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) Inhibitors such as canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga, Forxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance), for an average of 2 weeks, but in some for as much as six months and who had diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is typically a condition of uncontrolled diabetes seen in type 1 diabetes, or in adolescents with severe type 2 diabetes, with elevated blood glucose and evidence of ketoacidosis with elevated blood or urine ketones and acidosis with a high blood “anion gap,” reflecting the presence of substances called organic anions in the bloodstream. Another unusual feature noted in the FDA release was that blood glucose levels were typically only mildly elevated, below 200 mg/dl. What is ketoacidosis? The body uses insulin not only to move glucose into cells, but also as a signal to increase fat and protein synthesis in fat cells and other body tissues. When a persons who does not have diabetes goes a long period without eating, ketones act as an important source of energy. Their insulin concentrations in blood fall, acting as a negative signal to cause the body to break down fat into fatty acids and protein into amino acids. A subsequent step, also signaled by low levels of insulin, is the further breakdown of fatty acids and the removal of amino groups from certain amino acids to form ketone bodies, particularly an organic acid called beta-hydroxy butyrate, as well as acetoacetic acid, which is less important in ketoacidosis but which is measured in urine ketone test strips. For a diabetic person who has true insu Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: Fda

Sglt2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: Fda

SGLT2 Inhibitor Diabetes Drugs May Cause Ketoacidosis: FDA The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned today that sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors used to treat type 2 diabetes may lead to ketoacidosis requiring hospitalization. The warning includes the SGLT2 inhibitors canagliflozin (Invokana, Johnson & Johnson), dapagliflozin (Farxiga, AstraZeneca), and empagliflozin (Jardiance, Lilly/Boehringer), as well as three combination products that include an SGLT2 inhibitor: canagliflozin plus metformin (Invokamet, Johnson & Johnson), dapagliflozin plus metformin extended release (Xigduo XR, AstraZeneca), and empagliflozin plus linagliptin (Glyxambi, Lilly/Boehringer). A search of the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System database identified 20 cases of acidosis reported as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), ketoacidosis, or ketosis in patients treated with SGLT2 inhibitors from March 2013 to June 6, 2014, the FDA said . Ketoacidosis is not typically observed in patients with type 2 diabetes, the FDA notes, and the DKA case presentations were "atypical in that glucose levels were only mildly elevated at less than 200 mg/dL in some reports, while patients with type 1 diabetes who have DKA typically have glucose levels greater than 250 mg/dL." Signs of ketoacidosis include difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue and sleepiness. "Healthcare professionals should evaluate for the presence of acidosis, including ketoacidosis, in patients experiencing these signs or symptoms; discontinue SGLT2 inhibitors if acidosis is confirmed; and take appropriate measures to correct the acidosis and monitor sugar levels," the FDA advises. In Half of Cases, No Triggering Factor for DKA In all cases, a diagnosis of DKA or ketoacidosis wa Continue reading >>

Severe Ketoacidosis Associated With Canagliflozin (invokana): A Safety Concern

Severe Ketoacidosis Associated With Canagliflozin (invokana): A Safety Concern

Case Reports in Critical Care Volume 2016 (2016), Article ID 1656182, 3 pages 1Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Providence Hospital and Medical Center, 16001 W 9 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075, USA 2Department of Internal Medicine, Providence Hospital and Medical Center, 16001 W 9 Mile Road, Southfield, MI 48075, USA Academic Editor: Kurt Lenz Copyright © 2016 Alehegn Gelaye et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Canagliflozin (Invokana) is a selective sodium glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor that was first introduced in 2013 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Though not FDA approved yet, its use in type 1 DM has been justified by the fact that its mechanism of action is independent of insulin secretion or action. However, some serious side effects, including severe anion gap metabolic acidosis and euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), have been reported. Prompt identification of the causal association and initiation of appropriate therapy should be instituted for this life threatening condition. 1. Introduction More than 5 million patients are admitted annually to intensive care units (ICUs) in the United States. A number of life threatening medical conditions, including diabetic ketoacidosis, can be associated with metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis may also arise from several drugs and toxins through a variety of mechanisms. Since approval of the first-in-class drug in 2013, data have emerged suggesting that Sodium Glucose Transporter-2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors, including canagliflozin, may lead to diabetic ketoacidosis [1]. We pre Continue reading >>

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

Three Diabetes Drugs Linked To Ketoacidosis, Fda Warns

NASHVILLE -- Three type 2 diabetes drugs -- canagliflozin (Invokana), dapagliflozin (Farxiga), and empagliflozin (Jardiance) -- may lead to ketoacidosis, the FDA warned today. The sodium-glucose co-transporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are designed to lower blood sugar in patients with diabetes, but the FDA is investigating a connection between the drugs and dangerously high acid levels in the blood. They are also looking at whether changes will need to be made to the prescribing information, they said in the warning, which is posted online. At least two studies presented here at the annual meeting of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists have found a connection between the SGLT2 inhibitors and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). "Healthcare professionals should evaluate for the presence of acidosis, including ketoacidosis, in patients experiencing these signs or symptoms," the FDA said. "Discontinue SGLT2 inhibitors if acidosis is confirmed, and take appropriate measures to correct the acidosis and monitor sugar levels." The signs and symptoms listed included difficulty breathing, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, confusion, and unusual fatigue or sleepiness. The FDA is issuing the warning after they searched their database of adverse event complaints, they said in an announcement. From March 2013 to June 2014 there were 20 cases of DKA reported, most of them with type 2 diabetes as the indication. Hospitalization was required in all of the cases, and the median time to onset was 2 weeks after starting the drug. "I would encourage that these cases be studied so we can learn the scenarios behind them so they can be broadcast," said Farhad Zangeneh, MD, medical director of Endocrine, Diabetes and Osteoporosis Clinic, in an interview with MedPage Today. "The important Continue reading >>

How Does Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis?

How Does Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis?

Invokana (canagliflozin) is a popular diabetes medicationin a new class of drugs called SGLT-2 inhibitors. Manufactured by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, Invokana was the first SGLT-2 inhibitor drug to be FDA approved in 2013. Later, Janssen combined the active ingredient found in Invokana with metformin, another oral diabetes drug, and the combination drug is known as Invokamet. Invokanaand other SGLT-2 inhibitors work by affecting the sodium-glucose-linked transporter 2 (or sodium glucose so-transporter 2 as it is sometimes called) protein located in the duct system of the kidney. The glucose transporters are responsible for reabsorbing glucose back into the kidney. As inhibitors of the SGLT-2 protein, oral medications like Invokana block the reabsorption of glucose into the kidney. Rather than re-enter the kidney, the glucose it taken out and excreted in the urine so it is no longer in the body. Diabetic ketoacidosis (also known as DKA) is caused when ketones are abnormally high in the body, causing harm. Ketones are produced in the body when it is unable to use glucose in the cells and instead breaks down fat as a fuel source for energy. The byproduct of this fat metabolism leads to ketones, and causes the blood to become too acidic. The condition can develop rapidly and can be life-threatening over a short period of time. Initial symptoms of ketoacidosis may include: Feeling lightheaded or on the verge of fainting In type-2 diabetes, the development of ketoacidosis is rare, and the condition is usually seen in type-1 diabetes. Because of this rarity, individuals with type-2 diabetes may not recognize the symptoms. Ketoacidosis can also cause the body to develop other disease conditions, including cardiovascular issues. A dangerously lo Continue reading >>

How Does Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis?

How Does Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis?

In May 2015, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned that a new class of Type 2 diabetes drugs, including Johnson & Johnsons blockbuster Invokana , may cause a serious condition called ketoacidosis. Many patients experiencing this condition took the drug for about 2 weeks before symptoms showed up. Invokana causes a diabetics blood sugar to leave his or her body through urine and is among the most popular SGLT2 inhibitors, a class of Type 2 diabetes drugs. The drug can cause a condition called ketoacidosis that happens when the body produces too many acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that comes about when cells cannot get the glucose they need due to a lack of insulin. Instead, the body breaks down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, fatty acids (ketones) are produced and cause a chemical imbalance called diabetic ketoacidosis. A very similar medication that may cause the same dangerous side effects is Invokamet. J&J also combines the active ingredient in Invokana with metformin and markets it as Invokamet. J&J and its Janssen Pharmaceuticals unit made $278 million on Invokana in the first quarter of 2015 alone. With more people being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes than ever before, many expect that claims of ketoacidosis and other serious side effects will only continue to grow. Raizner Slania Accepting Invokana Ketoacidosis Cases Injuries caused by an antidiabetic medication may require hospitalization and long-term medical care. Patients who are injured by medications may be eligible for financial compensation for medical expenses, lost wages, and more. Loved ones of patients who die due to drug injury may be eligible to file a wrongful death lawsuit. If you developed Ketoacidosis after taking Invok Continue reading >>

Invokana Lawsuit

Invokana Lawsuit

Diabetes medications like Invokana (canagliflozin) have been linked to ketoacidosis and kidney injuries. Sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors are a group of drugs FDA-approved to treat low blood sugar in adults with Type 2 diabetes. The FDA has warned, however, that SGLT2 inhibitors like Invokana can lead to a condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), characterized by excessive acid levels in the blood. The FDA has also warned about bone breaks and kidney injuries associated with SGLT2 inhibitors. A number of manufacturers—including Johnson & Johnson, which makes Invokana—sell diabetic medications that are associated with harmful side effects. Hundreds of lawsuits currently await trial against Invokana in federal and state courts. Plaintiffs argue that Janssen Pharmaceuticals (a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson) misrepresented the risks of the medication and failed to warn patients about Invokana’s side effects. If you suffered an injury caused by Invokana or a similar SGLT2 inhibitor, you may be entitled to compensation. Contact us today for a free legal consultation. Serious Invokana Side Effects Invokana and similar drugs have strong links to ketoacidosis. There is also evidence that the drugs can cause impaired kidney function, heart problems, bone breaks, and other health complications. Ketoacidosis Symptoms of ketoacidosis, as noted by the American Diabetes Association, include: Trouble breathing Nausea Vomiting Abdominal pain Confusion or difficulty concentrating Unusual fatigue or sleepiness Dry or flushed skin Kidney Injuries Adverse event data has also pointed to possible impaired kidney function caused by Invokana and similar drugs. Adverse renal functions associated with these drugs include: Kidney failure Kidney impairment Dehydratio Continue reading >>

Sglt2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What's Behind The Fda Warning

Sglt2 Inhibitors And Diabetic Ketoacidosis: What's Behind The Fda Warning

With commentary by Yehuda Handelsman, MD, FACP, FACE, FNLA, an endocrinologist in private practice in Tarzana, CA, Medical Director and Principal Investigator of the Metabolic Institute of America and President of the American College of Endocrinology People with diabetes who take blood sugar-lowering drugs called SGLT2 inhibitors were recently warned by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that they should watch for signs of a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis. canagliflozin (Invokana) dapagliflozin (Farxiga) empagliflozin (Jardiance) as well as the combination pills: canagliflozin plus metformin (Invokamet) dapagliflozin plus metformin extended-release (Xigduo XR) empagliflozin plus linagliptin (Glyxambi). “Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) can be deadly,” says Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE, an advanced practice dietitian at the University of Chicago Kovler Diabetes Center and a member of EndocrineWeb’s advisory board. “DKA is usually more of a concern for people with type 1 diabetes, but this warning is for people with type 2 diabetes who are taking the SGLT2 inhibitors, as well as people with type 1 diabetes who take these medications off label. DKA — dangerously high acid levels in the bloodstream — happens when your body breaks down fat instead of glucose for energy, releasing acidic compounds called ketones. Early symptoms include thirst, frequent urination and sweet, fruity breath, Hess-Fischl says. You may feel tired and confused, and develop nausea, stomach pain, vomiting and difficulty breathing. “If you notice symptoms, call your doctor immediately. But if you’re vomiting, can’t catch your breath or are concerned, go to the emergency room,” she says. Putting the Risk in Perspective The FDA warning, relea Continue reading >>

Invokana & Ketoacidosis: Fda Takes Action

Invokana & Ketoacidosis: Fda Takes Action

Introduced to the US market in 2013, Janssen Pharmaceutical’s diabetes drug Invokana met with immediate fanfare. The Johnson & Johnson subsidiary hailed its new product as an “important [and] much-needed” development in the fight against type 2 diabetes. Forbes acclaimed the drug’s “market potential,” while highlighting Invokana’s ability to “attack blood sugar right from the get go.” The US Food & Drug Administration heralded Invokana as an “advance [in] innovation.” Invokana’s market potential was quickly realized, with an estimated 2 million prescriptions written in 2014 alone. But soon after, the FDA would make a troubling announcement: Invokana had been linked to a major health risk. Does Invokana Cause Ketoacidosis? According to an FDA Safety Announcement released on May 15, 2015, Invokana and a number of drugs like it “may lead to ketoacidosis, a serious condition where the body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones that may require hospitalization.” Less than a year later, the agency would turn to concrete action, adding a new warning to Invokana’s label. This major revision instructed physicians to immediately discontinue the drug in patients with signs and symptoms of ketoacidosis. SGLT2 Inhibitors Invokana belongs to a new class of drugs known as SGLT2, or sodium-glucose cotransporter-2, inhibitors. Other products in the class include: Invokamet Farxiga Jardiance Each of these drugs presents a serious risk of ketoacidosis, according to the FDA. To learn more about the agency’s response to Invokana’s potential safety risks, click here. In response to recent developments, patients who experienced ketoacidosis after taking Invokana, many of whom face costly medical bills, lost work and considerable suffering, have b Continue reading >>

Invokana Side Effects

Invokana Side Effects

Invokana belongs to a class of drugs known as sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 (SGLT2) inhibitors. These drugs lower blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetes patients, but they may also cause serious side effects like diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), limb amputations, and kidney problems. Some patients have filed lawsuits against Johnson & Johnson and other drug companies, claiming that drug makers did not sufficiently warn about these side effects. If you or a loved one suffered DKA or kidney problems after taking Invokana or another SGLT2 inhibitor, you may be eligible for a lawsuit. Contact us for a free legal consultation. Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA) Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a severe diabetes complication that occurs when the body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. Ketones are produced when cells don’t receive the energy they need from glucose and begin to break down fat for energy. Ketone accumulation acidifies the blood and can poison the body. DKA may send the patient into a diabetic coma and can even be fatal. In May 2015, the FDA warned that Invokana and other SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to DKA. In May 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned that Invokana and other SGLT2 inhibitors may lead to DKA. The FDA based the warning on 20 cases of DKA reported to the agency over a one-year period. This is an unusually high number of cases considering that DKA most commonly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes. All of the patients required hospitalization and/or a visit to an emergency room. In December 2015, the FDA declared that SGLT2 inhibitors would now be required to carry warnings about the risk of excessive blood acids. The FDA added that the drugs must also warn against serious urinary tract infections. Symptoms of DKA include: N Continue reading >>

Canagliflozin-induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Canagliflozin-induced Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Case Report A 62-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and depression presented with 4 days of nausea, vomiting, and generalized weakness. Her symptoms became progressively worse such that by the day of admission she had decreased appetite, polydipsia, polyuria, and could not walk. The patient denied fever, chills, abdominal pain, diarrhea, or sick contacts. Home medications were atorvastatin, metformin, sucralfate, pioglitazone, canagliflozin, exenatide, omeprazole, fluoxetine, ranitidine, lisinopril, and alprazolam. On physical examination, the patient’s vital signs included a temperature of 38.3°C, blood pressure 134/61, heart rate 107, respiratory rate 24, and oxygen saturation of 100% on 2 liters nasal cannula oxygen. The patient appeared ill and distressed. She had dry mucous membranes, clear lung sounds bilaterally, and her heart was regular without murmurs, gallops, or rubs. Her abdomen was soft and nontender with present bowel sounds. Extremities showed no edema, and she had no focal neurological findings. Laboratory revealed a metabolic acidosis with a pH of 7.08 and anion gap >17. Chemistry panel indicated sodium 134 mEq/L, potassium 5.2 mEq/L, chloride 112 mEq/L, CO2 <5 mEq/L, blood urea nitrogen 22 mg/dL, and creatinine 1.3 mg/dL. Blood glucose was 213 mg/dL, and urinalysis revealed glucose 2+ and ketones 3+. Serum ketones were present at 1:8 dilution, with a lactic acid of 0.8 mmol/L. The patient’s hemoglobin A1C (HbA1c) was 11.1. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for severe metabolic acidosis secondary to DKA. Aggressive fluid resuscitation was undertaken and an insulin drip initiated. Within 6 hours, the anion gap metabolic acidosis improved. On further review of her med Continue reading >>

Can Invokana Trigger Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Can Invokana Trigger Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Invokana Research has shown that taking the diabetes drug Invokana (canagliflozin) can trigger diabetic ketoacidosis, a potentially fatal condition. Invokana is used to treat Type 2 diabetes. There are more than 450,000 Invokana prescriptions filled every three months in the United States. The drug is made and marketed by Janssen, a partner of Johnson & Johnson. It was the first drug of its kind to treat Type 2 diabetes and drug makers were hopeful it would help patients who did not respond to other diabetes drugs. Sadly, it has been linked to many medical risks, including potentially deadly diabetic ketoacidosis. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a disease that affects the body’s ability to process insulin. The disease affects about nine million Americans. Over time, it can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease, blindness, kidney disease, damage to the feet and hands, and other health problems. In order for the body to manage sugar and turn it into energy, insulin must help cells absorb it. When this does not happen because of problems with insulin, sugar remains in the blood system, causing blood glucose levels to raise to unhealthy levels. This is why diabetics must pay attention to their blood sugar. About Invokana Invokana is part of a group of drugs known as SGLT2 anti-diabetics. It works by preventing glucose from being reabsorbed by the kidneys. It also allows excess sugar to be let out in urine. Studies have shown Invokana users excrete up to 450 calories of extra sugar in urine. Despite Invokana working for some users, it comes with a variety of side effects. Most are mild and might be a problem with all diabetes medications, including: Yeast infection Urinary tract infection Nausea Fatigue Photosensitivity Increased LDL (bad) cholesterol One of the bi Continue reading >>

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