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How Does Infection Precipitate Dka?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Print Overview Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious complication of diabetes that occurs when your body produces high levels of blood acids called ketones. The condition develops when your body can't produce enough insulin. Insulin normally plays a key role in helping sugar (glucose) — a major source of energy for your muscles and other tissues — enter your cells. Without enough insulin, your body begins to break down fat as fuel. This process produces a buildup of acids in the bloodstream called ketones, eventually leading to diabetic ketoacidosis if untreated. If you have diabetes or you're at risk of diabetes, learn the warning signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — and know when to seek emergency care. Symptoms Diabetic ketoacidosis signs and symptoms often develop quickly, sometimes within 24 hours. For some, these signs and symptoms may be the first indication of having diabetes. You may notice: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Nausea and vomiting Abdominal pain Weakness or fatigue Shortness of breath Fruity-scented breath Confusion More-specific signs of diabetic ketoacidosis — which can be detected through home blood and urine testing kits — include: High blood sugar level (hyperglycemia) High ketone levels in your urine When to see a doctor If you feel ill or stressed or you've had a recent illness or injury, check your blood sugar level often. You might also try an over-the-counter urine ketones testing kit. Contact your doctor immediately if: You're vomiting and unable to tolerate food or liquid Your blood sugar level is higher than your target range and doesn't respond to home treatment Your urine ketone level is moderate or high Seek emergency care if: Your blood sugar level is consistently higher than 300 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 16.7 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Precipitating Factors, Outcomes, And Recurrence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis At A University Hospital In Damascus

Precipitating Factors, Outcomes, And Recurrence Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis At A University Hospital In Damascus

Precipitating factors, outcomes, and recurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis at a university hospital in Damascus 1Department of Internal Medicine, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria 2Faculty of Medicine, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria 1Department of Internal Medicine, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria 2Faculty of Medicine, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria Address for correspondence: Dr. Zaynab Alourfi, Department of Internal Medicine, Damascus University, Damascus, Syria. E-mail: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : Avicenna Journal of Medicine This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. To study precipitating factors, outcomes, and recurrence of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) at a University hospital at Damascus, the capital of Syria. Medical records between 2006 and 2012 were reviewed. One hundred and fifteen admissions for 100 patients with DKA were included. All fulfilled the American Diabetic Association DKA diagnostic criteria. Of 115 admissions of DKA, there were 92 single admission and 23 recurrent admissions (eight patients). The order of precipitating factors of recurrent DKA or single admissions were the same with different percentage. The first and second factors were infection (74% and 48%) and treatment problems (17% and 24%), respectively. Complications rate was significantly higher in the intensive care unit (41.6%), compared to the ward admissions (14.2%). Overall in-hospital mortality rate was 11.3%. The severity of m Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Tweet Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication faced by people with diabetes which happens when the body starts running out of insulin. DKA is most commonly associated with type 1 diabetes, however, people with type 2 diabetes that produce very little of their own insulin may also be affected. Ketoacidosis is a serious short term complication which can result in coma or even death if it is not treated quickly. Read about Diabetes and Ketones What is diabetic ketoacidosis? DKA occurs when the body has insufficient insulin to allow enough glucose to enter cells, and so the body switches to burning fatty acids and producing acidic ketone bodies. A high level of ketone bodies in the blood can cause particularly severe illness. Symptoms of DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis may itself be the symptom of undiagnosed type 1 diabetes. Typical symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis include: Vomiting Dehydration An unusual smell on the breath –sometimes compared to the smell of pear drops Deep laboured breathing (called kussmaul breathing) or hyperventilation Rapid heartbeat Confusion and disorientation Symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis usually evolve over a 24 hour period if blood glucose levels become and remain too high (hyperglycemia). Causes and risk factors for diabetic ketoacidosis As noted above, DKA is caused by the body having too little insulin to allow cells to take in glucose for energy. This may happen for a number of reasons including: Having blood glucose levels consistently over 15 mmol/l Missing insulin injections If a fault has developed in your insulin pen or insulin pump As a result of illness or infections High or prolonged levels of stress Excessive alcohol consumption DKA may also occur prior to a diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Ketoacidosis can occasional Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

Diabetic Ketoacidosis - Symptoms

A A A Diabetic Ketoacidosis Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry, which resolve with proper therapy. Diabetic ketoacidosis usually occurs in people with type 1 (juvenile) diabetes mellitus (T1DM), but diabetic ketoacidosis can develop in any person with diabetes. Since type 1 diabetes typically starts before age 25 years, diabetic ketoacidosis is most common in this age group, but it may occur at any age. Males and females are equally affected. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. The most common Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Epidemiology Of Infection As A Precipitating Factor For Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Tanta University Hospital Hamed Zs, Gawaly Am, Abbas Km, El Ahwal Lm - Tanta Med J

Epidemiology Of Infection As A Precipitating Factor For Diabetic Ketoacidosis At Tanta University Hospital Hamed Zs, Gawaly Am, Abbas Km, El Ahwal Lm - Tanta Med J

Infection is the main precipitating factor of DKA in patients of Tanta University Hospital. Keywords:diabetes mellitus, diabetic ketoacidosis, infection Hamed ZS, Gawaly AM, Abbas KM, El Ahwal LM. Epidemiology of infection as a precipitating factor for diabetic ketoacidosis at Tanta University Hospital. Tanta Med J 2017;45:68-72 Hamed ZS, Gawaly AM, Abbas KM, El Ahwal LM. Epidemiology of infection as a precipitating factor for diabetic ketoacidosis at Tanta University Hospital. Tanta Med J [serial online] 2017 [cited2018 Mar 28];45:68-72. Available from: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a metabolic derangement with three main presentations, hyperglycemia, ketosis, and acidosis, which occurs in the presence of low effective insulin. It is one of the common emergencies in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) [1] . DKA affects more than 8 per 1000 diabetics annually. It is associated with significant morbidity and mortality, with a worldwide mortality rate of 210% [1] . DKA frequently occurs in type 1 diabetes as this type of diabetes is presented with an absolute lack of insulin production by the Islets of Langerhans More Details . In type 2 diabetes, the production of insulin is insufficient to meet the bodys requirements due to insulin resistance leading to activation of lipid metabolism with production of acidic ketone bodies that cause most of the symptoms and complications [2] . Many cases of DKA are triggered by insulin cessation due to social, psychological, and economic reasons especially in developing countries. Infection, new onset of diabetes, and other comorbid states such as stroke, acute pancreatitis, and chronic renal failure are implicated in the development of DKA [3] . Appropriate management of the precipitating factors of DKA decreases the mortality rate Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a dangerous complication of diabetes mellitus brought about by a lack of insulin in the body causing an inadequate uptake of glucose from the blood. It is characterized by a severe rise in blood sugar or hyperglycemia along with dehydration that may lead to shock and even loss of consciousness. Insulin is an important hormone that helps the body uptake and utilize glucose present in blood, therefore reducing the blood sugar level. If there is a lack of insulin, the blood sugar is not used and instead body fats are broken down to provide an alternative energy source. This breakdown of fat however, causes the release of acidic by-products called ketones that build up in the blood and urine. High glucose levels cause increased amounts of glucose to move into the urine, a process termed osmotic diuresis. During osmotic diuresis, water and solutes such as potassium and sodium also move into the urine. This leads to frequent excretion of large volumes of urine or polyuria, dehydration and compensatory thirst or polydypsia. Who is affected? DKA is more common among people with type 1 diabetes or those with type 2 diabetes who take insulin to regulate their blood sugar levels. Nearly a quarter of all type 1 diabetics are admitted to hospital with DKA at some point in their lives. Young children with type 1 diabetes are at particular risk of developing the condition. Causes Common causes or triggers of DKA typically include situations that raise the body's requirement for insulin. Examples include: Acute infection During infection, the body has an increased need for glucose that may not be met by an adequate amount of insulin for stimulating the uptake of glucose from the blood. Examples of infections that can cause this problem include the flu, ur Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Risk Factors And Management Strategies.

Diabetic Ketoacidosis: Risk Factors And Management Strategies.

Abstract Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the most common hyperglycemic emergency in patients with diabetes mellitus. DKA most often occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but patients with type 2 diabetes are susceptible to DKA under stressful conditions, such as trauma, surgery, or infections. DKA is reported to be responsible for more than 100 000 hospital admissions per year in the US, and accounts for 4-9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes. Treatment of patients with DKA uses significant healthcare resources and accounts for 1 out of every 4 healthcare dollars spent on direct medical care for adult patients with type 1 diabetes in the US. Recent studies using standardized written guidelines for therapy have demonstrated a mortality rate of less than 5%, with higher mortality rates observed in elderly patients and those with concomitant life-threatening illnesses. Worldwide, infection is the most common precipitating cause for DKA, occurring in 30-50% of cases. Urinary tract infection and pneumonia account for the majority of infections. Other precipitating causes are intercurrent illnesses (i.e., surgery, trauma, myocardial ischemia, pancreatitis), psychological stress, and non-compliance with insulin therapy. The triad of uncontrolled hyperglycemia, metabolic acidosis and increased total body ketone concentration characterizes DKA. These metabolic derangements result from the combination of absolute or relative insulin deficiency and increased levels of counter-regulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). Successful treatment of DKA requires frequent monitoring of patients, correction of hypovolemia and hyperglycemia, replacement of electrolyte losses, and careful search for the precipitating cause. S Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka) - Topic Overview

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition that develops when cells in the body are unable to get the sugar (glucose) they need for energy because there is not enough insulin. When the sugar cannot get into the cells, it stays in the blood. The kidneys filter some of the sugar from the blood and remove it from the body through urine. Because the cells cannot receive sugar for energy, the body begins to break down fat and muscle for energy. When this happens, ketones, or fatty acids, are produced and enter the bloodstream, causing the chemical imbalance (metabolic acidosis) called diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be caused by not getting enough insulin, having a severe infection or other illness, becoming severely dehydrated, or some combination of these things. It can occur in people who have little or no insulin in their bodies (mostly people with type 1 diabetes but it can happen with type 2 diabetes, especially children) when their blood sugar levels are high. Your blood sugar may be quite high before you notice symptoms, which include: Flushed, hot, dry skin. Feeling thirsty and urinating a lot. Drowsiness or difficulty waking up. Young children may lack interest in their normal activities. Rapid, deep breathing. A strong, fruity breath odor. Loss of appetite, belly pain, and vomiting. Confusion. Laboratory tests, including blood and urine tests, are used to confirm a diagnosis of diabetic ketoacidosis. Tests for ketones are available for home use. Keep some test strips nearby in case your blood sugar level becomes high. When ketoacidosis is severe, it must be treated in the hospital, often in an intensive care unit. Treatment involves giving insulin and fluids through your vein and closely watching certain chemicals in your blood (electrolyt Continue reading >>

Infections In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Pathogenesis

Infections In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus: A Review Of Pathogenesis

Go to: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a clinical syndrome associated with deficiency of insulin secretion or action. It is considered one of the largest emerging threats to health in the 21st century. It is estimated that there will be 380 million persons with DM in 2025.[1] Besides the classical complications of the disease, DM has been associated with reduced response of T cells, neutrophil function, and disorders of humoral immunity.[2–4] Consequently, DM increases the susceptibility to infections, both the most common ones as well as those that almost always affect only people with DM (e.g. rhinocerebral mucormycosis).[4] Such infections, in addition to the repercussions associated with its infectivity, may trigger DM complications such as hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. This article aims to critically review the current knowledge on the mechanisms associated with the greater susceptibility of DM for developing infectious diseases and to describe the main infectious diseases associated with this metabolic disorder. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Learning Objectives 1.Diagnosis of DKA 2.Precipitants of DKA 3.Managment of DKA 4. LADA- late onset autoimm. diabetes of adulthood DKA is most common in DM1 but can occur in DM2 when under significant stress. Normally, insulin allows tissue (mostly muscle) to take up glucose and suppresses lipolysis and proteolysis (anabolic state) When under stress and with insulin deficiency, the body produces glucagon-> glycogenolysis-> hi blood glucose and increases lipolysis-> FFA like beta hydroxybutyrate and acetoactone which cause acidosis(catabolic state) Lab abnormalities: hi bg (blood glucose), agap acidosis, ketonemia, ketonuria "serum ketone" tests measure acetoacetone, which is just one of the 2 major ketones serum b- hydroxybutyrate is a more accurate test of ketonemia but less readily available ketonuria can have false positive with some drugs ie) captopril K+ may be high in serum due to acidemia causing extracellular shifts, but pt have overall low K+ BUN and creatinine may reflect dehydration as glucosuria causes osmotic diuresis PE: fruity breath (acetone), kussmaul's respirations (deep labored), tachycardia, hypotension Triggers: Infection ie) influenza, pneumonia, gastroenterits Significant stressors: ACS, CVA, drugs (cocaine, meth) Noncompliance: insulin pump dysfunction, insulin noncompliance Will Daines gave us a nice tool: "6 i's"causing dka infection, ischemia, insulin deficiency, intra-abd processes (compromising pancreatic function), iatrogenic (ie) steroids), and ingestions (meth, cocaine) Management of DKA 1.Confirm diagnosis (plasma glucose, positive serum ketones, metabolic acidosis). 2.Admit to hospital; ICU may be necessary for frequent monitoring or if pH < 7.00 or AMS 3.Assess: Serum electrolytes (K+, Na+, Mg2+, Cl-, bicarbonate, phosphate) Acid-base Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Two Life Threatening Infections: Mucormycosis, And Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonepritis, Preciptating Erythema Nodosum Leprosum As The Initial Presentation Of Diabetes

Diabetic Ketoacidosis With Two Life Threatening Infections: Mucormycosis, And Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonepritis, Preciptating Erythema Nodosum Leprosum As The Initial Presentation Of Diabetes

Ahmed Daoud1*, Amira Elbendary2,3, Mohanad Elfishawi1, Mahmoud Rabea1, Mostafa Alfishawy1,4, Sholkamy Amany MD and Wasfy Ayda MD 1Internal Medicine department – Kasr Alainy Hospital, Cairo University, Egypt 2Dermatology Department, Kasr Alainy Hospital, Cairo University, Egypt 3Ackerman Academy of Dermatopathology, New York, New York, USA 4Ichan School of Medicine, Mount Sinai/ Queens General Hospital, New York, USA Corresponding Author : Ahmed Daoud, MD 2250 Holly Hall street Apartment 126, Houston , Tx 77054 Tel: 8239297124 E-mail: [email protected] Received June 19, 2014; Accepted September 16, 2014; Published September 24, 2014 Citation: Daoud A, Elbendary A, Elfishawi M, Rabea M, Alfishawy M, et al. (2014) Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Two Life Threatening Infections: Mucormycosis, and Bilateral Emphysematous Pyelonepritis, Preciptating Erythema Nodosum Leprosum as the Initial Presentation of Diabetes. J Diabetes Metab 5:433 doi:10.4172/2155-6156.1000433 Copyright: © 2014 Daoud A, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Visit for more related articles at Journal of Diabetes & Metabolism Abstract Emphysematous pyelonephritis is an acute necrotizing renal and perirenal infection, caused by gas forming organism. Mucormycosis is an opportunistic aggressive fungal infection causing tissue thrombosis and necrosis. Erythema nodosum leprosum reaction is an inflammatory reaction occurring in borderline and lepromatous leprosy before, during or after multidrug treatment, where immune complexes deposit in various organs resulting in considerable damage to the organs that Continue reading >>

Original Article Clinical Outcomes Of Septic Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis Between 2004 And 2013 In A Tertiary Hospital In Taiwan

Original Article Clinical Outcomes Of Septic Patients With Diabetic Ketoacidosis Between 2004 And 2013 In A Tertiary Hospital In Taiwan

Infection is the most common predisposing factor for diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA); however, studies are rare that have investigated the clinical outcomes of septic patients with infection-precipitated DKA. A retrospective cohort study was conducted at a tertiary hospital from 2004 to 2013. Patients with DKA in whom the presence of a predisposing infection was confirmed were enrolled. Characteristics at initial presentation, primary infection sources, and causative microorganisms were compared between the nonacute kidney injury (non-AKI) group and acute kidney injury (AKI) group at each stage. Risk factors for the development of failure-stage AKI and its outcomes were also analyzed. One hundred and sixty DKA episodes were assessed. The most common infection sites were the urinary and respiratory tracts. The leading causative microorganism was Escherichia coli, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae. A complicated/severe infection state [odds ratio (OR), 15.27; p < 0.001] and a high level of C-reactive protein (OR, 1.012; p < 0.001) were independently associated with bacteremia. Corrected sodium (Na; OR, 1.062; p = 0.039), initial plasma glucose (OR, 1.003; p = 0.041), severe grade of DKA (OR, 13.41; p = 0.045), and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score (OR, 1.08; p = 0.033) were identified as independent risk factors for the development of failure-stage AKI among septic patients with infection-precipitated DKA. Patients with failure-stage AKI had a higher frequency of incomplete recovery of renal function (20.4% of patients in failure vs. 5.9% of patients in risk and injury, p = 0.009). Bacteremia independently predicted the absence of complete recovery of renal function (OR, 5.86; p = 0.038). For patients with infection-precipitated DKA, the cli Continue reading >>

Infection As A Trigger Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Intensive Care—unit Patients

Infection As A Trigger Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis In Intensive Care—unit Patients

Together with hyperglycemic coma, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is the most severe acute metabolic complication of diabetes mellitus [ 1 ]. Defined by the triad hyperglycemia, acidosis, and ketonuria, DKA can be inaugural or complicate known diabetes [ 2 ]. Although DKA is evidence of poor metabolic control and usually indicates an absolute or relative imbalance between the patient's requirements and the treatment, DKA-related mortality is low among patients who receive standardized treatment, which includes administration of insulin, correction of hydroelectrolytic disorders, and management of the triggering factor (which is often cessation of insulin therapy, an infection, or a myocardial infarction) [ 3–8 ]. Although there is no proof that diabetics are more susceptible to infection, they seem to have more difficulty handling infection once it occurs [ 9 , 10 ]. Indeed, several aspects of immunity are altered in diabetic patients: polymorphonuclear leukocyte function is depressed, particularly when acidosis is present, and leukocyte adherence, chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and bactericidal activity may also be impaired [ 11–15 ]. Joshi et al. [ 10 ] reported recently on the lack of clinical evidence that diabetics are more susceptible to infection than nondiabetic patients. Nevertheless, infection is a well-recognized trigger of DKA. Earlier studies have investigated the prevalence of infection as a trigger of DKA and the impact of antimicrobial treatment [ 2 , 15–18 ]. However, none of these studies were of intensive care unit (ICU) patients only. Furthermore, most were descriptive, included small numbers of patients, used univariate analysis only, and did not designate infection as the sole outcome variable of interest. Efforts to identify correlates of infection h Continue reading >>

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