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How Does Infection Lead To Ketoacidosis?

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Heart & Vascular Institute

Definition | Causes | Risk Factors | Symptoms | Diagnosis | Treatment | Prevention Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs when a person’s blood glucose is too high because there is not enough insulin. Instead, the body starts to burn fat for energy. Fat is broken down into acids, causing acid levels to build up in the blood. These acids appear in urine and blood as ketones. DKA is a serious condition that can lead to coma or death if it is not promptly treated. Factors that may increase your risk of DKA: Not taking insulin as prescribed or not taking insulin at all Developing type 1 diabetes for the first time Gastroenteritis with persistent vomiting Pregnancy Surgery Some medications, such as steroids or antipsychotic drugs Blood clot to the lungs Significant illness or trauma Symptoms DKA may cause: High blood glucose levels (greater than 250 mg per dL) Dry mouth and skin Thirst Frequent urination Symptoms that require emergency care include: Severe stomach pain Rapid or difficult breathing Drowsiness Vomiting and nausea Fruity breath odor Rapid pulse Headache Diagnosis You will be asked about your symptoms and medical history. A physical exam will be done. Blood and urine tests wi Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. sstcyr

    How long does it take to get the body to enter ketosis? I read all about how to tell when it is but I'm just wondering if there's a general amt of time that it takes.
    And How do you know its working and not just making you gain weight from all the fat? I mean, I understand how ketosis works I'm just worried because a lot of people say you have to eat at a calorie deficit but before I started this I already ate at a calorie deficit and didn't lose weight, so I was kinda worried that it would just make me gain...

  2. waspsmacker

    It's literally impossible to eat at a deficit and not lose weight.
    Make sure you're tracking everything. Just because no one sees you eat it doesn't mean it doesn't count.

  3. [deleted]

    24-48 hours.
    If you eat at a maintenance or deficit you won't gain weight. So make sure to track your food. If you think you ate at a deficit and didn't lose you probably were not. Also weight loss is slow. Be patient.

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JARDIANCE is a prescription medicine used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes, and also to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known cardiovascular disease. JARDIANCE is not for people with type 1 diabetes or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). Important Safety Information What is the most important information I should know about JARDIANCE? JARDIANCE can cause serious side effects, including: Dehydration. JARDIANCE can cause some people to have dehydration (the loss of body water and salt). Dehydration may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, light-headed, or weak, especially when you stand up. You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you: have low blood pressure, take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics), are on a low salt diet, have kidney problems, are 65 years of age or older. Ketoacidosis (increased ketones in your blood or urine). Ketoacidosis is a serious condition and may need to be treated in the hospital. Ketoacidosis may lead to death. Ketoacidosis occurs in people with type 1 diabetes and can also occ Continue reading >>

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  1. megan

    I recently got the flu and was feeling awful with a temperature and all the fun that comes with it!. I knew I had to keep eating and taking in fluids though. I could barely get out of bed but I did what I had to. On the 3rd day in the night I checked and found I had high levels of ketones in my urine but in my blood it was 0.9. I checked again a little while later and it was 1.1 in my blood. Then 1.4. My sugars weren't too bad. As the ketones were rising and it was getting later I was worried at what point I would need help. The rule of thumb being getting advice at 1.5 and above and if higher and vomiting then going to A & E.
    I rang 111 as I didn't have anywhere else I could ring at that time. Then a paramedic phoned back to chat. She felt a dr was needed. A dr came round and said Id done the right thing. He found I had a UTI so prescribed antibiotics straight away.
    I was in a state but he said the ketones didn't concern him at this point particularly as they'd come down a bit since he arrived. Down to 1.1.
    He was very kind.
    I have since been in touch with my diabetic nurse during work hours and we have an appointment soon. She told me to check my pump Manual for sick days. I did and can't find any mention of ketones with normal blood sugars.
    She told me the treatment is the same. Go to hospital, get put on a glucose drip and double the insulin.
    We are 3 weeks on and I still have the tail end if this horrible flu virus thing. I live with ME and fibromyalgia too.
    I would rather avoid hospital at all costs. Last time I went in years ago for unrelated reasons I had to get my own blankets and meds back to deal with myself. I prefer to feel in some semblance of control in my own home than relying on others.
    What I'd like to know is others experiences and knowledge. Thanks

  2. ME_Valentijn

    megan said: ↑
    My sugars weren't too bad. What's not too bad? Hyperglycemia can result in excess ketone production starting at 13.3.
    There can be a fairly big delay between hyperglycemia and urine ketones ... maybe there's a similar delay with blood ketones? I had an 18.5 spike during the afternoon while at the GP's office with only "small" amounts of ketones in my urine, but measured "large" amounts of ketones in the evening when my blood sugar was already down to 10-11.
    Maybe you missed a spike in your blood sugar, but caught the after-effects in your ketones?
    megan said: ↑
    We are 3 weeks on and I still have the tail end if this horrible flu virus thing. I live with ME and fibromyalgia too.
    I would rather avoid hospital at all costs. Last time I went in years ago for unrelated reasons I had to get my own blankets and meds back to deal with myself. I prefer to feel in some semblance of control in my own home than relying on others. I have ME/CFS too, and totally understand where you're coming from. I stayed home with a likely case of lactic acidosis induced by metformin, because I felt way too sick to deal with calling anyone or going anywhere, much less a hospital. Probably wasn't thinking too clearly either, due to the severe acid-frying-my-brain headache that came with it
    But the noise, the lights, the food, uncomfortable beds ... it would be torture.

  3. megan

    My bloods were between 5 and 11... got to 13 at one point but I also didn't want to go hypo when I was sick at one point. I got very shaky and weak and hot.... I always got told that blood ketone testing was what was going on currently so more correct where as urine test was hours behind .
    There doesn't seem to be much information about this

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Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening problem that affects people with diabetes. It occurs when the body cannot use sugar (glucose) as a fuel source because there is no insulin or not enough insulin. Fat is used for fuel instead. When fat is broken down to fuel the body, chemicals called ketones build up in the body. As fat is broken down, acids called ketones build up in the blood and urine. In high levels, ketones are poisonous. This condition is known as ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is sometimes the first sign of type 1 diabetes in people who have not yet been diagnosed. It can also occur in someone who has already been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Infection, injury, a serious illness, missing doses of insulin shots, or surgery can lead to DKA in people with type 1 diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes can also develop DKA, but it is less common. It is usually triggered by uncontrolled blood sugar, missing doses of medicines, or a severe illness. Common symptoms can include: Ketone testing may be used in type 1 diabetes to screen for early ketoacidosis. The ketones test is usually done using a urine sample or a blood sample. Ketone testing is usually done w Continue reading >>

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  1. LisaJA

    I'm 5 weeks in and for the past 2 weeks I've had truly repellent, revolting bad breath . My friends and family have rated it about a 7 or 8/10 . My teenager has to open the car windows , it's that bad ! It's ruining my social life - I wouldn't go to a party last weekend for fear of breathing on people :-( I've read up on it as much as I can find and checked - no, it's not down not drinking enough water. No, it's not down to eating too much protein. No, it's not down to oral health care - I brush, I floss, I mouthwash and tongue scrape .( And my mouth is actually loads fresher since removing sugar from my diet .) I read a reply somewhere to a similar question and the person enquired whether the post writer was in weeks 3-6 ..... so this leads me to ask, has anyone else had the bad breath ( possibly just between weeks 3-6 ) and then it gone away ? I really do want to stick to keto, I've lost over a stone already and have another 5 to go .... but this bad breath is a deal breaker ... Please tell me it gets better ........... please ....

  2. charlie_simms

    Strangely, I never got keto breath.

  3. pueve

    Me neither! At least I don't think that I've got kept breath! How do you know that you have it? What does it taste like?

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