diabetestalk.net

How Does Glucose Get Converted To Fat Inside Of A Cell

Share on facebook

In this video I discuss the what are carbohydrates and the types of carbohydrates. The pros and cons to each type, and the best carbs to eat. Transcript Types of carbs So, what are the different types of carbohydrates? The answer to this question depends on who you ask. Some common classifications would be healthy and unhealthy, good and bad, slow and fast. In this video I am going to classify them as simple, complex and fibrous. Before we get into those classifications, we need to look at molecules. I know, fun stuff, but it will help you understand better. A monosaccharide is a single molecule, such as fructose, which is found in fruit. A disaccharide consists of 2 monosaccharide molecules, such as sucrose or table sugar. And a polysaccharide consists of many monosaccharide molecules, such as in whole grain pasta. Now that we have that out of the way, lets look at simple carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates are made up of mono and disaccharides, 1 or 2 molecules. Some foods include, fruits, milk, and foods with high amounts of added sugars. Typically simple carbohydrates are easily absorbed into the bloodstream because of their simple molecular structure. However, when you obtain simple carbohydrates from whole foods, they are usually combined with vitamins, minerals and fiber, which slows down the digestive process. Now, lets look at complex carbohydrates. Complex carbohydrates are composed of polysaccharides, so, because of their more complex molecular structure, they can take longer for the body to break down and digest, like whole grains and vegetables. However, some complex carbohydrate foods have been processed, which strips them of some of their natural, high fiber content as well as vitamins and minerals, so they are digested faster and more easily. So, with both simple and complex carbohydrates I have mentioned fast and slow digestion. Why is that important? 3 reasons, #1 is it is going to make you feel fuller longer, rapid digestion means hunger returns quicker which leads to more consumption. #2, typically slower digested foods cause lower blood level spikes, and #3, slower, longer digestion means the body is using more energy over a longer period of time to break down the food, which is an increase or boost in metabolism. Next up is fiber. Fiber is parts of plants that cant be digested. I have a separate video that looks deeper into fiber that I will link in the little I in the upper right-hand corner of your screen. Bottom line. So, the question is what type of carbohydrates should you eat. That is actually very easy to answer. All 3 types. Don’t focus on the types, instead, focus on Carbohydrates that have been minimally processed, like whole grain pasta, and whole wheat bread, also Fruits and vegetables that contain fiber, vitamins and minerals. And of course anything from dairy queen. Ah, just joking with ya folks. Seriously though, minimize the consumption of the processed foods, if you can eliminated them great, if not, its about moderation. Its ok to eat the foods you love, you just have to do it in moderation. Other sources... http://www.builtlean.com/2012/05/17/c... http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/healt... http://www.livestrong.com/article/133...

What Happens To Unburned Carbohydrates?

Your body uses mostly carbohydrates as well as fats for energy. Because the body doesn’t store carbs efficiently, they’re used first. Carbohydrates turn into glucose, which your body burns immediately or converts to glycogen to be stored in the muscles and liver for between meals. If you eat more calories from carbs or other sources than your body can use, the cells store the excess as fat. Of the three major nutrients -- carbohydrates, fat and protein -- the body burns carbs first for energy because they can’t be stored in great quantities. The carbohydrates in food get broken down into glucose, which moves into the small intestine, then the liver and into the blood. As blood sugar rises, the pancreas produces insulin, which signals the cells to take up sugar. Whatever glucose the cells don’t need immediately for energy is stored in the liver and muscles as glycogen. When the blood sugar levels fall -- such as between meals -- the liver releases glycogen. This cycle keeps your body supplied with a steady source of fuel. Insulin Resistance If you have insulin resistance or diabetes, the sugar-insulin cycle doesn’t work properly, leading to too much sugar and insulin circu Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. user2967

    I just learned that ATP can not be stored in excess and is only made by the body when it is needed. What makes ATP, like glucose and fat is what is stored under the skin or wherever. Now why cant the body just produce ATP and store it for heavy, heavy exercise when it would advantageous for it to be ready rather than it going through the production phase and then used. When I say ATP storage I mean in large amounts.

  2. Mad Scientist

    Let's compare ATP, glucose and fatty acids in terms of energy storage.
    ATP has a molecular weight of 507 Da
    Glucose has a molecular weight of 180 Da, and contains the same amount of energy as 31 ATP molecules
    Fatty acids vary in size, but a gram of fat contains about twice as much energy as a gram of glucose (or glycogen)
    The difference in energy density is huge, you would need enormous amounts of ATP to replace glucose/glycogen as energy storage mechanism, not to speak of fat. You can't put an arbitrary amount of ATP molecules into a cell, you 'll get into problems due to the osmotic pressure lots of molecules inside the cell would cause. Glucose is stored as glycogen in cells due to this effect, which makes one large glycogen molecule out of lots of glucose molecules.
    The energy density difference is even larger if you take into account that ATP and glucose bind water, while fat is stored without surrounding water. The actual difference in energy density of glycogen and fat is around 6 times.
    ATP is also not as stable as fat, it can get hydrolized in water. This would be a problem for long-term storage of energy.
    You'll find some more details in Albert's "Molecular Biology of the Cell"

  3. shigeta

    I think @AlanBoyd and @MadScientist have touched on the answer, fat is better suited by density for storing energy than ATP; ATP is optimal for quick conversion to bioenergy. Look at the question in another way: ATP in bioenergy cycle is dynamic - its an energy flux from food and breath to bioenergy.
    Biological energy is used at essentially the same rate at which we take it in. The vast majority is used as soon as its available. If we were to try to store enough ATP for say an hour the costs would be large.
    This back of the envelope calculation (see section 3.8) shows that 1 day of ATP is 64.5kg for a 2800 kcal a day energy intake. Approximately equal to body weight.
    Of course ATP is stored in excess - just a few seconds worth though, 8 if you believe competitive cyclists. ATP is a pretty small quantum of energy... Even an hour storage would add 12 pounds to an adult body weight. That's a lot. And what advantage would this give us? We might be able to engage in high energy activities (which use ATP faster than we can make it) for longer. But up to now it looks as if improvements in efficiency in generating ATP have been adequate for animals to stay competitive.
    Look at how evolution has dealt with the other component of bioenergy: oxygen. We can't hold our breath for more than a few minutes. 22 minutes is the current human record; impressive but still not that long. Oxygen is in plentiful supply brought in from outside and the adaptive costs to storing oxygen internally would simply not justify building up such a capacity for most of us. It seems even that aquatic mammals only hold their breath for a similar amount of time as we can if we practice. 20 minutes for Orcas. Penguins too. This isn't meant to be a survey of all animals ability to store oxygen, the point being that storage of oxygen has an adaptive cost that is not trivial.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Buy Genuine Supplements from MyProtein : http://tidd.ly/6b7efb22 MyProtein is the best website to buy the most Authentic and most Affordable Supplements. Do you think that sugar makes you Fat? If you do then this Video will change your opinion. In this video I explain how to burn stored fat and what exactly is insulin spike and how can you use the insulin hormone to build more muscle and lose fat. Insulin is the most anabolic hormone ever. For Online Training Mail at - [email protected] TOP 6 Bodybuilding Books YOU MUST READ : 1. Strength Training Anatomy : http://amzn.to/2zxKkOE 2. Anatomy and Bodybuilding : http://amzn.to/2h67Xmh 3. ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER Modern ENCYCLOPEDIA OF BODYBUILDING : http://amzn.to/2y5fSqR 4. Jim Stoppanis Encyclopedia of Muscle and Strength : http://amzn.to/2ziWhHE 5. Burn the Fat Feed the Muscle : http://amzn.to/2iy2mp3 6. Max Muscle Min fat : http://amzn.to/2lV42hv Best Supplements for Bodybuilding 1. Whey Protein : http://amzn.to/2zTsVfr 2. Fish Oil (Omega 3) : http://amzn.to/2yYY7NH 3. Creatine : http://amzn.to/2z05p11 4. BCAAs : http://amzn.to/2xDQRCM 5. Protein Bars : http://amzn.to/2hqeusD 6. Multivitamin : http://amzn.to/2iiderg Resistance Bands for Home Workouts : http://amzn.to/2wyi9ZX Camera Used (Panasonic Lumix GH 4) : http://amzn.to/2wlYukL Mic used (Rode Video MicGo ) : http://amzn.to/2z5UXal Lapel Mic used (Rode Lavalier Mic): http://amzn.to/2z5xGW6 - Research on Insulin and Muscle Building : https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2... - Easiest and Affordable Diet for Students both in College and Hostel - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJxm-... By Abhinav Mahajan For Online Personal Training: [email protected] Interact with me on: Facebook: facebook.com/abhinavmahajanfitness Instagram: AbhinavFitness Snapchat: mahajan_abhinav Website: www.StrengthUpgrade.com Abhinav Mahajan is an ISSA Personal Trainer and Sports Nutritionist. Along with having more than 8 years of Experience in Fitness and Bodybuilding he also happens to have worked and traveled Internationally as a Fashion Model for over 3 years. After delving into the world of Personal Development and Motivational Speaking, he has dedicated his life to help the Youth to reach their Highest Potential by achieving not only good aesthetics but also a fully functional body, a Healthy Mind, better Grooming Skills and address to some of the most common problems faced by the Youth.

How Sugar Makes You Fat

Look at how many grams of sugar are in what you’re eating (on the nutritional label). Now divide that number by 4. That’s how many teaspoons of pure sugar you’re consuming. Kinda scary, huh? Sugar makes you fat and fatfree food isn’t really free of fat. I’ve said it before in multiple articles, but occasionally, I’ve had someone lean over my desk and say “How in the heck does sugar make you fat if there’s no fat in it?”. This article will answer that puzzler, and provide you with some helpful suggestions to achieve not only weight loss success, but improved body health. First, let’s make some qualifications. Sugar isn’t inherently evil. Your body uses sugar to survive, and burns sugar to provide you with the energy necessary for life. Many truly healthy foods are actually broken down to sugar in the body – through the conversion of long and complex sugars called polysaccharides into short and simple sugars called monosaccharides, such as glucose. In additions to the breakdown products of fat and protein, glucose is a great energy source for your body. However, there are two ways that sugar can sabotage your body and cause fat storage. Excess glucose is the f Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. user2967

    I just learned that ATP can not be stored in excess and is only made by the body when it is needed. What makes ATP, like glucose and fat is what is stored under the skin or wherever. Now why cant the body just produce ATP and store it for heavy, heavy exercise when it would advantageous for it to be ready rather than it going through the production phase and then used. When I say ATP storage I mean in large amounts.

  2. Mad Scientist

    Let's compare ATP, glucose and fatty acids in terms of energy storage.
    ATP has a molecular weight of 507 Da
    Glucose has a molecular weight of 180 Da, and contains the same amount of energy as 31 ATP molecules
    Fatty acids vary in size, but a gram of fat contains about twice as much energy as a gram of glucose (or glycogen)
    The difference in energy density is huge, you would need enormous amounts of ATP to replace glucose/glycogen as energy storage mechanism, not to speak of fat. You can't put an arbitrary amount of ATP molecules into a cell, you 'll get into problems due to the osmotic pressure lots of molecules inside the cell would cause. Glucose is stored as glycogen in cells due to this effect, which makes one large glycogen molecule out of lots of glucose molecules.
    The energy density difference is even larger if you take into account that ATP and glucose bind water, while fat is stored without surrounding water. The actual difference in energy density of glycogen and fat is around 6 times.
    ATP is also not as stable as fat, it can get hydrolized in water. This would be a problem for long-term storage of energy.
    You'll find some more details in Albert's "Molecular Biology of the Cell"

  3. shigeta

    I think @AlanBoyd and @MadScientist have touched on the answer, fat is better suited by density for storing energy than ATP; ATP is optimal for quick conversion to bioenergy. Look at the question in another way: ATP in bioenergy cycle is dynamic - its an energy flux from food and breath to bioenergy.
    Biological energy is used at essentially the same rate at which we take it in. The vast majority is used as soon as its available. If we were to try to store enough ATP for say an hour the costs would be large.
    This back of the envelope calculation (see section 3.8) shows that 1 day of ATP is 64.5kg for a 2800 kcal a day energy intake. Approximately equal to body weight.
    Of course ATP is stored in excess - just a few seconds worth though, 8 if you believe competitive cyclists. ATP is a pretty small quantum of energy... Even an hour storage would add 12 pounds to an adult body weight. That's a lot. And what advantage would this give us? We might be able to engage in high energy activities (which use ATP faster than we can make it) for longer. But up to now it looks as if improvements in efficiency in generating ATP have been adequate for animals to stay competitive.
    Look at how evolution has dealt with the other component of bioenergy: oxygen. We can't hold our breath for more than a few minutes. 22 minutes is the current human record; impressive but still not that long. Oxygen is in plentiful supply brought in from outside and the adaptive costs to storing oxygen internally would simply not justify building up such a capacity for most of us. It seems even that aquatic mammals only hold their breath for a similar amount of time as we can if we practice. 20 minutes for Orcas. Penguins too. This isn't meant to be a survey of all animals ability to store oxygen, the point being that storage of oxygen has an adaptive cost that is not trivial.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Ohio DECA made an IMPACT on Community Outreach by donating to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation and help make type one diabetes, type none!

Office Of Science Outreach

Part 3: The Consequences of a High-Fructose Diet When fed fructose, the liver builds fatty acids and assembles them into triglycerides. It exports the triglycerides into the bloodstream, so that they can be taken up by fat cells for storage. The triglyceride-carrier protein is LDL, known as "bad cholesterol." It's a carrier of cholesterol, which attains a lower density by carrying additional triglycerides (which, being less dense than water or protein, make the carrier a "low-density" carrier protein.) Elevated triglycerides and cholesterol are associated with heart disease. Triglycerides are a part of the "metabolic syndrome" disease, which eventually manifests itself as Type 2 Diabetes. The transporter in liver cells, that moves triglycerides from the inside of the cell to the outside, and thus into the bloodstream, can only work so fast. If triglycerides are produced faster than the transporter can export them, the triglycerides build up inside liver cells. They form fat droplets. The liver accumulates fat. Now, in force-fed geese, fatty liver is called foie gras, but fatty liver is not what we want to have. Fatty liver is another of the pre-disposing factors to Type 2 Diabetes Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. user2967

    I just learned that ATP can not be stored in excess and is only made by the body when it is needed. What makes ATP, like glucose and fat is what is stored under the skin or wherever. Now why cant the body just produce ATP and store it for heavy, heavy exercise when it would advantageous for it to be ready rather than it going through the production phase and then used. When I say ATP storage I mean in large amounts.

  2. Mad Scientist

    Let's compare ATP, glucose and fatty acids in terms of energy storage.
    ATP has a molecular weight of 507 Da
    Glucose has a molecular weight of 180 Da, and contains the same amount of energy as 31 ATP molecules
    Fatty acids vary in size, but a gram of fat contains about twice as much energy as a gram of glucose (or glycogen)
    The difference in energy density is huge, you would need enormous amounts of ATP to replace glucose/glycogen as energy storage mechanism, not to speak of fat. You can't put an arbitrary amount of ATP molecules into a cell, you 'll get into problems due to the osmotic pressure lots of molecules inside the cell would cause. Glucose is stored as glycogen in cells due to this effect, which makes one large glycogen molecule out of lots of glucose molecules.
    The energy density difference is even larger if you take into account that ATP and glucose bind water, while fat is stored without surrounding water. The actual difference in energy density of glycogen and fat is around 6 times.
    ATP is also not as stable as fat, it can get hydrolized in water. This would be a problem for long-term storage of energy.
    You'll find some more details in Albert's "Molecular Biology of the Cell"

  3. shigeta

    I think @AlanBoyd and @MadScientist have touched on the answer, fat is better suited by density for storing energy than ATP; ATP is optimal for quick conversion to bioenergy. Look at the question in another way: ATP in bioenergy cycle is dynamic - its an energy flux from food and breath to bioenergy.
    Biological energy is used at essentially the same rate at which we take it in. The vast majority is used as soon as its available. If we were to try to store enough ATP for say an hour the costs would be large.
    This back of the envelope calculation (see section 3.8) shows that 1 day of ATP is 64.5kg for a 2800 kcal a day energy intake. Approximately equal to body weight.
    Of course ATP is stored in excess - just a few seconds worth though, 8 if you believe competitive cyclists. ATP is a pretty small quantum of energy... Even an hour storage would add 12 pounds to an adult body weight. That's a lot. And what advantage would this give us? We might be able to engage in high energy activities (which use ATP faster than we can make it) for longer. But up to now it looks as if improvements in efficiency in generating ATP have been adequate for animals to stay competitive.
    Look at how evolution has dealt with the other component of bioenergy: oxygen. We can't hold our breath for more than a few minutes. 22 minutes is the current human record; impressive but still not that long. Oxygen is in plentiful supply brought in from outside and the adaptive costs to storing oxygen internally would simply not justify building up such a capacity for most of us. It seems even that aquatic mammals only hold their breath for a similar amount of time as we can if we practice. 20 minutes for Orcas. Penguins too. This isn't meant to be a survey of all animals ability to store oxygen, the point being that storage of oxygen has an adaptive cost that is not trivial.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • How Is Glucose Converted To Fat

    Dear Reader, Ah, poor carbohydrates, maligned by diets such as Atkins’ and the ketogenic diet. However, carbohydrates are your body’s main source of energy — in fact your muscles and brain cells prefer carbs more than other sources of energy (triglycerides and fat, for example). To answer your question: research completed over the last several decades suggests that if you are eating a diet that is appropriate for your levels of daily activi ...

    ketosis Apr 21, 2018
  • Can Blood Glucose Be Converted To And Stored As Fat?

    Lecture 14: Introduction to metabolic regulation If you lose the printed handout, you can download another copy here. The "purpose" of metabolism is to supply the energy and raw materials that the body needs to stay alive and reproduce. Not only must these systems operate efficiently in "ideal" situations, but they must also handle shortages and unexpected demands: fighting, natural disasters, pregnancy, lactation, famine, injury and disease. Me ...

    ketosis Apr 22, 2018
  • Diabetic Shaking Inside

    Diabetes is a health condition, which is associated with abnormally high levels of glucose (or sugar) in the blood. It can be indicated by many signs and symptoms. Type 2 diabetes is the most dangerous form of this health condition and if not controlled properly, it can cause complications. Increased hunger and thirst are the most common signs of diabetes but there are others as well, such as weight loss, passing out, blurred vision and headaches ...

    diabetes Dec 14, 2018
  • How Does Glucose Get Converted To Fat Inside Of A Cell

    This article was originally published on January 23, 2012 and reviewed and updated by the CurioCity team in September 2017. Why can't my diabetic grandmother have sugar in her coffee? The answers to all these questions started at the very beginning of life on earth, before diseases or the ability to taste even existed. Like a dollar at the shopping mall, glucose is a unit of currency. Glucose is a sugar, and its the basic unit of currency for li ...

    ketosis Apr 26, 2018
  • Can Glucose Be Converted To Fat

    Your body uses mostly carbohydrates as well as fats for energy. Because the body doesn’t store carbs efficiently, they’re used first. Carbohydrates turn into glucose, which your body burns immediately or converts to glycogen to be stored in the muscles and liver for between meals. If you eat more calories from carbs or other sources than your body can use, the cells store the excess as fat. Of the three major nutrients -- carbohydrates, fat a ...

    ketosis Apr 24, 2018
  • Why Can't Fat Be Converted To Glucose

    This is perhaps a little on the 'nerdy' side of questions, but is something I don't quite understand. It's not really necessary to fully understand it, to follow a 'whole foods' diet, or an 'ssos' lifestyle, but still, I would like to get my head around it. So in that regard... I understand that carbohydrates are converted into glucose, which is then used as energy in the body, and whatever energy the body does not use, it then moves into the ad ...

    ketosis Dec 14, 2018

More in ketosis