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How Does Diabetes Cause High Plasma Glucose Levels And Ketoacidosis

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Today's question was sent in by Madeleine from Manhattan who asks "How long does wine last once opened? How to conserve wine to last longer once opened?". Send us your question and we will do our best to answer them: http://www.tellmewinetv.com/send-us-y...

8 Explain How A High Blood Ketone Level Helps The Body Conserve Blood Glucose

8. Explain how a high blood ketone level helps the body conserve blood glucose.high blood ketone levels help the body conserve blood glucose because they use fat instead of the glucose.9. Restate your predictions that were correct and give the data from your experiment that supports them. Restate your predictionsthat were not correct and correct them, giving the data from your experiment that supports the correction.my prediction of plasma glucose levels being highest immediately after the meal (0hr) was right at 6.4 mmol/l. my prediction of plasma ketonelevels being highest before the meal were right at 109. my prediction of plasma insulin levels being highest 1-3 hours after the meal were rightwith 176 pmol/I the highest at 1 hour after the meal. my prediction of plasma glucagon levels being highest 1-3 hours after the meal were rightwith 5.7 pmol/l the highest at 1 hour after the meal.Application1. During exercise, epinephrine and norepinephrine are released from the adrenal medulla. Epinephrine and norepinephrine have thesame effect on plasma glucose levels as glucagon. Explain how epinephrine and norepinephrine affect plasma glucose and why thisis important during exercise.Du Continue reading >>

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  1. Colin Gerber

    There have been studies done on this, one done by Alperin et al. found the following results:
    In the upright posture, venous outflow is considerably less pulsatile (57%) and occurs predominantly through the vertebral plexus, while in the supine posture venous outflow occurs predominantly through the internal jugular veins. A slightly lower tCBF (12%), a considerably smaller CSF volume oscillating between the cranium and the spinal canal (48%), and a much larger ICC (2.8-fold) with a corresponding decrease in the MRI-derived ICP values were measured in the sitting position. [1]
    There are MRI machines that work while sitting up:
    Or laying down:
    [1]http://www.uic.edu/labs/pimlab/r...

  2. Ravi Tej

    Its all a play of the 'Gravity'.
    Veins in the legs are enveloped by the skeletal muscles there, and when they are actively contracting this squeezes the veins of its blood in a 'heart-ward' direction. You may ask why couldn't the blood flow the other way, thanks for the 'valves' that are interspersed along the length of this venous channel which prevents this from happening. This is the principle of 'the muscle pump' and it is important so much so that the soleus muscle (the main bulk of your calf) is called the 'second-heart' as it too literally pumps the blood.
    And now coming to what is that that causes the changes in cerebral perfusion with posture:
    [A word of caution: The cerebral perfusion is governed by auto-regulatory phenomenon, wherein the cerebral blood flow remains rather constant even with quite a change in blood pressure and a gross deviation from the normal of the blood pressure is needed to change it. And in fact, only in rare cases does this postural changes causes a syncope (Orthostatic hypotension) ,that too, with an added deficit of the sympathetic reflexes (reflex vasoconstriction)]

    In the supine position, since all of the body is at the same level, it is of the impression that there is no net differential effect of gravity on different parts of the body. And thus there is no active role of gravity in deciding the blood flow, and the other factors which control blood flow comes to play.

    While in standing position and that too in a 'static stance' for long, due to gravity, the blood (venous) pools in the lower limbs, and thus there is less blood that reaches the heart (less venous return) and consequently heart pumps less blood as whatever heart does is just pump the quantity it has been filled before systole (preload). There is a decrease in blood pressure and thus a 'relatively' decreased blood perfusion. As I mentioned earlier too, there are regulatory mechanisms that maintains a constant cerebral perfusion in the face of a changing blood pressure. As the fMRI is quite sensitive a test, it can rather be that it does recognise this slight 'relative' change of the flow. But surely, the transient fall in BP, can be recorded, though this transient fall is quickly compensated by sympathetic activation.
    Its an accepted fact that in cases of orthostatic hypotension, the syncope (caused by cerebral hypoperfusion) is caused in patients of a sympathetic defecit (or decreased activity) when in the standing posture, where the decreased blood pressure remains uncompensated and a fall in BP below a critical level does with a decrease in cerebral perfusion for a few seconds and due to this hypoxic condition syncope occurs. And ironically, when the person falls of syncope, the gravity component is canceled and he regains his consciousness due to corrected cerbral flow, thus this can too be taken as a proof of the effect of posture on cerebral perfusion.

  3. Sohan

    To know about Blood flow in very important for a man . To maintain your blood flow you have to exercise regularly.You should improve your blood flow for a good health.

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Diabetic Ketoacidosis Presenting With Pseudonormoglycemia In A 15-year-old Girl With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Presenting with Pseudonormoglycemia in a 15-Year-Old Girl with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus 1 zmir Tepecik Training and Research Hospital, Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, zmir, Turkey 2 zmir Katip elebi University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, zmir, Turkey * Address for Correspondence: zmir Katip elebi University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Endocrinology, zmir, Turkey Phone: +90 232 469 69 69 E-mail: [email protected] Received 2012 Dec 24; Accepted 2013 Feb 8. Copyright Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, Published by Galenos Publishing. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Pseudonormoglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a rare condition and has been reported only in a few adult patients. We present a 15-year-old girl with a 9-year history of type 1 diabetes who presented with euglycemic and extreme hypertriglyceridemia. The acidosis and hypertriglyceridemia resolved with intravenous insulin the Continue reading >>

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  1. Roark

    So after 2 excruciatingly painful attacks of my lower right side over the past two weeks with no current diagnosis, I was thinking it could be a gallbladder issue. However, after awaking today to an extremely red urine (pardon the graphics), I am now keying in the kidney, probably kidney stones. So I'm doing the research, and after no medical issues in all my 28 years, I'm trying to discover what if anything in my diet could have triggered this (I've been mostly bulletproof for 2-3 months).
    I've been trying to do intermittent fasting most the time, based on my schedule, I eat later in the day from 5p-11p usually, and only drink a morning BP coffee besides that. I load the BP coffee with 5tbsp of butter, 2tbsp of MCT, and 1tbsp of coconut oil. My food is generally 3 pastured eggs and 4 strips of lightly cooked bacon, or a pound of grassfed beef on a bed of spinach with a small amount of dressing. I may eat a few tablespoons of raw almond butter or natural unblanched peanut butter for a snack. Sometimes I also include an organic pork sausage or two. Other than the coffee, I only drink water.
    So in light of thinking kidney stones could be my recent problem, I've wondered, is it too much fat, too much protein, or not enough water? I know Robb Wolf has addressed the protein issue, but what about the insane amount of fats? I guess I could increase my water consumption, but it's all I drink as it is. I also found Paul Jaminet of the Perfect Health Diet believes ketogenic diets could increase risk of kidney stones by something like 50-500 times?
    Could anyone shed any light on this? Many thanks, and I'm heading back to the doctor tomorrow for a kidney ultrasound and urinalysis.
    ps. I also supplement daily with magnesium (which I've seen specifically recommended for kidney stone prevention), D3, C, Selenium, Copper, Zinc, Cod Liver Oil, and Biotin.

  2. Jason Miller

    raw spinach can cause kidney stones, sounds like your not getting many veggies in your diet, more water is always good, digestive enzymes with ox bile work really well for the fat breakdown.

  3. Allan Balliett

    Lothario - Vitamin K2 is supposed to prevent and cure kidney stones. If you're eating real pastured eggs, I'd think that 3 yolks a day would have you covered UNLESS you are doing high level D3 supplementation in which case you need to take about 100mcg k2 per 2,000 iu D3 or risk having calcium deposits in your tissues (aka kidney stones) Ck this out in a recent Mercola video interview with Dr Kate of the "Vitamin D3 and the Calcium Paradox" book or Chris Masterjohn's 'recently' published paper on Factor X (K2)

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What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

Hyperglycemia And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) are too high, it's called hyperglycemia. Glucose is a sugar that comes from foods, and is formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the body's cells and is carried to each through the bloodstream. But even though we need glucose for energy, too much glucose in the blood can be unhealthy. Hyperglycemia is the hallmark of diabetes — it happens when the body either can't make insulin ( type 1 diabetes ) or can't respond to insulin properly ( type 2 diabetes ). The body needs insulin so glucose in the blood can enter the cells to be used for energy. In people who have developed diabetes, glucose builds up in the blood, resulting in hyperglycemia. If it's not treated, hyperglycemia can cause serious health problems. Too much sugar in the bloodstream for long periods of time can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs. And, too much sugar in the bloodstream can cause other types of damage to body tissues, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems in people with diabetes. These problems don't usually show up in kids or te Continue reading >>

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  1. abuvia

    When I decided to start dieting (about a month ago) I didn't know about NK. I just started doing the same old, same old... tracking foods in m.f.p. and counting calories. I used the automatic tools on m.f.p. at that time to determine my calorie goal.
    After 2 weeks diligently weighing food and counting calories I'd lost NOTHING and a friend suggested going low-carb. So, I did. And after discovering this site I've begun watching my protein and eating more fat. However, this is all I've adjusted.
    Tonight I finally calculated my macros using the info in the "Just the Facts, Ma'am" post. I was happy to see that they (percentage-wise) closely matched my actual calorie breakdown over the past two weeks. EXCEPT for one big difference: I've been aiming for 1,200 calories/day (as recommended by m.f.p.) and tonight's calculation indicates I should have a 1,761 calorie goal.
    I am reading more and more about NK and am slowly making the paradigm shift... but, it's still hard for me to believe that I could lose weight as a 5' 4", 165 lb woman by eating that many calories!
    Thoughts?
    I certainly don't want to risk any loss of my lean body mass. But, I'd really like to hear from anyone who's had success losing weight on significantly more calories/day than would be allowed on a traditional calorie-restricted diet.
    A little perspective on my situation: On 1,200 calories/day combined with eating NK-style I've had great results compared to past diets. I'm down about 6 lbs. Though, of course, much of that is the initial water weight Also, I am rarely hungry and often have to make a real effort fill that calorie allotment each day.

  2. EricaHV

    1600 calories is considered a "starvation diet" no matter what diet you are on, but in ketosis you are actually getting nutrition from your own body.
    I have under-eaten and gained weight, so under-eating was a concern when I started this. I am not going to give you a definate answer, I am newer, but I am finding my hunger varies and I tend to want to eat between 1200 and 1800 calories, depending on my activity ( I had a 6.5 hour workout today training for a tournament so I may try to force myself to eat a little more) I am eating more than before and losing weight.
    Keto is a natural appetite suppressant, and fortunately when you are not eating the calories your body is supplementing them. I am in super fear of under- eating again, so the days I end up with 800 or 900 calories (it has happened a few times) I get in another meal. I am not sure if it is smart or not.

  3. lovetoknit

    Quote:

    Originally Posted by abuvia
    When I decided to start dieting (about a month ago) I didn't know about NK. I just started doing the same old, same old... tracking foods in m.f.p. and counting calories. I used the automatic tools on m.f.p. at that time to determine my calorie goal.
    After 2 weeks diligently weighing food and counting calories I'd lost NOTHING and a friend suggested going low-carb. So, I did. And after discovering this site I've begun watching my protein and eating more fat. However, this is all I've adjusted.
    Tonight I finally calculated my macros using the info in the "Just the Facts, Ma'am" post. I was happy to see that they (percentage-wise) closely matched my actual calorie breakdown over the past two weeks. EXCEPT for one big difference: I've been aiming for 1,200 calories/day (as recommended by m.f.p.) and tonight's calculation indicates I should have a 1,761 calorie goal.
    I am reading more and more about NK and am slowly making the paradigm shift... but, it's still hard for me to believe that I could lose weight as a 5' 4", 165 lb woman by eating that many calories!
    Thoughts?
    I certainly don't want to risk any loss of my lean body mass. But, I'd really like to hear from anyone who's had success losing weight on significantly more calories/day than would be allowed on a traditional calorie-restricted diet.
    A little perspective on my situation: On 1,200 calories/day combined with eating NK-style I've had great results compared to past diets. I'm down about 6 lbs. Though, of course, much of that is the initial water weight Also, I am rarely hungry and often have to make a real effort fill that calorie allotment each day. If you do not need all those calories, don't eat them. If you are not hungry, don't eat. If you were lower in calories than you are now, I would just add some fat to my meals to up the calories. As long as you eat at least 1200 calories, you should be fine.
    Carolyn

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