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How Does Acidosis Cause Abdominal Pain

Abdominal Pain In Patients With Hyperglycemic Crises.

Abdominal Pain In Patients With Hyperglycemic Crises.

Abstract BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence and prognosis of abdominal pain in patients with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic state (HHS). Abdominal pain, sometimes mimicking an acute abdomen, is a frequent manifestation in patients with DKA. The prevalence and clinical significance of gastrointestinal symptoms including abdominal pain in HHS have not been prospectively evaluated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospectively collected evaluation of 200 consecutive patients with hyperglycemic crises admitted to a large inner-city teaching hospital in Atlanta, GA.We analyzed the admission clinical characteristics, laboratory studies, and hospital course of 189 consecutive episodes of DKA and 11 cases of HHS during a 13-month period starting in October 1995. RESULTS: Abdominal pain occurred in 86 of 189 patients with DKA (46%). In 30 patients, the cause of abdominal pain was considered to be secondary to the precipitating cause of metabolic decompensation. Five of them required surgical intervention including 1 patient with Fournier's necrotizing fasciitis, 1 with cholecystitis, 1 with acute appendicitis, and 2 patients with perineal abscess. The presence of abdominal pain was not related to the severity of hyperglycemia or dehydration; however, a strong association was observed between abdominal pain and metabolic acidosis. In DKA patients with abdominal pain, the mean serum bicarbonate (9 +/- 1 mmol/L) and blood pH (7.12 +/- 0.02) were lower than in patients without pain (15 +/- 1 mmol/L and 7.24 +/- 0.09, respectively, both P <.001). Abdominal pain was present in 86% of patients with serum bicarbonate less than 5 mmol/L, in 66% of patients with levels of 5 to less than 10 mmol/L, in 36% of patients with Continue reading >>

The Etiology Of Abdominal Pain In Diabetic Acidosis*

The Etiology Of Abdominal Pain In Diabetic Acidosis*

The usual signs, symptoms, and laboratory findings in prediabetic coma are well known. The clinical picture of dehydration associated with malnutrition, polyuria, and odor of acetone on the breath, decreased intraocular tension, and Kussmaul breathing, when found in conjunction with sugar and acetone bodies in the urine make a clinical picture that could hardly be confused with any other condition. Other laboratory findings are a high blood sugar, a low CO2 combining power of the blood plasma, and leukocytosis. The white cell count sometimes rises above 65,0001 per cubic millimeter of blood. This picture is usually clear cut and offers Continue reading >>

<< Guidelines For The Ed Management Of Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

<< Guidelines For The Ed Management Of Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Epidemiology, Etiology, And Pathophysiology Epidemiology and Etiology "Type 1" and "Type 2" Diabetes in Children Type 1 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes seen in children today. The primary metabolic derangement in type 1 diabetes is an absolute insulin deficiency. These patients will have a life-long dependence on insulin injections. The overall incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes is about 15 cases per 100,000 people per year (about 50,000 are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year). An estimated 3 children of every 1000 will develop insulin-dependent diabetes by the age of 20. Type 1 diabetes is primarily a disease of Caucasians. The worldwide incidence is highest in Finland and Sardinia and lowest in the Asian and black populations. Type 1 diabetes is more frequently diagnosed in the winter months (the reason for this is not known.) Interestingly, twins affected by type 1 diabetes are often discordant in the development of the disease.13 About 95% of cases of type 1 diabetes are the result of a genetic defect of the immune system, exacerbated by environmental factors.13 The autoimmune destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas results in the inability to produce insulin. Inheritance of type 1 diabetes is carried in genes of the major histocompatibility complex, the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system. Eventually, this research may lead to a vaccine using the insulin B chain 8-24 peptides to actually prevent type 1 diabetes.13 It is currently thought that islet cells damaged by a virus produce a membrane antigen that may stimulate a response by T killer cells of the immune system in the genetically susceptible patient. The T killer cells misidentify the beta cell as foreign and destroy it. As the beta cells in the pancreas are destroyed, the remai Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic Ketoacidosis (dka)

Diabetic ketoacidosis is an acute metabolic complication of diabetes characterized by hyperglycemia, hyperketonemia, and metabolic acidosis. Hyperglycemia causes an osmotic diuresis with significant fluid and electrolyte loss. DKA occurs mostly in type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). It causes nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain and can progress to cerebral edema, coma, and death. DKA is diagnosed by detection of hyperketonemia and anion gap metabolic acidosis in the presence of hyperglycemia. Treatment involves volume expansion, insulin replacement, and prevention of hypokalemia. Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is most common among patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and develops when insulin levels are insufficient to meet the body’s basic metabolic requirements. DKA is the first manifestation of type 1 DM in a minority of patients. Insulin deficiency can be absolute (eg, during lapses in the administration of exogenous insulin) or relative (eg, when usual insulin doses do not meet metabolic needs during physiologic stress). Common physiologic stresses that can trigger DKA include Some drugs implicated in causing DKA include DKA is less common in type 2 diabetes mellitus, but it may occur in situations of unusual physiologic stress. Ketosis-prone type 2 diabetes is a variant of type 2 diabetes, which is sometimes seen in obese individuals, often of African (including African-American or Afro-Caribbean) origin. People with ketosis-prone diabetes (also referred to as Flatbush diabetes) can have significant impairment of beta cell function with hyperglycemia, and are therefore more likely to develop DKA in the setting of significant hyperglycemia. SGLT-2 inhibitors have been implicated in causing DKA in both type 1 and type 2 DM. Continue reading >>

Non-surgical Causes Of Acute Abdominal Pain

Non-surgical Causes Of Acute Abdominal Pain

Non-Surgical Causes of Acute Abdominal Pain Abdominal pain constitutes 5% of the causes of emergency admissions and is an important part in the practice of emergency services in all centers. Patients may suffer from acute surgical abdomen, acute abdomen with nonsurgical diseases or acute problems of chronic diseases. Abdominal pain is sometimes associated with acute trauma. Clinical assessment is a process where diagnosis and treatment must be done quickly and must be well managed. We have tried here to discuss the non-surgical causes of abdominal pain. 1. Introduction Acute abdomen describes the sudden and severe starting of abdominal pain with unexplained etiology [1]. Case management should be done fairly quickly. Nonsurgical diseases as well as surgical pathologies could be the cause of acute abdomen. Medical history and physical examination findings are very important for assessment. Abdominal pain is the most important sign of acute abdomen but might not be observed in each cases [2]. Especially the elderly and children should be considered for acute abdomen. Abdominal pain is usually a feature, but a pain-free acute abdomen can occur, particularly in older people, in children, in the immunocompromised, and in the women during their last trimester of pregnancy. Acute abdominal complaints are common [3]. The differential diagnosis of acute abdomen should be done as soon as possible with the medical history, physical examination, laboratory and radiological findings; and the diagnosis should be accelerated for patient management [4]. 2. Pathophysiology 2.1. Visceral pain Visceral pain is a kind of a pain resulting from abdominal, pelvic and thoracic organs whose mechanism is not clearly understood and thus, very difficult to identify [5]. Visceral pain is a common, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Practice Essentials Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, major, life-threatening complication of diabetes that mainly occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes, but it is not uncommon in some patients with type 2 diabetes. This condition is a complex disordered metabolic state characterized by hyperglycemia, ketoacidosis, and ketonuria. Signs and symptoms The most common early symptoms of DKA are the insidious increase in polydipsia and polyuria. The following are other signs and symptoms of DKA: Nausea and vomiting; may be associated with diffuse abdominal pain, decreased appetite, and anorexia History of failure to comply with insulin therapy or missed insulin injections due to vomiting or psychological reasons or history of mechanical failure of insulin infusion pump Altered consciousness (eg, mild disorientation, confusion); frank coma is uncommon but may occur when the condition is neglected or with severe dehydration/acidosis Signs and symptoms of DKA associated with possible intercurrent infection are as follows: See Clinical Presentation for more detail. Diagnosis On examination, general findings of DKA may include the following: Characteristic acetone (ketotic) breath odor In addition, evaluate patients for signs of possible intercurrent illnesses such as MI, UTI, pneumonia, and perinephric abscess. Search for signs of infection is mandatory in all cases. Testing Initial and repeat laboratory studies for patients with DKA include the following: Serum electrolyte levels (eg, potassium, sodium, chloride, magnesium, calcium, phosphorus) Note that high serum glucose levels may lead to dilutional hyponatremia; high triglyceride levels may lead to factitious low glucose levels; and high levels of ketone bodies may lead to factitious elevation of creatinine levels. Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic Acidosis

Metabolic acidosis is a condition that occurs when the body produces excessive quantities of acid or when the kidneys are not removing enough acid from the body. If unchecked, metabolic acidosis leads to acidemia, i.e., blood pH is low (less than 7.35) due to increased production of hydrogen ions by the body or the inability of the body to form bicarbonate (HCO3−) in the kidney. Its causes are diverse, and its consequences can be serious, including coma and death. Together with respiratory acidosis, it is one of the two general causes of acidemia. Terminology : Acidosis refers to a process that causes a low pH in blood and tissues. Acidemia refers specifically to a low pH in the blood. In most cases, acidosis occurs first for reasons explained below. Free hydrogen ions then diffuse into the blood, lowering the pH. Arterial blood gas analysis detects acidemia (pH lower than 7.35). When acidemia is present, acidosis is presumed. Signs and symptoms[edit] Symptoms are not specific, and diagnosis can be difficult unless the patient presents with clear indications for arterial blood gas sampling. Symptoms may include chest pain, palpitations, headache, altered mental status such as severe anxiety due to hypoxia, decreased visual acuity, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, altered appetite and weight gain, muscle weakness, bone pain, and joint pain. Those in metabolic acidosis may exhibit deep, rapid breathing called Kussmaul respirations which is classically associated with diabetic ketoacidosis. Rapid deep breaths increase the amount of carbon dioxide exhaled, thus lowering the serum carbon dioxide levels, resulting in some degree of compensation. Overcompensation via respiratory alkalosis to form an alkalemia does not occur. Extreme acidemia leads to neurological and cardia Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis that begins in the kidneys. People with lactic acidosis have kidneys that are unable to remove excess acid from their body. If lactic acid builds up in the body more quickly than it can be removed, acidity levels in bodily fluids — such as blood — spike. This buildup of acid causes an imbalance in the body’s pH level, which should always be slightly alkaline instead of acidic. There are a few different types of acidosis. Lactic acid buildup occurs when there’s not enough oxygen in the muscles to break down glucose and glycogen. This is called anaerobic metabolism. There are two types of lactic acid: L-lactate and D-lactate. Most forms of lactic acidosis are caused by too much L-lactate. Lactic acidosis has many causes and can often be treated. But if left untreated, it may be life-threatening. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are typical of many health issues. If you experience any of these symptoms, you should contact your doctor immediately. Your doctor can help determine the root cause. Several symptoms of lactic acidosis represent a medical emergency: fruity-smelling breath (a possible indication of a serious complication of diabetes, called ketoacidosis) confusion jaundice (yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes) trouble breathing or shallow, rapid breathing If you know or suspect that you have lactic acidosis and have any of these symptoms, call 911 or go to an emergency room right away. Other lactic acidosis symptoms include: exhaustion or extreme fatigue muscle cramps or pain body weakness overall feelings of physical discomfort abdominal pain or discomfort diarrhea decrease in appetite headache rapid heart rate Lactic acidosis has a wide range of underlying causes, including carbon monoxide poisoni Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus.[1] Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness.[1] A person's breath may develop a specific smell.[1] Onset of symptoms is usually rapid.[1] In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes.[1] DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances.[1] Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids.[1] DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies.[3] DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high blood sugar, low blood pH, and ketoacids in either the blood or urine.[1] The primary treatment of DKA is with intravenous fluids and insulin.[1] Depending on the severity, insulin may be given intravenously or by injection under the skin.[3] Usually potassium is also needed to prevent the development of low blood potassium.[1] Throughout treatment blood sugar and potassium levels should be regularly checked.[1] Antibiotics may be required in those with an underlying infection.[6] In those with severely low blood pH, sodium bicarbonate may be given; however, its use is of unclear benefit and typically not recommended.[1][6] Rates of DKA vary around the world.[5] In the United Kingdom, about 4% of people with type 1 diabetes develop DKA each year, while in Malaysia the condition affects about 25% a year.[1][5] DKA was first described in 1886 and, until the introduction of insulin therapy in the 1920s, it was almost univ Continue reading >>

Metabolic Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prognosis, Prevention

Metabolic Acidosis: Causes, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prognosis, Prevention

Acidosis- A medical condition in which the fluids present in the body start to develop increased amount of acidic content making the body fluids acidic. There are two types of Acidosis- Respiratory Acidosis and Metabolic Acidosis. Respiratory Acidosis occurs as a result of malfunction of lungs. Metabolic Acidosis occurs as a result of malfunction of the kidneys. In this article, we will look into about Metabolic Acidosis. We will look into the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of Metabolic Acidosis. As stated, Metabolic Acidosis is a medical disorder in which the body starts producing excessive amounts of acid and/or the kidneys are not able to remove enough acidic content from the body. If not corrected at the appropriate time, Metabolic Acidosis can lead to a medical condition called acidemia in which pH scale in the blood gets low as a result of the kidneys being unable to form bicarbonates in the body. Causes Of Metabolic Acidosis The amount of acid in the blood can is determined by measuring the pH. A lower value of the pH means that the blood is acidic and a higher value of pH means that rhe blood is basic. Ideal pH value in the blood should be around 7.5. There are many processes in an individual's body which produces acid. Usually, the lungs and the kidneys take care of the excess production of acid; however, if there is a malfunction of these organs it results in Acidosis. As stated, Metabolic Acidosis begins in the kidneys. It develops when the kidneys are not able to discard excessive acid or in cases when they discard too much basic content from the body. Metabolic Acidosis is of three types: Diabetic Acidosis: This occurs in poorly controlled diabetes patients. In this form, there is formation of excess ketones making the blood acidic. Hyperchloremic Acidosi Continue reading >>

An Exceptional Case Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

An Exceptional Case Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Copyright © 2017 Celine Van de Vyver et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract We present a case of diabetic ketoacidosis, known as one of the most serious metabolic complications of diabetes. We were confronted with rapid neurological deterioration and unseen glycaemic values, which reached almost 110 mmol/L, subsequently resulting in hyperkalaemia and life-threatening dysrhythmias. This is the first reported live case with such high values of blood glucose and a favourable outcome. 1. Introduction Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is known as one of the most serious complications of diabetes, besides hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic syndrome (HHS), and it is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The symptoms are often nonspecific and there are many diseases that mimic the presentation. The clinical course usually evolves within a short time frame (<24 h). DKA exists of a triad of uncontrolled hyperglycaemia, metabolic acidosis, and increased total body ketone concentration [1]. These three criteria are needed for diagnosis. The most common precipitating factors of DKA are infections and discontinuation of or inadequate insulin therapy. Mainstays of treatment are correction of hypovolemia and hyperglycaemia, rapid administration of insulin, and electrolyte management. Glycaemic values in DKA normally do not exceed 33 mmol/L. In contrast, blood glucose in HHS is often higher [2, 3]. We present a case of severe diabetic ketoacidosis with glycaemic values of almost 110 mmol/L, leading to neurologic sequelae and requiring more aggressive treatment. A similar case report detailing th Continue reading >>

Question 2 Of 11

Question 2 Of 11

A 65-year-old man with past medical history of schizophrenia complains of vomiting for the past 24 hours. He reports feeling very hot for several days, but denies other symptoms including abdominal pain, chest pain, and shortness of breath. You are unable to obtain further details as he is having trouble hearing the questions. Vital signs: temperature 101°F, heart rate 130/min, respiratory rate 35/min, blood pressure 120/80 mm Hg, pulse oximetry 100% on room air. You would also expect this patient to have: A respiratory alkalosis with a metabolic acidosis. A respiratory acidosis with metabolic alkalosis. A 40-degree right axis deviation manifested by a terminal r wave in AVR on ECG. An intracranial hemorrhage on CT scan of the brain. An elevated lithium level. Answer Explanation : Aspirin intoxication caused a mixed acid base disturbance. Stimulation of the central respiratory center in the medulla leads to a respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic acidosis can be severe and is caused via several mechanisms. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation leads to an increase in oxygen use and CO2 production. Pyruvate and lactate are by-products of anaerobic respiration. Increased CO2 increases the respiratory rate further. It also causes the kidneys to increase excretion of bicarbonate causing a metabolic acidosis. Additionally the Krebs cycle is disrupted leading to increased lipolysis and gluconeogenesis. The by-product of these pathways is increased ketone production, which contributes to the acidosis. Of note, children typically do not develop respiratory alkalosis with salicylate intoxication: they usually present with only a metabolic acidosis. Treatment should be aggressive. Charcoal is indicated in a patient with an adequate mental status. Avoid intubation if possible, as de Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis And Pancreatitis

Lactic Acidosis And Pancreatitis

All nukes (d4T, ddI, abacavir, tenofovir, FTC, 3TC, AZT), hydroxyurea and ribavirin, have been linked to reports of lactic acidosis and/or pancreatitis. PIs and efavirenz have also been associated with pancreatitis. Lactic acidosis Lactic acidosis is a very serious side effect but it is no longer reported in countries that no longer use d4T, ddI and AZT. Although other nukes are linked to lactic acidosis one or more of these nukes are linked to most cases. Lactic acid is a by-product formed when the body breaks down starches and sugars. Levels of lactic acid are normally carefully regulated by the liver. Small increases in lactic acid (called hyperlactataemia) are relatively frequent, and are temporary, especially after exercise. If they reach a higher level, there is a risk of lactic acidosis. This is a potentially fatal side effect related to nucleoside/tide analogues. It is now rarely reported. Not only are nukes included in nearly all HIV combinations, but the symptoms of lactic acidosis are common side effects or symptoms. Symptoms Symptoms include: Unexplained tiredness, often severe Sickness (vomiting) and nausea Pain in the stomach, abdomen and/or liver Unexplained weight loss Difficulty breathing Poor blood circulation – cold hands or feet or bluish skin colour Sudden peripheral neuropathy Before combination therapy was available, this was only very rarely seen in HIV, and might well have been under diagnosed. Drug packaging now includes a clearer warning about this risk. Pregnancy might be an additional risk factor for lactic acidosis when using nukes. For this reason d4T or ddI are not recommended during pregnancy when alternative drugs are available. Lactic acidosis is diagnosed through examination, lab tests and an abdominal CT scan or liver biopsy. Altho Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Professor of Pediatric Endocrinology University of Khartoum, Sudan Introduction DKA is a serious acute complications of Diabetes Mellitus. It carries significant risk of death and/or morbidity especially with delayed treatment. The prognosis of DKA is worse in the extremes of age, with a mortality rates of 5-10%. With the new advances of therapy, DKA mortality decreases to > 2%. Before discovery and use of Insulin (1922) the mortality was 100%. Epidemiology DKA is reported in 2-5% of known type 1 diabetic patients in industrialized countries, while it occurs in 35-40% of such patients in Africa. DKA at the time of first diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is reported in only 2-3% in western Europe, but is seen in 95% of diabetic children in Sudan. Similar results were reported from other African countries . Consequences The latter observation is annoying because it implies the following: The late diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in many developing countries particularly in Africa. The late presentation of DKA, which is associated with risk of morbidity & mortality Death of young children with DKA undiagnosed or wrongly diagnosed as malaria or meningitis. Pathophysiology Secondary to insulin deficiency, and the action of counter-regulatory hormones, blood glucose increases leading to hyperglycemia and glucosuria. Glucosuria causes an osmotic diuresis, leading to water & Na loss. In the absence of insulin activity the body fails to utilize glucose as fuel and uses fats instead. This leads to ketosis. Pathophysiology/2 The excess of ketone bodies will cause metabolic acidosis, the later is also aggravated by Lactic acidosis caused by dehydration & poor tissue perfusion. Vomiting due to an ileus, plus increased insensible water losses due to tachypnea will worsen the state of dehydr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

Diabetic Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome

In Brief Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS) are two acute complications of diabetes that can result in increased morbidity and mortality if not efficiently and effectively treated. Mortality rates are 2–5% for DKA and 15% for HHS, and mortality is usually a consequence of the underlying precipitating cause(s) rather than a result of the metabolic changes of hyperglycemia. Effective standardized treatment protocols, as well as prompt identification and treatment of the precipitating cause, are important factors affecting outcome. The two most common life-threatening complications of diabetes mellitus include diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome (HHS). Although there are important differences in their pathogenesis, the basic underlying mechanism for both disorders is a reduction in the net effective concentration of circulating insulin coupled with a concomitant elevation of counterregulatory hormones (glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone). These hyperglycemic emergencies continue to be important causes of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes. DKA is reported to be responsible for more than 100,000 hospital admissions per year in the United States1 and accounts for 4–9% of all hospital discharge summaries among patients with diabetes.1 The incidence of HHS is lower than DKA and accounts for <1% of all primary diabetic admissions.1 Most patients with DKA have type 1 diabetes; however, patients with type 2 diabetes are also at risk during the catabolic stress of acute illness.2 Contrary to popular belief, DKA is more common in adults than in children.1 In community-based studies, more than 40% of African-American patients with DKA were >40 years of age and more than 2 Continue reading >>

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