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How Do You Treat Respiratory Acidosis?

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Respiratory acidosis #sign and symptoms of Respiratory acidosis Respiratory acidosis ABGs Analyse https://youtu.be/L5MWy1iHacI Plz share n subscribe my chanel is a condition that occurs when the lungs cant remove enough of the Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 carbon dioxide (CO2) produced by the body. Excess CO2 causes the pH of blood and other bodily fluids to decrease, making them too acidic. Normally, the body is able to balance the ions that control acidity. This balance is measured on a pH scale from 0 to 14. Acidosis occurs when the pH of the blood falls below 7.35 (normal blood pH is between 7.35 and 7.45).Rinku Chaudhary NSG officer AMU ALIGARH https://www.facebook.com/rinkutch/ Respiratory acidosis is typically caused by an underlying disease or condition. This is also called respiratory failure or ventilatory failure. Suctioning https://youtu.be/hMJGkxvXTW0 Normally, the lungs take in oxygen and exhale CO2. Oxygen passes from the lungs into the blood. CO2 passes from the blood into the lungs. However, sometimes the lungs cant remove enough CO2. This may be due to a decrease in respiratory rate or decrease in air movement due to an underlying condition such as: asthma COPD pneumonia sleep apnea TYPES Forms of respiratory acidosis There are two forms of respiratory acidosis: acute and chronic. Acute respiratory acidosis occurs quickly. Its a medical emergency. Left untreated, symptoms will get progressively worse. It can become life-threatening. Chronic respiratory acidosis develops over time. It doesnt cause symptoms. Instead, the body adapts to the increased acidity. For example, the kidneys produce more bicarbonate to help maintain balance. Chronic respiratory acidosis may not cause symptoms. Developing another illness may cause chronic respiratory acidosis to worsen and become acute respiratory acidosis. SYMPTOMS Symptoms of respiratory acidosis Initial signs of acute respiratory acidosis include: headache anxiety blurred vision restlessness confusion Without treatment, other symptoms may occur. These include: https://www.healthline.com/health/res... sleepiness or fatigue lethargy delirium or confusion shortness of breath coma The chronic form of respiratory acidosis doesnt typically cause any noticeable symptoms. Signs are subtle and nonspecific and may include: memory loss sleep disturbances personality changes CAUSES Common causes of respiratory acidosis The lungs and the kidneys are the major organs that help regulate your bloods pH. The lungs remove acid by exhaling CO2, and the kidneys excrete acids through the urine. The kidneys also regulate your bloods concentration of bicarbonate (a base). Respiratory acidosis is usually caused by a lung disease or condition that affects normal breathing or impairs the lungs ability to remove CO2. Some common causes of the chronic form are: asthma chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) acute pulmonary edema severe obesity (which can interfere with expansion of the lungs) neuromuscular disorders (such as multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy) scoliosis Some common causes of the acute form are: lung disorders (COPD, emphysema, asthma, pneumonia) conditions that affect the rate of breathing muscle weakness that affects breathing or taking a deep breath obstructed airways (due to choking or other causes) sedative overdose cardiac arrest DIAGNOSIS How is respiratory acidosis diagnosed? The goal of diagnostic tests for respiratory acidosis is to look for any pH imbalance, to determine the severity of the imbalance, and to determine the condition causing the imbalance. Several tools can help doctors diagnose respiratory acidosis. Blood gas measurement Blood gas is a series of tests used to measure oxygen and CO2 in the blood. A healthcare provider will take a sample of blood from your artery. High levels of CO2 can indicate acidosis.

Treatment Of Acute And Chronic Respiratory Acidosis With A Volume-cycled Respirator.

Treatment of Acute and Chronic Respiratory Acidosis with a Volume-cycled Respirator. Stephen N. Ayres, M.D. (Associate); Stanley Giannelli Jr., M.D.; Antoinette Criscitiello, R.N., M.S.; Ruth G. Armstrong, R.N., B.S. This content is PDF only. Please click on the PDF icon to access. Respiratory acidosis can be treated best by a mechanical ventilator that both increases alveolar ventilation and decreases respiratory work and carbon dioxide production. The low flow oxygen method is ineffective and dangerous; recent studies suggest that pressure-cycled intermittent positive pressure breathing devices may be ineffective in ventilating patients with markedly abnormal lung or chest wall compliances, since the required pressures may be impossible to attain in such patients. Analysis of blood gas and expired air in 13 patients with acute or chronic respiratory acidosis demonstrate the advantages of a volume-cycled piston respirator (Morch) over a pressure-cycled respirator. Most striking is Continue reading >>

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  1. Andy12345

    Hi forgive me if this is dumb, I am following a 30-40g carbs a day diet, I thought ketosis was a good thing but reading this article it doesn't sound all that good, have I got the wrong end of the stick? Thanks
    Below is what I read not me saying it
    Our body produces energy from the glucose we get from the consumed carbohydrates. But when glucose is not available, the liver produces ketone bodies to provide the body with the required energy. Although ketones are always present in the body, their levels can rise during a period of prolonged fasting. This condition is called ketosis.
    The most common cause of ketosis is following a low-carb diet. When one switches over from a high-glycemic diet to a low-glycemic diet, their body enters into a stage of ketosis. The body does not immediately start producing ketones, but if carbohydrates are not included in the diet for a long time, say two days or more, the body starts utilizing the energy from its fat stores. The glucose is thus preserved only for dire conditions like preventing protein and muscle breakdown.
    The initial stage of ketosis is considered relatively harmless. In fact, ketosis has also been deliberately induced through a ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy. However, prolonged ketosis is harmful for the body and is highly discouraged.
    Symptoms
    The most common symptoms of ketosis include:
    Note: Ketosis and its symptoms are often confused with diabetic ketoacidosis. However, diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition, where a severe deficiency of insulin, leads to a toxic buildup of blood glucose, accompanied by excessive breakdown of fat and muscle tissues. However, such alarming levels of ketone bodies are not usually seen in healthy individuals.
    Fatigue
    Dizziness
    Headache
    Excessive thirst
    Nausea accompanied by abdominal pain
    Problems with sleeping
    Bad breath
    Cold hands and feet
    Metallic, sweet, or fruity taste in the mouth
    Strong smelling urine
    Loss of appetite
    Temporary sense of euphoria
    Diagnosis
    A confirmatory urine test can be done to see whether the body is in a state of ketosis. One can purchase ketosis strips that are easily available in the market. The strip changes color if ketone bodies are present in the urine.
    Side Effects
    A prolonged state of ketosis can cause major health problems like:
    Calcium deficiency
    Osteoporosis
    Gout
    Kidney stones
    Liver damage
    Controversy Surrounding Ketosis and its Symptoms
    Most people claim that going into ketosis and exhibiting its symptoms is no reason for alarm, and simply denotes a different and specific phase of metabolism that the body is going through. This is the main reason that people still strongly advocate going in for low-carb diets, and even go to the extent of claiming that certain organs function better during the state of ketosis. However, research says that ketone bodies are acidic compounds, and their accumulation in the blood could lead to toxicity. It is an aggravation of symptoms that lead to the potentially life-threatening condition called ketoacidosis.
    Doing Away With Ketosis
    The easiest way of reversing ketosis is by including carbohydrates in the diet. One has to make sure that they do not start consuming carbohydrates suddenly, but increase the intake gradually, after consulting a health professional. Eating smaller and frequent meals help mitigate the symptoms to a large extent. Another important thing is to keep the body hydrated to help dilute the urine and, in turn, flush out the ketone bodies.
    To avoid conditions like ketosis and other medical complications, it is always advisable that you consult a health professional before making any extreme changes in your diet. He/she would best know what is suitable for you and guide you accordingly.

  2. Claire87

    It could just be me, but that sounds like an advert from a bread company. But then I've seen a lot of conflicting information on the internet about lots of things. There was massive slush campaign on soya when it first came out because the meat production industry feared soya products taking over and putting them out of business.
    From my personal experience: I went through Ketosis. The only feeling I had was tiredness while it was happening for a couple of days, then I felt amazing. I managed to avoid getting insulin tablets because my blood sugar and weight loss in two weeks was such a big change, and the only thing I can credit that to is a low carb diet and going through ketosis. Ketosis saved me from a life of medication and made me feel great. I'm an advocate of it.
    But I'm not an expert on the low carb diet, so I asked my nutritionist friend. She'll know the answer. She always does. I'll post it up when she gets back to me.

  3. Andy12345

    Thankyou, I have been trying to get lower and this week I managed 30g by cutting out bread altogether ,I used to have a sandwich for lunch but now salads with ham egg etc. I have no idea if I have been through or am going through ketosis, I've been on or under 100g for the last couple of months, a month at about 150g before that, I have my 3 month since diag anniversary on Thursday and I've lost 2 stone 10lb and am getting fit, going to the gym all the time, is there a sign that I'm in ketosis and is it a permanent state or do you pass through it, if so how do you know?
    Thanks
    Andy

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Hello guys In this video discuss about the basic concept of acidosis and alkalosis and Discuss the topic of respiratory acidosis The cause Sign symptom and treatment Please subscribe my channel for more video And comment which video you want discuss in next videos. Thanks

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis can be defined as a medical condition in which hypoventilation or decreased ventilation leads to an increase in the concentration of blood carbon dioxide and decreased pH or acidosis. CO2 is constantly produced as the cells of the body respire. However, carbon dioxide can rapidly accumulate if the lungs are unable to expel it adequately through alveolar ventilation. Hence, alveolar hypoventilation leads to increased levels of PaCO2, a condition which is referred to as hypercapnia. Increased levels of PaCO2 reduce the HCO3/PaCO2 ratio as well as decrease the pH levels. The ICD-9 Code for this disorder is 276.2. The condition is subdivided into the following two types: In this form, the PaCO2 levels are elevated above 47 mm Hg or 6.3 kPa reference mark along with accompanying acidemia (pH levels less than 7.35). In this type, the PaCO2 levels are elevated above upper limit of reference range, with normal blood pH levels (between 7.35 and 7.45) or near normal pH that is secondary to the renal compensation and elevated levels of serum bicarbonate (HCO3 greater than 30 mm Hg). There are a number of factors which might be responsible for the development of this diso Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. momomentos

    Hello! This is my second day at a low carb/keto attempt. I am a pretty active(hot yoga, gym, walking) 23, female, 5’8" and 145lbs.
    Yesterday (the first day)
    -I ate 3154 calories! (148g carbs/18%, 241g fat, 66%, 130 g protein, 16%)
    I took a multivitamin, two omega 3s, extra vitamin c
    -I was feeling pretty good until around 730 pm.
    -Started getting dizzy, cranky, tired but wired
    -Didn’t want to eat anymore because I had already eaten almost 3000 calories and I feel like just because I am doing keto doesn’t mean I can eat unlimited calories, correct?
    -Well when I went to go to sleep, my head was hurting, my muscles were cramping and i could NOT sleep - an issue i am very unfamiliar with.
    -I did not have cravings majority of the day until this point
    -I tried licking some salt
    -I tried a 200 mg magnesium pill
    -i ended up eating 12 chocolate covered almonds which = 275 calories of the 3154 so I still had almost 3000 for the entire day.
    -before keto i was eating 2500 max.
    -After “binge” went into a half sleep like state for the rest of the night - night sweats and weakness until 7 am when i woke up unable to fall back asleep.
    Day 2:
    -Ate 3152 calories (130 g carbs, 16%, 230g fat, 64%, 155g protein, 20%)
    took two multivtamins this time (one in morning, one in evening)
    -two omega 3 supplements
    -One emergen-C packet (includes electrolytes)
    -1 200 mg magnesium pilll
    magnesium salt bath
    -eating plain salt
    -drinking and peeing my life away
    -Felt nauseous in morning
    -Ate my eggs and ghee anyway
    -Took a giant poop ! (tmi?haha)
    -Felt really really good until about 11:30 am - refed my keto friendly foods which helped for about an hour and then it all went downhill from there.
    -Super weak, irritable and foggy
    -was in cooking class for nutrition school (I am new still, that is why I cant answer this question yet!) and only had a small taste of the hummus we made on a cucumber
    -no cravings at this point, just weakness
    -Went home and had almond milk with two tbsps of coconut oil and spices and salt to try to help.
    -helped a bit so i went to hot yoga (weaker than usual)
    -Got back took the magnesium bath
    -thought i was going to nail it
    -laying in bed googling things and then my muscles started twitching like crazy! I aleady took so many supplements i didnt wnat to take more so i ate some salt (quite a bit of salt)
    -insomnia once again
    -weird sweaty feeling
    -ended up eating 10 chocolate covered almonds
    -didnt help
    -ate a bun and a knock off quest bar.
    my “binge” cost me around 600 calories from my total above
    -i am feeling still starving but a little sleepier and the cramping has mostly stopped.
    Does anyone have any advice or explanation?
    It seems to be the biggest issue at night, especially because I can not sleep!!
    I suppose the second day (today) i could have tried eating more fat, but I didnt want to eat much more than 2500 calories.

    Should I even be worrying about how many calories im eating at this point?
    Could I have been in ketosis with that amount of carbs?
    Why even with all the suppllements/water/salt, etc. am i experiencing muscle cramping ?!

  2. Zimon

    My plain and simple advice would be: further cut down on carbs and stop exercising. You are putting a lot of strain on your body if your that active and try to transition to a new fuel source.
    your current nutritional profile isn’t keto, so if keto adaptation is your goal, then I would go that router described above. Also try upping your magnesium and potassium intake from keto-friendly sources like nuts and leafy, green vegetables (preferably spinach, kale etc.) it seems your muscles need more of that stuff.

    also: don’t restrict calories for the first week(s). Just listen to your body and eat when you’re hungry, stop when you’re full and eat mostly fat with a bit of protein in it every meal. Only eat nutrient dense foods e.g. avoid eating pure butter just for the sake of hitting macros. You can supplement every meal with butter, though!

  3. MooBoom

    momomentos:
    130 g carbs, 16%, 230g fat, 64%, 155g protein, 20%
    You’re not keto, by a long shot. Your target carbs (total) should be 20g or under. Protein as a rule- = 1-1.5g per kilo of lean body mass. With the exercise you’re doing I’d go 1.5g. The rest- eat fat to satiety.
    Eat when hungry. Stop when full.
    You will need potassium, magnesium and salt to get you through the first few days/weeks as your body kicks the carb addiction. Drink tonnes of water- don’t exercise unless your body has abundant energy- rest.
    I thought I was keto on 50g carb a day, but I wasn’t and still had the keto flu for 2 weeks when I cut down to 20g a day. So worth it now those weeks are behind me though.

    Check out the FAQ’s section here on the forums, and I highly recommend that you listen to the dudes podcasts on getting started. You have much to learn grasshopper but we are here to help you!

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This video Respiratory Tract Infections: Influenza Virus is part of the Lecturio course Respiratory Medicine WATCH the complete course on http://lectur.io/influenzavirus LEARN ABOUT: - Influenza virus - Influenza A - importance - Subtypes of influenza virus - Clinical manifestations of influenza virus - Managment of influenza virus THE PROF: Your tutor is Professor Jeremy Brown. He studied medicine in London, graduating with honors, and continued his postgraduate medical training in a variety of London hospitals. He completed his PhD in molecular microbiology in 1999 and obtained a prestigious Welcome Advanced Research Fellowship for further scientific training at the University of Adelaide. LECTURIO is your single-point resource for medical school: Study for your classes, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2, MCAT or MBBS with video lectures by world-class professors, recall & USMLE-style questions and textbook articles. Create your free account now: http://lectur.io/influenzavirus INSTALL our free Lecturio app iTunes Store: https://app.adjust.com/z21zrf Play Store: https://app.adjust.com/b01fak READ TEXTBOOK ARTICLES related to this video: Flu (Influenza) Symptoms and Treatment http://lectur.io/influenzaarticle SUBSCRIBE to our YouTube channel: http://lectur.io/subscribe WATCH MORE ON YOUTUBE: http://lectur.io/playlists LETS CONNECT: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/lecturio.med... Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lecturio_me... Twitter: https://twitter.com/LecturioMed

Respiratory Acidosis

Respiratory acidosis is a medical emergency in which decreased ventilation (hypoventilation) increases the concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and decreases the blood's pH (a condition generally called acidosis). Carbon dioxide is produced continuously as the body's cells respire, and this CO2 will accumulate rapidly if the lungs do not adequately expel it through alveolar ventilation. Alveolar hypoventilation thus leads to an increased PaCO2 (a condition called hypercapnia). The increase in PaCO2 in turn decreases the HCO3−/PaCO2 ratio and decreases pH. Terminology[edit] Acidosis refers to disorders that lower cell/tissue pH to < 7.35. Acidemia refers to an arterial pH < 7.36.[1] Types of respiratory acidosis[edit] Respiratory acidosis can be acute or chronic. In acute respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range (over 6.3 kPa or 45 mm Hg) with an accompanying acidemia (pH <7.36). In chronic respiratory acidosis, the PaCO2 is elevated above the upper limit of the reference range, with a normal blood pH (7.35 to 7.45) or near-normal pH secondary to renal compensation and an elevated serum bicarbonate (HCO3− >30 mm Hg). Causes Continue reading >>

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  1. NroK1118

    Keto Macros

    So recently I've decided to try out the ketogenic diet (I have Lyle McDonald's book shipping as I type! :P), but I have a few questions about calculating my total calories needed and most importantly, my macros. My main goal is to gain a little bit of weight, which is why my numbers are a little higher later on.
    I've checked my work both ways, and the first thing I did was convert my BMR to a total calories required based off of activity level. My BMR was ~1540, so I did 1540 x 1.8 and that comes out to be roughly 2770. I also tried the way where you just multiply your body weight by anywhere from 10-20. Generally I've heard that you wan 10-12 to cut, 13-15, to maintain, and 16-20 to bulk up. Since I've also seen fitnessman post that it's the best to use a 20 to bulk I went ahead and did 140 x 20 which comes out to 2800. So this was the easy part. Both of my numbers came to around 2800 which made me happy, so I am fine sticking with 2800 as my daily caloric requirements, but the part I'm a little confused about is my macros.
    From reading about keto and really checking into it, the best ratio I've come to find is 65/30/5 or 60/35/5 where the macros are f/p/c. I would like to stick with the second one just because there is a little bit more protein and I want to gain some weight! Here's the problem: In order to calculate your total intake in grams of each macro I've seen fitnessman recommend just your BW for protein. So that would be 140g, which equates to 560 calories from protein alone. That leaves me with 2240 (2800-560) calories for fat and carbs. Now I'm just going to use 50g of carbs daily as a guess because I still haven't figured what I want, but either way it's between 30-50g for keto, but I'll go with 50g. So then I did 50 x 4 and that's 200 calories from carbs per day. That leaves me with 2040 calories from fats per day which is roughly 227g. This is all fine and dandy until I come back to the ratios...
    If you base your daily required calories off of the macros the above numbers do not even jive out. If I want to stick dead on to the ratios that means I would need 60% fat, 35% protein, and 5% carbs. Let's do the math... So calories from fat per day SHOULD be 2800(0.6) which equals 1680 calories from fat, or roughly 187 grams. My protein should then be 2800(.35) which comes to 980 calories from protein, or roughly 245 grams. And then for carbs it should be 2800(.05) which comes to 140 calories from carbs or roughly 35 grams.
    This is just plain confusing because the numbers in the calories(ratio) method are not even close to the first method. My question basically is, which method should I actually abide by?
    Answers are much appreciated!!!

  2. lvsteven

    tltr.
    keto macros = 60% fat / 5-10% carbs / 70-75% protein
    anything else?
    oh.. and read the guide to ketosis. its all in there.
    by the time you get lyle mcdonalds book that will just be re-enforcement for what you have already learned.
    stickies = answers to 90% of all the questions you have.

  3. greekmanman

    Originally Posted by NroK1118
    So recently I've decided to try out the ketogenic diet (I have Lyle McDonald's book shipping as I type! :P), but I have a few questions about calculating my total calories needed and most importantly, my macros. My main goal is to gain a little bit of weight, which is why my numbers are a little higher later on.
    I've checked my work both ways, and the first thing I did was convert my BMR to a total calories required based off of activity level. My BMR was ~1540, so I did 1540 x 1.8 and that comes out to be roughly 2770. I also tried the way where you just multiply your body weight by anywhere from 10-20. Generally I've heard that you wan 10-12 to cut, 13-15, to maintain, and 16-20 to bulk up. Since I've also seen fitnessman post that it's the best to use a 20 to bulk I went ahead and did 140 x 20 which comes out to 2800. So this was the easy part. Both of my numbers came to around 2800 which made me happy, so I am fine sticking with 2800 as my daily caloric requirements, but the part I'm a little confused about is my macros.
    From reading about keto and really checking into it, the best ratio I've come to find is 65/30/5 or 60/35/5 where the macros are f/p/c. I would like to stick with the second one just because there is a little bit more protein and I want to gain some weight! Here's the problem: In order to calculate your total intake in grams of each macro I've seen fitnessman recommend just your BW for protein. So that would be 140g, which equates to 560 calories from protein alone. That leaves me with 2240 (2800-560) calories for fat and carbs. Now I'm just going to use 50g of carbs daily as a guess because I still haven't figured what I want, but either way it's between 30-50g for keto, but I'll go with 50g. So then I did 50 x 4 and that's 200 calories from carbs per day. That leaves me with 2040 calories from fats per day which is roughly 227g. This is all fine and dandy until I come back to the ratios...
    If you base your daily required calories off of the macros the above numbers do not even jive out. If I want to stick dead on to the ratios that means I would need 60% fat, 35% protein, and 5% carbs. Let's do the math... So calories from fat per day SHOULD be 2800(0.6) which equals 1680 calories from fat, or roughly 187 grams. My protein should then be 2800(.35) which comes to 980 calories from protein, or roughly 245 grams. And then for carbs it should be 2800(.05) which comes to 140 calories from carbs or roughly 35 grams.
    This is just plain confusing because the numbers in the calories(ratio) method are not even close to the first method. My question basically is, which method should I actually abide by?
    Answers are much appreciated!!!

    Forget the ratios; go with 1g/lb pro, <50g CHO, and fill the rest with fats.

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