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How Do You Treat Lactic Acidosis?

Metformin-induced Lactic Acidosis: No One Left Behind

Metformin-induced Lactic Acidosis: No One Left Behind

Abstract Metformin is a safe drug when correctly used in properly selected patients. In real life, however, associated lactic acidosis has been repeatedly, although rarely, reported. The term metformin-induced lactic acidosis refers to cases that cannot be explained by any major risk factor other than drug accumulation, usually due to renal failure. Treatment consists of vital function support and drug removal, mainly achieved by renal replacement therapy. Despite dramatic clinical presentation, the prognosis of metformin-induced lactic acidosis is usually surprisingly good. In the previous issue of Critical Care, Friesecke and colleagues demonstrate that the survival rate of patients with severe lactic acidosis due to metformin accumulation can be strikingly higher than expected based on the initial clinical evaluation [1]. Metformin is nowadays the first-line drug of choice for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes [2]. This drug is the sixth most frequently prescribed in the USA (> 50 million prescriptions in 2009) and is taken by almost 1.5% of the Italian population [3, 4]. Metformin is a safe drug when correctly used in properly selected patients. In particular, no cases of lactic acidosis (a relatively common side effect of other biguanide compounds) were reported in 347 trials with 70,490 patient-years of metformin use [5]. Real life can differ from research settings, however, and lactic acidosis has been repeatedly, although rarely, observed in patients treated with metformin. The number of inquiries to the Swedish Poison Information Centre for metformin intoxication has increased 10 times during the past decade, with 25 cases of severe lactic acidosis reported in 2007 and 2008 [6]. According to the American Association of Poison Control Centers, metform Continue reading >>

Metformin-related Lactic Acidosis: Case Report - Sciencedirect

Metformin-related Lactic Acidosis: Case Report - Sciencedirect

Open Access funded by Sociedad Colombiana de Anestesiologa y Reanimacin Lactic acidosis is defined as the presence of pH <7.35, blood lactate >2.0mmol/L and PaCO2 <42mmHg. However, the definition of severe lactic acidosis is controversial. The primary cause of severe lactic acidosis is shock. Although rare, metformin-related lactic acidosis is associated with a mortality as high as 50%. The treatment for metabolic acidosis, including lactic acidosis, may be specific or general, using sodium bicarbonate, trihydroxyaminomethane, carbicarb or continuous haemodiafiltration. The successful treatment of lactic acidosis depends on the control of the aetiological source. Intermittent or continuous renal replacement therapy is perfectly justified, shock being the argument for deciding which modality to use. We report a case of a male patient presenting with metformin poisoning as a result of attempted suicide, who developed lactic acidosis and multiple organ failure. The critical success factor was treatment with continuous haemodiafiltration. Definimos acidosis lctica en presencia de pH <7.35, lactato en sangre >2.0mmol/L y PaCO2 <42mmHg. Por otro lado, la definicin de acidosis lctica grave es controvertida. La causa principal de acidosis lctica grave es el estado de choque. La acidosis lctica por metformina es rara pero alcanza mortalidad del 50%. La acidosis metablica incluyendo a la acidosis lctica puede recibir tratamiento especfico o tratamiento general con bicarbonato de sodio, trihidroxiaminometano, carbicarb o hemodiafiltracin continua. El xito del tratamiento de la acidosis lctica yace en el control de la fuente etiolgica; la terapia de reemplazo renal intermitente o continua est perfectamente justificada, donde el argumento para decidir cul utilizar ser el estado de Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise: What You Need To Know

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise: What You Need To Know

Muscle ache, burning, rapid breathing, nausea, stomach pain: If you've experienced the unpleasant feeling of lactic acidosis, you likely remember it. It's temporary. It happens when too much acid builds up in your bloodstream. The most common reason it happens is intense exercise. Symptoms The symptoms may include a burning feeling in your muscles, cramps, nausea, weakness, and feeling exhausted. It's your body's way to tell you to stop what you're doing The symptoms happen in the moment. The soreness you sometimes feel in your muscles a day or two after an intense workout isn't from lactic acidosis. It's your muscles recovering from the workout you gave them. Intense Exercise. When you exercise, your body uses oxygen to break down glucose for energy. During intense exercise, there may not be enough oxygen available to complete the process, so a substance called lactate is made. Your body can convert this lactate to energy without using oxygen. But this lactate or lactic acid can build up in your bloodstream faster than you can burn it off. The point when lactic acid starts to build up is called the "lactate threshold." Some medical conditions can also bring on lactic acidosis, including: Vitamin B deficiency Shock Some drugs, including metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes, and all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS can cause lactic acidosis. If you are on any of these medications and have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get medical help immediately. Preventing Lactic Acidosis Begin any exercise routine gradually. Pace yourself. Don't go from being a couch potato to trying to run a marathon in a week. Start with an aerobic exercise like running or fast walking. You can build up your pace and distance slowly. Increase the Continue reading >>

Hiv & Aids Information :: Factsheet Lactic Acidosis

Hiv & Aids Information :: Factsheet Lactic Acidosis

Please enter the email address. Separate multiple addresses with a comma. Lactic acidosis refers to a build-up of lactic acid in the blood. It is a rare but dangerous side-effect of some anti-HIV drugs most of these are no longer in regular use. Your HIV clinic will use blood tests to check your levels of lactic acid. Lacticacidosis is very rare. Nevertheless, it is an important subject to understandbecause people who develop the condition can become dangerously ill. Lacticacidosis is a serious side-effect of the nucleosidereverse transcriptaseinhibitor (NRTI)class of anti-HIV drugs. This class includes abacavir (Ziagen),didanosine (ddI, Videx), lamivudine (3TC, Epivir), stavudine (d4T,Zerit), tenofovir (Viread) andzidovudine (AZT, Retrovir). The drugsmost linked with lactic acidosis are stavudine and didanosine. However, neitherof these drugs is now used if any other treatment options are available, mainlybecause of the side-effects they can cause. Lactic acidosis is also apotential, but rare, side-effect of other drugs, including the commonlyprescribed diabetes drug, metformin. The term lactic acidosis is used to describehigh levels of a substance called lactate in the blood. Lactate is a by-productof the processing of sugar within the body. Lacticacidosis is one of several conditions which are believed to be caused by damage to mitochondria . Mitochondriaare found in all human cells and are involved in the production of energy.Other possible side-effects ofNRTIs which may also be associated withdamage to mitochondria include peripheral neuropathy (numbness or pain in the feetand hands); bone marrow suppression; pancreatitis (inflammation of thepancreas); hepatic steatosis (accumulation of fat in the liver); and myopathy(muscle damage). "Lactic acidosis may occurat a Continue reading >>

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Acidosis is a biochemical condition, caused by acid-alkaline imbalance in the body's pH levels, where the acidity of the body fluid is very high. The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance of chemicals (acids and bases) in the body. All foods are digested in the body leaving ash as the result of the digestion. This food ash can be neutral, acid or alkaline, depending largely on the mineral composition of the foods. Some foods leave an acid residue, some alkaline. The acid ash results when there is a depletion of the alkali reserve in the blood and the tissues of the body. When the alkalinity of the blood is reduced, the ability to transport carbon dioxide is reduced. As a result, acid accumalates in the tissues. Acidosis can be classified into respiratory acidosis and metabolic acidosis. When the body is unable to remove carbon dioxide through breathing, it results in respiratory acidosis. Metabolic acidosis occurs when the kidney is not able to remove enough acid from the body. Metabolic acidosis has several types. Diabetic acidosis (Diabetic ketoacidosis) develops when ketone bodies which are acidic build up in the body. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused when too much sodium bicarbonate is lost from the body. Lactic acidosis occurs when there is a build up of lactic acid. Symptoms of Acidosis The general symptoms of acidosis are constant hunger, pain in the pharynx, nausea and vomitting, headaches, various nervous disorders and drowsiness. Chronic acidosis can lead to inflammation of the kidneys, rheumatism, artericlerosis, high BP, skin disorders and other degenerative diseases. It lowers immunity and vitality and makes us prone to the danger of other infections. Causes of Acodosis The main cause of acidosis is wrong diet choices. It mainly occurs because of too many Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear. They usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; a general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get emergency medical help right away. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep your recent prescription and your medical history with yo Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

The buildup of lactic acid in the bloodstream. This medical emergency most commonly results from oxygen deprivation in the body’s tissues, impaired liver function, respiratory failure, or cardiovascular disease. It can also be caused by a class of oral diabetes drugs called biguanides, which includes metformin (brand name Glucophage). Another biguanide called phenformin was pulled from the market in the United States in 1977 because of an unacceptably high rate of lactic acidosis associated with its use. Concerns about lactic acidosis also delayed the introduction of metformin to the U.S. market until 1995, despite the fact that it had been widely used for years in other countries. There have been reports of lactic acidosis occurring in people taking metformin, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration estimates that lactic acidosis occurs in 5 out of every 100,000 people who use metformin for any length of time. However, this risk is much lower than it was in people taking phenformin, and it is not clear whether the episodes of lactic acidosis associated with metformin have actually been due to metformin use. In fact, the lactic acidosis could have been explained by the person’s diabetes and related medical conditions. Nonetheless, diabetes experts recommend that metformin not be used in people with congestive heart failure, kidney disease, or liver disease. They also recommend that it be discontinued (at least temporarily) in people undergoing certain medical imaging tests called contrast studies. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include feeling very weak or tired or having unusual muscle pain or unusual stomach discomfort. Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Lactic Acidosis - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Lactic acidosis is a rare complication of malignancy and is seen in patients who have cancer with a high proliferative rate such as lymphoma, leukemia, and small cell carcinoma. Generoso G. Gascon, ... Bruce Cohen, in Textbook of Clinical Neurology (Third Edition) , 2007 Primary lactic acidosis of the neonate usually ends in death within months. In an occasional infant, the lactic acidosis becomes less severe, and the infant will develop nearly normally until adolescence, when neurodegeneration may be observed. If definite nuclear gene mutations are identified in the future in patients with primary lactic acidosis, prenatal diagnosis using chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis should be feasible. The prognosis of the other congenital lactic acidoses depends on the underlying biochemical defectsbest with biotinidase deficiency and the gluconeogenic defects, less with PDH, PC, and Krebs' cycle defects. Ian W. Seetho, John P.H. Wilding, in Clinical Biochemistry: Metabolic and Clinical Aspects (Third Edition) , 2014 Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious complication that can occur whilst taking metformin. Lactic acidosis was more frequently reported with phenformin, another biguanide that was subsequently withdrawn in most countries in 1977 after 306 documented cases. While phenformin excretion relies upon hepatic hydroxylation (pharmacogenetically deficient in approximately 10% of Caucasians), metformin is subject to renal tubular secretion, and its excretion depends only on renal function. Lactic acidosis presents with non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, nausea, vomiting, altered level of consciousness and abdominal pain. Biochemical features of lactic acidosis are those of an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis with high blood lactate concentrations. There ap Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Lactic Acidosis Treatment & Management

Approach Considerations Treatment is directed towards correcting the underlying cause of lactic acidosis and optimizing tissue oxygen delivery. The former is addressed by various therapies, including administration of appropriate antibiotics, surgical drainage and debridement of a septic focus, chemotherapy of malignant disorders, discontinuation of causative drugs, and dietary modification in certain types of congenital lactate acidosis. Cardiovascular collapse secondary to hypovolemia or sepsis should be treated with fluid replacement. Both crystalloids and colloids can restore intravascular volume, but hydroxyethyl starch solutions should be avoided owing to increased mortality. [21] Excessive normal saline administration can cause a nongap metabolic acidosis due to hyperchloremia, which has been associated with increased acute kidney injury. [32] Balanced salt solutions such as Ringer lactate and Plasma-Lyte will not cause a nongap metabolic acidosis and may reduce the need for renal replacement therapy; however, these can cause a metabolic alkalosis. [33] No randomized, controlled trial has yet established the safest and most effective crystalloid. If a colloid is indicated, albumin should be used. Despite appropriate fluid management, vasopressors or inotropes may still be required to augment oxygen delivery. Acidemia decreases the response to catecholamines, and higher doses may be needed. Conversely, high doses may exacerbate ischemia in critical tissue beds. Careful dose titration is needed to maximize benefit and reduce harm. Lactic acidosis causes a compensatory increase in minute ventilation. Patients may be tachypneic initially, but respiratory muscle fatigue can ensue rapidly and mechanical ventilation may be necessary. Alkali therapy remains controversial Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Publications Published: July 1998 Information on this subject has been updated. Read the most recent information. Dr P Pillans,former Medical Assessor, Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring (CARM), Dunedin Metformin is a useful anti-hyperglycaemic agent but significant mortality is associated with drug-induced lactic acidosis. Significant renal and hepatic disease, alcoholism and conditions associated with hypoxia (eg. cardiac and pulmonary disease, surgery) are contraindications to the use of metformin. Other risk factors for metformin-induced lactic acidosis are sepsis, dehydration, high dosages and increasing age. Metformin remains a major reported cause of drug-associated mortality in New Zealand. Of the 12 cases of lactic acidosis associated with metformin reported to CARM since 1977, 2 occurred in the last year and 8 cases had a fatal outcome. Metformin useful but small risk of potentially fatal lactic acidosis Metformin is a useful therapeutic agent for obese non-insulin dependent diabetics and those whose glycaemia cannot be controlled by sulphonylurea monotherapy. Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect. The reported frequency of lactic acidosis is 0.06 per 1000 patient-years, mostly in patients with predisposing factors.1 Examples of metformin-induced lactic acidosis cases reported to CARM include: A 69-year-old man, with renal and cardiac disease, was prescribed metformin due to failing glycaemic control on glibenclamide monotherapy. He was well for six weeks, then developed lactic acidosis and died within 3 days. Post-surgical lactic acidosis caused the death of a 70-year-old man whose metformin was not withdrawn at the time of surgery. A 56-year-old woman, with no predisposing disease, died from lactic acidosis following major Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Type B Lactic acidosis type B is associated with certain diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus), some drugs—notably biguanides, certain toxins, and some inborn errors of metabolism (Table I). Tissue hypoxia and hypotension are not obvious features of type B lactic acidosis but may supervene as a consequence of the acidemia. The incidence of lactic acidosis among patients with diabetes has declined since the biguanide phenformin (phenylethybiguanide) was withdrawn in many countries during the 1970s. Lactic acidosis occurred approximately 10–15 times more frequently during phenformin therapy than with metformin. An inherited inability to hydroxylate phenformin may explain the higher risk of lactic acidosis than with metformin. Lactic acidosis complicating metformin (dimethylbiguanide) occurs much less commonly, with most cases being reported among patients in whom biguanide therapy is contraindicated (e.g., renal impairment or hypoxic states). LACTIC ACIDOSIS Lactic acidosis occurs whenever lactate production exceeds its utilization. This can occur with tissue hypoxia or in nonhypoxemic conditions when cellular metabolism is impaired. Type A lactic acidosis is the hypoxic form. It can occur with true hypoxemia, severe anemia, reduced oxygen delivery from poor perfusion, or from dramatically increased tissue demand from exercise, convulsions, or heat stroke.1,3,4,7 Type B lactic acidosis is the nonhypoxic form. It occurs in the face of adequate oxygen delivery when mitochondrial oxidative function is abnormal. This can occur with drugs or toxins, hypoglycemia, diabetes mellitus, liver failure, renal failure, lymphosarcoma, sepsis, and inborn errors of metabolism (Box 60-1).1,2,4 PROGNOSIS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES Primary lactic acidosis of the neonate usually ends in death Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatment

Lactic Acidosis: Symptoms, Causes, And Treatment

Lactic acidosis occurs when the body produces too much lactic acid and cannot metabolize it quickly enough. The condition can be a medical emergency. The onset of lactic acidosis might be rapid and occur within minutes or hours, or gradual, happening over a period of days. The best way to treat lactic acidosis is to find out what has caused it. Untreated lactic acidosis can result in severe and life-threatening complications. In some instances, these can escalate rapidly. It is not necessarily a medical emergency when caused by over-exercising. The prognosis for lactic acidosis will depend on its underlying cause. A blood test is used to diagnose the condition. Lactic acidosis symptoms that may indicate a medical emergency include a rapid heart rate and disorientaiton. Typically, symptoms of lactic acidosis do not stand out as distinct on their own but can be indicative of a variety of health issues. However, some symptoms known to occur in lactic acidosis indicate a medical emergency. Lactic acidosis can occur in people whose kidneys are unable to get rid of excess acid. Even when not related to just a kidney condition, some people's bodies make too much lactic acid and are unable to balance it out. Diabetes increases the risk of developing lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis may develop in people with type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus , especially if their diabetes is not well controlled. There have been reports of lactic acidosis in people who take metformin, which is a standard non-insulin medication for treating type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, the incidence is low, with equal to or less than 10 cases per 100,000 patient-years of using the drug, according to a 2014 report in the journal Metabolism. The incidence of lactic acidosis is higher in people with diabetes who Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: Clinical Implications And Management Strategies

Lactic Acidosis: Clinical Implications And Management Strategies

Lactic acidosis: Clinical implications and management strategies Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine. 2015 September;82(9):615-624 Quality Officer, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Departments of Pulmonary Medicine and Critical Care Medicine, Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic; Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Department of Pharmacy, Cleveland Clinic; Assistant Professor, Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH Medical ICU Clinical Specialist, Department of Pharmacy, Cleveland Clinic Director, Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Critical Care Medicine, Respiratory Institute, Cleveland Clinic Address: Anita J. Reddy, MD, Department of Critical Care Medicine, Respiratory Institute, A90, Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195; e-mail: [email protected] ABSTRACTIn hospitalized patients, elevated serum lactate levels are both a marker of risk and a target of therapy. The authors describe the mechanisms underlying lactate elevations, note the risks associated with lactic acidosis, and outline a strategy for its treatment. Serum lactate levels can become elevated by a variety of underlying processes, categorized as increased production in conditions of hypoperfusion and hypoxia (type A lactic acidosis), or as increased production or decreased clearance not due to hypoperfusion and hypoxia (type B). The higher the lactate level and the slower the rate of normalization (lactate clearance), the higher the risk of death. Treatments differ depending on the underlying mechanism of the lactate elevation. Thus, identifying the reason for hyperlactatemia and differentiating between type A and B lactic acidosis are of the utmo Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Patient professional reference Professional Reference articles are written by UK doctors and are based on research evidence, UK and European Guidelines. They are designed for health professionals to use. You may find one of our health articles more useful. Description Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis due to the inadequate clearance of lactic acid from the blood. Lactate is a byproduct of anaerobic respiration and is normally cleared from the blood by the liver, kidney and skeletal muscle. Lactic acidosis occurs when the body's buffering systems are overloaded and tends to cause a pH of ≤7.25 with plasma lactate ≥5 mmol/L. It is usually caused by a state of tissue hypoperfusion and/or hypoxia. This causes pyruvic acid to be preferentially converted to lactate during anaerobic respiration. Hyperlactataemia is defined as plasma lactate >2 mmol/L. Classification Cohen and Woods devised the following system in 1976 and it is still widely used:[1] Type A: lactic acidosis occurs with clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. Type B: lactic acidosis occurs without clinical evidence of tissue hypoperfusion or hypoxia. It is further subdivided into: Type B1: due to underlying disease. Type B2: due to effects of drugs or toxins. Type B3: due to inborn or acquired errors of metabolism. Epidemiology The prevalence is very difficult to estimate, as it occurs in critically ill patients, who are not often suitable subjects for research. It is certainly a common occurrence in patients in high-dependency areas of hospitals.[2] The incidence of symptomatic hyperlactataemia appears to be rising as a consequence of the use of antiretroviral therapy to treat HIV infection. It appears to increase in those taking stavudine (d4T) regimens.[3] Causes of lactic acid Continue reading >>

A Side Effect You Should Know About

A Side Effect You Should Know About

The glucose-lowering medication metformin (Glucophage) could cause lactic acidosis if your kidneys and liver are not working efficiently. Lactic acidosis is when high levels build up in the blood of a substance called lactic acid — a chemical that is normally produced by your body in small amounts and removed by your liver and kidneys. The risk of lactic acidosis goes up if you: have heart failure or a lung ailment have kidney or liver problems drink alcohol heavily In these cases, you might not be able to take metformin. If you don't have one of these problems, you are at a very low risk for developing lactic acidosis from metformin. You should, however, contact your doctor immediately if you suddenly develop any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: diarrhea fast and shallow breathing muscle pain or cramping weakness tiredness or unusual sleepiness You should also let your doctor know if you get the flu or any illness that results in severe vomiting, diarrhea, and/or fever, or if your intake of fluids becomes significantly reduced. Severe dehydration can affect your kidney or liver function and increase your risk of lactic acidosis from metformin. Continue reading >>

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