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How Do You Treat Lactic Acidosis?

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear. They usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; a general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get emergency medical help right away. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep your recent prescription and your medical history with yo Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis Update For Critical Care Clinicians

Lactic Acidosis Update For Critical Care Clinicians

Lactic Acidosis Update for Critical Care Clinicians Franz Volhard Clinic and Max Delbrck Center for Molecular Medicine, Medical Faculty of the Charit Humboldt University of Berlin, Berlin, Germany. Correspondence to Dr. Friedrich C. Luft, Wiltberg Strasse 50, 13125 Berlin, Germany. Phone: 49-30-9417-2202; Fax: 49-30-9417-2206; E-mail: luft/{at}fvk-berlin.de Abstract. Lactic acidosis is a broad-anion gap metabolic acidosis caused by lactic acid overproduction or underutilization. The quantitative dimensions of these two mechanisms commonly differ by 1 order of magnitude. Overproduction of lactic acid, also termed type A lactic acidosis, occurs when the body must regenerate ATP without oxygen (tissue hypoxia). Circulatory, pulmonary, or hemoglobin transfer disorders are commonly responsible. Overproduction of lactate also occurs with cyanide poisoning or certain malignancies. Underutilization involves removal of lactic acid by oxidation or conversion to glucose. Liver disease, inhibition of gluconeogenesis, pyruvate dehydrogenase (thiamine) deficiency, and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation are the most common causes. The kidneys also contribute to lactate removal. Concerns have been raised regarding the role of metformin in the production of lactic acidosis, on the basis of individual case reports. The risk appears to be considerably less than with phenformin and involves patients with underlying severe renal and cardiac dysfunction. Drugs used to treat lactic acidosis can aggravate the condition. NaHCO3 increases lactate production. Treatment of type A lactic acidosis is particularly unsatisfactory. NaHCO3 is of little value. Carbicarb is a mixture of Na2CO3 and NaHCO3 that buffers similarly to NaHCO3 but without net generation of CO2. The results from animal stud Continue reading >>

Metformin-related Lactic Acidosis: Case Report - Sciencedirect

Metformin-related Lactic Acidosis: Case Report - Sciencedirect

Open Access funded by Sociedad Colombiana de Anestesiologa y Reanimacin Lactic acidosis is defined as the presence of pH <7.35, blood lactate >2.0mmol/L and PaCO2 <42mmHg. However, the definition of severe lactic acidosis is controversial. The primary cause of severe lactic acidosis is shock. Although rare, metformin-related lactic acidosis is associated with a mortality as high as 50%. The treatment for metabolic acidosis, including lactic acidosis, may be specific or general, using sodium bicarbonate, trihydroxyaminomethane, carbicarb or continuous haemodiafiltration. The successful treatment of lactic acidosis depends on the control of the aetiological source. Intermittent or continuous renal replacement therapy is perfectly justified, shock being the argument for deciding which modality to use. We report a case of a male patient presenting with metformin poisoning as a result of attempted suicide, who developed lactic acidosis and multiple organ failure. The critical success factor was treatment with continuous haemodiafiltration. Definimos acidosis lctica en presencia de pH <7.35, lactato en sangre >2.0mmol/L y PaCO2 <42mmHg. Por otro lado, la definicin de acidosis lctica grave es controvertida. La causa principal de acidosis lctica grave es el estado de choque. La acidosis lctica por metformina es rara pero alcanza mortalidad del 50%. La acidosis metablica incluyendo a la acidosis lctica puede recibir tratamiento especfico o tratamiento general con bicarbonato de sodio, trihidroxiaminometano, carbicarb o hemodiafiltracin continua. El xito del tratamiento de la acidosis lctica yace en el control de la fuente etiolgica; la terapia de reemplazo renal intermitente o continua est perfectamente justificada, donde el argumento para decidir cul utilizar ser el estado de Continue reading >>

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Natural Cures And Home Remedies For Acidosis

Acidosis is a biochemical condition, caused by acid-alkaline imbalance in the body's pH levels, where the acidity of the body fluid is very high. The kidneys and lungs maintain the balance of chemicals (acids and bases) in the body. All foods are digested in the body leaving ash as the result of the digestion. This food ash can be neutral, acid or alkaline, depending largely on the mineral composition of the foods. Some foods leave an acid residue, some alkaline. The acid ash results when there is a depletion of the alkali reserve in the blood and the tissues of the body. When the alkalinity of the blood is reduced, the ability to transport carbon dioxide is reduced. As a result, acid accumalates in the tissues. Acidosis can be classified into respiratory acidosis and metabolic acidosis. When the body is unable to remove carbon dioxide through breathing, it results in respiratory acidosis. Metabolic acidosis occurs when the kidney is not able to remove enough acid from the body. Metabolic acidosis has several types. Diabetic acidosis (Diabetic ketoacidosis) develops when ketone bodies which are acidic build up in the body. Hyperchloremic acidosis is caused when too much sodium bicarbonate is lost from the body. Lactic acidosis occurs when there is a build up of lactic acid. Symptoms of Acidosis The general symptoms of acidosis are constant hunger, pain in the pharynx, nausea and vomitting, headaches, various nervous disorders and drowsiness. Chronic acidosis can lead to inflammation of the kidneys, rheumatism, artericlerosis, high BP, skin disorders and other degenerative diseases. It lowers immunity and vitality and makes us prone to the danger of other infections. Causes of Acodosis The main cause of acidosis is wrong diet choices. It mainly occurs because of too many Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis.

Treatment Of Lactic Acidosis.

Severe lactic acidosis is often associated with poor prognosis. Recognition and correction of the underlying process is the major step in the treatment of this serious condition. Intravenous administration of sodium bicarbonate has been the mainstay in the treatment of lactic acidosis. Aggressive use of this therapeutic modality, however, can lead to serious complications and should therefore be considered with caution. Peritoneal dialysis and hemodialysis provide large amounts of alkali without causing the hypernatremia or hypervolemia commonly associated with bicarbonate infusion. Peritoneal dialysis with bicarbonate-based dialysate, in particular, appears to be an ideal means of delivering physiologic buffer. Administration of methylene blue was initially thought to increase lactate metabolism by altering the cellular oxidative state. Its subsequent clinical use, however, showed little efficacy. Sodium nitroprusside has been advocated for the treatment of some forms of lactic acidosis as a method of alleviating regional hypoperfusion. Insulin therapy has been found to be quite useful in the treatment of phenformin-associated lactic acidosis and is recommended in this setting. Since dichloroacetate activates pyruvate dehydrogenase and enhances lactate metabolism, it may be a useful adjunct in the treatment of lactic acidosis. Continue reading >>

A Side Effect You Should Know About

A Side Effect You Should Know About

The glucose-lowering medication metformin (Glucophage) could cause lactic acidosis if your kidneys and liver are not working efficiently. Lactic acidosis is when high levels build up in the blood of a substance called lactic acid — a chemical that is normally produced by your body in small amounts and removed by your liver and kidneys. The risk of lactic acidosis goes up if you: have heart failure or a lung ailment have kidney or liver problems drink alcohol heavily In these cases, you might not be able to take metformin. If you don't have one of these problems, you are at a very low risk for developing lactic acidosis from metformin. You should, however, contact your doctor immediately if you suddenly develop any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: diarrhea fast and shallow breathing muscle pain or cramping weakness tiredness or unusual sleepiness You should also let your doctor know if you get the flu or any illness that results in severe vomiting, diarrhea, and/or fever, or if your intake of fluids becomes significantly reduced. Severe dehydration can affect your kidney or liver function and increase your risk of lactic acidosis from metformin. Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

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Lactic Acidosis And Exercise: What You Need To Know

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise: What You Need To Know

Muscle ache, burning, rapid breathing, nausea, stomach pain: If you've experienced the unpleasant feeling of lactic acidosis, you likely remember it. It's temporary. It happens when too much acid builds up in your bloodstream. The most common reason it happens is intense exercise. Symptoms The symptoms may include a burning feeling in your muscles, cramps, nausea, weakness, and feeling exhausted. It's your body's way to tell you to stop what you're doing The symptoms happen in the moment. The soreness you sometimes feel in your muscles a day or two after an intense workout isn't from lactic acidosis. It's your muscles recovering from the workout you gave them. Intense Exercise. When you exercise, your body uses oxygen to break down glucose for energy. During intense exercise, there may not be enough oxygen available to complete the process, so a substance called lactate is made. Your body can convert this lactate to energy without using oxygen. But this lactate or lactic acid can build up in your bloodstream faster than you can burn it off. The point when lactic acid starts to build up is called the "lactate threshold." Some medical conditions can also bring on lactic acidosis, including: Vitamin B deficiency Shock Some drugs, including metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes, and all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) drugs used to treat HIV/AIDS can cause lactic acidosis. If you are on any of these medications and have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get medical help immediately. Preventing Lactic Acidosis Begin any exercise routine gradually. Pace yourself. Don't go from being a couch potato to trying to run a marathon in a week. Start with an aerobic exercise like running or fast walking. You can build up your pace and distance slowly. Increase the Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic Acidosis: What You Need To Know

Lactic acidosis is a form of metabolic acidosis that begins in the kidneys. People with lactic acidosis have kidneys that are unable to remove excess acid from their body. If lactic acid builds up in the body more quickly than it can be removed, acidity levels in bodily fluids — such as blood — spike. This buildup of acid causes an imbalance in the body’s pH level, which should always be slightly alkaline instead of acidic. There are a few different types of acidosis. Lactic acid buildup occurs when there’s not enough oxygen in the muscles to break down glucose and glycogen. This is called anaerobic metabolism. There are two types of lactic acid: L-lactate and D-lactate. Most forms of lactic acidosis are caused by too much L-lactate. Lactic acidosis has many causes and can often be treated. But if left untreated, it may be life-threatening. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are typical of many health issues. If you experience any of these symptoms, you should contact your doctor immediately. Your doctor can help determine the root cause. Several symptoms of lactic acidosis represent a medical emergency: fruity-smelling breath (a possible indication of a serious complication of diabetes, called ketoacidosis) confusion jaundice (yellowing of the skin or the whites of the eyes) trouble breathing or shallow, rapid breathing If you know or suspect that you have lactic acidosis and have any of these symptoms, call 911 or go to an emergency room right away. Other lactic acidosis symptoms include: exhaustion or extreme fatigue muscle cramps or pain body weakness overall feelings of physical discomfort abdominal pain or discomfort diarrhea decrease in appetite headache rapid heart rate Lactic acidosis has a wide range of underlying causes, including carbon monoxide poisoni Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Lactic Acidosis - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Lactic acidosis is a rare complication of malignancy and is seen in patients who have cancer with a high proliferative rate such as lymphoma, leukemia, and small cell carcinoma. Generoso G. Gascon, ... Bruce Cohen, in Textbook of Clinical Neurology (Third Edition) , 2007 Primary lactic acidosis of the neonate usually ends in death within months. In an occasional infant, the lactic acidosis becomes less severe, and the infant will develop nearly normally until adolescence, when neurodegeneration may be observed. If definite nuclear gene mutations are identified in the future in patients with primary lactic acidosis, prenatal diagnosis using chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis should be feasible. The prognosis of the other congenital lactic acidoses depends on the underlying biochemical defectsbest with biotinidase deficiency and the gluconeogenic defects, less with PDH, PC, and Krebs' cycle defects. Ian W. Seetho, John P.H. Wilding, in Clinical Biochemistry: Metabolic and Clinical Aspects (Third Edition) , 2014 Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious complication that can occur whilst taking metformin. Lactic acidosis was more frequently reported with phenformin, another biguanide that was subsequently withdrawn in most countries in 1977 after 306 documented cases. While phenformin excretion relies upon hepatic hydroxylation (pharmacogenetically deficient in approximately 10% of Caucasians), metformin is subject to renal tubular secretion, and its excretion depends only on renal function. Lactic acidosis presents with non-specific symptoms such as lethargy, nausea, vomiting, altered level of consciousness and abdominal pain. Biochemical features of lactic acidosis are those of an elevated anion gap metabolic acidosis with high blood lactate concentrations. There ap Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

The buildup of lactic acid in the bloodstream. This medical emergency most commonly results from oxygen deprivation in the body’s tissues, impaired liver function, respiratory failure, or cardiovascular disease. It can also be caused by a class of oral diabetes drugs called biguanides, which includes metformin (brand name Glucophage). Another biguanide called phenformin was pulled from the market in the United States in 1977 because of an unacceptably high rate of lactic acidosis associated with its use. Concerns about lactic acidosis also delayed the introduction of metformin to the U.S. market until 1995, despite the fact that it had been widely used for years in other countries. There have been reports of lactic acidosis occurring in people taking metformin, and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration estimates that lactic acidosis occurs in 5 out of every 100,000 people who use metformin for any length of time. However, this risk is much lower than it was in people taking phenformin, and it is not clear whether the episodes of lactic acidosis associated with metformin have actually been due to metformin use. In fact, the lactic acidosis could have been explained by the person’s diabetes and related medical conditions. Nonetheless, diabetes experts recommend that metformin not be used in people with congestive heart failure, kidney disease, or liver disease. They also recommend that it be discontinued (at least temporarily) in people undergoing certain medical imaging tests called contrast studies. Symptoms of lactic acidosis include feeling very weak or tired or having unusual muscle pain or unusual stomach discomfort. Continue reading >>

Hiv & Aids Information :: Factsheet Lactic Acidosis

Hiv & Aids Information :: Factsheet Lactic Acidosis

Please enter the email address. Separate multiple addresses with a comma. Lactic acidosis refers to a build-up of lactic acid in the blood. It is a rare but dangerous side-effect of some anti-HIV drugs most of these are no longer in regular use. Your HIV clinic will use blood tests to check your levels of lactic acid. Lacticacidosis is very rare. Nevertheless, it is an important subject to understandbecause people who develop the condition can become dangerously ill. Lacticacidosis is a serious side-effect of the nucleosidereverse transcriptaseinhibitor (NRTI)class of anti-HIV drugs. This class includes abacavir (Ziagen),didanosine (ddI, Videx), lamivudine (3TC, Epivir), stavudine (d4T,Zerit), tenofovir (Viread) andzidovudine (AZT, Retrovir). The drugsmost linked with lactic acidosis are stavudine and didanosine. However, neitherof these drugs is now used if any other treatment options are available, mainlybecause of the side-effects they can cause. Lactic acidosis is also apotential, but rare, side-effect of other drugs, including the commonlyprescribed diabetes drug, metformin. The term lactic acidosis is used to describehigh levels of a substance called lactate in the blood. Lactate is a by-productof the processing of sugar within the body. Lacticacidosis is one of several conditions which are believed to be caused by damage to mitochondria . Mitochondriaare found in all human cells and are involved in the production of energy.Other possible side-effects ofNRTIs which may also be associated withdamage to mitochondria include peripheral neuropathy (numbness or pain in the feetand hands); bone marrow suppression; pancreatitis (inflammation of thepancreas); hepatic steatosis (accumulation of fat in the liver); and myopathy(muscle damage). "Lactic acidosis may occurat a Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis

Lactic Acidosis

Type B Lactic acidosis type B is associated with certain diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus), some drugs—notably biguanides, certain toxins, and some inborn errors of metabolism (Table I). Tissue hypoxia and hypotension are not obvious features of type B lactic acidosis but may supervene as a consequence of the acidemia. The incidence of lactic acidosis among patients with diabetes has declined since the biguanide phenformin (phenylethybiguanide) was withdrawn in many countries during the 1970s. Lactic acidosis occurred approximately 10–15 times more frequently during phenformin therapy than with metformin. An inherited inability to hydroxylate phenformin may explain the higher risk of lactic acidosis than with metformin. Lactic acidosis complicating metformin (dimethylbiguanide) occurs much less commonly, with most cases being reported among patients in whom biguanide therapy is contraindicated (e.g., renal impairment or hypoxic states). LACTIC ACIDOSIS Lactic acidosis occurs whenever lactate production exceeds its utilization. This can occur with tissue hypoxia or in nonhypoxemic conditions when cellular metabolism is impaired. Type A lactic acidosis is the hypoxic form. It can occur with true hypoxemia, severe anemia, reduced oxygen delivery from poor perfusion, or from dramatically increased tissue demand from exercise, convulsions, or heat stroke.1,3,4,7 Type B lactic acidosis is the nonhypoxic form. It occurs in the face of adequate oxygen delivery when mitochondrial oxidative function is abnormal. This can occur with drugs or toxins, hypoglycemia, diabetes mellitus, liver failure, renal failure, lymphosarcoma, sepsis, and inborn errors of metabolism (Box 60-1).1,2,4 PROGNOSIS AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES Primary lactic acidosis of the neonate usually ends in death Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Publications Published: July 1998 Information on this subject has been updated. Read the most recent information. Dr P Pillans,former Medical Assessor, Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring (CARM), Dunedin Metformin is a useful anti-hyperglycaemic agent but significant mortality is associated with drug-induced lactic acidosis. Significant renal and hepatic disease, alcoholism and conditions associated with hypoxia (eg. cardiac and pulmonary disease, surgery) are contraindications to the use of metformin. Other risk factors for metformin-induced lactic acidosis are sepsis, dehydration, high dosages and increasing age. Metformin remains a major reported cause of drug-associated mortality in New Zealand. Of the 12 cases of lactic acidosis associated with metformin reported to CARM since 1977, 2 occurred in the last year and 8 cases had a fatal outcome. Metformin useful but small risk of potentially fatal lactic acidosis Metformin is a useful therapeutic agent for obese non-insulin dependent diabetics and those whose glycaemia cannot be controlled by sulphonylurea monotherapy. Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect. The reported frequency of lactic acidosis is 0.06 per 1000 patient-years, mostly in patients with predisposing factors.1 Examples of metformin-induced lactic acidosis cases reported to CARM include: A 69-year-old man, with renal and cardiac disease, was prescribed metformin due to failing glycaemic control on glibenclamide monotherapy. He was well for six weeks, then developed lactic acidosis and died within 3 days. Post-surgical lactic acidosis caused the death of a 70-year-old man whose metformin was not withdrawn at the time of surgery. A 56-year-old woman, with no predisposing disease, died from lactic acidosis following major Continue reading >>

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise

Lactic Acidosis And Exercise

Lactic acid builds up naturally in the muscles during vigorous activity. Sometimes if we've overdone it during a workout or run, the body can't clear lactic acid or lactate quickly enough, and lactic acid levels build up. Lactic acid can irritate muscles, causing discomfort and soreness. Sore muscles after exercising is called delayed onset muscle soreness or DOMS. Lactic acid is just one cause of DOMS. Because lactic acid is removed from muscles between a few hours to under a day after a workout, it can't be blamed for lasting soreness some days after working out. Cooling down or warming down after exercise can help remove the lactic acid as well as letting the heart rate slow down more gradually. Some severe medical conditions can also cause lactic acidosis, which can be dangerous. During exercise, muscles metabolise glucose (sugar) into energy. Muscles receive glucose continually through the blood, and also have their own stores of sugar (called glycogen). Every person has an upper limit of exercise ability, called the anaerobic threshold or lactate threshold. The lactate threshold is basically a measurement of how fit the heart and blood vessels are. With regular exercise training, a persons lactate threshold goes up. Exercising at an intensity level below the lactate threshold produces very little lactic acid and the body quickly clears what is produced. A person can exercise below the lactate threshold for a long time, even for hours. Once the intensity of exercise exceeds the lactate threshold, muscles begin to use glucose inefficiently, through alternative chemical reactions. Lactic acid is produced and can rapidly build up in the blood and muscles. When a person's exercise intensity crosses the lactate threshold the activity rapidly becomes much more difficult Continue reading >>

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