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How Do You Reverse Ketoacidosis?

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Understanding And Treating Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a serious metabolic disorder that can occur in animals with diabetes mellitus (DM).1,2 Veterinary technicians play an integral role in managing and treating patients with this life-threatening condition. In addition to recognizing the clinical signs of this disorder and evaluating the patient's response to therapy, technicians should understand how this disorder occurs. DM is caused by a relative or absolute lack of insulin production by the pancreatic b-cells or by inactivity or loss of insulin receptors, which are usually found on membranes of skeletal muscle, fat, and liver cells.1,3 In dogs and cats, DM is classified as either insulin-dependent (the body is unable to produce sufficient insulin) or non-insulin-dependent (the body produces insulin, but the tissues in the body are resistant to the insulin).4 Most dogs and cats that develop DKA have an insulin deficiency. Insulin has many functions, including the enhancement of glucose uptake by the cells for energy.1 Without insulin, the cells cannot access glucose, thereby causing them to undergo starvation.2 The unused glucose remains in the circulation, resulting in hyperglycemia. To provide cells Continue reading >>

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  1. Starlight

    Post copied from CW Counsellors original post in the thread below
    DO NOT DRINK ALCOHOL IF YOU ARE KETOTIC!
    Alcohol is a powerful inhibitor of gluconeogenesis. In fact, it forces part of the gluconeogenic metabolic process into reverse. This means that if all the glucose in the blood is being derived from gluconeogenesis then the consumption of alcohol will inevitably cause the blood glucose level to fall. Worse still, the alcohol also stops ketone body production, thus leaving the brain entirely without fuel.
    A person who is ketotic is 100% reliant on gluconeogenesis to maintain adequate levels of glucose in the blood. If, under these circumstances alcohol is taken, the person will become disorientated and might lose consciousness, not just from the alcohol, but from low blood sugar. Needless to say, this could be very dangerous, and even fatal.
    Alcohol does not have these effects if the glycogen stores in the liver are normal. Under these circumstances the blood glucose level in the blood is maintained by the breakdown of liver glycogen, a process that is not influenced by alcohol. If a person becomes confused under these circumstances it is due simply to the pharmacological effects of the alcohol!
    http://www.minimins.com/cambridge-d...ation/26311-dangers-alcohol-when-ketosis.html

  2. SummerRain

    Thanks for this, I have a function coming up towards the end of Feb, I think I will gently knock myself out of ketosis the day before without gorging, eat a sensible meal on the day as well before going out in the evening. Do you think that will be ok?
    There is no point me saying I won't drink when I go there because I will and I would rather not be poorly! I won't have a lot, I never do but I am not going to take the risk with even one teeny drink whilst in KT. Just gutted have to get back into it after, oh well, life happens and all part of the learning curve

  3. babystar31

    I think this should definitely be a sticky! Thanks x

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