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How Do You Get Rid Of Ketones In Your Urine?

High Blood Glucose (hyper) & Type 1 Diabetes

High Blood Glucose (hyper) & Type 1 Diabetes

Key points Hyperglycaemia happens from time to time to all people who have diabetes. Hyperglycaemia is a major cause of many of the complications that happen to people who have diabetes. For this reason, it’s important to know what hyperglycaemia is, what its symptoms are, and how to treat it. Untreated hyperglycaemia diabetes can lead to a life threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). If you have Type 1 diabetes, you will often develop high blood glucose levels. Managing your Type 1 diabetes is a lot to do with developing problem solving skills and learning to use them. Remember that if your body is producing its own insulin, it alters the amount all the time (minute by minute). When you have Type 1 diabetes you have to do this consciously by using your knowledge and making sensible choices. Your diabetes nurse educator can help you learn the skills you need to do this. Some people prefer to get guidance on any of the choices they make. Everyone is different. If you are making choices you haven’t previously put into practice, get advice and support from your diabetes team before and while you make the changes. The effects of high blood glucose levels are probably what first led you to visit the doctor when your diabetes was diagnosed. Normally the human body keeps its blood glucose level very stable (between 4mmol/L – 7.5mmol/L). The body has various systems (regulated by hormones such as insulin and glucagon) for keeping the blood glucose level in this range. This doesn’t happen if you have Type 1 diabetes. Symptoms of high blood glucose levels Feeling thirsty Passing a lot of urine (you may need to get up often during the night) Feeling very tired Treatment for high blood glucose levels Try to work out why your glucose level is high. If it is Continue reading >>

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

The human body primarily runs on glucose. When your body is low on glucose, or if you have diabetes and don’t have enough insulin to help your cells absorb the glucose, your body starts breaking down fats for energy. Ketones (chemically known as ketone bodies) are byproducts of the breakdown of fatty acids. The breakdown of fat for fuel and the creation of ketones is a normal process for everyone. In a person without diabetes, insulin, glucagon, and other hormones prevent ketone levels in the blood from getting too high. However, people with diabetes are at risk for ketone buildup in their blood. If left untreated, people with type 1 diabetes are at risk for developing a condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). While rare, it’s possible for people with type 2 diabetes to experience DKA in certain circumstances as well. If you have diabetes, you need to be especially aware of the symptoms that having too many ketones in your body can cause. These include: If you don’t get treatment, the symptoms can progress to: a fruity breath odor stomach pain trouble breathing You should always seek immediate medical attention if your ketone levels are high. Testing your blood or urine to measure your ketone levels can all be done at home. At-home testing kits are available for both types of tests, although urine testing continues to be more common. Urine tests are available without a prescription at most drugstores, or you can buy them online. You should test your urine or blood for ketones when any of the following occurs: Your blood sugar is higher than 240 mg/dL. You feel sick or nauseated, regardless of your blood sugar reading. To perform a urine test, you urinate into a clean container and dip the test strip into the urine. For a child who isn’t potty-trained, a pa Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

What are ketones and what causes them? Ketones are the result of the body burning fat for energy or fuel. For a person with diabetes, ketones are often the result of prolonged high blood sugar and insulin deficiency. Without the right amount of insulin, glucose starts to build up in the blood stream and doesn't enter the cells. The cells burn fat instead of glucose, and ketones form in the blood and spill into the urine. Some causes of high blood sugar are: Missing an insulin dose or skipping some oral medications. A disconnected or blocked insulin pump tube. Being sick with the flu. High levels of stress. Eating more carbohydrates than your medication covers. What are the signs that I should test for ketones? Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, frequent thirst, blurry vision, dry mouth, vomiting, and fatigue. There are several scenarios that should prompt a test for ketones. If your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl for two tests in a row. When you are ill. When your blood sugar is over 240 mg/dl and you are planning on exercising. If you are pregnant, you should test for ketones each morning before breakfast and whenever blood sugars are elevated. How do I test for ketones? There are two ways to test for ketones - by testing your urine or your blood. Ketones appear first in the blood stream and are later present in the urine, so testing your blood for ketones is the best way to check for an early problem. To check urine for ketones, you must collect a urine sample or dip a ketone test strip into a fresh stream of urine. After waiting for the time suggested by the ketone strip manufacturer, you compare the color strip to the chart on the bottle. The darker the color, the higher the amount of ketones in the urine. At this time, there are just a few mete Continue reading >>

Five Things To Know About Ketones

Five Things To Know About Ketones

If you live with diabetes, you have probably heard that ketones are something to watch out for. That they have something to do with the dreaded diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). But do you really understand what ketones are and why they happen? It’s scary to think about, sure. But it’s also very important to be in the know about ketones and to be prepared. 1) What are ketones? If there isn’t enough insulin in your system, you can’t turn glucose into energy. So your body starts breaking down body fat. Ketones are a chemical by-product of this process. This can occur when people with type 1 diabetes don’t take insulin for long periods of time, when insulin pumps fail to deliver insulin and the wearer does not monitor blood glucose, or during serious illness (in type 1 or type 2) when insulin doses are missed or not increased appropriately for the stress of illness. Ketones can happen to anyone with diabetes, but the condition is more common in people with type 1. 2) Why are ketones dangerous? Ketones upset the chemical balance of your blood and, if left untreated, can poison the body. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Eventually they build up in the blood. The presence of ketones could be a sign that you are experiencing, or will soon develop, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA)—a life-threatening medical emergency. 3) When should I test for ketones, and how? There are several situations in which it is a good idea to check for ketones, usually every four to six hours. Talk to your doctor to know what makes the most sense for you and your diabetes management plan. Your blood glucose is more than 300 mg/dl (or a level recommended by your doctor) You feel nauseated, are vomiting or have abdominal pain You are Continue reading >>

Blood And Urine Ketones

Blood And Urine Ketones

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: Ketones are made when your body turns fat into energy. This happens when your body does not have enough insulin to turn sugar into energy. Ketones are released into your blood. Your kidneys get rid of ketones in your urine. You may need to test your urine or blood for ketones when your blood sugar levels are high. Early treatment for high levels of urine or blood ketones may prevent diabetic ketoacidosis. Diabetic ketoacidosis is a life-threatening condition that can lead to coma or death. DISCHARGE INSTRUCTIONS: Call 911 for any of the following: You have a seizure. You begin to breathe fast, or are short of breath. Return to the emergency department immediately if: You become weak and confused. You have fruity, sweet breath. You have severe, new stomach pain and are vomiting. You are more drowsy than usual. Contact your healthcare provider if: Your ketone level is higher than your healthcare provider said it should be. Your blood sugar level is lower or higher than your healthcare provider says it should be. You have moderate or large amounts of ketones in your urine or blood. You have a fever or chills. You are more thirsty than usual. You are urinating more often than usual. You have questions or concerns about your condition or care. When to test your urine or blood for ketones: Your healthcare provider will tell you if you need to test your urine or blood. Test for ketones when you have any of the following: Your blood sugar level is higher than 300 mg/dl. You have nausea, abdominal pain, or are vomiting. You have an illness such as a cold or the flu. You feel more tired than usual. You are more thirsty than normal or have a dry mouth. Your skin is flushed. You urinate more than usual. How to test for urine ketones: Ask your healthcare provi Continue reading >>

Ketones And Exercise – What You Need To Know

Ketones And Exercise – What You Need To Know

A researcher on diabetes and exercise describes why exercise elevates risk of DKA for people with Type 1 diabetes. In a new set of guidelines for Type 1 diabetes and exercise, I and my fellow researchers warn that people with Type 1 diabetes need to monitor for elevated levels of ketones during exercise. If you have Type 1 and exercise regularly, testing for ketones could save your life. Ketones develop in our bodies when we mobilize fat as fuel. Fat is an important energy source that is used by the body at rest and during exercise. Ketones are a general term in medicine used to describe the three main ketone bodies that the liver produces – acetoacetate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, and acetone. Read “Too Many with Type 1 Don’t Test for Ketones.” sponsor Ketone bodies help fuel the brain and skeletal muscle during times of prolonged fasting or starvation, so in a way ketones are very important for survival. We actually have enough stored fat to generate energy for days, but this can cause a number of metabolic problems, the most important of which is ketoacidosis. In Type 1 diabetes, ketone levels can rise even without starvation, if insulin levels drop too much and levels of other hormones like glucagon and catecholamines rise. This rise in ketone levels in diabetes can cause a life-threatening condition called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Read “How DKA Happens and What to Do About it.” The symptoms of ketoacidosis include: A lack of energy, weakness, and fatigue Nausea and vomiting, stomach pain, decreased appetite Rapid weight loss Decreased perspiration, foul or fruity breath Altered consciousness, mild disorientation or confusion Coma sponsor The reasons for developing high ketone levels in Type 1 diabetes include: Missed insulin injections Failure of insulin Continue reading >>

What Are Ketones?

What Are Ketones?

Ketones are an acid remaining when the body burns its own fat. When the body has insufficient insulin (or cannot use sufficient insulin), it cannot get glucose (sugar) from the blood into the body's cells to use as energy and will instead begin to burn fat stores. When the body is burning too much fat, it may cause ketones to become present as by product shown in your urine. Burning fat instead of glucose can lead to a condition called ketosis. It can make you feel poorly, with lack of energy. If you have healthy or low BMI it can also be dangerous as you may also lose too much weight. Testing for ketones Your urine is usually tested for ketones during your diabetes clinic appointments. You may also be tested for ketones if you have been taken into hospital with high blood sugar levels. Ketones are detected by testing the urine with a dip stick. They are measured on a scale with 0 being lowest and 4++ being the highest. The test sticks can be purchased from a pharmacy or online and in some cases you may be prescribed test strips for home testing for if you get blood sugar levels over a certain level. Your diabetes midwife will usually complete ketone tests when you attend clinic appointments, so it is not necessary to purchase dip sticks for home use unless you're advised to by a medical professional. Blood ketones can also be tested and are much more accurate than the urine dip sticks. Type 1 diabetics may be given ketone blood testing monitors. Why are ketones common in ladies diagnosed with gestational diabetes? Ketones can be detected when you have not eaten for a long period of time and may be found in samples taken in the morning due to fasting overnight. It is common for mothers with gestational diabetes to develop ketones due to limiting too many carbohydrates f Continue reading >>

Urine Test For Ketones

Urine Test For Ketones

A A A Topic Overview Ketones are substances that are made when the body breaks down fat for energy. Normally, your body gets the energy it needs from glucose (sugar). If your body cannot use glucose for energy—for example, if your body doesn't make or use insulin—ketones are formed. You might also have ketones if you are not eating enough carbohydrates and your body uses fat for energy instead. Your body wants to get rid of ketones through urine. Ketones in urine is most common in people who have type 1 diabetes. It is an early sign that there is not enough insulin, and blood sugar may be dangerously high. This can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, a very serious medical problem. You can test your urine for ketones at home using specially prepared tablets or plastic strips. Collect a urine sample in a clean container. Follow the manufacturer's directions on the bottle of test strips or tablets. If either the test strip or the urine changes color when the tablet is dropped into the sample, ketones are present in your urine sample. The test results are read as negative to 1+ to 4+ or small to large. If the results of your ketone test show that the ketone level in your urine is more than 2+, or moderate, call your doctor for advice. Credits Continue reading >>

February /march 2002

February /march 2002

About Diabetes Food & Diabetes Medications & Diabetes Current Issue Archive En Español Recommended Websites Your Guide to Diet and Diabetes Recipes for Diabetes Fiesta of Flavors: Traditional Hispanic Recipes for People with Diabetes In This Issue Diabetes - The Medical Perspective Diabetes and Food Recipes to Try Exercise as a Part of Living Medication Update New Resources Diabetes -The Medical Perspective Ketosis is the condition of having too many ketones in the blood. Ketones are waste products made when your body is forced to burn body fat, instead of glucose, for energy. Your body gets rid of ketones by emptying them into your urine. Your body will use body fat instead of glucose when any of the following situations occur: You have a high blood glucose (hyperglycemia) caused by too much food and/or too little insulin. Without the right amount of insulin, your body burns fat for energy. You have a low blood glucose (hypoglycemia) caused by too much insulin and/or too little food. When your body does not have enough glucose to be used for energy, it uses fat instead. Using a lot of energy as in exercise, stress, or illness. How do I know if I have ketones in my urine? If you have high blood glucose and/or have some symptoms from the list below you may have a high level of ketones. If you have high blood glucose levels, and your ketones are high for long periods of time, you could develop ketoacidosis. Signs of ketoacidosis or ketones in your urine, include... dry mouth/great thirst fruity breath loss of appetite nausea/vomiting dry, flushed skin/fever fatigue/drowsiness frequent urination labored breathing. If you have these symptoms, or have a blood glucose level over 240 mg/dL, you should test your urine using a ketone test kit. If you have large amounts of keton Continue reading >>

Ketones In Urine

Ketones In Urine

I know this is an old post, but people may still be checking for answers. I work in a laboratory where we do urinalysis constantly all day every day. In a pregnant woman, you can see ketones in the urine in two, but separate, circumstances. First is ketones in combination with any urine glucose (sugar) level. This may be a sign of gestational diabetes and you should start asking your doctor questions about it. Second is ketones by themselves. I'm 12 weeks pregnant and had ketones in my urine and was instructed by my doctor to go to the ER and get IV fluids. This was directly related to my eating habits, which at that point were near null because of the morning sickness. Because I was eating so little, and barely able to keep water down, my body was using my fat stores to supply nutrients to the baby. This breakdown of fat in such large amounts causes ketones as a waste product, which is then excreted through your urine. Ketones occur in the absence of carbs, when your body starts to use fat for calories. You will see ketones when you are eating very low calorie, very low carb, or have impaired insulin function. Ketones are concentrated in a state of dehydration. Excess glucose in urine indicates eating too many carbs (if you're diabetic) and/or impaired insulin function. Both are hallmarked by sweet smelling urine. Make sure you eat small meals during the day and add a night time snack, with a protein, to prevent ketosis while sleeping. If you think you have diabetes see a physician. I am 38 weeks pregnant and my urin showed high ketones this week. My blood sugar was in "acceptable" level; however, my doctor said that the presence of ketones in my urine means I need to drink alot more water because my body is converting carbs to sugar faster than I can exp Continue reading >>

What To Do If You Have Ketones

What To Do If You Have Ketones

I woke up pretty late today, around 11am. I really didn’t feel like getting up at all because I was still really tired. I was woken up by a ringing house phone that I ignored, then a cell phone with my husband on the other end. Then my mom coming downstairs to get the laundry and reminding me that we were going out today. (I live in my parents basement apartment.) “Ok, Ok… I am getting up” I tell her. I took in a big yawn and stretch of the arms. Then I actually got up out of my bed. I felt weird but I just thought it was because I got out of the bed too quickly. I tried to lick my lips together, but I had no saliva in my mouth - it was like the Mojave desert in there. I went to the bathroom to wash up because now my mom was getting antsy and rushing me. Don’t you just love getting up like that? Anyway, I started to feel a bit nauseated after about 20 minutes. I know these symptoms all too well. Dry mouth, Nausea = High blood sugar or Ketones. So, I checked my blood sugar. 3 2 1 334. Oh boy. Ok, umm… how did this happen? I didn’t really eat anything high carb last night? I went to bed with a pretty decent number and I just changed my infusion set. I don’t feel sick. My pump site isn’t hurting. It really boggled my mind. I felt my heart race a bit and started feeling panicky, and my breathing was getting heavier. Can you say panic attack? I always get a little paranoid though, it’s just my thing. Anyway, I told myself “Ok, Gina just calm down, you know what to do.” So I did my thing. I went back into the bathroom and grabbed my Ketostix to check my urine for Ketones. This is something I do when I have an unexpected high blood sugar with nausea. My urine test came out with Large, the highest level. Ugh. Ketones on the back of the bottle start out w Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

A Preventable Crisis People who have had diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, will tell you it’s worse than any flu they’ve ever had, describing an overwhelming feeling of lethargy, unquenchable thirst, and unrelenting vomiting. “It’s sort of like having molasses for blood,” says George. “Everything moves so slow, the mouth can feel so dry, and there is a cloud over your head. Just before diagnosis, when I was in high school, I would get out of a class and go to the bathroom to pee for about 10–12 minutes. Then I would head to the water fountain and begin drinking water for minutes at a time, usually until well after the next class had begun.” George, generally an upbeat person, said that while he has experienced varying degrees of DKA in his 40 years or so of having diabetes, “…at its worst, there is one reprieve from its ill feeling: Unfortunately, that is a coma.” But DKA can be more than a feeling of extreme discomfort, and it can result in more than a coma. “It has the potential to kill,” says Richard Hellman, MD, past president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. “DKA is a medical emergency. It’s the biggest medical emergency related to diabetes. It’s also the most likely time for a child with diabetes to die.” DKA occurs when there is not enough insulin in the body, resulting in high blood glucose; the person is dehydrated; and too many ketones are present in the bloodstream, making it acidic. The initial insulin deficit is most often caused by the onset of diabetes, by an illness or infection, or by not taking insulin when it is needed. Ketones are your brain’s “second-best fuel,” Hellman says, with glucose being number one. If you don’t have enough glucose in your cells to supply energy to your brain, yo Continue reading >>

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes With Ketone Bodies In Cats

Diabetes Mellitus with Ketoacidosis in Cats The term “ketoacidosis” refers to a condition in which levels of acid abnormally increased in the blood due to presence of “ketone bodies.” Meanwhile, diabetes is a medical condition in which the body cannot absorb sufficient glucose, thus causing a rise the blood sugar levels. In diabetes with ketoacidosis, ketoacidosis immediately follows diabetes. It should be considered a dire emergency, one in which immediate treatment is required to save the life of the animal. Typically, the type of condition affects older cats; in addition, female cats are more prone diabetes with ketoacidosis than males. Symptoms and Types Weakness Lethargy Depression Lack of appetite (anorexia) Muscle wasting Rough hair coat Dehydration Dandruff Sweet breath odor Causes Although the ketoacidosis is ultimately brought on by the cat's insulin dependency due to diabetes mellitus, underlying factors include stress, surgery, and infections of the skin, respiratory, and urinary tract systems. Concurrent diseases such as heart failure, kidney failure, asthma, cancer may also lead to this type of condition. Diagnosis You will need to give a thorough history of your cat’s health, including the onset and nature of the symptoms, to your veterinarian. He or she will then perform a complete physical examination, as well as a biochemistry profile and complete blood count (CBC). The most consistent finding in patients with diabetes is higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. If infection is present, white blood cell count will also high. Other findings may include: high liver enzymes, high blood cholesterol levels, accumulation in the blood of nitrogenous waste products (urea) that are usually excreted in the urine (azotemia), low sodium levels Continue reading >>

When To Worry About Ketones

When To Worry About Ketones

“Your blood sugar is over 250. We’ll have to test for ketones, just to make sure you’re not spilling any.” The nurse stuck a label featuring my name and date of birth onto a plastic cup. “The bathroom is down the hall and to the right,” she said. By now, I was familiar with the drill, having experienced it a handful of times in the past: Provide urine sample to endocrinologist and keep my fingers crossed that it’s negative. Fortunately, it was—no ketones spilled. Though we often toss the word ketones around when we talk about diabetes, there tends to be confusion about what ketones are and when they’re dangerous. What are ketones? Ketone bodies are produced by the liver and are byproducts of fat metabolism. They occur when muscles in the body (which normally uses glucose as fuel) begin to use fat instead. This can happen when a person restricts carbohydrates (i.e., following a ketogenic diet—see below), eats too little, or feels ill. Simply put, ketones are markers of fat burning in the body. People with diabetes need to be concerned about ketones, though, because they can be a sign of a life-threatening condition. The presence of ketones makes the blood acidic and can result in an illness known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which occurs when blood sugar levels are very high. DKA can be caused by not getting enough insulin, and it may occur prior to a diagnosis of type one diabetes. DKA symptoms of concern include a dry mouth, blood sugar levels greater than 240 mg/dL, strong thirst, and frequent urination. Without treatment, these symptoms can worsen into confusion, extreme fatigue, flushed skin, fruity-smelling breath, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, and difficulty breathing. The most serious effects include swelling in the brain, loss of conscio Continue reading >>

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Facts Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a condition that may occur in people who have diabetes, most often in those who have type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes. It involves the buildup of toxic substances called ketones that make the blood too acidic. High ketone levels can be readily managed, but if they aren't detected and treated in time, a person can eventually slip into a fatal coma. DKA can occur in people who are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and have had ketones building up in their blood prior to the start of treatment. It can also occur in people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes that have missed an insulin dose, have an infection, or have suffered a traumatic event or injury. Although much less common, DKA can occasionally occur in people with type 2 diabetes under extreme physiologic stress. Causes With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make the hormone insulin, which the body's cells need in order to take in glucose from the blood. In the case of type 2 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to make sufficient amounts of insulin in order to take in glucose from the blood. Glucose, a simple sugar we get from the foods we eat, is necessary for making the energy our cells need to function. People with diabetes can't get glucose into their cells, so their bodies look for alternative energy sources. Meanwhile, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, and by the time DKA occurs, blood glucose levels are often greater than 22 mmol/L (400 mg/dL) while insulin levels are very low. Since glucose isn't available for cells to use, fat from fat cells is broken down for energy instead, releasing ketones. Ketones accumulate in the blood, causing it to become more acidic. As a result, many of the enzymes that control the body's metabolic processes aren't able Continue reading >>

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