diabetestalk.net

How Do You Get Out Of Ketoacidosis?

Share on facebook

What is DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS? What does DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS mean? DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS meaning - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS definition - DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a potentially life-threatening complication of diabetes mellitus. Signs and symptoms may include vomiting, abdominal pain, deep gasping breathing, increased urination, weakness, confusion, and occasionally loss of consciousness. A person's breath may develop a specific smell. Onset of symptoms is usually rapid. In some cases people may not realize they previously had diabetes. DKA happens most often in those with type 1 diabetes, but can also occur in those with other types of diabetes under certain circumstances. Triggers may include infection, not taking insulin correctly, stroke, and certain medications such as steroids. DKA results from a shortage of insulin; in response the body switches to burning fatty acids which produces acidic ketone bodies. DKA is typically diagnosed when testing finds high b

What Is Diabetic Ketoacidosis?

Diabetic Ketoacidosis GENERAL INFORMATION: What is diabetic ketoacidosis? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is a life-threatening condition caused by dangerously high blood sugar levels. Your blood sugar levels become high because your body does not have enough insulin. Insulin helps move sugar out of the blood so it can be used for energy. The lack of insulin forces your body to use fat instead of sugar for energy. As fats are broken down, they leave chemicals called ketones that build up in your blood. Ketones are dangerous at high levels. What increases my risk for DKA? Not enough insulin Poorly controlled diabetes Infection or other illness Heart attack, stroke, trauma, or surgery Certain medicines such as steroids or blood pressure medicines Illegal drugs such as cocaine Emotional stress Pregnancy What are the signs and symptoms of DKA? More thirst and more frequent urination than usual Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting Blurry vision Dry mouth, eyes, and skin, or your face is red and warm Fast, deep breathing, and a faster heartbeat than normal for you Weak, tired, and confused Fruity, sweet breath Mood changes and irritability How is DKA diagnosed? Your healthcare provider will Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. jcpryor3

    Cyclical Ketogenic Diet + Intermittent Fasting

    Hey everyone! I was wondering how I would go about implementing the CKD and IF. I kinda have an idea, but I'm not to sure. I plan on using a workout routine designed for CKD. In one of the Keto forums, there is a thread from Blindfaith titled, "Step By Step Keto Diet Plan." I will be using the workout from that thread most likely, if not, something fairly similar.
    I'm guessing I would need to follow some of the keto guidelines (i.e. 65% fat, 30% protein, 0-5% carbs, as well as carb refeeeding during the weekends) and some IF guidelines (i.e. 16/8, 10g bcaa pre-workout). Monday through thursday I would be doing IF, while implementing keto guidelines mentioned above to enter ketosis. Friday will be my depletion workout followed by a carb refeed. I understand that a carb refeed lasts anywhere from 24-36hrs, starting Friday evening and ending Saturday at midnight. Correct me if I'm wrong because I've been doing a lot of research lately and still trying to process it all so I can get the ball rolling finally. Anyways, fridays and saturdays would be used strictly for carb refeeding, which would mean that I have to ditch IF starting friday evening until saturday at midnight. I would begin IF again starting Sunday morning.
    What I need to know is if this would work out. Thoughts, input, and concerns are all welcome. Thank you in advance!

  2. KLMARB

    Originally Posted by jcpryor3
    Hey everyone! I was wondering how I would go about implementing the CKD and IF. I kinda have an idea, but I'm not to sure. I plan on using a workout routine designed for CKD. In one of the Keto forums, there is a thread from Blindfaith titled, "Step By Step Keto Diet Plan." I will be using the workout from that thread most likely, if not, something fairly similar.
    I'm guessing I would need to follow some of the keto guidelines (i.e. 65% fat, 30% protein, 0-5% carbs, as well as carb refeeeding during the weekends) and some IF guidelines (i.e. 16/8, 10g bcaa pre-workout). Monday through thursday I would be doing IF, while implementing keto guidelines mentioned above to enter ketosis. Friday will be my depletion workout followed by a carb refeed. I understand that a carb refeed lasts anywhere from 24-36hrs, starting Friday evening and ending Saturday at midnight. Correct me if I'm wrong because I've been doing a lot of research lately and still trying to process it all so I can get the ball rolling finally. Anyways, fridays and saturdays would be used strictly for carb refeeding, which would mean that I have to ditch IF starting friday evening until saturday at midnight. I would begin IF again starting Sunday morning.
    What I need to know is if this would work out. Thoughts, input, and concerns are all welcome. Thank you in advance!

    Yes, it will work well. The reason IF works well with a ketogenic/sustained lipolytic nutritional pattern is that there is no significant amount of glycogen storage (except during recompensation periods) which acts as a buffer that interferes with sustained and adapted lipolysis. That's why IF combined with a carb-based cut often shows little advantage, due to the constant presence of glycogen, depending upon types and amounts of carbs consumed...

  3. jcpryor3

    If I'm understanding you correctly, your saying that IF + CKD work great together right? And IF complimented with a carb based diet has little advantage due to higher glycogen stores right?

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

Study Discussed: Comparison of low- and high-carbohydrate diets for type 2 diabetes management: a randomized trial. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26... Dr Neal Barnard's 74 week RCT: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/artic... PART 1 of Misleading Studies Series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kgM_A... --------------------------------- I'm a high carb vegan, and have been for over 5 years. I lost belly fat and significantly reduced severe acne through becoming vegan. I share videos that I hope will help you on your journey to becoming healthier, while also being kinder to the animals and the environment. Connect with me! Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/lisanloves Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lisanloves Twitter: https://twitter.com/lisanloves My Sugar Myths Series Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

Euglycemic Diabetic Ketoacidosis, A Misleading Presentation Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Go to: Introduction Hyperglycemia and ketosis in diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) are the result of insulin deficiency and an increase in the counterregulatory hormones glucagon, catecholamines, cortisol, and growth hormone. Three processes are mainly responsible for hyperglycemia: increased gluconeogenesis, accelerated glycogenolysis, and impaired glucose utilization by peripheral tissues. This might also be augmented by transient insulin resistance due to hormone imbalance, as well as elevated free fatty acids.[1] DKA is most commonly precipitated by infections. Other factors include discontinuation of or inadequate insulin therapy, pancreatitis, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular accident, and illicit drug use. The diagnostic criteria of DKA, established by the American Diabetic Association, consists of a plasma glucose of >250 mg/dL, positive urinary or serum ketones, arterial pH of <7.3, serum bicarbonate <18 mEq/L, and a high anion gap. The key diagnostic feature of DKA is elevated circulating total blood ketone concentration. Hyperglycemia is also a key diagnostic criterion of DKA; however, a wide range of plasma glucose levels can be present on admission. Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. blurfocus

    Your first, best, and cheapest option is not to use them.
    Ketostix do not measure what many people expect that they do.
    Ketostix only measure excess levels of acetoacetate, which is not the type of ketones that correlate with nutritional ketosis.
    Ketostix may show negative ketones when your blood ketones are high and then may show positive ketones when your blood ketones are low.
    Misinterpretation of what they show is one of the most common unnecessary causes of keto anxiety and wasted time. You can be perfectly successful on a ketogenic or low-carb diet without ever measuring ketones.
    Many people are already overwhelmed with learning about keto diets. Adding another layer of unnecessary complexity doesn't help the matter. Often, people are most successful on keto when they treat it as a lifestyle and not a diet. Obsessively measuring ketones can be at odds with attempting to live a keto lifestyle.
    If you decide to use Ketostix anyway, please be kind to those who answer questions here by not submitting a question that begins with I know that Ketostix are unreliable, but ...
    If you consume few enough carbohydrates and avoid excessive intake of protein, you can trust that your liver will be producing ketones within a single day. That is how human metabolism works.
    If you consume too many carbs, you will be kicked out of ketosis temporarily. However, if you once again restrict carbs, you will go right back into ketosis within 24 hours. This is because the liver can store only 100 grams of glycogen. If you restrict carbs, the liver will run out of glycogen within a day and begin burning fat instead. The liver produces ketones as a side effect of burning fat.
    As an example of how Ketostix can be misleading, it is possible to eat a high-carbohydrate meal followed by a positive Ketostix result. You may think that you cheated the system, but you didn't. It takes time for excess ketones to appear in urine. Ketostix are showing you what happened in the past before you cheated.
    If you have the time and really want to know why Ketostix will not tell you much, read pages 164 and 165 of The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living by Volek and Phinney. This is the section headed by Ketones: To Measure or Not.
    If you do not have this book, read this summary:
    http://ketopia.com/why-you-need-to-stop-worrying-about-the-color-of-your-ketostix/
    Ketostix were designed to help diabetics avoid ketoacidosis which is a dangerous condition involving very high blood sugar and very high serum ketones. If you have near normal blood sugar and serum ketone levels consistent with nutritional ketosis, you don't need to worry about this.
    Ketostix only measure excess levels of acetoacetate, which is not the type of ketones that correlate with nutritional ketosis.
    The ketones that correlate with nutritional ketosis are known as beta-hydroxybutyrate. This type can be measured only with a blood ketone meter.
    There is a built-in time lag. Ketostix are measuring what has happened in the past since it takes a while for the kidneys to produce urine.
    Exercise can influence how many excess ketones are excreted.
    You can be in nutritional ketosis even when Ketostix show no excess acetoacetate. In the keto-adapted state, very little acetoacetate ketones will be excreted in urine even though blood ketones may be high.
    Note that it takes a period of four to six weeks of being in ketosis every day in order to become keto-adapted. Someone who is keto-adapted has adapted to using fat as the primary fuel for muscles and various organs. The keto-adapted brain uses ketones in place of glucose for most of its energy needs. When keto-adapted, most acetoacetate is not excreted. Instead, muscles convert it to beta-hydroxybutyrate and return it to the blood for use by the brain.
    If after all of this, you still want to use Ketostix because you bought them and cannot bring yourself to throw them away or because they are comforting in some way, here is how they may be useful.
    When you are first starting a low-carb or keto diet and transitioning into ketosis from a moderate to high-carb diet, Ketostix will confirm that your body has in fact done what biology says that it must do. It will show that your liver has begun producing ketones.
    Once you are a few days into the diet, you can give them away to a keto newbie or toss them. Note that Ketostix will eventually expire, especially if you keep them in a moist environment like a bathroom.
    If you have a medical condition that makes monitoring blood ketone levels necessary or if you are a numbers geek with spending money, you may be interested in purchasing a ketone blood meter and test strips for measuring beta hydroxybutyrate in your blood. The test strips cost somewhere between $2 and $5 per strip.
    There are a few meters to choose from.
    Precision Xtra - https://www.abbottdiabetescare.com/products/patient/pxtra-overview.html
    Nova Max Plus - http://www.novacares.com/nova-max-plus/
    CardioChek Home - http://www.healthchecksystems.com/CardioChek.cfm#home
    Most use one of the first two listed (Precision Xtra or Nova Max Plus). Some say that the Precision Xtra is the more accurate of the two. I've found that readings from these two track fairly closely with each other. The Nova Max Plus has cheaper test strips.
    To detect nutritional ketosis, look for a reading between 0.5 and 5.0 mmol / liter. Some experts recommend aiming for a level of 1.0 to 5.0 mmol / liter.
    Another option is the Ketonix Sport breath meter. This meter measures acetate in the breath. It does not require test strips.
    Acetate forms when acetoacetate spontaneously breaks down to acetate. According to Volek and Phinney (page 165 of The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living), it should be linearly correlated with blood ketones. In practice, it is not as accurate as the blood meters in part because it is difficult to breathe in the same way every time you test.
    Ketonix Sport (order direct from Sweden) - https://www.ketonix.com/index.php/product/sport
    Again, remember that you can be perfectly successful on a ketogenic or low-carb diet without ever measuring ketones whether in urine, blood, or breath.
    In the final analysis, ketone concentrations are what they are. Chasing ketone concentrations often becomes as unnecessary and distracting as Ketostix. Unless you are treating epilepsy, cancer, or other medical condition, the concentration of ketones do not matter too much. You can achieve weight loss and a sense of well-being even with lower levels of ketones.
    Focus on how you feel, not on the number. Use ketone meters for interest and experimentation, but don't let the results stress you out.
    tl;dr never, unless you have read and understood this post, yet still want to use them anyway
    [If anyone has any suggestions for improving this post or correcting misinformation, let me know. I'll correct this and re-post it once in a while]

  2. anbeav

    Hallelujah!!
    tl;dr never
    If you want to do it for experimentation, go for it but please spare the rest of us the unnecessary ketosis anxiety
    edits: In addition to false negatives, ketostix commonly show false positives as in when people eat a high carb meal and think they cheated biology. Also I might remove the bit about using ketostix to monitor keto-adaptation, just asking for more posts about the issue. Also I might emphasize that people seem to already be overwhelmed with keto when starting and adding another layer of unnecessary complexity doesn't help the matter. People always talk about lifestyle, live a lifestyle and IMO living a lifestyle certainly shouldn't have to include measuring. Lastly, ketone concentrations are what they are. If you want to measure with a blood or breath meter, they are what they are and chasing ketone concentrations often becomes as unnecessary as ketostix. Unless someone has a medical condition for which a particular concentration is required for management, focus on how you feel not the number. Use the meter for interest and experimentation, but don't let it stress you out.

  3. blurfocus

    Thanks. I have incorporated your feedback.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
Share on facebook

What is KETOACIDOSIS? What does KETOACIDOSIS mean? KETOACIDOSIS meaning - KETOACIDOSIS definition - KETOACIDOSIS explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... Ketoacidosis is a metabolic state associated with high concentrations of ketone bodies, formed by the breakdown of fatty acids and the deamination of amino acids. The two common ketones produced in humans are acetoacetic acid and ß-hydroxybutyrate. Ketoacidosis is a pathological metabolic state marked by extreme and uncontrolled ketosis. In ketoacidosis, the body fails to adequately regulate ketone production causing such a severe accumulation of keto acids that the pH of the blood is substantially decreased. In extreme cases ketoacidosis can be fatal. Ketoacidosis is most common in untreated type 1 diabetes mellitus, when the liver breaks down fat and proteins in response to a perceived need for respiratory substrate. Prolonged alcoholism may lead to alcoholic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis can be smelled on a person's breath. This is due to acetone, a direct by-product of the sp

Ketoacidosis

Ketones in the urine, as detected by urine testing stix or a blood ketone testing meter[1], may indicate the beginning of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a dangerous and often quickly fatal condition caused by low insulin levels combined with certain other systemic stresses. DKA can be fixed if caught quickly. Diabetics of all species therefore need to be checked for ketones with urine testing stix, available at any pharmacy, whenever insulin level may be too low, and any of the following signs or triggers are present: Ketone Monitoring Needed: Little or no insulin in last 12 hours High blood sugar over 16 mmol/L or 300 mg/dL (though with low insulin, lower as well...) Dehydration (skin doesn't jump back after pulling a bit gums are tacky or dry)[2] Not eating for over 12 hours due to Inappetance or Fasting Vomiting Lethargy Infection or illness High stress levels Breath smells like acetone (nail-polish remover) or fruit. Note that the triggers and signs are somewhat interchangeable because ketoacidosis is, once begun, a set of vicious circles which will make itself worse. So dehydration, hyperglycemia, fasting, and presence of ketones are not only signs, they're also sometimes trigge Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. tim

    Firstly I want to preface with the fact that I'm not arguing as to the effects of saturated fats on your body and the many potential misconceptions the health industry has about saturated fats, I'm simply attempting identify a method of reaching ketosis through diet that can be achieved by anyone, consistently, without raising LDL cholesterol levels regardless of fitness levels and activity. Many people are scared off the diet after receiving blood work because of increased LDL and the more blood tests like these are seen by medical professionals the more it proliferates the negative opinions of ketogenic diets amongst the medical community.
    I made a post
    34 to the Facebook group today regarding the results of clinical studies vs individual reports of elevations in LDL cholesterol after following a ketogenic diet periods of up to 6-12 months. I'm creating this topic as a means for me to follow up on my blood panels over the coming weeks and to further break down my reasoning behind what I'm doing.
    Objective: Identifying a method of reaching ketosis consistently (through diet only) without increasing LDL cholesterol levels regardless of activity level by adapting saturated vs unsaturated fat intake to individual variables.
    Clinical studies have shown that ketogenic diets high in polyunsaturated fats result in increased ketone levels when compared to diets high in saturated fats. Additionally, the diets high in polyunsaturated fats resulted in no adverse effects on LDL cholesterol levels, while the diets higher in saturated fats resulted in significant increases.
    Link to full article
    180
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
    37
    Differential metabolic effects of saturated versus polyunsaturated fats in ketogenic diets.
    BS Fuehrlein, MS Rutenberg, JN Silver, MW Warren, DW Theriaque, GE Duncan, PW Stacpoole and ML Brantly, The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, Apr 2004
    Ketogenic diets (KDs) are used for treatment of refractory epilepsy and metabolic disorders. The classic saturated fatty acid-enriched (SAT) KD has a fat:carbohydrate plus protein ratio of 4:1, in which the predominant fats are saturated. We hypothesized that a polyunsaturated fat-enriched (POLY) KD would induce a similar degree of ketosis with less detrimental effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Twenty healthy adults were randomized to two different weight-maintaining KDs for 5 d. Diets were 70% fat, 15% carbohydrate, and 15% protein. The fat contents were 60 or 15% saturated, 15 or 60% polyunsaturated, and 25% monounsaturated for SAT and POLY, respectively. Changes in serum beta-hydroxybutyrate, insulin sensitivity (S(I)), and lipid profiles were measured. Mean circulating beta-hydroxybutyrate levels increased 8.4 mg/dl in the POLY group (P = 0.0004), compared with 3.1 mg/dl in the SAT group (P = 0.07). S(I) increased significantly in the POLY group (P = 0.02), whereas total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased significantly in the SAT group (both P = 0.002). These data demonstrate that a short-term POLY KD induces a greater level of ketosis and improves S(I), without adversely affecting total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with a traditional SAT KD. Thus, a POLY KD may be superior to a classical SAT KD for chronic administration.
    There are many arguments about whether or not having higher levels of LDL cholesterol matters as much as the medical community at large says it does but the fact remains, most medical professionals consider high levels of LDL to be dangerous and will recommend people stop the ketogenic diet more often than not.
    This causes two immediate problems:
    The individual panics and their first reaction is to stop the diet immediately, at the very least they'll continue amidst healthy anxiety
    The results of the blood test proliferate the stigma amongst medical professionals that there is causation between ALL ketogenic diets and higher levels of LDL cholesterol regardless of what the diet constituted of
    But some people have reductions in LDL cholesterol while on a high saturated fat versions of the keto diet, how can you explain that?
    While definitely not the only factor, the most obvious factor could be the level of physical activity the individual is involved in and the TYPE of physical activity it is. Studies have shown that aerobic exercise prevents increases in cholesterol from diets high in saturated fat.
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
    12
    Increased blood cholesterol after a high saturated fat diet is prevented by aerobic exercise training.
    JF Ortega, VE Fernández-Elías, N Hamouti and R Mora-Rodriguez, Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquee, nutrition et metabolisme, Jan 2013
    A high saturated fatty acids diet (HSFAD) deteriorates metabolic and cardiovascular health while aerobic training improves them. The aim of this study was to investigate in physically inactive and overweight people if 2 weeks of HSFAD leads to hyperlipemia or insulin resistance and if concurrent aerobic exercise training counteracts those effects. Fourteen overweight (body mass index, 27.5 ± 0.6 kg·m(-2)), healthy, young individuals (aged 24.8 ± 1.8 years) were randomly assigned to a diet (D) or a diet plus exercise (D + E) group. During 14 consecutive days both groups increased dietary saturated fatty acids from 31 ± 10 to 52 ± 14 g·day(-1) (p < 0.001) while maintaining total fat intake. Concurrent to the diet, the D + E group underwent 11 cycle-ergometer sessions of 55 min at 60% peak oxygen uptake (V˙O(2peak)). Before and after intervention, insulin sensitivity and body composition were estimated, and blood lipids, resting blood pressure, and VO(2peak) were measured. Body weight and composition, plasma free fatty acids composition and concentration, and insulin sensitivity remained unchanged in both groups. However, post-intervention total cholesterol (T(C)) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) increased above pre-intervention values in the D group (147 ± 8 to 161 ± 9 mg·dL(-1), p = 0.018 and 71 ± 10 to 82 ± 10 mg·dL(-1), p = 0.034, respectively). In contrast, in the D + E group, T(C) and LDL-C remained unchanged (153 ± 20 to 157 ± 24 mg·dL(-1) and 71 ± 21 to 70 ± 25 mg·dL(-1)). Additionally, the D + E group lowered systolic blood pressure (6 ± 2 mm Hg, p = 0.029) and increased VO(2peak) (6 ± 2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1), p = 0.020). Increases in T(C) and LDL-C concentration induced by 14 days of HSFAD can be prevented by concurrent aerobic exercise training, which, in addition, improves cardiorespiratory fitness.
    The ketogenic diet is gaining immense traction however it still suffers from one major setback, reports of increases in LDL cholesterol and the inevitable stigma that follows. To combat this stigma we now have research that shows our preconceptions of LDL may be unfounded to a certain degree, but like anything these arguments will take a long time to become mainstream.
    While there are many people that have successfully transitioned to a ketogenic diet without taking saturated vs unsaturated fats into consideration (and that's great for them) and have perfect blood work there are many that haven't. Instead of treating ketogenic diets as a one-size-fits-all approach backed up with modern & fringe arguments about LDL levels I propose that more thought needs to be put into the induction process.
    Before starting a ketogenic diet some questions need to be asked, these are just a few basic ideas that I've thrown around based on the studies I've read and sifting through causation and correlations.
    What is your level of activity? If you are very active aerobically then increasing your intake of saturated fats won't have the same impact on your LDL levels that someone with a sedentary lifestyle has (although the amount may differ for the individual). The goal, of course, is for everyone to be active but there are many heavy people on a ketogenic diet that are unable to exercise at their current weight. In these cases recommending at least a 20/80 ratio of saturated vs unsaturated fats may be a better approach until activity levels can be increased.
    Will elevations in LDL put you off the diet? GP's well versed in ketogenic diets are few and far between and you can't throw a stone without hitting a story about someone's GP recommending they stop their diet immediately 6 months into their diet. If this is something that will prevent you from continuing with your diet then reducing saturated fats may be a way of sticking to the diet long term while showing your GP that ketogenic diets can help lower LDL cholesterol at the same time leading them to become more interested in the topic and not writing it off. On the other hand if you are confident in studies regarding LDL not being as bad as previously thought then this won't be as much of an issue for you.
    There are still some unanswered questions that I hope to find the answers to, for instance how do the effects of cholesterol mobilising due to weight loss combat the effects of reducing saturated fat intake? Will one outweigh the other and if so which?

    I'll follow up with my own blood work and other results over the next several weeks.

  2. BillJay

    Great thread, I'll be watching since my LDL is sky-high and although it is Pattern A and currently considered to be unlikely to contribute to atherogenicity, the science is always evolving and that might change.
    tim:


    Clinical studies have shown that ketogenic diets high in polyunsaturated fats result in increased ketone levels when compared to diets high in saturated fats.
    I want to point out that in the following YouTube video Dr. Cate Shanahan points out the mechanism by which polyunsaturated fats work to lower LDL, which is why they're recommended by mainstream medical dogma, is to cause the LDL to actually stick to the vascular linings which induces atherogenic plaque, so it's usually a choice between saturated and monounsaturated fat while polyunsaturated fats should be incidental to the other fats consumed and not the determining factor.
    YouTube: Dr. Cate Shanahan - 'Practical Lipid Management for LCHF Patients'
    Dr. Cate Shanahan - 'Practical Lipid Management for LCHF Patients'
    176

    (The YouTube link in the editor appears fine, but when saved, it doesn't display correctly, so I'll monitor this and update it as necessary.)

  3. larry

    I'm bookmarking this fascinating and important thread.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • How Do You Get Out Of Ketoacidosis?

    Short-term high blood sugars are rarely lethal. However, for people with type 1 diabetes and some with type 2 who are not producing enough insulin, periods of high blood sugars can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis. The absence of insulin allows your blood to slowly become acidic. The body’s cells cannot survive under acidic conditions so the liver will try to help the cells that are starved for glucose and secrete glucose. When combined with dehyd ...

    ketosis Jan 11, 2018
  • Can You Get Ketoacidosis From A Low Carb Diet?

    10 Tips For Getting Into Nutritional Ketosis For Weight Loss What is Nutritional Ketosis? Ketosis is an eating plan where the body uses ketones to fuel the brain and body instead of glucose like most people use when on the SAD (standard American diet). It can be very helpful for blood sugar and consistent energy because fat is a very stable source of fuel. We all have a few million calories of fat we would gladly burn off, right? It takes a while ...

    diabetic diet Jan 11, 2018
  • How Can You Get Ketoacidosis

    Good question! According to Wikipedia: Diabetic ketoacidosis is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients with diabetes mellitus. In order to define ketoacidosis a little better, let's go back to the source: diabetes. Someone who is diabetic is unable to produce insulin, a hormone necessary for the transfer of sugar from the bloodstream to the cells, which in turn produce energy. If this progression is disrupted, through lack of ins ...

    ketosis Jan 3, 2018
  • Can Too Much Protein Get You Out Of Ketosis?

    You likely already know cutting the carbs is important on a keto diet, but protein intake matters, too! One of the biggest mistakes people run into when going and staying keto is eating too much protein. So, you might be left with the question: How much protein can you eat on a ketogenic diet? Let’s cover how you can avoid the mistake of consuming too much protein and exactly how much of it you can eat on a ketogenic diet. Eating Protein on the ...

    ketosis Jan 5, 2018
  • Why Do You Get Ketoacidosis

    Diabetic ketoacidosis, or DKA, is a serious health problem that can happen to a person with diabetes. It happens when chemicals called ketones build up in the blood. Normally, the cells of your body take in and use glucose as a source of energy. Glucose moves through the body in the bloodstream. Insulin is a hormone that helps your cells take in the glucose from the blood. If you have diabetes, your cells can’t take in and use this glucose in a ...

    ketosis Jan 3, 2018
  • Why Do You Get Ketoacidosis In Diabetes

    Diabetic ketoacidosis is a serious condition characterized by high blood sugar (hyperglycemia), low insulin, and the presence of moderate to large amounts of ketones in the blood. It's a medical emergency that requires treatment in a hospital. If not treated in a timely fashion, ketoacidosis can lead to coma and death. While diabetic ketoacidosis (or DKA) is much more common among people with type 1 diabetes, it can also occur in people with type ...

    diabetes Dec 29, 2017

Popular Articles

More in ketosis