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How Do You Avoid Ketosis?

3 Reasons You Might Want To Ditch That Ketogenic Eating Plan

3 Reasons You Might Want To Ditch That Ketogenic Eating Plan

Ketogenic eating might just be the most popular idea in the unconventional health and fitness movement right now. I get dozens of emails a week from people asking for Keto tips and tricks. I’m not convinced that most of these people should be Keto though. It’s been billed as a great way to lose weight, which has attracted a lot of attention, but it’s not all roses, unicorns, and fairy dust. Here’s three reasons why you might want to reconsider your plan to go Keto… 1. Ketogenic eating is obsessive. When I interviewed Jimmy Moore, author of Keto Clarity, this is one of the issues I brought up. Ketosis is notoriously difficult to get into, verify, and sustain without bringing back some of the old, obsessive Dieting strategies that we’ve been working hard to get away from. Tracking macros, monitoring blood glucose, and testing ketone levels are all required steps in the process for most people. This kind of protocol attracts people with disordered eating habits. It’s the perfect blend of effective, obsessive, and new. If you’re trying to get into ketosis for medical reasons, then you’ve gotta do what you’ve gotta do. If you want to get into ketosis because you heard it’s great for weight loss or for some other non-medical reason, it’s too obsessive for my taste. 2. Ketogenic eating probably doesn’t fit your lifestyle. You know me—I’m not a huge fan of cardio or long workouts. I’m bearish on exercise as a modern concept, but I’m bullish on functional fitness and DWYLT. In other words, I want people to do active things they love with a little sprinting and short functional strength workouts thrown in. In order to actually enjoy those things and feel strong and healthy when doing them, you’ll need adequate glycogen. That’s something that Continue reading >>

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

088.8KSHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS and Keto Max from Pruvit provide exogenous ketones. Maximize your ketone levels with a ketogenic diet approved food list. What is Ketosis? Explore the health benefits of ketosis for accelerated fat loss, disease prevention, better brain function, appetite control, performance, and more. Ketosis can often be a misunderstood subject. Some think it is part of a starvation diet or a alarming sign that something has gone wrong in your metabolism. But this is simply not the truth! You see, ketones – contrary to popular belief and myth – are a much needed and essential healing energy source in our cells that come from the normal metabolism of fat. Have you ever heard someone say that fats are “evil”? This has become the standard way of thinking in today’s society, which has led to our primary energy source coming from carbohydrates – sugar AKA glucose. Most people eat a diet high in carbohydrates or glucose. When sugar is your body’s primary energy source, that sugar needs to be processed first in the cell soup before it can be passed into the energy factory of the cell- the mitochondrion. Energy sources from fat don’t require this processing; it goes directly into the mitochondria for energetic uses. That is, it is more complicated to create energy out of sugar than out of fat. The process of ketosis refers to the body’s ability to use fats as its primary source of energy, over glucose. “Carbohydrates are not required to obtain energy. Fat supplies more energy than a comparable amount of carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate diets tend to make your system of producing energy more efficient. Furthermore, many organs prefer Continue reading >>

How The Ketogenic Diet Weakens Cancer Cells

How The Ketogenic Diet Weakens Cancer Cells

Chronic disease continues to ravage our world today despite tremendous advances in health care. Therapeutic approaches to treating this wide-range suffering cannot be met by technological growth in pharmacology, genetic therapy, or surgery. It should be obvious that the real solution for treating cancer and disease is not found in a man-made pill but rather is found in regulating the metabolic functions within our bodies. Western cultures today enjoy a diet rich in the delicacies that our ancestors did not consume on a regular basis such as grain, sugar, and starch. Research continues to show that sugar is the main source of fuel which feeds cancer and contributes to an inflammatory environment. Sugar essentially increases the risk for cancer and disease. How the Ketogenic Diet Works What is the Ketogenic Diet? The Eskimos and Maasai group are cultures we often look at to learn how their scant consumption of carbohydrates sustained their bodies through harsh weather conditions. It turns out that their low carb diet switched their metabolism to burn fat instead of sugar or glucose. This created a metabolic state known as ketosis, a process in which the body burns ketones to make energy, instead of relying on sugar or carbohydrate. Ketones are metabolized by fatty acids in the liver for energy. (This source of fuel is capable of crossing the blood brain barrier and is an excellent form of energy for neurons.) When the body lacks glucose, which is its first source of fuel, ketones are created in its absence. Ketosis was a beneficial process the human body developed as an adaptation to times when food was unavailable (such as for these hunter-gatherers). However, you can effectively produce ketones too by limiting the carbohydrates in your diet to less than 80 grams daily a Continue reading >>

5 Supplements You Should Avoid

5 Supplements You Should Avoid

Given the opportunity, availability and depth of one’s pockets, getting the daily requirements of vitamins and minerals should always come from real food sources. In reality, this is not always the case – and that’s where supplements can help. But making sense of the overwhelming choices of supplements can be a cause for aspirin in itself. Here’s a list of five supplements that you absolutely want to avoid. Cheap Multi-vitamins Most multivitamins are made from synthetic products, using artificial colors and binders. Depending on how your digestive environment reacts they can cause feelings of nausea or worse. Some of the vitamins and minerals in multivitamins are too high, acting as fillers, or they are too low to have any real benefit. The outcome of all this is simply expensive urine. Poor quality, ineffectual amounts, and hazardous manufacturing are some things to watch for. From a keto perspective also watch for hidden sugars. Some vitamins include sugar-based binders and fillers like dextrose or maltodextrin, corn syrup, and rice and other flour fillers. Although the amount of sugar is small, don’t spend it on supplements. Do this instead Eat a nice variety of keto-friendly foods. Organ meats (in sausage, for those less daring personalities), dairy, and keto-approved vegetables are all great ways to get all the vitamins and minerals you need. Also, getting plenty of Vitamin D is easy…go outside and play/run/walk/bike/etc. Cleanse / Detox products Products which will aid bowel movements, ease constipation or flush “mucoid plaque” from the intestines. The term “mucoid plaque” comes from the alternative medical community and such claims are anecdotal, lacking empirical data. Similar to some multivitamins, these are money down the drain…pun TOTALL Continue reading >>

How Many Carbohydrates Do You Need?

How Many Carbohydrates Do You Need?

A perennial question, argument and debate in the field of nutrition has to do with how many carbohydrates people should be eating. While the nutritional mainstream is still more or less advocating a large amount of daily carbohydrate (with fat being blamed for the health problems of the modern world), groups often considered at the ‘fringe’ of nutrition are adamant that carbohydrates are the source of all evil when it comes to health, obesity, etc. They advocate lowering carbohydrates and replacing them with dietary protein, fat or both. This is a topic that I discussed in some detail in Carbohydrates and Fat Controversies Part 1 and Carbohydrate and Fat Controversies Part 2 and I’d recommend readers take a look at those for a slightly different look at the issue than what is discussed here. Arguments over recommended carbohydrate intake have a long history and it doesn’t appear to be close to ending any time soon. Typical mainstream recommendations have carbohydrates contributing 50% or more of total calories while many low-carbohydrate advocates suggest far fewer (ranging from the 40% of the Zone diet to close to zero for ketogenic diets). This article looks at the topic in detail. And while I originally wrote it quite a while back (some of you have probably seen it before), it was nice going over it with fine toothed comb for an update. While the majority of it stands up well over time, I was able to make some slight changes to the values, along with removing some original stuff that wasn’t really relevant. Enjoy. Introduction It’s safe to say that most carbohydrate recommendations that you will see are put in terms of percentages, you should be eating 45% of your calories as carbs, or 65% or whatever number is being used. As I discussed in Diet Percentag Continue reading >>

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is The Ketogenic Diet Safe For Everyone?

Is a ketogenic diet safe for you? Is a ketogenic diet safe? Before you try this at home… First and foremost, if you pick up a copy of Jimmy Moore and Dr. Eric Westman’s excellent new book, Keto Clarity (which I highly recommend–see my review here) and feel (understandably) inspired to immediately embark on a ketogenic diet, I would caution anyone with a serious chronic health problem, especially anyone who is taking prescription medications, not to attempt a ketogenic diet on his/her own without medical supervision. Medications and Early Ketosis Even though I personally believe in the power of ketogenic diets to improve and even reverse many chronic illnesses, from diabetes to chronic fatigue to mood disorders, the diet does this by causing very real shifts in body chemistry that can have a major impact on medication dosages and side effects, especially during the first few weeks. Examples of problematic situations include sudden drops in blood pressure for those on blood pressure medications (such as Lasix, Lisinopril, and Atenolol), and sudden drops in blood sugar for those on diabetes medications (especially insulin). These changes in blood pressure and blood sugar are very positive and healthy, but the presence of medications can artificially intensify these effects and cause extreme and sometimes dangerous reactions unless your dosage is carefully monitored by you and your clinician in the first month or so. Another important example of a medicine that would require careful monitoring is Lithium, an antidepressant and mood stabilizing medicine. The ketogenic diet causes the body to let go of excess water during the first few days, which can cause Lithium to become more concentrated in the blood, potentially rising to uncomfortable or even toxic levels. These Continue reading >>

Which Foods To Eat (and Avoid) On The Ketogenic Diet

Which Foods To Eat (and Avoid) On The Ketogenic Diet

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! *By Cory Yeakel When most people hear the word “diet,” they immediately imagine being forced to give up all the foods they love in favor of bland, boring alternatives. While it’s true that dieting requires you to pay closer attention to your food, it doesn’t mean giving everything up you enjoy! This is especially true with the ketogenic diet, which is becoming more and more popular because of how many delicious foods you can still enjoy while following the plan. For those unfamiliar with keto, it’s a form of low-carb diet that focuses on eating foods with higher protein and higher fat. “Higher fat?!”, you may ask. Yes, higher fat! By eating fewer carbs and more fat, you’re putting the body into a process called ketosis. In short, ketosis is where your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs, turning your body into a fat-burning machine that will leave you lean and mean. One of the main reasons people give up on a diet is because they feel too restricted on what they can and can’t eat, but the ketogenic diet’s increased protein and fat limits really expand your options at meal time. To show you some examples, check out the quick cheat sheet below to see which foods are OK and which you should avoid when trying to go keto. Foods to eat Avocado Bacon Beans Butter Eggs Meat and fish (pretty much any type) Non-starch vegetables (in other words, mostly those that grow above ground) Nuts Nut butter Olive oil Most condiments as long as they’re low-sugar (ketchup, mustard, etc.) Foods to avoid Banana Bread (including bagels, muffins, etc.) Oatmeal Pasta Processed food (crackers, candy, etc.) Processed drinks (soda, sports drinks, etc.) Potatoes (which means French fries, t Continue reading >>

Will Eating Fruit Stop My Low-carb Ketosis?

Will Eating Fruit Stop My Low-carb Ketosis?

Many diets help you lose body fat. For example, a ketogenic -- or low-carbohydrate -- diet is an effective method. You must restrict your total carbohydrate intake and specifically avoid certain types of carbohydrates to remain in ketosis. Consult a health care professional before beginning any dietary program. Ketogenesis Ketogenesis is the state where you are primarily burning free fatty acids, or ketones, for fuel. While your body will always burn sugar and amino acids to a degree, when your freely available sugar is depleted, your body may turn to ketones as its primary fuel. To achieve a ketogenic state, you must avoid all non-fibrous carbohydrates to deplete your glycogen, or sugar levels. This is accomplished more quickly with regular, intense exercise. Exercise depletes the glycogen in your muscles, and the more you deplete, the faster you achieve ketosis. Glycemic Index All non-fibrous carbohydrates have an effect on your blood sugar levels. Whether your source is fruit, grains or soda, all carbohydrates raise your blood sugar a hour or two after consumption. The degree to which your blood sugar is raised depends on both the quantity of carbohydrates you consume and the type. This is called the glycemic index, which is a rating scale from 1 to 100. The higher the number, the greater the spike in blood sugar levels. Fructose has a low glycemic index, generally around 20. This means fructose does not generate a large spike in your blood sugar levels, but will instead have a slower, more modest release of energy, according to a study published in the July 2002 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Ketosis While on the surface it may seem like fructose is the ideal choice due to its limited effect on your blood sugar and insulin levels, it is more complicated tha Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Foods To Avoid

Ketogenic Diet Foods To Avoid

I see a ketogenic diet as a lifestyle and I would have liked to say that there are no foods to avoid on a ketogenic diet. In an ideal world I would have told you to eat any food, but just eat all foods in moderation. That is kind of what we are told all the time. Isn't it? The reality though is that there are plenty of foods that we should never have eaten in the first place and now to just say eat them all in moderation is therefore not a valid or useful argument. Whilst on a ketogenic diet the foods to avoid can be summarized as all sugary and starchy food. This is a topic I intend to cover only once, as I prefer to focus on what we should be eating and doing, rather than what we shouldn't be. If you feel the same and want to rather check out what you should be eating, then check out our list for a comprehensive shopping list and our ketogenic diet checklist that summarizes it all. Now, let's look into the different categories of food we shouldn't be eating and why. What Now Now that you know what foods to avoid on your ketogenic diet, focus on what you CAN have. There are lots of amazing real foods and snacks that you can enjoy every day. Once you feel how good it feels when you eat healthily, you won't miss these foods. And if you miss any of them, then check out some of these amazing recipes. Continue reading >>

5 Mistakes To Avoid On A Ketogenic Diet

5 Mistakes To Avoid On A Ketogenic Diet

I promise that this is the next to last blog post about dietary stuff for a while. I just wanted to conclude this series with some pointers on things to avoid if you should find yourself curious about implementing a dietary shift, away from carbs and towards fat as an energy source. There is, of course, plenty of information available courtesy of my good friend Mr. Google, but I want to highlight the pitfalls I experienced in hopes that you can learn or be entertained by my failures–or possibly even both. I’d like to remind you that I am not a doctor or dietician. The following statements have not been approved by anyone other than myself, and likely reflect significant gaps in objective factuality! I wrote an eBook compiling my experiments with the ketogenic diet and type 1 diabetes which you can check out here: Low-carb and Ketogenic are not synonymous. A ketogenic diet is by definition “low-carb” but unless you are consistently bringing your carb intake below 50 grams (ideally below 30 grams) daily, your body will maintain glucose as a fuel source. This may still be useful for managing blood sugar, but athletic efforts will still require higher loads of carbs with corresponding higher doses of insulin. The benefit of ketosis requires commitment and some time to fully achieve. Keto acidosis or DKA and Ketosis are not the same things. DKA is an extremely high level of ketones which lead to a shift in the pH level of the blood–it is not the ketones themselves as much as the acidic condition that is dangerous. Ketones are a natural byproduct of metabolizing fat and are no more a cause for alarm (in small quantities) than glucose in the blood. When any chemical in the blood accumulates too rapidly, bad things happen. Ketosis is not a drastic “dump” of ketone Continue reading >>

Know The Precautions Of A Ketogenic Diet

Know The Precautions Of A Ketogenic Diet

Overview The ketogenic diet focuses on calories from fat and protein while avoiding carbohydrates. When carbs are absent, your body uses fats and protein for energy. The ketogenic diet is named for the ketone bodies that are waste products of fat breakdown and can be measured in the urine. Applications include weight loss and the treatment of neurological disorders, though the dietary specifics may be substantially different among applications. Regardless, a ketogenic diet is extreme and can be a potent stressor for your body. If you pursue it, do so with caution, knowledge and your doctor's supervision. Does the Ketogenic Diet Really Work to Help Control Seizures? Seizures disorders, such as epilepsy, occur when the activity in your brain occasionally is out of control, resulting in a cluster of uncontrolled behavior, sensations or movements. The ketogenic diet has proved to be very effective in controlling seizures that have resisted other treatments, according to the Epilepsy Foundation. Scientists do not yet know how the ketogenic diet that mimics starvation helps control seizures or why it only works in a subset of people. In the manifestation of the ketogenic diet for epilepsy, more than 80 percent of your daily calories come from fat. Can a Ketogenic Diet Work for Tourette's? Tourette's syndrome is a neurological disorder defined by uncontrollable, repetitive movements or sounds called tics. Evidence supports the role of energy metabolism in regulating the level of certain neurotransmitters that control the level of brain activity, according to a 2009 review in "Current Neuropharmacology." However, the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in controlling Tourette's syndrome tics has not been determined. Can a Ketogenic Diet Prevent Kidney Stones? Kidney stones are Continue reading >>

Stress And Ketosis

Stress And Ketosis

Have you ever experienced stress? What about stress and ketosis? I do not think there is a human alive today who is not subject to some degree of stress. Our modern world is full of stressors. We constantly need to keep up with fast-paced lifestyles, technology, information…our lives have lost the harmonic rhythm of nature, substituted by a man-made frantic pace! Every day the demands on our tie and attention are greater: job, family, kids, school, even just watching the news. You know how it feels, right? But do you know what it DOES? Did you realize that stress and ketosis are inversely proportional? Stress can kick us right out of ketosis, or can make it extremely difficult to stay in it. How cortisol affects ketosis Cortisol is the hormone of stress. It is released in the body as a response to our flight or fight mechanism. Which is perfectly fine when the stimulation is quick and intense. But what happens when we are subject to stress for long periods of time? cortisol levels never have a chance to decrease, and this leads to a whole series of negative effects: Cortisol breaks down protein for sugar, so it will start eating up your muscles. It will also eventually start breaking down bone tissue leading to osteoporosis Cortisol burns fat but at the same time increases visceral fat, which increases insulin resistance and raises inflammation. increases appetite and cravings! suppresses the immune system in multiple ways But the main way it affects ketosis is by its main function, which is to elevate sugar levels in the blood through gluconeogenesis! The effects of long-term stress Prolonged stress will imbalance your hormones, suppress thyroid and adrenal function and imbalance hormones! And these conditions are the result of it: Inability to concentrate Digestive Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Common Ketogenic Diet Mistakes

How To Avoid Common Ketogenic Diet Mistakes

The ketogenic diet can be a very effective way to lose weight. Since you’re not giving your body carbohydrates to use as energy, it starts using the fat stores. Most people who follow the diet find that they lose weight at a consistent pace while still feeling satisfied and full. However, there are times when it just doesn’t seem to be working. If you’re not losing weight while following the plan, you may be making a few mistakes. In fact, there are several misconceptions that can lead weight loss to stall. Take a look at the following list to see if you are making some of these common mistakes. If you are, a few simple tweaks to your plan could put you back on the path to losing weight. You’ll be much closer to reaching your goals. Eating Too Many Calories If you’ve ever been on a diet that required you to measure portions and keep count the calories you ate, you probably like that the ketogenic diet doesn’t require you to count calories. As long as you stick to no- and low-carb foods, you should be losing weight. However, this is a bit misleading. Ultimately, weight loss comes from using up more calories than you take in. On a ketogenic diet, the fat and the protein are supposed to keep you satisfied enough that you end up eating fewer calories overall. This is the primary reason that the diet works. If you’re eating a lot of high-calorie foods, you could have trouble losing weight, even if all of those foods are technically “approved” foods for the diet. In particular, nuts are a common problem because it’s easy to eat a lot of them in a short period of time. A single serving of nuts is a small handful, and comes in at around 200 calories. It’s easy to see how this can quickly add up. While you don’t have to go crazy counting calories, it’s Continue reading >>

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

Pregnancy Toxaemia And

Pregnancy Toxaemia And

Contents Industry Background Management Nutrition Animal Health Breeding Fibre Production Fibre Marketing Meat Production and Marketing Pasture and Weed Control Economic Analysis Tanning Skins ketosis in goats The diseases pregnancy toxaemia and ketosis can cause severe problems in goats. While the diseases are clinically different and occur during different stages of pregnancy and lactation, the basis of the disorder is essentially the same: a decrease in blood sugar levels and an increase in ketones. In ruminants, glucose is synthesised mainly from propionic acid (a volatile fatty acid produced in the rumen) and from amino acids. The amount of glucose that is absorbed directly depends on how much dietary carbohydrate escapes rumen fermentation and is digested in the small intestine. This form of glucose uptake varies with different feeds as well as their treatment. Ruminants can use products from rumen fermentation, such as volatile fatty acids, for most of their energy requirements. However, the nervous system, kidneys, mammary gland and foetus have a direct requirement for glucose. During periods of peak glucose requirement (late pregnancy and early lactation) problems may arise due to a glucose deficiency. The incidence of pregnancy toxaemia and ketosis varies with the two main types of goats. In dairy goats with a genetic potential for high milk production, ketosis may be a potential problem; in non-milch goats (Angora, Cashmere and meat) pregnancy toxaemia is more common. PREGNANCY TOXAEMIA Main causes The most important cause of pregnancy toxaemia is a decline in the plane of nutrition during the last six to eight weeks of pregnancy. This places the pregnant female in a difficult situation because the developing foetus imposes an unremitting drain on available m Continue reading >>

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