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How Do You Avoid Ketosis?

Ketosis

Ketosis

Tweet Ketosis is a state the body may find itself in either as a result of raised blood glucose levels or as a part of low carb dieting. Low levels of ketosis is perfectly normal. However, high levels of ketosis in the short term can be serious and the long term effects of regular moderate ketosis are only partially known at the moment. What is ketosis? Ketosis is a state the body goes into if it needs to break down body fat for energy. The state is marked by raised levels of ketones in the blood which can be used by the body as fuel. Ketones which are not used for fuel are excreted out of the body via the kidneys and the urine. Is ketosis the same as ketoacidosis? There is often confusion as to the difference between ketosis and ketoacidosis. Ketosis is the state whereby the body is producing ketones. In ketosis, the level of ketones in the blood can be anything between normal to very high. Diabetic ketoacidosis, also known as DKA, only describes the state in which the level of ketones is either high or very high. In ketoacidosis, the amount of ketones in the blood is sufficient to turn the blood acidic, which is a dangerous medical state. When does ketosis occur? Ketosis will take place when the body needs energy and there is not sufficient glucose available for the body. This can typically happen when the body is lacking insulin and blood glucose levels become high. Other causes can be the result of being on a low carb diet. A low level of carbohydrate will lead to low levels of insulin, and therefore the body will produce ketones which do not rely on insulin to get into and fuel the body’s cells. A further cause of ketosis, less relevant to people with diabetes, is a result of excessive alcohol consumption. Is ketosis dangerous? The NHS describes ketosis as a pote Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Weight Loss (or Gain Muscle) On A Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

How To Prevent Weight Loss (or Gain Muscle) On A Therapeutic Ketogenic Diet

The ketogenic diet is becoming increasingly popular as we learn more about the potential benefits in terms of both performance and chronic disease management. However, the diet also has to be tailored to your personal goals, and we’ve previously written about some of the pitfalls for athletes using a ketogenic diet. For instance, satiety may be one of the most notable benefits of a ketogenic diet [1], which seems to provide an advantage during weight loss. But if you’re already lean and your ketogenic diet is causing you to undereat, losing lean mass can be a concern. This is important for athletes, but also for patients using a therapeutic ketogenic diet to control a chronic neurodegenerative disease, because muscle mass and strength are two of the best predictors of long-term health and mortality. Thus, the question that naturally arises is: how can I implement a ketogenic diet without losing weight? The topic of gaining or maintaining weight (specifically lean mass) on a ketogenic diet is often left out of the discussion. In fact, the following question was recently sent to the team at Nourish Balance Thrive: I just finished listening to your latest podcast. Very informative! At the end, you were asking for suggestions for possible topics. I have one: the combination of ketosis and an ectomorphic body type: issues for people like myself who don't want to lose weight or outright cannot afford to but want to apply ketosis for other reasons. In my particular case, it is a neurodegenerative disease I'm dealing with (Parkinson's). There is quite a bit of literature indicating that a keto diet could be helpful, but my BMI varies between 19 and 20 and ketosis tends to lower that considerably. Are there things one can tweak to do keto without the weight loss, or do you t Continue reading >>

Nutritional Bankruptcy: The Real Reason To Avoid “nutritional Ketosis”

Nutritional Bankruptcy: The Real Reason To Avoid “nutritional Ketosis”

last week. A big part of the goings on at my Ketotard Chronicles Group concerns the following utter bullshit promoted by ketotards, ketoshysters and ketophants (a ketotarded sycophant of ketoshysters; e.g., Jimmy Moore and that ilk). Calories don’t matter; don’t bother counting them. Limit both carbohydrate and protein. Once carb and protein limits have been reached, consume unlimited fat to satiety. …Like Reggie Owens says, “Satiety…you know…that thing that makes you fat.” Less often talked about in terms of the general insanity outlined above is what I consider the number one reason to avoid all of these hyper-fat protein-limiting Keto Diets: Nutritional Bankruptcy. It’s very easy to show, yet virtually nobody shows it, I find almost nobody that’s aware of it, and in fact, there’s this perverse ignorance out there I encounter often, that fat, in itself, is highly nutritious when in fact, it’s nearly devoid of micronutrition. Let’s just dive right in. I’m using FitDay because I like the graphs it makes. For a more complete nutritional picture you can plug the same things into Chronometer. Let’s start with butter because that’s the high water mark for nutrition (because of the milk solids…) and it goes down hill from there. All of these are for ONE WHOLE CUP…about 2,000 calories worth. Well, ok, looks like it’s a way to get your vitamin E. Not much else and overall, nearly nothing. Now, you ketotards out there: ask your one-half walnut brains what this means if 80% of your diet consists of some mix of the above? Speaking of walnuts, hell, you’d be better off just eating 2 1/2 cups of those, except you’d be worse off with protein at only 8% and you’d blow your carbohydrate limits with 41 grams for 9% of calories—but at least yo Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet Leads To Acetone Bad Breath

Ketogenic Diet Leads To Acetone Bad Breath

Q. I have been reading about the advantages of a ketogenic diet to lose weight and control blood sugar. I tried this in the past. I lost fat and felt healthy, but I had horrible acetone-smelling breath. This was even mentioned in my student evaluations, not a good thing for a professor. Is there any way to avoid this? A. A ketogenic diet gets very little of its energy from carbohydrates and most of it from fat. In this low-carb high-fat plan, protein intake is moderate. Under these conditions, the body burns fat for energy and produces chemicals called ketones as a by-product. Such a diet helps with body fat loss and improves metabolic markers such as HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Acetone is one of the ketones your body makes, and it shows up in the breath when following a strict no-sugar no-starch approach. According to Eric Westman, MD, a proponent of this diet, the acetone breath should eventually fade. Until it does, he suggests drinking plenty of water, brushing teeth (and tongue) regularly and chewing sugarless gum, mint leaves or cinnamon bark. Would you like to learn more about the ketogenic diet and why it works so well to shed pounds? We recently had the opportunity to talk to Dr. Westman about his research and the low-carb approach to weight loss, blood sugar control and heart health. Show # 958 titled Flipping the Food Pyramid Upside-Down aired a few weeks ago. It will be free for another two weeks as an mp3 download from this link. Don’t miss this chance to get specific details about the pros and cons of the ketogenic diet. Continue reading >>

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

Avoid This Ketogenic Rip-off

The Truth About Exogenous Ketones Ketones are all the rage among low carbers. And like most things in nutrition and performance, we've found a way to get them in supplement form so we don't have to do any actual work. What are ketones? They're a byproduct of ketosis caused by the process of converting fat to fuel. Your body makes them when it's in a calorie or carb restricted state. What do they do? The body and brain can use them as fuel without the presence of glucose in the blood. And now, you can take ketone supplements (salts and esters), known as exogenous ketones, without actually restricting anything. According to those promoting this nasty-tasting supplement, that means you can have a brain and body fuelled by ketones, along with all of the supposed health benefits that come with running on fat. Well, don't fall for it. Exogenous Ketones = Endogenous Fat Storage? The problem with ketone supplementation (EXOgenous) is that it's not even close to the same thing as being in ketosis (ENDOgenous ketone production). And just like the butter-blended-into-coffee trend, it's a farce. Ketones may be depressing dieters' hunger and giving them a hit of energy and cognitive enhancement, but it's INHIBITING their ability to burn fat, providing zero nourishment, and doing nothing for their metabolic health. There's an assortment of evidence suggesting that it's probably making things worse. Think of exogenous ketones kind of like alcohol. When they're consumed, everything is stored and nothing else is burned. So any lipolysis (fat burning) that would be taking place is halted; any glucose and fatty acids in your blood that were circulating are stored; and the ingested ketones are burned until there aren't any left. More importantly, this clearance of alternative fuels (glucos Continue reading >>

What Carbohydrates Not To Eat On Keto

What Carbohydrates Not To Eat On Keto

Starting a ketogenic diet can be difficult for some. It’s basically the complete opposite of what most people are used to eating. So many mistakes to make, habits to change and things to learn. One of the most important things you need to know is what not to eat on keto. This mysterious metabolic state called ketosis is a shift that happens within our biology. It’s an adaptive response that changes the use of glucose as the body’s main fuel source into using ketones for fuel. It occurs over after fasting for several days or restricting one’s carbohydrate intake to a bare minimum. Usually, the guideline is less than 30-50 grams of NET carbs. Adaptation can take up to 2-3 weeks. This changes the liver’s digestive enzymes into preferring fat for energy production. The macronutrient ratios on keto are approximately 70-80% fat 15-25% protein <5% carbohydrates. What is Ketosis in Macros The foods eaten on a ketogenic diet are primarily fatty meat, eggs, nuts, cruciferous vegetables, butter, oils and fat upon fat – bacon strips upon bacon strips. You can’t just eat anything on keto if it fits your macros (or mouth). During adaptation, you have to be even more meticulous because the body will gladly default back to a sugar burning metabolism whenever it can. However, there’s a big difference between burning glucose and fatty acids. The difference is in quality. Nutrition is a powerful tool that causes specific adaptation to occur in the body according to exactly what we digest. If you want to get into ketosis, then you need to know what foods not to eat on keto. The biggest devil in this is sugar. Glucose is the direct opposite of ketones and the two can’t co-exist. If there’s excess glucose in the bloodstream, then the body will definitely not be in a state Continue reading >>

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Migraines?

Can A Ketogenic Diet Help Prevent Migraines?

The auras, debilitating pain, nausea, and sensitivity to noise and light means that migraine sufferers will do almost anything to ward off a migraine. Several recent studies exploring the potential of a ketogenic diet show anecdotal promise of less-frequent attacks, but aren’t yet conclusive. What is a Ketogenic Diet? Sometimes referred to as “Atkins Light” or “The Bacon Diet,” a ketogenic diet is a diet that is low carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high fat. Typical macronutrients for someone on a ketogenic diet is 5% carbs, 25% protein, and 75% fat (yes, you read that right), with the actual amount of grams and calories consumed dependent on the individual’s needs. As Laura West, migraine sufferer and author of the blog @MigraineKetoTherapy explains “it seemed very simple: eat a lot of fat, moderate protein, and as few carbs as possible. The fact is, it really is that simple. Follow those basic principles and sooner or later you will find yourself in a state of ketosis, in which you are fueling your body primarily with fat instead of carbohydrates. Burning fat for fuel produces ketone bodies that help prevent the build up of glutamate in the brain that wreaks havoc on the brains of many of us migraine sufferers.” One doctor is downright bullish on the potential of a ketogenic diet for migraines: “We’ve only just begun to see glimpses of the therapeutic potential of ketogenic diets beyond the treatment of epilepsy, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimers, Parkinsons, etc.), obesity, and migraine” predicts Dr. Josh Turknett, neurologist and author of The Migraine Miracle*. Proven Medical Success for Epilepsy For years now, doctors have been prescribing a ketogenic diet to patients who suffer from epilepsy, as it has been shown t Continue reading >>

Preventive Strategies For Ketosis

Preventive Strategies For Ketosis

Parturition and the onset of lactation challenges calcium and energy homeostasis in dairy cows predisposing them to periparturient disorders that affect health, production and reproductive performance says Carlos Risco, DVM, Dipl. ACT, University of Florida. Dairy cattle experience a negative carbohydrate balance, from -3 weeks and + 3 weeks from calving and are at risk to develop ketosis, Risco explained at the 2010 Western Veterinary Conference. Milk production, in particular, drives the high requirements for glucose because other fuels cannot substitute for lactose in milk. To counteract this, the cow mobilizes body fat and protein stores in the form of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and amino acids. This promotes gluconeogenesis and occurs under the influence of low serum concentrations of insulin. Volatile fatty acids (acetate, propionate, butyrate [BHBA]) produced in the rumen are also presented to the liver as fuels. Acetate and butyrate are ketogenic, and propionate is glycogenic. The key to prevention of ketosis is to maximize dry matter intake before and after calving to prevent excessive NEFA mobilization. Preventing ketosis in the first place is key to avoid some post-partum issues. Risco outlined some preventive strategies: The transition ration. To prevent ketosis the transition ration should maximize DMI, provide adequate energy density, and minimize ketogenic precursors. Silage with a high butyric acid content should not be fed. Introduce ration changes gradually. Manage transition cows to maximize DMI, e.g., provide adequate bunk space. Avoid over-conditioning of cows in late lactation and the early dry period. Niacin (nicotinic acid) fed in transition rations at 6–12 g /d may help reduce blood ketone levels. Propylene glycol may be administered pr Continue reading >>

Which Foods To Eat (and Avoid) On The Ketogenic Diet

Which Foods To Eat (and Avoid) On The Ketogenic Diet

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! *By Cory Yeakel When most people hear the word “diet,” they immediately imagine being forced to give up all the foods they love in favor of bland, boring alternatives. While it’s true that dieting requires you to pay closer attention to your food, it doesn’t mean giving everything up you enjoy! This is especially true with the ketogenic diet, which is becoming more and more popular because of how many delicious foods you can still enjoy while following the plan. For those unfamiliar with keto, it’s a form of low-carb diet that focuses on eating foods with higher protein and higher fat. “Higher fat?!”, you may ask. Yes, higher fat! By eating fewer carbs and more fat, you’re putting the body into a process called ketosis. In short, ketosis is where your body burns fat for energy instead of carbs, turning your body into a fat-burning machine that will leave you lean and mean. One of the main reasons people give up on a diet is because they feel too restricted on what they can and can’t eat, but the ketogenic diet’s increased protein and fat limits really expand your options at meal time. To show you some examples, check out the quick cheat sheet below to see which foods are OK and which you should avoid when trying to go keto. Foods to eat Avocado Bacon Beans Butter Eggs Meat and fish (pretty much any type) Non-starch vegetables (in other words, mostly those that grow above ground) Nuts Nut butter Olive oil Most condiments as long as they’re low-sugar (ketchup, mustard, etc.) Foods to avoid Banana Bread (including bagels, muffins, etc.) Oatmeal Pasta Processed food (crackers, candy, etc.) Processed drinks (soda, sports drinks, etc.) Potatoes (which means French fries, t Continue reading >>

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

Pruvit Ketogenic Diet Plan: Foods To Eat & Avoid While Drinking Keto Os

088.8KSHARES Share to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to PinterestPinterestPinterestShare to PrintPrintPrintShare to MoreAddthisMore Keto OS and Keto Max from Pruvit provide exogenous ketones. Maximize your ketone levels with a ketogenic diet approved food list. What is Ketosis? Explore the health benefits of ketosis for accelerated fat loss, disease prevention, better brain function, appetite control, performance, and more. Ketosis can often be a misunderstood subject. Some think it is part of a starvation diet or a alarming sign that something has gone wrong in your metabolism. But this is simply not the truth! You see, ketones – contrary to popular belief and myth – are a much needed and essential healing energy source in our cells that come from the normal metabolism of fat. Have you ever heard someone say that fats are “evil”? This has become the standard way of thinking in today’s society, which has led to our primary energy source coming from carbohydrates – sugar AKA glucose. Most people eat a diet high in carbohydrates or glucose. When sugar is your body’s primary energy source, that sugar needs to be processed first in the cell soup before it can be passed into the energy factory of the cell- the mitochondrion. Energy sources from fat don’t require this processing; it goes directly into the mitochondria for energetic uses. That is, it is more complicated to create energy out of sugar than out of fat. The process of ketosis refers to the body’s ability to use fats as its primary source of energy, over glucose. “Carbohydrates are not required to obtain energy. Fat supplies more energy than a comparable amount of carbohydrate, and low-carbohydrate diets tend to make your system of producing energy more efficient. Furthermore, many organs prefer Continue reading >>

8 Things To Avoid On A Keto Diet

8 Things To Avoid On A Keto Diet

There are many guides telling you what to eat and drink on a keto diet. It can however sometimes be good to also know what to not eat or drink on a keto diet. Since that food that are good for a keto diet are foods that are very high in fat and low on carbohydrates the opposite should therefor in general be avoided. That means food that is low in fat and high in carbohydrates. But there are also some things that can be hard to know if they are good for you or not. Diet soda Diet soda might seem like something that is good to drink at a low carb diet since they do not contain any sugar or carbs. However there is a danger with these and that is the artificial sweeteners that are used as replacement for the sugar. Everyone’s bodies react differently to these sugar substitutes. Some people can drink diet soda without any problem when on a keto diet and others can not have a single glass of it without interrupting their diet and their ketosis. Low-carb sweets There are many different low carb sweets out there that claim they are good for a low carb diet. However most of these often contain processed food and also in many cases a relative high amount of carbohydrates. It does not seem like a lot when it says 4 net grams of carbs but if you eat 2 or 3 of these candy in one day it quickly becomes quite many carbohydrates. avoid sweets on keto diet Processed or packaged foods Try to avoid processed or packaged food. They often come with added artificial additions. Did you e.g. know that crashed bugs are used as red food coloring or that there sometimes is duck feathers in your bread. Get natural food and try to avoid processed and packaged food. No matter if you are on a low carb diet or not, this kind of things is not good for you. Different Fluids Fluids with a high carbohyd Continue reading >>

Ketogenic Diet: What Not To Eat On Keto

Ketogenic Diet: What Not To Eat On Keto

When you start off on a diet it is important to understand what you can eat and what you can’t eat, otherwise, it really isn’t a diet. The same thing applies to the ketogenic diet. There are certain foods that you can not eat if you wish to stay in a state of ketosis. Thankfully, the the list of keto-friendly foods that you can eat is so long that you really shouldn’t have a problem finding a lot of recipes that you enjoy and are keto-safe. The purpose of this post is to talk about the different foods that you should avoid on keto because if you aren’t prepared you can easily mess up and knock your body out of ketosis. Foods to Avoid on Keto One of the interesting things about keto is that a lot of your cravings being to disappear. When you see the foods that you can’t eat your first thought might be “there is no way I’m going to be able to give up that.” However, once you’re in ketosis you understand that many of the things you craved were simply caused by the carbohydrates within them. This is why in our weight loss manual we start people off with a carb detox so they can see the benefits of no longer craving carbs. Another blessing of being in the age of the Internet is that 1000s of people have shared different substitutes for the foods they enjoy. If you are hoping to find some substitutes for the foods that you can’t eat below then check out our post on low-carb substitutes. Grains and Starches Let’s face it, bread is a big deal. A lof people eat bread every single day in some form. It’s very convenient to be able to run down to Subway and pick up a sandwich. Bread goes with every meal so when people hear that they have to give it up for keto they turn their back and try to find another diet. But grains cause your body problems. You know th Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Ketosis And Low Carb Flu?

How To Avoid Ketosis And Low Carb Flu?

Please help. I was in ketosis for a month and got depressed and tired of worrying about it. So, I want to eat paleo still but do I HAVE to be in keto to lose weight? How do I find a balance between not starving myself of carbs but then not making enough ketones? For instance, I want to eat sweet potatoe sometimes, or maybe some fried green tomatoes occasionally. I maybe even want to eat a hot dog at the fair occasionally. I am totally convinced from reading GaryTaubes books that saturated fat is not bad, so how can I eat it and not be keto AND lose weight? Continue reading >>

How You Can Avoid The “keto Flu”

How You Can Avoid The “keto Flu”

Have you heard of the keto flu? Most people in modern society have basically been eating sugar all day everyday for their entire lives. Getting into the Keto Zone switched the mitochondria from burning sugar for fuel to using fat instead. For people with particularly deranged metabolisms, this transition can cause a myriad of symptoms commonly referred to as the “keto flu.” What is Keto Flu? The keto flu is a result of the mitochondria in your cells “re-learning” how to use fat for energy. When you were born and subsisting off of your mother’s milk you were in a mild state of ketosis. As soon as you were weaned off milk and onto high sugar foods such as starches (such as carrots and potatoes), grains (such as wheat and corn), and fruits (like applesauce and bananas), the metabolism switches over to primarily using sugar for fuel. In essence, keto flu is sugar withdrawal. Most have us have gone our whole lives eating sugar from the moment we wake up (oatmeal, fruit, toast, pancakes, waffles, bagels, cereal, etc) until the moment we go to sleep (ice cream, cookies, brownies, crackers, chips, and candy.) This has created a situation where most people bodies no longer possess the metabolic machinery required to burn fat for fuel. When you eliminate carbs from your diet to get in to the keto zone for weight loss and better health you may experience symptoms as the body adapts to this new fuel source. Symptoms of The Keto Flu Keto flu symptoms will generally occur during the adaptation phase of a ketogenic diet (the first 3-14 days). Symptoms may also result from cheat days or “falling off the wagon.” Keto flu symptoms include: Fatigue Cramps Aches and Pains Heart Palpitations Nausea Constipation Diarrhea Sugar Cravings Brain Fog Irritability Sleep Disturbances Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Low Carb Sweeteners

The Best And Worst Low Carb Sweeteners

Most people that start a keto diet plan find that they have some intense cravings for sugar in the beginning, but will dissipate after a few weeks. Even the seasoned low carber will tell you that they have cravings every once in a while, sometimes burning inside them so deep they want to give up to temptation. That’s where sweeteners come in, where you can make or bake things you usually can’t eat. Of course, you will have to watch out because most things that say “carb free” actually still contain carbs. Make sure you take the net carbs of any impacting sweetener into consideration when tracking your macros. As a general rule of thumb, it’s always best to try to avoid sweeteners in the beginning. They’re well known to cause cravings and some may stall your progress with over-use. Stay strict and try to only occasionally consume sweet treats when you are on a low carb diet. Types of Sweeteners In general, there are a few classifications of sweeteners. There are natural sweeteners, sugar alcohols, and synthetic sweeteners (or artificial sweeteners). There are a few others that aren’t exactly classified in these categories (like glycerin based sweeteners) but they are quite uncommon and rarely used, so we’ll skip going over them. For a ketogenic diet, I personally suggest sticking with erythritol and stevia (or a blend) because they are both naturally occurring, don’t cause blood sugar or insulin spikes, and sweeten just perfectly. When used in combination, they seem to cancel out the aftertaste that each has, and work like a charm. When you purchase sweeteners, make sure to take a look at the ingredients on the packaging. You normally want the pure sweetener, rather than having fillers such as maltodextrin, dextrose, or polydextrose which can cause spik Continue reading >>

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